Selasa, 30 April 2013

My Boxer Doesn't Like Other Dogs

My Boxer Doesn't Like Other Dogs

It's very important for a boxer to have an owner who is dominant. Let it know that you, the owner, are the leader of the pack to help it get along with and like being around other dogs. Boxers are energetic and athletic and can be very protective of their owners. This means that a boxer that doesn't like other dogs needs to be watched closely and the situation needs to be remedied as soon as possible. Boxers are intelligent and highly trainable, so teach them from an early age to get along well with other dogs.

Exercise

    Keeping your boxer in a happy and healthy state of mind, which will help it to get along with others, starts with exercise. Boxers need a lot of active exercise, and at least one long, brisk walk every day. Not only is the walk important for its exercise, you also must consistently use the walk as an opportunity to let the dog know that you're the master. Don't let it be in the alpha position. You walk the boxer; the boxer doesn't walk you. This means that it walks beside you, not in front of you, and it can't be the one who decides when it wants to stop and sniff and which direction it wants to walk in. Repeatedly show your boxer gently, but firmly, that you're the master.

How Boxers Think

    Boxers are very protective. It's easy for them to see another dog as a threat to your safety, which will make them feel that they need to be protective. When you're around other dogs with your boxer, use a calm friendly voice and attempt body language that makes it feel that you're comfortable with the other dogs and see them as friendly.

Provide Brief Socialization Opportunities

    As the pack leader, encourage your boxer to socialize appropriately with other dogs. It's best to introduce social opportunities when it's well fed, has had some exercise, and is least likely to be feeling anxious. Correct your boxer immediately and firmly if it jumps up on another dog or acts aggressive in any way. Keep social interactions brief at first, with the boxer on a leash, heeling to you.

Be Patient

    It's easiest to teach a boxer to get along well with other dogs when it's between six months and three years old. After that, it will be stubborn about changing its behavior and may continue to act as if it doesn't like other dogs. Continue to patiently expose your boxer to social opportunities with other dogs and never lapse in showing it that you're the master. Remove the boxer immediately from any situation where it's showing aggression that you're having difficultly curbing.

How to Mix Different Brands of Dry Dog Food

How to Mix Different Brands of Dry Dog Food

Dogs can be picky eaters, especially when their brand of dog food has been changed. It is common for a veterinarian to place a dog on a certain food to prevent allergies, stomach upset or even help with arthritis. However, for whatever the reason, the dog may not adapt well to that food. If this is the case, mixing the dog's old brand of dog food with the new brand may help with a smoother transition.

Instructions

    1

    Get a large container to hold the dry dog food. Pick a container that is air locked and will seal without allowing any moisture inside. Moisture may cause the food to become stale or moldy. Food containers that are not sealed properly may also attract unwanted bugs or rodents.

    2

    Combine small amounts of the new food with the old brand of dog food. Mixing small portions (1/4 new to 3/4 old) may help prevent any gastrointestinal upset from occurring and will hopefully make the change in food easier on the dog.

    3

    Mix the combination of the dog food thoroughly. Place a cup or small bowl inside to help scoop the dry dog food into the bowl when the dog is ready to eat. Close the lid thoroughly when done mixing the two brands.

    4

    Offer the dog a bowl of food when it is time to eat. If the dog eats the food without any complication, gradually add more new dog food to the mixture. If the dog turns his nose up at the concoction, perhaps add more of the old dog food in to see if this helps.

    5

    Continue to slowly increase the new brand of dry dog food and decrease the old brand. This process may last 7 to 10 days, depending on how finicky the dog is.

How to Roast Pig Ears

How to Roast Pig Ears

Roasted pig ears are considered a delicious, salty snack by some people. Pig ears are regularly saved during the roasting of an entire pig and then cooked individually. They can also be purchased in large quantities separate from the pig itself. More commonly, roasted pig ears are given to dogs as a chew treat. Although roasted pig ears are available at many supermarkets and ethnic food stores, you can easily prepare them yourself at home. Roasting pig ears is a simple cooking task and requires basic cooking supplies that most people already own.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat an oven to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

    2

    Fill a cooking pot three-fourths full of cold tap water.

