Jumat, 31 Mei 2013

How to Make Homemade Dog & Cat Food

How to Make Homemade Dog & Cat Food

Opening a pack or tin of pet food is convenient, but it is not always the healthiest option for your dog or cat. In the wild, dogs and cats eat primarily a raw meat diet with a small amount of vegetation and grains from the stomachs of their prey: their digestive systems are designed for this type of food. If you are unhappy with the quality of ready-made pet food available or would just like to make your own, it requires only a little more effort than opening that tin of ready-made food.

Instructions

Ready-to-go Packets

    1

    Grind the meat in a food processor. Chicken, lamb, fish or beef is fine; pork should be avoided because of its high acidity. Use only one type of meat at a time. Put ground meat into the bowl.

    2

    Add vegetables to the processors and chop finely. Combine the vegetables and the ground meat in the bowl. There should be a ratio of about one part vegetables to three parts meat. If you want to add brown rice to the mix, it should be counted in the vegetable portion. Broccoli, carrots, squash and zucchini are all suitable for inclusion; avoid tomatoes, potatoes and other nightshades, like eggplants and peppers.

    3

    Crack three or four eggs into the mixture and combine. Bake the eggshells in the oven until they are totally dried out. Grind to a powder in the food processor---this is a homemade calcium supplement. Add the eggshell powder to the meat and vegetable mix and combine.

    4

    Spoon the mixture into separate containers, enough for three meals in each. Mark the date and contents on the containers and freeze them. Thaw before giving to your pet. The thawed meals will last for three days in the refrigerator.

Chunky Meals

    5

    Cut your chosen meat into cubes. For larger dogs, 3-inch cubes are fine. For smaller dogs and cats, cut into 1-inch cubes.

    6

    Sprinkle some premade eggshell calcium supplement on the meat and serve.

    7

    Give cats whole small fish, such as sardines, once a week or once a fortnight if available. Give cats and dogs raw chicken necks if you want to feed them bones---chicken necks contain bones that are easily broken without the risk of lodging in throats; never give cooked bones. Dogs can be given a joint bone or leg bone weekly for a chewing treat.

How to Keep a Blue Heeler Busy

How to Keep a Blue Heeler Busy

Australian cattle dogs, known unofficially as blue heelers or Queensland blue heelers, are members of the herding group of dogs, as recognized by the AKC, or American Kennel Club. Renowned for both their high energy and uncanny intelligence, they love to be active. Investing time and patience in training is necessary for a cattle dog to reach her full potential. In addition to daily walks, hiking and swimming, there are several organized activities and sports you may consider to satisfy your cattle dogs mental and physical needs.

Mastering the Walk

    Known as blue heelers, the Australian cattle dog is a loyal family companion but never forgets his herding roots.
    Known as blue heelers, the Australian cattle dog is a loyal family companion but never forgets his herding roots.

    Australian cattle dogs were bred to work and have a mind of their own. They must be given something to do, or they will make their own decisions which often result in destructive behavior such as chewing or herding and nipping at the heels of people and other pets in the home. Walking your Australian cattle dog with her by your side is one simple way for your dog to get the physical exercise the breed requires, while building a strong bond and demonstrating your leadership.

Add Rollerblading and Bicycling to the Walk

    You can pick up the pace of a regular walk by rollerblading or riding your bicycle with your dog jogging alongside. While expert recommendations vary, Cesar Millan, star of the television show, The Dog Whisperer, founder of the Dog Psychology Center in Los Angeles and author of many bestselling books about dogs, suggests a minimum of a half hour walk, twice each day, and up to an hour and a half a day.

Backpacking

    Give your dog more of a workout than a regular walk with a backpack containing books or a ballast that weighs between 10 and 20 percent of your dogs weight. The addition of the backpack has a calming effect on most dogs, and gives them a sense of purpose. Trainers regularly use backpacks to help rehabilitate aggressive or over-protective dogs and those with extremely high energy.

Organized Sports

    Consider keeping your Australian cattle dog busy by joining organized sports such as Rally obedience, flyball, agility or herding trials. Every town and city has some kind of dog club and the Internet offers many resources. Depending upon your cattle dogs personality, one or more of the available activities will appeal to you both and give her a chance to work her body and mind.

Rally Obedience

    A combination of competition obedience and agility, Rally obedience was developed in 2000 by Charles Kramer, the original innovator of the American Agility program in 1984. Rally relies on positive training methods and enhances the human/dog bond with its softer approach than traditional competition obedience. You and your dog move through the course in a lighthearted manner following signs and performing instructions for different behaviors that are written on cards. It's all about having fun and interacting with your dog while competing for titles.

Flyball

    Many Australian cattle dogs excel at the sport of flyball. Fast-paced and exciting, flyball is a race between two teams of four dogs in which they race over hurdles to trigger a box that releases a ball that they carry back over the hurdles. It is a fascinating sport to watch as the dogs are so completely focused and single-minded in their mission.

Agility

    An obstacle course for dogs, agility competition is an entertaining sport for the participants and audience. The course includes seesaws, hoops, tunnels, cat walks and obstacles through which you and your dog maneuver off-leash. Agility is the perfect sport for Australian cattle dogs as they were bred to perform a series of intricate moves around cattle many times larger than themselves. This predisposition toward being able to execute complex zigzag moves and predilection for turning on a dime is part of their makeup and the obstacles on the agility course mimic these challenges.

Herding Trials

    Herding trials are one of the best ways to release the potential of your Australian cattle dog. Herding trials are sponsored through the AKC to preserve and perpetuate the breed's herding instincts. There are three levels of competition in the AKC's program: Herding Tested, Pre-Trial Testing and Herding Trials. These trials are open to dogs over 9 months of age that are registered with the organization. If your dog is not registered, or not pure bred, there are opportunities to become involved with herding trials through independent dog clubs.

Frisbee and Fetch

    There are many kinds of activities your dog and you can do right at home on a daily basis. Some Australian cattle dogs are addicted to fetch, returning the ball directly to your hands like a flyball box. Others love jumping up in the air after Frisbees. Both of these games are exhilarating and rewarding for both you and your dog. Its important to create a psychological challenge in addition to a physical one. Make your dog sit or lie down in between throws to keep it interesting.

Reinforce Training

    Spend quality time with your blue heeler while keeping her busy by having regular, short training sessions throughout the day of commands she already knows. Practice of commands such as sit, stay, down and the recall, reinforce positive behavior and contribute to an overall well-behaved dog. Australian cattle dogs will take over if they can, so kind, consistent training with their pack leader is a positive, interactive activity to practice on a regular basis.

    Most sports and other strenuous activities are for healthy, fit dogs. Always check with your veterinary professional before undertaking any new activities with your dog.

How to Get APHIS European Certification for Pet Food

How to Get APHIS European Certification for Pet Food

There are numerous varieties of pet food on the market today. Some claim they are premium, while others say they are organic; and knowing which is best can be confusing. Because European laws governing the pet food are much stricter than the United States, one of the best ways to know which brand is superior is to make sure your pet food has the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) European certification. The APHIS European certification is a program of the USDA that tests pet food to determine if it can be exported to Europe. Because this certification sets high standards for pet food, manufacturers must take extra steps to obtain certification.

Instructions

    1

    Manufacture pet food that is fit for human consumption. According to European requirements, this is a defining factor for quality pet food. All human grade food must meet guidelines set by the USDA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). By contrast, pet food without the APHIS European certification may contain by-products that are declared unfit for human consumption and have little or no nutrition. Ingredients not fit for human consumption often contain bacteria, chemical residue and carcinogens.

    2

    Obtain a health certificate. Pet food manufacturers must obtain a health certificate that is signed by APHIS after pet food manufacturing facilities have been inspected and officially approved by APHIS veterinary services. A health certificate must accompany each individual pet food shipment.

    3

    Meet labeling requirements. Pet food manufacturers who want APHIS European certification must meet strict labeling requirements that include listing all additives, preservatives, antioxidants and color. Labels must include a description of the pet food (complete or complementary) and describe the species for which it is intended (dog, cat or other animal) If the label indicates "complete," the food must be nutritionally complete for one daily serving. The label must be written in the official language of the country in which it's sold.

    4

    Pass quality controls. Suppliers of cereals, meat or fish must be approved by APHIS. Approval is based upon freshness, nutritional quality and digestibility. Quality control at the manufacturing site measure levels of protein and the percentage of fat. Additional quality controls cover hygiene, packaging and storage.

Kamis, 30 Mei 2013

Care & Training of Maltese Puppies

Care & Training of Maltese Puppies

Bred as early as 300 B.C., Maltese are meant to be companions and lap dogs. They weigh, on average, no more than seven pounds and sport a white coat that can grow to touch the ground. They are gentle but lively and enjoy play time. Maltese do not tolerate extreme temperatures or loneliness well and are meant to be indoor dogs. They enjoy spending quality time with their humans, but are wary of strangers and are capable guard dogs despite their small size. Maltese have few genetic health concerns and, if well-cared for, can live up to 14 years.

Feeding

    Maltese puppies should be given a dry, small-breed puppy formula food until they are nine to 12 months old. Puppy formula has extra protein your Maltese puppy needs to grow. Avoid foods meant for larger breeds, as the kibble can be difficult to chew or even break your Maltese puppy's tiny teeth. Small breeds such as Maltese don't have fat stores for energy, so they require more frequent meals. Plan to feed your Maltese puppy four small meals per day. Use the daily amount recommendations on the food packaging as a general guideline as to how much your puppy should eat each day.

Exercise

    Baby and adult Maltese are energetic and need daily exercise. Their small size makes this requirement easy for an owner to meet, however. Many of them can get their exercise just wandering around the house, but these playful dogs also enjoy a game of fetch or tug. Let your puppy do all of the pulling, however, or you risk hurting it because of its small size. Your Maltese puppy will also appreciate daily walks on a leash. Five to 10 minutes a day will give it the opportunity to spend time out of the house or yard and exercise its mind as it is exposed to new sights, sounds and smells.

Socialization

    Your Maltese puppy may be small, but it is feisty and courageous. Maltese don't seem to realize how small they are and may pick fights with much larger dogs. This can be dangerous, so you should socialize your puppy as early as possible. The ideal age for socialization is before six months. This is your chance to introduce your Maltese puppy to other dogs, strangers, children, sights, sounds, smells and any other situation you think your puppy might encounter throughout its life. Reward your Maltese puppy with treats and praise whenever it acts bravely and friendly in new situations or around new people or animals. This will help give your Maltese the confidence it needs to face life without fear or aggression.

Training

    Give your Maltese boundaries in your home. Its feisty nature can cause it to be domineering if it does not have rules to follow. You can choose whichever rules fit the needs of your home and your family, but enforce them daily and consistently. Some examples include not allowing your Maltese to sleep on your bed, making the trash can off limits or requiring your dog to sit and wait patiently at the door before being let outside or allowed to greet visitors. You should also teach your Maltese puppy basic obedience commands such as sit, stay, down and come. Use positive reinforcement techniques and reward your puppy for obeying commands and rules correctly. Never punish your Maltese. It is easily injured due to its small size, and it can develop fear or aggression.

Other Care

    Take your Maltese puppy to a veterinarian to receive vaccinations against diseases, such as rabies and distemper. Your vet may ask you to bring your puppy in several times in the first year of its life for regular physical examinations (to detect any developing health problems) and to administer booster shots. After your puppy reaches one year, it should see a vet at least once a year to stay up-to-date on its physicals and vaccinations. At home, provide a warm place for your Maltese puppy to sleep, such as a dog bed or a blanket in a crate. Keep toys, chews and bones meant for small breeds available at all times to give your puppy a chance to exercise its teeth and its mind. Brush your Maltese puppy's coat at least once weekly to avoid tangling and matting. Bathe as needed.

Facts About Miniature Schnauzers

Facts About Miniature Schnauzers

A fun-loving dog, the miniature schnauzer is affectionate and totally committed to his family. Not known as a breed that likes to wander away, this dog prefers to remain by his family's side. Because of his low shedding coat, the miniature schnauzer makes a suitable pet for allergy-prone people.

History Facts

    The miniature schnauzer, a bred-down version of the standard schnauzer, originated in Germany. According to the American Kennel Club, the miniature schnauzer is a result of mixing the standard schnauzer, Affenpinscher and poodle. Originally used to guard livestock and chase vermin, the primary function of the miniature schnauzer today is as a companion animal. Recognized as a distinct breed since the end of the 1800s, the miniature schnauzer has been bred in the United States since 1925 and is part of the terrier group for American Kennel Club classification.

Body and Coat Facts

    The miniature schnauzer, a stocky breed with a wiry coat, comes in silver, black and silver, and the more common salt and pepper coloration. Body hair is stripped close with the legs left in full coat. Daily brushing to prevent mats along with regular professional grooming to strip the coat is necessary. The ears, erect and pointed, perch high on the head. The head of this breed features profuse whiskers. The tail, docked short, stands high and erect. The miniature schnauzer normally stands 12 to 14 inches high at the shoulders and weighs 10 to 15 lbs.

Temperament Facts

    An intelligent breed, the miniature schnauzer loves children and remains devoted to his family. The dog fits in well with apartment living as long as his exercise needs are met. The breed, though not confrontational, warns of strangers and defends against supposed threats by other dogs.

Exercise and Health Facts

    The miniature schnauzer requires regular exercise to work off his energy and help prevent potential behavioral issues. Include daily walks as well as runs in a fenced area in his daily regimen. Prone to diabetes, von Willebrands disease, eye problems and skin, kidney and liver disorders, the miniature schnauzer enjoys a lifespan of about 15 years.

Food for a Shih Tzu Dog

Food for a Shih Tzu Dog

The Shih Tzu is a lively, sweet dog that is eager to please her owner, which makes it even more difficult to deny her some doggy treats. And while every dog deserves an occasional snack, it is important to provide your Shih Tzu with proper nutrition to keep her healthy.

Importance of Nutrition

    All dogs are carnivorous, so the majority of their diet should be meat, but other food is also required to maintain a healthy and nutritious diet. For instance, fiber is required for proper digestion, and carbohydrates furnish a much needed energy source, which is why it is vital to nourish a Shih Tzu with the proper foods.

Providing Proper Nutrition

    In the past, it was not always easy to combine the necessary ingredients needed to provide a dog with a balanced meal, but today it is simple to care for a Shih Tzu because there are a variety of already prepared nutritious dog foods for sale in grocery stores and pet boutiques.

Which Food to Buy

    Dog food is available in three formulas that accommodate the stages of life and are specifically made for puppies, adults and seniors. Shih Tzu owners, as well owners of any other dogs, should consult their veterinarian to determine which brand is best for their pet.

Feeding Tidbits

    Shih Tzu owners should not ignore nutritional guidelines and treat their dogs as if they are their children by giving them tidbits of foods such as cookies, cakes and other sweets. This may not be harmful if a dog is fed a balanced diet, but it is wise to limit these treats to a minimum.

Storing Dog Food

    Store food in large quantities so that it is always available. To ensure it last for the longest time possible, store dry food in air-tight plastic containers.

Dilution Alopecia in Dobermans

Dilution Alopecia in Dobermans

Dilution alopecia is also called fawn Doberman syndrome, blue Doberman syndrome, blue dog disease, color dilution alopecia or color mutant alopecia. "Alopecia" simply means baldness. Although dilution alopecia can affect other dog breeds, it most often appears in Doberman pinschers. This is an incurable genetic disease, but it will not kill the dog.

Time Frame

    All puppies with the condition will be born looking normal. Symptoms of color dilution alopecia do not appear until the dog is anywhere from 6 months to 3 years old, although the Southwest Ohio Doberman Rescue has reported seeing it in puppies as young as 4 months old. Symptoms will continue for the rest of the dog's life.

Symptoms

    The coat will begin thinning along the back. The hair becomes brittle and falls off. The bald patches spread, often to the face, belly and legs. The skin of these bald patches becomes very rough, develops what looks like dandruff and is often covered in bumps. These bumps can be pimples, blackheads or pustules. These bumps may open and ooze pus.

Misconception

    Despite the common names of fawn Doberman syndrome and blue Doberman syndrome, color dilution alopecia can happen in many other breeds of dogs, particularly those with blue or fawn coloring. These breeds include chow chow, Italian greyhound, whippets, Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish setters and standard poodles.

Significance

    Genes cause color dilution alopecia. Just how the genes work or are linked to diluted dog colors is unknown. A diluted dog color means that the base color has white mixed with it. Diluted black dog coats cause the blue coloration and a diluted red coat causes the fawn or reddish-tan coloration. Dog owners should not breed any dog with color dilution alopecia.

Diagnosis

    Many other reasons exist for why a dog could suddenly lose hair and get rough, scaly, bumpy skin, according to "Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook." These include thyroid problems, ringworm, mange, allergies or zinc-responsive dermatosis, which zinc supplements can cure. Owners should have a veterinarian examine the affected dog's skin and hair in order to get a correct diagnosis.

Expert Advice

    Owners can slow down the rate of hair loss and skin irritation by always bathing the dog in the gentlest shampoos possible. Antibiotic rinses and gentle moisturizing lotions made for dogs can also help make the dog more comfortable, according to the Canine Inherited Disorders Database.

Boxer Facts

Boxer Facts

While the Boxer breed as recognized today was refined to perfection in Germany in the 1890s, ancestors of the breed can be found all the way back to 1600s Europe. The breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1904, and over the decades it grew in popularity with American dog owners. It maintains a presence on the AKC top ten list of favorite breeds, coming in at No. 7 in 2010.

History

    Legend has it that Boxers are descendants of the fighting Mastiffs of Tibet, though putting a modern Boxer next to those ancient Mastiffs you could barely see a resemblance. It is a cousin to virtually all breeds of Bulldogs, and the Germans refined the breed in terms of appearance and behavior through the 19th century. The Boxer became an AKC champion in 1915, and through the 1940s its talent for winning awards made the breed popular among American families.