    3

    Place the pig ears into the pot of water and set the pot on top of a burner on the stove top. Turn the burner on high and allow the water to come to a boil.

    4

    Watch the pot until it barely begins to boil and then remove it from the burner. This step is done to remove any impurities from the surface of the ear prior to cooking.

    5

    Pour the pig ears into a colander, draining off the water.

    6

    Refill the pot with cold tap water until it is three-fourths full.

    7

    Place the pig ears back into the pot and then place the pot back on the stove top burner. The burner should again be set to the highest setting.

    8

    Allow the pot of water to come to a boil to blanch the ears and then drain the water out as done previously. Turn off the stove burner.

    9

    Place the pig ears into a shallow roasting pan and spread them out into a single layer.

    10

    Place the roasting plan uncovered into the preheated oven.

    11

    Allow the pig ears to cook for 3 hours and then remove the roasting pan from the oven.

    12

    Turn off the oven and allow the pig ears to cool completely before eating them or giving them to pets.

How to Rescue a Pit Bull in Indiana

How to Rescue a Pit Bull in Indiana

Pit bulls are an often-misunderstood breed. Thought of as a vicious, dog fighting breed, pit bulls can be very loving and tender. It all depends on how the owner raises the dog. Because of their bad reputation, many pit bulls in Indiana are abandoned and left for rescue organizations to find them loving homes. It takes a special person to rescue abandoned pit bull .

Instructions

    1

    Spend time becoming educated about pit bulls. Part of the reason so many pit bulls need rescuing is because their owners didnt understand the breed. Before you attempt to rescue or adopt a rescued pit bull, read as much as you can about the breed.

    2

    Evaluate your environment. Rescued dogs come in all temperaments. Its important to match the dog personality with your household environment. If you are looking to adopt a rambunctious, energetic pit bull that requires a lot of exercise, you cannot leave the dog at home alone while you work all day. That is a recipe for disaster.

    3

    Call or visit the Indiana County Humane Society. Although they are not specific to pit bull rescues only, they save thousands of dogs each year. They match the appropriate dog with families and provide $250 worth of animal care (including, but not limited to spay/neutering the pet, vaccinations, de-worming treatment) before allowing families to adopt their pets (see Resources).

    4

    Visit the Halfway House Pit Bull Rescue located in Central Indiana. Specializing in pit bulls, the Halfway House Pit Bull Rescue puts their potential adoptive families through a stringent application process. They feel that the pit bulls have been through enough tragedy and abuse prior to coming to their facility. Proper prescreening helps to prevent the dogs from enduring such hardship again.

    5

    Go to Indianas Casa Del Toro Bully Breed Education & Rescue. Specializing in pit bulls, they have an extensive program where by, they put the dogs through socialization drills; training and test for temperament to make sure the dogs are adoptable. They also spay/neuter the dogs and provide the necessary health screening to ensure the dogs are healthy for adoption.

What Small Dogs Are Compatible With Great Danes?

What Small Dogs Are Compatible With Great Danes?

If you own a Great Dane and wish to own a smaller dog with your Dane, you may be wondering what small dog breeds will get along with a bigger dog. Before you choose a smaller dog, you will need to take into consideration many factors, including breed, temperament and personality of each dog. All dogs have their own personality, and it's the attitude of the dog, not the breed, that determines who gets along with whom.

Considerations

    Before you look for the right breed of small dog, a major consideration is the personality of your Great Dane. If your Great Dane is quick to squabble with other dogs or doesn't get along with other dogs, you should not consider any breed of dog as the Dane can hurt or ever kill a smaller dog. Your Dane needs to be of good temperament and well socialized. The Great Dane needs to be calm and mature as an exuberant puppy may accidentally injure a smaller dog in play.

Breed Characteristics

    Choose a smaller dog breed that is not aggressive and not known for being scrappy. Terriers are a poor choice as friends for Danes because they can take a Great Dane on without regard to their own danger. Avoid dogs that are snappy or will not get along. Active breeds such as hounds (beagles, foxhounds) may work as well as calmer small dogs such as bichon frise, poodles, or American Eskimo dogs.