Appearance

    Though white Boxers were introduced into the AKC in the early part of the 20th century, by 2011 they were no longer considered a breed standard. They can still be registered, but not shown in the conformation ring. The modern breed standard has a short and shiny fawn or brindle coat which doesn't require much grooming but can shed quite a bit. The Boxer has a compact body with a wide chest and a shoulder span of between 21 and 25 inches. Its dark brown eyes are medium size and dark rimmed, and its ears are set high and wide apart.

Attitude

    Boxers are alert and playful, a dignified clown that loves to be around people, other dogs and even small children. They are usually not aggressive, and respond well to good socialization. They are boisterous and require exercise, otherwise they can develop some destructive habits, such as chewing your favorite shoes or tearing into your family sofa. Boxers also like to be close to their humans, and will likely plant themselves right on your lap to command your immediate attention.

Controversy

    About 25 percent of Boxers are born white, but unlike albinos they only have white fur, as opposed to being born without pigment. According to the Northeastern Boxer Rescue, some breeders euthanize white puppies because they do not conform to the breed standard. They also have a bad reputation of being born deaf, harder to train and mean. In reality, only about 18 percent of white Boxers are deaf, and those that are deaf still respond to hand signals and sign language for training. The color of its coat does not indicate that one Boxer is meaner than any other.

Should I Feed My Existing Dog and New Puppy at the Same Time?

Should I Feed My Existing Dog and New Puppy at the Same Time?

    A new dog will need guidance to learn its boundaries.
    A new dog will need guidance to learn its boundaries.

Food Causes Fights.

    Dogs are extremely protective over their food. If a new dog comes on the scene, your existing dog may feel insecure about its food supply, especially if the new pup sniffs its food. By feeding the new dogs separately, you are showing your existing dog that its food supply is safe.

The Dogs Will Need to Integrate at Some Point.

    Eventually the dogs will learn to accept each other and will be secure about their food source. The quicker this happens the better, but separate feeding will slow the process down. Two feeding sessions is hardly convenient for you, so if you chose to feed the dogs together, supervise early encounters to prevent fights.

Bottom Line

    Dogs all behave differently around food. Some become aggressive while others are submissive. If your existing dog is timid, gradually introducing the other dog at meal times is a good idea. If your current dog is confident, allow the two to eat together. The pup may learn the meal time boundaries quicker this way.

What Can Yorkies Have for Treats?

What Can Yorkies Have for Treats?

Treats are useful for training as well as the occasional expression of affection for your canine companion. Yorkshire terriers, called Yorkies by those devoted to the breed, are popular due to their small size, perky looks and sweet temperaments. Although their nutritional needs are similar to those of dogs in general, their tiny size makes it important that they be given the right treats.

Vegetables

    Most dogs, including Yorkies, enjoy fresh vegetables and even fruit. Carrots, squash and green beans are ideal choices. Never feed your Yorkie avocado, onions, mushrooms, grapes or raisins, as these are toxic to dogs.

Rawhide

    Rawhide treats also are a popular dog treat. As dogs chew them, they break into small pieces. Give your Yorkie rawhide treats only when you are able to supervise the animal and throw the pieces away when they are small enough to be a choking hazard.

Homemade Treats

    Make homemade treats for your Yorkie. You can customize treats for your Yorkie's particular nutritional needs by adding flaxseed oil for dry skin, vitamin and lipid supplements and protein for a Yorkie's delicate bones and constantly growing hair. Yorkie Yummies provides recipes for several Yorkie-friendly treats in flavors such as peanut butter, tuna, cheese, whole wheat and bacon (see Resources).

Other Treats

    Yorkies may have small amounts of cooked chicken, cottage cheese and yogurt, provided they are not sweetened with any artificial sweeteners. Keep in mind that Yorkies are very small, so adjust the portions accordingly when you feed your Yorkie. However, do not use treats to replace regular meals.

Other Harmful Foods

    Many foods that you may be tempted to give your Yorkie are dangerous. Because of the dog's small size, even a tiny amount can be toxic. These foods include chocolate, caffeine, macadamia nuts, human baby food (which may contain onion powder), bones and sugarless candy. It also is unwise to feed your Yorkie cat food: although not toxic, cat food generally is too high in protein and fat for a Yorkie.

Rabu, 29 Mei 2013

About Mini Pinschers

About Mini Pinschers

The mini pinscher, or miniature pinscher, is a breed separate from the Doberman pinscher, not a smaller version. The mini pinscher breed's history is actually older than that of the Doberman's. This energetic, curious breed can be a good small-home family dog, if treated correctly by all members of the family.

History

    The small but sturdy mini pinscher was developed in Germany for use as a rat-hunting dog, using the dachshund, Italian greyhound and short-haired German pinscher breeds. Records of the breed begin approximately two hundred years ago but some believe the breed's history goes even further back. Since the word "pinscher" means "terrier" in German, the mini pinscher was originally classified in the American Kennel Club's terrier group when first recognized in 1925. Later, in 1972, the breed became a member of the toy group.

Size and Stature

    The breed standard used by the American Kennel Club is very specific about the height of the breed. Dogs must be between 10 and 12.5 inches, measured to the top of the shoulders. Dogs over or under these measurements are disqualified from consideration in the show ring. The ideal mini pinscher is between 11 and 11.5 inches. Male mini pinschers' height at the top of the shoulders should match the length from chest to buttock; female mini pinschers, however, can be longer than tall. Though small, the mini pinscher should not be slight in build.

Conformation

    The mini pinscher should have a tapering head with a level or sloping shape to the back from shoulder to the top of the tail. The mini pinscher should naturally carry the tail upright. The chest area should be wide and the ribs should offer the lungs a lot of space. Joints should seem small in proportion to the rest of the dog. The mini pinscher moves with a high-stepping gait that is in a straightforward motion.

Coat and Colors

    Mini pinschers have short coats. The acceptable colors in the breed are red; red with black hairs mixed in, called "stag" red; black with rust-colored markings on the cheeks, lips, bottom jaw, above the eyes, lower legs and the inside of hind legs; and chocolate with rust-colored markings in the same areas as above. Noses must be black in all colors except for chocolate; chocolate dogs must have chocolate-colored noses.

Temperament

    Mini pinschers are energetic and bold dogs. The breed is also curious enough to get into trouble on a regular basis. Generally mini pinschers get along with children but children prone to playing roughly or not respecting the dog's space may hurt or frighten a mini pinscher.

Care

    Mini pinschers only need occasional baths and brushing when it comes to grooming, thanks to the breed's short coat. Though energetic, mini pinschers fit into small living spaces well. As a puppy, the mini pinscher should have its dewclaws removed and the tail docked. The breed is small, so rough play can result in unintended injuries. Some health issues mini pinschers may have include patellar luxation, where the knee cap moves out of place; demodectic mange, a type of skin parasite; and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, which is a degeneration of the hip joint.

How to Raise a Labrador Retriever Puppy

How to Raise a Labrador Retriever Puppy

Labrador Retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds around the globe. Prized for their gentle nature and pleasant dispositions, Labs have found their way into the hearts and homes of owners. Large and intelligent, the Labrador Retriever can be found engaged in nearly every dog sport from hunting to dock diving. Raising a Labrador Retriever puppy is not difficult, although it does take a little time and effort to produce a well-mannered puppy.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase your Labrador puppy from an experienced, reputable breeder. Puppies are typically weaned between the ages of 8 and 10 weeks, and can be taken home at this age. Responsible breeders will have their Labs tested for genetic conditions such as hip dysplasia and progressive retinal atrophy, which are prevalent conditions in the breed. Ask to see the health clearances on the parents before agreeing to purchase a puppy.

    2

    Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to have your puppy evaluated. Your vet will give your pup a complete physical to make sure it is free of illness. Your vet will also administer any necessary vaccinations and worming treatments to keep your puppy healthy.

    3

    Start your puppy's housebreaking as soon you get home. Labrador Retrievers are intelligent dogs and, with consistent training, they quickly learn that they should potty outside. Take your puppy to a low-traffic, quiet area of your yard and give it the command to potty. Be sure to take it out upon waking and after meals to avoid accidents indoors.

    4

    Fit your Lab puppy with a collar. A collar is necessary to keep identification tags on your puppy, so the sooner the pup gets used to a collar, the better. Attach the lead and allow the puppy to drag it around and get used to the feel of being attached to a leash.

    5

    Set up a crate in a quiet area and place your puppy in it for a few minutes at a time to begin crate training. Labrador Retrievers are curious dogs and can easily cause damage if they are left alone uncrated. Place a few toys inside the crate to keep the pup occupied, and reward the puppy with a treat when it lies quietly. Gradually increase the time your puppy is crated until it lies quietly for as long necessary.

    6

    Keep your puppy's bowl filled with fresh water at all times and feed it three small meals spaced throughout the day. Labradors are prone to gastric conditions such as bloat, so spacing out meals will encourage it to eat slowly and allow its body time to digest food properly. Feed your puppy a high-quality dog food to help prevent allergies and digestive issues.

    7

    Teach your puppy basic obedience skills. Simple commands such as "sit", "lie down", "heel" and "stay" will make your pup a welcomed family companion. Work in 10-minute training sessions to keep your puppy from becoming bored, and always offer a treat as soon as the dog obeys.