Size

    Size, is of course, relative, when talking about Great Danes. Most dogs are vastly smaller than a Great Dane, even though they may be considered medium-sized or even large-sized dogs. Choose a dog that would not be injured by play. For this reason, very tiny dogs such as Chihuahuas or light-boned dogs such as Italian greyhounds may not be suitable for Great Danes as buddies.

Breed or Individual?

    When considering a dog to get as a friend to a Great Dane, take into account the dog's personality. The dog's breed is a nice starting point, but dogs are individuals and do not necessarily fit the standards or the expectations of the breed. Mixed breeds can often do well with Great Danes. Choose the opposite sex of the Great Dane and be sure to spay or neuter them both.

Fun Facts About the Greyhound

Fun Facts About the Greyhound

A wide variety of fun facts about greyhounds are likely to amuse and educate fellow dog enthusiasts. This fascinating breed has been referenced in ancient cultures, owned by famous historical figures and is the second-fastest land animal on Earth. One fun fact is that greyhounds rely on their sight to hunt, rather than their sense of smell.

History

    Greyhounds are one of the oldest purebreds still in existence. They're mentioned in ancient Egyptian history and the only breed of dog named in the Bible. Their speed and ability to see nearly half a mile made them desirable in Egypt for hunting rabbits feeding on crops. Contrary to their name, grey is not a common color for the breed.

Dog Racing

    Greyhounds are faster than any other dog breed, which makes them a prime choice for racing. When a new greyhound is born, the right ear is tattooed with the birth date and the left ear with the litter number -- markings that allow owners to track a dog's racing record. Many retired greyhounds find a new career as household pets.

Speed

    The greyhound, which can reach 45 mph within a few steps, is second only to the cheetah as the fastest land animal on Earth. One reason greyhounds run so fast is their slender body makeup -- an average of six percent body fat, long legs and a thin torso. The way greyhounds use their legs is unique: when they're in a full stride, all four legs are off the ground, which means less friction with the terrain they cover.

Man's Best Friend

    The familiar saying of "a dog is man's best friend" has historical evidence to support the claim. Alexander the Great's favorite dog is believed to have been the greyhound. Around 500 B.C., greyhounds were depicted on the face of coins. Greyhounds also have been part of more modern history -- in 1493 they became the first European dogs in the New World. General George Custer is said to have 14 greyhounds.

History of Pomeranians

History of Pomeranians

The Pomeranian is a companion dog and the perfect breed for a family pet. It is a small dog that weighs between 3 and 7 pounds and is classified in the toy group. It does not require much exercise but does need careful grooming due to a thick double coat, which is typically orange or red in color. Outgoing, alert, intelligent and eager to please, this breed is just as at home in the show ring as in a domestic environment.

Origin

    The Pomeranian originated from the Spitz family of dogs, which in turn has been traced as far back as the Stone Age to a type of Peat dog known as the Torfhund. The German Spitz is thought to be the oldest breed in Europe, with archaeological evidence suggesting that Spitz-type dogs have been around for at least 4,500 to 7,500 years. It is likely that this breed is present in the ancestry of many modern breeds.

Names

    The name Pomeranian was first used as a general term and encompassed breeds now categorized individually: the five sizes of German Spitz and also the Italian Volpino. In Germany, the Spitz was known as "Der Pommer," and in its anglicized form this became "Pomeranian." In France it was known as Lou Lou; in Holland either Keeshond or Wolfshond. The name Pomeranian caught on in Georgian England, however, and this is the name that has stuck with the breed ever since.

Queen Victoria

    In 1888, a toy Pomeranian was sent to Queen Victoria from Florence, Italy. Although the Pomeranian was already kept in England at this time, something of a trend for the smaller type started when it became known that the Queen owned one. Queen Victoria was popular among her subjects, and consequently the popularity of this breed soared. From the year 1891 to 1893 inclusive, the Queen was involved in showing Pomeranians, and their popularity with the Royal family continued when the future King Edward VII bought one for his young daughter.

Development

    In 1870 the Spitz dog, as it was then known, was recognized by the Kennel Club in England. Some of these dogs could weigh up to 30 pounds and were a popular choice for herding sheep. When the smaller size became much more popular and desirable in late Victorian England, it was further developed by the addition of the Seidenspitz, a breed thought to have come about by crossing the smallest Spitz dogs with Maltese dogs. Initially it was difficult to control the size of the dogs that were bred, but over time this was standardized to consistently produce the toy dog of today.

Senin, 29 April 2013

How to Identify a White German Shepherd Vs. a Siberian Husky Dog

How to Identify a White German Shepherd Vs. a Siberian Husky Dog

The white German shepherd and the Siberian husky dog breeds can be mistaken for each other upon first glance. Both dogs have fur coats built for cold weather, long bushy tails, are more than 20 inches tall and are high-energy and intelligent. A second, longer look will reveal physical differences.

Instructions

    1

    The white German shepherd's coat will be completely white. The Siberian husky's coat is usually two-toned. Common combinations include white and black, white and red, and white and gray. Single-toned Siberian huskies are usually gray or brown.

    2

    White German shepherds are classified as large-sized; Siberian huskies are classified as medium-sized. Both male and female white German shepherds weigh between 77 and 85 pounds. Male Siberian huskies weigh up to 60 pounds, while females can reach 50 pounds.

    3

    White German shepherds have long, single-coated fur, while Siberian huskies have medium-length, double-coated fur. The thickness of the husky's coat should be striking, because the breed can handle temperatures of minus-58 degrees. The white German shepherd's coat is not nearly as thick.

How to treat a Siberian Husky

How to treat a Siberian Husky

Siberian huskies are a very friendly, especially with children. These dogs are considered to be sled dogs, so exercise is needed often. Huskies do not make great watch dogs because these dogs hardly ever bark and love strangers. If you show your Husky who is in charge and treat it like one of the family, you will have a great companion.

Instructions

    1

    Groom your Husky daily using a metal comb and shedding blade. Gently run the comb through the dog's hair but avoid pulling the hair if you find a knot. Instead, hold the knot with one hand close to the dog's skin and run the metal comb through to untangle it. Talk to your dog to make it feel at ease while it is being groomed.

    2

    Show your Husky that you are the leader of the family. Eat your dinner before you give dinner to your Husky. Walk through a doorway before your dog. Make the dog move out of the way instead of walking around it.

    3

    Praise your dog for doing something good. Say things like "good boy" or "good job" when your are training the dog. Ignore bad behavior and use patience. Avoid negative reinforcement such as yelling or slapping, because it will cause the dog to lose trust in you.

    4

    Walk your Husky using a leash for 30 to 60 minutes per day. Walk your dog in the evening if it is an overly hot day because it can get heat stroke easily due to its thick coat. Raise your dog in an area that has lots of space to run. Huskies are a very energetic breed and need space to move.

    5

    Purchase toys for your Husky to play with to stimulate its mind. Play with your dog to form a bond. Avoid leaving or ignoring your dog for hours at a time. If a Husky gets bored, it will become destructive and could chew on your things to entertain itself.

    6

    Feed your Husky (after you have already eaten) three times a day. Follow the instructions on the side of the bag of dry dog food with regard to how much you should feed your dog. The best type of food for your dog is kibble with at least 30 percent crude protein. Check the side of the kibble bag for the nutritional information. Make sure that the first ingredient listed is some kind of meat. This will help your husky build muscle and stay healthy. Feed your dog a biologically appropriate raw food diet (BARF) if it has allergies, teeth problems or skin and coat problems. Keep your Husky's water bowl full at all times to keep the dog from getting hydrated.

Easy Homemade Diets for Elderly Dogs

Easy Homemade Diets for Elderly Dogs

A dog is considered elderly, or senior, when she has reached the last third of her life expectancy; this varies from breed to breed. Not all dogs are considered elderly, however, based on health, energy level and general well-being. Homemade diets are an easy way to give your dog the nutrition she needs as she gets older. Consult with a veterinarian to design a diet specific to the dog's nutritional and health needs.