How to Identify a Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire terriers, known for their small size and big personality, are the second most popular dog breed in the United States. They were originally bred as small hunting dogs, used to hunt down mice and rats in confined spaces. These unique dogs are easy to identify if you know their characteristics. Read on to learn more.

Instructions

    1

    Take note of the size of the dog you want to identify. Yorkshire terriers are small dogs with compact bodies which usually maintain and upright posture. From the ground to the shoulders, they are 6 or 7 inches tall. They weigh, on average, 7 lbs.

    2

    Look at the dog's ears. The Yorkshire terrier has small, pointy, V-shaped ears which stand erect or partially erect at all times. They have abbreviated tails which angle up only slightly from their back.

    3

    Observe the coat. Yorkshire terriers have long strands of straight hair which sometimes extend from their back as far as the ground. The hair is fine and with a silky texture.

    4

    Notice the color of the coat. Yorkshire terriers are black and tan when born, but become lighter in color as they grow older. Mature dogs have a blue colored hair on their backs, darker blue around their tails and tan around the legs, chest and head.

    5

    See if the dog's personality characteristics match up with a Yorkshire terrier's. Because of their breeding as rodent hunters, Yorkshire terriers are courageous dogs, usually independent and full of vigor.

    6

    Go to the website of the Yorkshire Terrier Club of America to see pictures of Yorkshire terriers and read about the breed. Then you can identify if the dog's characteristics are a match with Yorkshire terriers.

Characteristics of a Maltipoo

Characteristics of a Maltipoo

What Are the Three Coat Varieties for Dachshunds?

What Are the Three Coat Varieties for Dachshunds?

The dachshund is known for its short legs and long back. The dog was bred this way, in Germany, to flush badgers out of their burrows and fight them to the death. The dachshund is recognized in the standard and miniature sizes. The miniature is a grown dog 11 pounds or under, while the standard weighs between 16 and 32 pounds. There are three dachshund coat varieties: smooth-haired, long-haired and wire-haired.

Long-Haired Dachshund

    A dachshund's long back makes it subject to spinal problems.
    A dachshund's long back makes it subject to spinal problems.

    The coat of a long-haired dachshund should be silky and glossy, with feathering on the legs and tail. The hair should be a little longer under the neck, on the chest, belly, ears and behind the legs. The coat shouldn't be too profuse, have equally long hair everywhere, be curly or have a parting on the back. The hair on the tail should be the longest on the body and form a flag. The long-haired dachshund can come in many colors, but the nails and nose should be black.

Smooth-Haired Dachshund

    Dachshunds live 12-15 years.
    Dachshunds live 12-15 years.

    The coat of the smooth-haired dachshund should be glossy and held close to the body. It shouldn't be too long or thick. A brushy or hairless tail is considered a fault. The dachshund's coat can be any color. A patch of white on the chest is considered a fault unless the dog is a dapple, which means a dark base color with lighter colored areas. The nose and nails of the dog must be black.

Wire-Haired Dachshund

    The dachshund is friendly but can be headstrong.
    The dachshund is friendly but can be headstrong.

    The outer coat of a wire-haired dachshund should be harsh, uniform, tight and short, with a softer and shorter undercoat. There should be no soft hair on the outer coat at all, especially on the top of the head. The hair also shouldn't be "wild," wavy, curly or sticking out. The dog should have a beard and eyebrows, and the hair on the ears should be almost smooth. The tail should be robust and taper to a point, and shouldn't have a flag. All colors are permissible but the most often seen is wild boar, which gives the coat a nice grizzled effect. The nose, nails and eye rims should be black.

Care and Grooming

    The wire-haired dachshund should have a professional trimming twice a year. The smooth haired dachshund should have regular brushing and combing, and then a rubdown with a damp cloth. The long haired dachshund should be combed and brushed every day.

Types of Corgis

Types of Corgis

Once considered a single dog type, the Welsh corgi was split into two breed registries in the 1930s. The more popular type is the Pembroke corgi; however, Cardigan corgis have a longer history on the British Isles. The two corgi breeds also have distinct differences in appearance and personality.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

    Often called "the corgi with the tail," the Cardigan Welsh corgi is the older of the two types. The dog arrived in the British Isles with the Central European Celts around 1200 B.C. The tribe settled in an area of Wales subsequently called Cardiganshire. Corgis became especially useful several centuries later when they were used to drive cattle. Welsh farmers were not allowed to fence off land and were forced to share common pasture with their neighbors. The trained corgis would nip at the cattle's heels and push them farther away to greener pastures.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

    The Pembroke Welsh corgi is not as old a breed as the Cardigan corgi, but the dog's history still spans hundreds of years. Flemish weavers went to Wales in 1107 accompanied by a particular type of dog, the ancestors of the Pembroke corgi. These dogs came from the same group from which the Pomeranian, Chow Chow and Samoyed originated. These dogs were crossed with the Cardigan Welsh corgis as some point before the mid-1800s.

Differences

    The Pembroke corgi is shorter than the Cardigan corgi, with a finer textured coat and straighter legs. The American Kennel Club standards, which is what breeders agree is the ideal appearance for the breed, call for the Cardigan to stand 10.5 to 12.5 inches tall at the highest point of the withers. The Pembroke stands 10 to 12 inches tall. The Cardigan is heavier than the Pembroke corgi. Females usually weigh about 34 pounds and males to weigh no more than 38 pounds. Female Pembroke corgis are around 25 pounds and males are about 30 pounds.

    Ears and tail are two areas in which it is easier to tell the two breeds apart. Cardigan corgis have long tails and rounded ears, and Pembrokes have pointed, erect ears and short tails. The colors of the Cardigan corgi are more varied than the colors of the Pembroke corgi. Since only certain colors are permitted by the AKC for Pembroke corgi show dogs, several color variations have been selectively bred out. In addition, the Pembroke Welsh corgi reportedly has a bolder, more excitable personality than the generally placid Cardigan corgis.

Popularity

    The corgi breed was officially split into the two types in 1934. At that time 59 Cardigan Welsh corgis were registered in England, compared to 250 Pembroke Welsh corgis. The Cardigan type had almost disappeared, but careful breeding helped to revive the breed. The Pembroke corgi surged in popularity during the same time period when a young English princess became a corgi enthusiast -- the princess later became Queen Elizabeth II, and she has owned more than 30 corgis over 60 years, many of which descended from the first Corgi given to her on her 18th birthday. The Pembroke is ranked 26th and the Cardigan is 85th on the AKC's list of 150 dog breeds by popularity.

Types of Dogs Used on the Police Force

Types of Dogs Used on the Police Force

Police dogs are trained to be an aggressive but obedient member of the police force. This can be a tricky combination. Many of the dogs come from a hunting and herding class. They are valued for their keen sense of smell, which is valuable for tracking suspects or drugs and for search and rescue.

German Shepherd

    As the most popular police dog breed, the German shepherd is prized for its strength, obedience, eagerness to learn, confidence, alertness, cheerfulness and courage. They were originally bred as herders but were used in World War I as messengers that carried information to soldiers. The dogs also smelled enemy forces before army officials could detect them. Their performance in the war got the attention of American police officials who trained the dog to be a part of the police force. German shepherds have a keen protective instinct and must be trained to obey from an early age.

Labrador Retriever

    Labrador retrievers are strong and loyal dogs.
    Labrador retrievers are strong and loyal dogs.

    Labrador retrievers are known for their good temperament. They are eager to please, making them an ideal candidate as a police dog. These dogs stand out from other police dogs because of their ability to swim, and they don't hesitate at jumping into icy water. They are commonly used at airports to sniff out narcotics. Labrador retrievers act quickly and courageously in an emergency. The breed is also a common guide dog.

Rottweiler

    Rottweilers fall into two breed categories.
    Rottweilers fall into two breed categories.

    Rottweilers are extremely strong dogs, with a huge muscular body and intimidating stare that is accented by their round forehead and sharp teeth. Their strength is matched by their intelligence and some police officers prefer them over German shepherds. Rottweilers are divided into German and American breeds. The German breed is shorter and stockier with a broader head than its American counterpart. Like other police dogs, the Rottweiler is devoted to its owner.

Doberman Pinscher

    Like the German shepherd, doberman pinschers gained popularity after their successful use in WW I. Several thousand of these dogs were trained for action in the war. While they aren't as commonly used for police work as German shepherds, they are valued for their obedience, loyalty and quick reaction. Doberman pinschers are often depicted in movies as snarling guard dogs. But according to Dog and Kennel magazine, they learn their aggression from humans.

Selasa, 28 Mei 2013

Pug Dog Information

Pug Dog Information

Pugs are one of the most beloved breed of dogs for pet owners around the world. They have certain qualities that make them unique in appearance and personality, providing unparalleled appeal to those who choose to bring a pug into their lives. When owning a pug, there is never a dull day, as these dogs are known for being constant clowns.

Origin

    The origin of the pug is surrounded by mystery and debate. Most researchers believe that the breed was developed from a short-haired Pekingese about 400 B.C. in Asia. Others argue that they were cross-bred with a small bulldog. Regardless of their true origin, pugs today are the result of hundreds of years of experimentation that has led to great improvements in the breed, and they certainly appear much different than the dogs they descended from.