Protein

    It is a popular misconception that diet needs are vastly different for the older dog; it depends on the dog's needs. Elderly dogs still require high quality protein, according to the Doctors Foster and Smith website. Depending on Rover's energy level and health, protein should consist of 20 percent to 35 percent of his daily diet. Some veterinarians advocate for raw meat versus cooked, but there is no scientific evidence to prove one method is better than the other. Choose the method that is easiest, but not all meat is to be fed raw. Good protein sources include chicken, turkey, ground hamburger, turkey and chicken, lamb, salmon, tuna fish, venison, duck, rabbit, beef, liver, tripe, halibut, eggs, yogurt and cottage cheese.

Fat

    The risk of too much fat in a dog's diet lies mainly with her weight. Dogs do not succumb to heart disease due to high fat diets, but too much fat sometimes leads to pancreatitis, according to Dr. Ron Hines of All Creature Care. If an older dog is less active, do not add fat to her homemade diet. Feeding natural meats give the dog an adequate amount of fat, about 10 percent to 15 percent of the dog's daily needs. If lean meats are used, add 1 tbsp. of olive oil per 30 lbs. of the dog's weight. This healthy fat is good for her coat and skin.

Carbohydrates

    Unfortunately most commercial dog foods have high levels of carbohydrates, which convert to fat in a dog. Carbohydrates are frequently found in dog foods to increase satiety, but high protein diets accomplish the same thing and are more nutritious, according to the Dog Aware website. An older dog does not require more or fewer carbohydrates than he did when he was younger. If he is less active, he requires fewer calories, not necessarily fewer carbohydrates, fat or protein. Good sources of carbohydrates, which ideally contribute about 25 percent to the dog's daily needs, include brown rice, whole wheat pasta or bread, and cooked potatoes.

Vitamins and Minerals

    An older dog also benefits from vegetables and fruit. Protein and carbohydrate sources provide vitamins and minerals, but adding fruits such as apples, bananas and pears -- and vegetables such as spinach, green beans, alfalfa sprouts and broccoli -- lend more nutrition to the elderly dog's diet. So long as her diet contains meat, vegetables, fruit, fat and carbohydrates, supplemental vitamins do not need to be added. Calcium does need to be added to her diet. It is found in adequate amounts in egg shells and powdered bone meal.

Fiber

    The amount of fiber a dog needs is not known. A good gauge of fiber intake is the quality of his stool. If he suffers from either constipation or diarrhea, adjust his fiber intake accordingly. Older dogs tend toward constipation, but many natural foods contain high levels of fiber. Good sources of fiber include pure pumpkin, oatmeal, carrots, wheat bran and beets.

Dangerous Foods

    Never feed a dog grapes, raisins, chocolate, onions, large amounts of garlic or salt, no matter what the dog's age. Also avoid alcohol, coffee, moldy or spoiled foods, avocado, yeast dough and macadamia nuts. The seeds and pits of fruits such as apples and peaches are toxic and deadly to dogs.

The Temperament of a Redbone Coonhound

The Temperament of a Redbone Coonhound

The redbone coonhound is an active and energetic breed, with a penchant for hunting.

This breed is intelligent and trainable, for the most part, but the breed's temperament causes some dogs to ignore their trainer's commands in favor of following their noses. Redbone coonhounds also have been known to dig their way out of a fenced yard, so they can follow a scent.

The Indoor Behavior of the Redbone Coonhound

    Redbone coonhounds are tactile with their owners, while indoors. The breed also is fairly inactive and calm -- a huge contrast to its outside behavior. Experts say this active hunting breed can thrive in an apartment home, but only if owners exercise their pet, often. If the dog does not get enough exercise, it can turn to chewing, loud barking and even baying, to release built-up energy and relieve boredom.

The Outdoor Behavior of the Redbone Coonhound

    The great outdoors is this breed's domain. Hunting is deeply ingrained in the redbone coonhound's temperament, making it a good companion for hunters and people who enjoy the outdoors.