Appearance

    Pugs are a small dog with short, stocky bodies. Their heads, which rest on a very short neck, are round, and they have flat, square-shaped, darkly colored muzzles, large eyes and small, rose-shaped ears. Their faces also have the deep wrinkles that give them their characteristic look. They have corkscrew tails, and their fur is soft and short. Pugs come are black, fawn, party-color and silver, which is described as a very shiny white. The silver dogs are not common.

Temperament

    Pugs are perpetually cheerful dogs, and once they are socialized, they usually get along well with other dogs and small children. They are intelligent and are easily trained. They do require a strong-minded owner to lead the family pack or they will try to establish the place of home leader and can be become possessive of toys, furniture, food and even their owners. Having owners who establishes themselves as the alphas will help a pug feel more secure and at ease. Even though they are a small breed, pugs can be effective guard dogs as well.

Care

    When well cared for, pugs can live 12 to 15 years. They require little grooming; just the occasional bath and brush-out with a fine-toothed comb. (Bathing too frequently will remove natural oils and can dry out their skin, causing them unnecessary itching.) However, the wrinkles on their face do need more attention and should be cleaned regularly to avoid infection.

    Pugs are strong, active dogs and need to be walked daily for optimal health. They also have hearty appetites, and treats should be limited. Exercising will not only help to maintain their weight, it will provide these highly curious dogs with plenty of stimulation.

Health Problems

    Because of their short muzzle, pugs are prone to breathing problems. They also tend to have allergies. Temperature extremes can easily cause them stress, and pug owners should always be mindful of the weather before exposing them. Pugs are also prone to hip dysplasia, particularly in the later years of their life. It is wise to buy pugs from breeders that have a trusted and responsible reputation to help ensure their health and longevity.

What Is the Difference Between an Irish Red & White Setter & a Welsh Springer Spaniel?

What Is the Difference Between an Irish Red & White Setter & a Welsh Springer Spaniel?

The Irish red and white setter, or IRWS, and the Welsh springer spaniel, or WSS, share superficial resemblance to each other. Both breeds have long white coats, liberally marked with chestnut red patches. However, that is where the resemblance ends. Despite the two breeds both being used for hunting, they differ substantially in size, purpose and temperament, as well as in other important ways.

Antiquity

    The WSS is by far the older of the two breeds. According to the American Kennel Club, the WSS may date as far back as 7000 B.C., although the Agassian hunting dog from which the springer is thought to be directly descended was not developed until approximately 250 B.C. Even should one doubt the likelihood of the breed surviving for that length of time, red-and-white springer spaniels appear in European artwork and literature going back as far as the 14th century By contrast, the IRWS was not recognizably its own breed until the end of the 17th century. Due to its near extinction, however, the IRWS was not sufficiently established in its home country to have its own breed club until 1944, making it a very young breed despite its history.

History

    The histories of these two breeds differ in ways other than mere antiquity. During the 18th century, the wealthy elite favored the Welsh springer spaniel as a gun dog. This favor was lost in the 19th century, when the English springer spaniel became the preferred field dog throughout the United Kingdom. However, the Welsh springer experienced renewed popularity in the conformation show ring during the 19th century, where it was first exhibited as the Welsh cocker spaniel." Although the breed remained popular throughout the World Wars in the UK, no Welsh springer spaniels were registered in the AKC between 1926 and 1948. By contrast, the Irish red and white setter was relatively unknown outside of its native country. While the solid-red Irish setter was created from Irish red and white stock, its rise in popularity during the 19th century resulted in a serious decline in Irish red and white setters. At one time, the breed was thought to be extinct, until the Rev. Noble Huston began efforts to re-establish the breed in the UK. The Irish red and white did not become established in the United States until the 1960s and was not fully recognized by the AKC until 2009.

Hunting Style

    Both the Welsh springer and the Irish red and white are used for hunting birds. Both breeds work independently and search or quarter the field enthusiastically and at a moderate pace. However, the Welsh springer is a flushing spaniel, meaning that it frightens the birds it finds into the air for the hunter to shoot. The Irish red and white sets or points at the birds it finds, standing or crouching rigidly in place until the hunter has found the birds and flushes them to shoot. Both breeds retrieve the downed game after it has been shot. Unlike the Irish red and white, the Welsh springer may also be used as a water dog.

Appearance

    Both the Welsh springer and the Irish red and white have white coats decorated with red patches. That is essentially where the resemblance between the two breeds ends. The coat of the Welsh springer is straight and of moderate length, with moderate feathering on the legs. It stands between 17 inches and 19 inches at the shoulder and has a body slightly longer than its shoulder height. The AKC breed standard indicates that the tail is usually docked and is usually carried on a horizontal plane. The coat of the Irish red and white is short compared to that of the springer, although the feathering on the legs and tail is also fairly profuse. It is a taller dog than the Welsh springer, standing 22.5 inches to 26 inches at the shoulder, and its body is never any shorter from the shoulder to the base of the tail than its shoulder height. The Irish red and whites tail is of moderate length, never docked, and is never carried any higher than the line of its back.

How to Care for a Standard Poodle

The standard poodle is a quick learner and relatively easy to train when compared with other breeds. This gentle, friendly dog is gracious to its family, other pets and strangers visiting the house. Be prepared to spend a lot of time grooming your dog's coat.

Instructions

    1

    Vaccinate your standard poodle when you first get him, and see that he gets yearly booster vaccinations to maintain his immunity to disease. Also, worm your adult dog every three months and consult with your veterinarian about flea control products.

    2

    Feed your standard poodle high-grade dog food. The first ingredient should be meat if you want a quality product. Crude protein should be no less than 21 percent and crude fat no less than 20 percent. The fiber content needs to be 4 percent or less.

    3

    Be sure to feed your standard poodle two to three small meals per day as opposed to the traditional one to two larger ones. This will help prevent bloat.

    4

    Train and socialize your standard poodle when he's young. The poodle is highly intelligent and should receive firm and consistent obedience training.

    5

    Exercise your standard poodle daily. The poodle does not need a high amount of activity but should have a backyard to play in.

    6

    Clip your poodle's coat every six to eight weeks. This breed sheds very little. Shampoo your dog regularly and trim his nails every two to three weeks. Also, check your dog's ears regularly for mites.

    7

    Understand that standard poodles are prone to certain health conditions such as cataracts (cloudy eye lens), progressive retinal atrophy (progressive damage to the retina), allergies, skin problems, hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint) and Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder).

    8

    Know that female and male standard poodles can reach heights over 15 inches. Males will weigh between 25 and 70 lbs.; females, between 45 and 60 lbs.

    9

    Expect a standard poodle to live 12 to 15 years.

The Expected Sizes of Toy Poodles

The Expected Sizes of Toy Poodles

The American Kennel Club uses height to determine the sizes of poodles. Toy poodles generally are less than 10 inches tall from the highest point of their shoulders to the ground. The weight of an adult toy poodle varies from 6 to 9 pounds. According to Toy Poodle News, female toy poodles generally grow as big as their mothers, while males grow as big as their fathers. To estimate the adult size of a toy poodle, prospective owners should check out the parents. Alternately, Toy Poodle News offers a formula for determining the expected size of toy poodles. Multiply the weight of the puppy at 10 weeks by 2.5 to get an approximation of the adult size of the pup.

Physical Features

    Toy poodles have a moderately rounded skull and longish, straight muzzle. Their eyes are dark and oval, set far apart and generally black or brown in color. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. The tail is set high and carried high, too. At times, breeders dock the tail to half its length to give the dog a more balanced appearance. The coat can be curly or corded and is solid in color, whether black, silver, blue, gray, cream, apricot, white, brown or red.

Temperament

    These dogs are extremely intelligent, and this makes it very easy to train them. They are lively dogs that can keep people entertained for hours. They love to socialize but also make good watchdogs. However, if proper attention and exercise is not provided, toy poodles have a tendency to become high-strung and timid. They require daily walks or quality playing time to meet their exercise needs. They can develop certain behavioral issues, such as snapping, growling, barking obsessively and being nervous. These problems usually develop when owners do not show leadership skills.

Health Issues

    Owing to their small size, toy poodles are prone to genetic health disorders, such as immune mediated hemolytic anemia, diabetes, heart disorders, ear infections, digestive system problems, epilepsy, cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy and skin allergies. However, when healthy and well looked after, toy poodles can live anywhere from 12 to 15 years. Toy poodles are prone to injuries while jumping. Hence, they should not be allowed to jump from couches and beds.

Grooming

    Toy poodles require regular grooming to keep them healthy and neat. They need bathes regularly and hair clipping every six to eight weeks. They have a tendency to get ear wax and, hence, need ear cleaning frequently. Also, ear hair plucking is necessary to prevent mites and infections. The breed requires regular scaling of teeth to prevent teeth and gum diseases and infections.

Senin, 27 Mei 2013

Facts About Shiba Inu Dogs & Puppies

Facts About Shiba Inu Dogs & Puppies

The Shiba Inu is the most popular dog breed in Japan, according to "Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds." This dog breed is one of only six dog breeds native to Japan, although when the Shiba Inu originated is unknown. They were originally bred to hunt small animals and to chase larger animals out of the thick undergrowth and into the path of hunters' weapons. They are also called Shibas, brushwood dogs or Japanese small sized dogs.

Identification

    Shibas have heads resembling that of a fox. They have pointy noises and naturally pointed ears that tip forward, making them appear to be smaller than they actually are. This small ears are thought to help keep in the dog's body heat, according to "Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds." They have a body made in the same sturdy style as a spitz dog, but with shorter coats. They come in several colors, mainly black and tan or red with white, pale or gray bellies, insides of the legs and undersides of their bushy tails that are naturally carried over the dog's back.

Size

    These are small- to medium-sized dogs, with males often growing to be larger, heavier and more muscular than the female. The average size of male Shiba Inus is 14.5 to 16.5 inches high from the ground to the highest point of their shoulder. The average weight of the males is 23 lbs. Females only weigh about 17 lbs. and grow to an average of 13.5 to 15.5 inches tall. Individual Shibas can grow smaller or larger than the average.

History

    Shibas are thought to descend from a mixture of three now extinct Japanese breeds--the Shinshu Shiba, the Mino Shiba and the Sanin Shiba. All three of these breeds are thought to descend from the spitz. The breed was nearly wiped out by both World War II and a distemper outbreak in 1952. By 1954, the Shiba Inu arrived in America.

Temperament

    Shibas are very independent, intelligent dogs that have a reputation of being difficult to train. For this reason, only people experienced with dogs should adopt a Shiba. Shibas may be aggressive to other dogs. Shibas were bred to be active and hunt all day, so they may become destructive out of boredom if they are not given regular exercise. Shibas make excellent watchdogs, according to Dog Breed Info.com.

Health Problems

    Compared to many other purebreds, Shibas are prone to few health problems. But they are prone to knee problems, cataracts, hip dysplasia (a painful condition where the hip bone does not go into the socket) and are allergic to the saliva in flea bites (known as flea allergy dermatitis.) Shiba Inus can also get hypothyroidism, a problem of the thyroid gland, according to the Northeast Shiba Rescue Association.

Why Red Meat Gets a Dog Sick

Why Red Meat Gets a Dog Sick

DogAge.com states that the best diet for your dog is one that sticks to dog food most of the time. This will help ensure that your pet will have the proper nutrition he needs. However, many people believe that feeding their dog red meat is good for his health and a positive addition to his diet. Unfortunately, dogs can become sick on human food, though, and some experts say that red meat is one of the foods that may make your dog ill.

Raw Red Meat

    One reason that red meat may cause dogs to become sick is that their owners feed it to them raw. Raw red meat significantly increases the risk of gastrointestinal illness. This is because bacteria, cysts and parasites are often present in uncooked meat.

Red Meat with Bones

    Red meat with bones can dramatically increase the risk of illness and should never be given to your pet. The bones in red meat splinter easily. These splinters may break off and puncture a dog's gastrointestinal tract.

Cooked Red Meat's Effects

    Infopet.co.uk reports that there is evidence to suggest that dogs who eat a lot of red meat (cooked) are more likely to develop cancer. This is linked to the fact that dogs who eat mostly table scraps or human foods also tend to consume too much fat and not enough necessary cancer fighting nutrition. This type of diet also leads to more rapid aging for your pet.

Moderation of Cooked Red Meat

    Though raw red meat and/or a diet high in cooked red meats may cause illness in your pet, DogAge states that small amounts of cooked red meat are acceptable occasionally and in moderation. Avoid regular usage, and use the cooked meat only occasionally, as a special treat.

Avoiding Red Meat

    Though we believe that dogs are carnivores, findoutaboutdogs.com reports they actually do not need meat in order to survive. They are omnivores. Thus, you may choose to decrease the risk of illness by avoiding red meat in your dog's diet. This will not deprive your pet of necessary protein. They can do well on alternate protein and even plants and grains. If you choose a dog food that is complete and balanced, your dog will eat what he needs to be healthy.

What Is the Different Between a Toy Yorkie & Teacup Yorkie?

What Is the Different Between a Toy Yorkie & Teacup Yorkie?

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized Yorkshire terriers, or Yorkies, in 1885. The breed originated in England to catch rats. According to the AKC, Yorkies are members of the Toy Group.

Standard

    The Yorkshire Terrier Club of America is the parent or main club. A Yorkie normally weighs from 4 lb. to 7 lb.

Official Breed

    The only recognized name is Yorkshire terrier. There is no Toy Yorkshire terrier or Teacup Yorkshire terrier breed.

Size Divisions

    There is no recognized division of Yorkies called toy, teacup, mini, micro or any other size division. According to Gale Thompson of the Yorkshire Club of America, although a puppy may be born that is smaller than standard (runt), it is not desirable, and breeding to make Yorkies smaller is not responsible.

Substandard Size

    According to Thompson, most breeders do not consider bitches less than 5 lb. suitable for breeding, and very small Yorkies are more likely to have hereditary problems and sustain injuries.

Toy or Teacup

    Since the terms toy or teacup Yorkies are marketing ploys and not actual terms, there are no specific differences. According to Dr. Louise Murray, the puppy is often a runt or the offspring of runts, not a special breed. Murray warns that breeding for tiny sizes creates unhealthy dogs.

Are Dalmatians Safe With Children?

Are Dalmatians Safe With Children?

Dalmatians are generally considered to be good family pets and safe with children who are 6 years and older. However, Dalmatians are energetic and high-spirited, and can knock over smaller children in their enthusiasm. Also, children may pull tails and poke eyes without realizing that they are hurting a dog. In such a case, a dog may react aggressively. No child should be left unsupervised when playing with a Dalmatian or any other breed.

Temperament

    Although Dalmatians are intelligent and fast learners, they can be stubborn and have minds of their own. They require strong leadership qualities when undergoing training. Pet owners should mean what they say by always being consistent, and children should be taught the same rules for dealing with the dog. Dalmatians can be neurotic and hyperactive, and may bite if not trained properly. Do not leave a dog alone with children. Young Dalmatians jump a lot when excited, causing adults and children to fall and possibly be injured.

Mental Stimulation

    Because this breed is lively, Dalmatians require regular exercise and mental stimulation to keep them busy and entertained. If a Dalmatian cannot vent its energy, a dog might resort to destructive chewing and barking excessively. Dalmatians should not be allowed to get bored, or they can ruin your home and yard. A Dalmatian loves going jogging, hiking or running around in a safe and fenced area. A dog also responds well to agility training and obedience training. Just a short walk is not sufficient to keep the destructive tendencies at bay. A bored Dalmatian can also grow aggressive and attack younger members of the family.

Socializing

    Dalmatians love companionship of their pet owners and family. They can tolerate other pets but have a special affinity toward horses. Many greet visitors with excitement, barking and jumping. Others may show slightly protective instincts and may be more polite when greeting visitors. Socialize them with outsiders at an early age; otherwise, they grow aggressive and skittish. Leaving such a dog around children is not recommended.

Trick Training

    If you train your dog and exercise it regularly, a Dalmatian makes an excellent family pet. The breed is intelligent and can be trained to become a good watchdog. Using positive reinforcement, such as treats, toys and praises, you can teach your Dalmatian to do tricks. The dog will associate the command for a trick with the trick itself, and perform it to perfection.

How to Adopt a Shitzu Rescue Dog

How to Adopt a Shitzu Rescue Dog

The shih tzu, also known as shitzu, is a small, solid dog with a long, flowing coat and a playful temperament, according to the American Kennel Club. Shih tzus come in many colors and while they are sweet in nature, they know how to take care of themselves. Unfortunately, shih tzus, like many dog breeds, are sometimes neglected, abused or left homeless. Shih tzu rescues across the country have rescue dogs available for adoption.

Instructions

    1

    Research the shih tzu breed to ensure that its traits and temperament are what you want in a dog.

    2

    Look for a shih tzu rescue group in your area. Type "shih tzu rescue" or "shitzu rescue" and your zip code or city name into an online search engine. Alternatively, look in the phone book or ask around at local pet shops or animal shelters.

    3

    Contact the shih tzu rescue either through its website, by telephone or in person to let them know you are interested in adopting a shih tzu. You may be required to fill out an adoption application online or in person.

    4

    Answer any questions the rescue might have about your home, schedule and current/past pets. Remember that they have the rescue dog's best interests at heart.

    5

    Allow a representative from the shih tzu rescue to come to your house for an inspection, if needed.

    6

    Browse the list of adoptable dogs at the rescue to see if there are any in particular you'd like to meet. Tell the rescue representative your requirements in a dog and see if she has any recommendations.

    7

    Make an appointment to see any rescue shih tzus you are interested in adopting. Meet in a neutral location, especially if you have another dog. Introduce your current dog to the rescue dog to make sure there will not be any problems.

    8

    Fill out the adoption contract provided by the shih tzu rescue. Read it carefully to make sure you understand all terms and conditions before signing. Pay any adoption fees to the rescue representative or foster parent.

What Kind of Dog Is a Police Dog?

What Kind of Dog Is a Police Dog?

Dogs serve a wide variety of purposes for police forces including narcotics, bob and arson detection, tracking, patrol or other special services according to the United States Police Canine Association. Police departments utilize different breeds of dogs to accomplish different goals. Dogs breeds used by police departments are known to be highly intelligent and hard working dogs.

German Shepherds

    According to the Summerville Police department, German Shepherds are the most used police dogs because of their size, keen intelligence and work ethic. German Shepherds' service to the United States goes back as far as World War I and up through the Vietnam War. In the 1950s the breed was used for crowd control and became known as an aggressive dog. Police departments have developed training programs for both the handler and dog to help lessen these stereotypes.

Belgian Malinois

    The Belgian Malinois (pronounced "mal-in-wha") is smaller, more streamlined version of a German Shepherd. This type of Belgian Shepherd dog includes the Groenendael, Laekenois and Tervueren breeds. These dogs, originally bred as sheep herders in Holland, are known for their agility and endurance. Malinois are also recognized for their hard-working traits and speed. The Malinois is an everyday police dog and used in similar circumstances as German Shepherds.

Labrador Retriever

    The Labrador Retriever is not only a popular domestic pet but is also a breed utilized by police departments. Labs are known for their intelligence, loyalty and obedience. Labs are used in service as non-aggressive or passive purposes such as bomb detection. The dogs stiff out explosives, or another specified target, and will sit down once the scent is detected.

Bloodhounds

    The loveable bloodhound is used by police departments for tracking suspects or for detection of narcotics and bombs. Bloodhounds are used in water tracking activities and also are known for cadaver searches. The bloodhound is single minded when on the trail of a scent. The bloodhound are typically not used to track dangerous felons because bloodhounds are not aggressive according to Lee Lofland, a former police officer and author.

Minggu, 26 Mei 2013

Excessive Shedding in Rottweilers

Excessive Shedding in Rottweilers

A Rottweiler is a big responsibility. It is a huge dog that has a bad -- and often unwarranted -- reputation for aggression. It will take time and effort to train and socialize your dog so that it will become a loyal and gentle companion. While this dog has short hair, it sheds a lot, so you need to be prepared to clean it up and prevent it as much as possible.

Its Coats

    Rottweilers have more hair than you might expect just from looking at them. They actually have two coats. One coat is an outer coat of medium length and fairly coarse hair. The coat is referred to as a guard coat because it is intended to protect the animal's skin from soil and other natural detritus. The other coat is a soft, fleecy undercoat. This coat acts as insulation, which it once needed as its traditional duties of guarding and cart hauling were often performed in rainy and cold weather.

Causes of Shedding

    Rottweilers naturally shed their undercoats twice a year, with a major blowout in the spring and a lesser one in the fall. Female Rottweilers also shed their undercoats with their fertility cycle. There are more unnatural causes of shedding such as allergies. Rottweilers are often allergic to the grains that low-quality dog foods are filled with, and Rottweilers, with their sensitive skin, are often allergic to flea bites. Both of these allergies can cause them to pull their own hair out in droves.

Grooming

    Grooming can drastically reduce the amount of hair a Rottweiler sheds. Brush your dog several times a week. Not only will this remove the hair that otherwise would have ended up on your floor, it will also help spread around the oils that are naturally on your Rottweiler's skin. You should bathe your Rottweiler no more than once a month, as bathing strips its coat of those same natural oils. And when you do bathe it, rinse it well because any remaining soap residue will dry out and irritate the dog's skin, which ultimately will increase shedding.

Tackling Shedding from Unnatural Causes

    Keep your dog, especially in the warm months, on a flea and tick preventative medication. If you find that one brand is not working, try a different brand, because some brands are ineffective in certain areas. You may need to treat your yard with pesticides if the problem persist. If your dog is still shedding, it may be allergic to its food. Try buying a higher quality dog food that is not grain based. You may also need to try food with different meat bases. Also, lacing your dog's food with an oil like fish oil can help keep its coat healthy.

What Does Pure Breeding Mean?

What Does Pure Breeding Mean?

More than 400 dog breeds are found worldwide, and telling the difference between a mixed-breed dog and a dog that comes from pure breeding can be difficult. Purebreds are generally bred for specific traits.

Definition

    A purebred puppy comes from two dogs of the same breed. For example, two collies that mate will produce a purebred collie puppy. If a collie and a boxer mate, their puppy is not considered purebred, even though it is still the offspring of two purebred dogs.

Benefits

    Pure breeding produces dogs with predictable physical and temperamental traits. Purebred dogs may have been bred specifically for their guarding abilities, for athleticism or for intelligence. Physical traits, such as coat length, size and head shape, vary widely among purebred dogs.

Considerations

    A breeder of purebred dogs should be able to provide documentation proving the lineage of a purebred puppy. If you wish to show your purebred puppy, you will need to register the dog with the American Kennel Club.

How to Get a New Maltese Puppy

How to Get a New Maltese Puppy

The Maltese, a breed of dog in the toy or small dog genre, is increasingly popular and can be found in or near every major city in the United States. Some favorable characteristics of the Maltese include their hypoallergenic nature, friendly disposition, and small, manageable size. Maltese dogs are likely to be lively with high energy, a trait that does not abate with age.

Instructions

    1

    Consult a local pet shop for pet listings. Often breeders who sell purebred dogs will give local pet shops their contact information or post signs and advertisements at the store location. On occasion, shops will also sell Maltese puppies.

    2

    Visit the nearest pound or animal shelter. Statistically, Maltese dogs are often abandoned because of their lively nature. It is not unlikely that these often expensive dogs could be found at an animal shelter.

    3

    Search for Maltese puppies in your area at nextdaypets.com. This is a website listing various rare dog breeds across the United States. Keep checking it if at first there are no listings in your area.

    4

    Contact the American Kennel Club, or use their website as a resource for finding a responsible breeder from whom to get your maltese. Good breeders will pay attention to health issues, personality, and socialization of pups. These breeders will be promoted by the AKC.

How to Choose a Maltese Puppy

How to Choose a Maltese Puppy

Choosing a puppy from a litter can be a difficult task when they are all so cute. When you bring a puppy into your home, you are making a commitment to that animal for its lifetime and for small dogs, that can mean up to 15 years. It's important to choose a puppy that will be compatible with your lifestyle and can grow into being part of the family. Read on to learn how to choose a Maltese puppy.

Instructions

    1

    Look for the temperament you want. Puppies that rush forward and smother you with love and affection are the pushier, more alpha of the group. The quieter and more mellow Maltese puppies will hang back. Evaluate each puppy individually. Do you want a quieter, more mellow pet or a more energetic one?

    2

    Avoid overly shy or distrustful Maltese litters. If none of the puppies are coming to greet you and play, turn around and walk away. At least some of the puppies should be outgoing and playful. It's OK if it takes the others a little while to get used to you, but not if they bark nervously or run away.

    3

    Choose a middle of the road puppy. You probably don't want the boss of the group, who pushes everyone around and steals all the toys, but neither do you want the picked on, submissive puppy. Pick an outgoing puppy who plays with the group but isn't at either end of the spectrum.

    4

    Look for curious, alert puppies. Making some noise should get a few of the puppies attention. Watch which ones come over to investigate. You want a curious, alert puppy who doesn't startle at every noise.

    5

    Spend time alone with each puppy. When taken away from his litter mates, how does the Maltese puppy act? Does he look at you when you speak to him? Is his tail wagging? Without the support of the litter, shy puppies might become more outgoing and outgoing puppies more relaxed.

How to Get a Maltese Puppy to Eat

How to Get a Maltese Puppy to Eat

Small breed puppies like the Maltese often cut their first teeth later than larger dogs. This means they may have trouble adjusting to hard dog food nuggets. Choking is a hazard too. Canned food can be expensive and can cause diarrhea. Canned dog food is also more fattening than dry nuggets. There are some things you can do to help your new Maltese puppy eat dog food.

Instructions

    1

    Add warm water to dry puppy food about 20 minutes before feeding time. Let the puppy food absorb the water; add more water as needed to make an oatmeal-like consistency. Use a fork to break up the nuggets. Pour off excess water as a Maltese puppy can choke on the liquid. Gradually add less liquid to the food as the puppy's teeth come in. Crunching on the harder nuggets will help their new teeth.

    2

    Add one teaspoon of plain yogurt (not vanilla) to the puppy's food. Mix with a small amount of water and let stand for several minutes. The yogurt will help replace necessary digestive bacteria and settle a nervous stomach. Let the dog food nuggets absorb the liquid until it can easily be mashed with a fork.

    3

    Serve all dog food at room temperature. Wait for cold ingredients to warm up, and warm additions to cool completely. Changes in temperature also change the taste of the dog food and will not be as appealing to the puppy.

    4

    Serve a homemade food diet to the most finicky Maltese puppy. Boil one pound of ground beef until completely cooked through, about 40 minutes. Strain, rinse and let cool. Boil two cups of rice according to package directions. Let the rice cool completely. Combine rice and beef in dog bowl and serve a quarter cup per puppy. Freeze the unused portion for later use.

    5

    Clean all food and water bowls daily. Bacteria builds up in the bottom and sides of the dog bowls. The bowls may smell bad, so the puppy won't use eat out of them. Provide plenty of fresh room temperature drinking water for the puppy at all times. A thirsty puppy will not eat. Adding moisture to the food is not enough. All dogs need access to fresh drinking water throughout the day.

Miniature Poodle Colors

Miniature Poodle Colors

Miniature poodles come in a variety of colors. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes one set of colors for all varieties and sizes of poodle. There are also several other colors and color combinations that the AKC does not recognize. Don't assume you know what color a poodle is when it's born -- the coat takes a while to come to maturity. Here's a guide to 10 of the most common colors of miniature poodles, in alphabetical order.

Apricot

    Apricot poodles are a soft, reddish-orange color. They can come in a variety of shades, from near red to cream with reddish tones. Apricot poodles carry the fading gene, meaning the color becomes lighter than it was at birth. To qualify for shows, apricot poodles must have some black points or black spots.

Black

    The best black miniature poodles should have deep jet black coats, with no traces of gray or silver (gray hairs in aging poodles are natural and not necessarily a flaw). A show-quality black poodle must have black points and a black face, even when shaved.

Blue

    Blue is the darkest gray a poodle comes in. Many blue poodles are born black, then fade to blue by the time they're about 2 months old. Some puppies have brown undertones to their coats, and it takes several years sometimes for the full blue color to blossom. Blue takes the longest of all poodle colors to come to maturity. These dogs should have black points and brown eyes.

Brown

    Brown poodles can range from almost black to reddish-brown. The best browns are a rich, solid, chocolate brown. They should have liver points and and dark amber eyes. Sometimes the eyes can be lighter, especially with puppies, but these should change to amber as the dog ages.

Cafe Au Lait

    These miniature poodles really do have the color of coffee with milk -- a very light tan that is similar to cream. Cafe-au-lait poodles have liver points and dark amber eyes. It takes about two years for a cafe-au-lait miniature poodle to reach full color maturity.

Cream

    Cream miniature poodles are off-white, with a warm pinkish-brown tinge. Cream poodles can look like faded apricot poodles, but have their own category. It takes about two years for a cream poodle's color to mature.

Gray

    Gray encompasses a wide variety of shades. Don't mix up gray with silver or blue, however; these colors are closely related to gray but have separate categories.

Red

    While red is a somewhat new color for the standard poodle, it has existed in the miniature poodle for some time. These dogs can range from almost apricot to a deep auburn.

Silver

    Silver is related to gray, blue and black, and it is the lightest of the colors in this grouping. Silver miniature poodles are born black and lighten with age. For a miniature poodle to truly be considered silver, it should have a silver face and feet by the time it's 6 weeks old.

White

    White poodles are often snowy white, but they can also be tinted with apricot. White is one of the most common colors of miniature poodles. Most white poodles are born cream, but lighten to white when they grow up.

What Are the Benefits of Plain Yogurt for Canines?

What Are the Benefits of Plain Yogurt for Canines?

Plain yogurt offers a host of benefits for canines. It contains healthy bacteria, called probiotics, which play an important role in maintaining the balance of bacteria in a dog's digestive tract. If you'd like your dog to reap all the benefits from this food, it's important that the yogurt you select not have added sugars or fillers.

Promotes Good Digestion

    A dog's digestive system is populated by millions of friendly and unfriendly bacteria. Both are necessary for healthy digestion. The live cultures in yogurt, called lactobacillus acidophilus, help inhibit the growth of bad bacteria that can cause digestive upset such as loose stools and excessive gas.

Helps Reduce Yeast

    Every dog has yeast in his body, and it's generally harmless. When it multiplies out of control, it becomes problematic to a dog's health. Too much yeast in the system can lead to ear infections, skin issues and problems with digestion. Plain yogurt helps keep the yeast at manageable levels. Yeast feeds off of sugar, so it's important not to use products with added sugars or flavorings.

Supports Immune System

    A healthy immune system can fight infection, but when bacteria and fungi overpopulate the digestive tract, even the healthiest system can be compromised. When this happens, the body's ability to ward off infection and heal itself is suppressed and it becomes vulnerable to attacks by harmful organisms. A weakened immune system can make it easier for your dog to contract illnesses, and more difficult for him to recover. Adding a small amount of yogurt (1 tbsp.) to your dog's diet can help keep dangerous bacteria at bay.

Helps Ease Effects of Antibiotics

    It's not uncommon for your vet to prescribe antibiotics for a number of canine health issues. They help fight infection. In doing so, they not only kill harmful bacteria, but the good bacteria too. By adding yogurt to your dog's diet during and after a round of antibiotics, you're helping to restore the delicate equilibrium of different strains of bacteria in his system, and help him recover faster. This also helps prevent diarrhea and other digestive problems that can be caused by antibiotics.

Calms Upset Stomach

    Yogurt is easy to digest and soothing on the stomach. When your dog is sick, the environment in his stomach is out of balance. By feeding yogurt, it helps maintain the correct levels of bacteria to keep your dog healthy. It's a high-protein food and it helps with nutrient absorption, so when your dog is vomiting or has diarrhea, this food helps provide nourishment without the added ingredients that can irritate your dog's stomach.

Can You Give Sugar Water to a Puppy?

Can You Give Sugar Water to a Puppy?

Puppies, especially small or toy breeds, are susceptible to low blood sugar, a condition that can be treated with sugar water. Dangerously low sugar levels in a puppy can result in seizure and death.

Hypoglycemia

    Sugar water is a life-saving treatment for puppies whose immature systems fail to regulate glucose, a condition called hypoglycemia. Puppies less than 4 months old are most likely to require sugar water as a dietary supplement.

Sweet Supplement

    Sugar can save a puppy's life.
    Sugar can save a puppy's life.

    Sugar water for puppies can be made with white table sugar, Karo syrup, honey or Nutri-Cal. Mix the sugar product with water and feed to the puppy with an eyedropper or rub on the tongue and gums.

Symptoms

    Puppies that suffer from hypoglycemia and are in urgent need of sugar water will exhibit weakness, listlessness, trembling and disorientation. Without sugar water, hypoglycemia can advance very quickly to lifelessness, seizures and death.

Prevention/Solution

    Many breeders recommend that puppies be offered sugar water, or other sweetened water, every day until they are at least 4 months old. It is also important to feed puppies a well-balanced puppy food every four hours.

Preventative Dosage

    The suggested daily dose of sugar water for puppies is 2 tablespoons of honey (or equivalent sweetener) with 1/2 cup of water. Puppies can also be fed two tablespoons of peanut butter mixed with honey or Karo syrup, in small increments over the course of a day.

Expert Insight

    Small breeds, like Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers, are most susceptible to hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can cause death very quickly in a puppy; call a veterinarian immediately if sugar water does not immediately resuscitate the puppy.

Sabtu, 25 Mei 2013

What Are the Dangers of Deer Meat for Dogs?

What Are the Dangers of Deer Meat for Dogs?

Dogs are omnivorous and need eat a balanced diet including protein. In the U.S., deer meat is available from many sources and can provide dogs with the protein they need. The safety of the meat depends on a number of factors, including the origin of the meat and the way it is harvested.

Disease

    Deer and elk in some parts of the U.S. suffer from Chronic Wasting Disease, a fatal illness similar to mad cow disease. While there is no evidence that CWD can be passed onto humans, research has not been conducted to find out whether it is dangerous for dogs. Experts advise not to eat the flesh of an animal that appears sick, and to avoid the eyes, brain, spinal cord, spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes of all deer. The disease was first seen in south western Nebraska, Colorado and Wyoming, but since 2000 has increasingly been identified in other areas.

Chemical Poisoning

    Free-ranging deer hunted in agricultural areas may have grazed on agricultural land and ingested pesticides and other chemicals. Research conducted by the National Institute of Health has found increased levels of canine lymphoma in dogs exposed to lawn chemicals. Meat from deer that have eaten such grass may also contain the chemicals, and this could poison your dog.

Lead Exposure

    A study by the U.S. Department of Health's Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry states that fragments of lead bullets were found in venison meant for human consumption. This poses a risk of elevated lead levels in the blood of anyone or any animal who eats it, so care must be taken when harvesting the meat to avoid areas with shot damage. Dogs with lead poisoning have symptoms including convulsions or fits, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea.

Bacterial Contamination

    Deer that are killed by hunting and cleaned in the field must be handled correctly in order to avoid bacterial contamination. The organs should be removed whole, and the intestinal cavity cleaned with a solution of water and vinegar to kill any bacteria present. Feeding your dog deer meat that has not been cleaned under optimum conditions or kept at the correct temperature could result in salmonella poisoning or brucellosis, a bacterial infection found in both deer and dogs. Brucellosis is contracted by consuming the milk or flesh of an infected animal.

Buy Safe Meat

    Deer meat can be purchased from hunters in some states, and at roadside stalls and local stores. To ensure that the meat you give your dog is safe, buy it directly from ranchers who farm with deer and harvest the meat under government inspection, according to strict guidelines.