    Rebone coonhounds are energetic, as this breed enjoys chasing and will quickly run after anything that catches its eye. As a result of their curiosity, and the instinct to follow their noses, redbone coonhounds often get lost after ignoring their owners commands.

The Redbone Coonhound and the Human Family

    Expectations of a redbone coonhound as a family pet should not be too high, as the breed's first instinct is to hunt and track prey. The breed can, however, be a good family pet, because it is not an active dog, when indoors and it interacts well with family members.

The Redbone Coonhound and Trainability

    This breed is trainable, as they are eager to do their trainer's bidding, and they are fairly intelligent.

    Because of the redbone coonhound's eagerness to hunt and chase, sudden movements and other distractions can make training difficult.

How to Feed Cockapoos

How to Feed Cockapoos

When a cocker spaniel and a poodle are bred together, the offspring are referred to as cockapoos. Cockapoo dogs are on the small side, usually weighing between 12 and 24 pounds. These dogs are energetic and very affectionate which makes them great pets. Once you bring your cockapoo home, you will want to know how to properly feed it and keep your cockapoo in prime health.

Instructions

    1

    Create a feeding schedule that will give the dog two meals a day. It is best if these feedings are 12 hours apart. If you wake up at 6 a.m., feed your pet at 6:30 a.m. and again at 6:30 p.m.

    2

    Look at the back of your premium dog food package and find the chart that tells you how much the cockapoo should be fed per serving. The appropriate amount is determined by the cockapoo's weight. Place this amount in your dog's food dish.

    3

    Place the food dish and a dish filled with water out at your predetermined morning feeding time.

    4

    Pick the food dish up after 20 minutes and put it away. The water dish can be left out, but the food dish needs to be taken away because this is the best way to monitor how much food your dog is eating. Your dog will also have time to work up an appetite. When the dog sees the bowl coming, he will recognize that it is now time to eat. Repeat this process for the dog's evening meal.

    5

    Give your cockapoo one treat sometime during the day. It's best to do it at the same day each day so the dog comes to expect it. This step is optional, but one the dog will enjoy in between meals.

How to Tell if Your Dog Is a Pure Lab

How to Tell if Your Dog Is a Pure Lab

According to the American Kennel Club 2009 registration statistics, the Labrador retriever is the most popular breed of dog in the United States. It has held the spot as most popular dog breed in the US for 19 years in a row. Labrador retrievers, also referred to as "labs," have been a recognized breed by the AKC since 1917. A purebred Labrador retriever will conform to specific anatomical and physical characteristics.

Instructions

    1

    Request a DNA test of your dog to determine his exact breed. You can purchase a canine DNA test online to perform yourself or contact the office of your veterinarian to see if they can perform the test for you. While this is likely the most expensive option, it will also provide you with the most reliable answer to the question of your dog's breed.

    2

    Contact the breeder or pet store where you obtained your dog and ask for a pedigree chart detailing your dog's heritage. If available, this chart will provide information about several generations of labs bred together that ultimately resulted in your pet.

    3

    Consult your veterinarian and ask for his opinion on the breed of your dog. Your veterinarian will likely be well-educated on the breed standards for the Labrador retriever and will examine your pet to determine if it conforms to those standards.

    4

    Compare the anatomical and physical characteristics of your dog to those of a purebred Labrador retriever to see if it has the same traits. According to the breed standards listed by the American Kennel Club, a purebred lab will be one of only three colors: black, yellow or chocolate. Its coat is dense, straight and short with weather resistant properties. Female labs over 12 months of age range in height from 21 to 24 inches at the withers and are between 55 and 70 pounds when in good physical condition . Males of good physical condition and over 12 months of age will range in height from 22 to 25 inches at the withers and are between 65 to 80 pounds. A purebred Labrador retriever will have a wide skull, an otter-like medium-length tail and ample pigmentation on the nose and rims of the eyes. Other breed standards for labs are available online through the American Kennel Club website.

Minggu, 28 April 2013

What Is the Development of a Golden Retriever Puppy?

What Is the Development of a Golden Retriever Puppy?

Information on Dachshund Puppies

A big dog in a small package sums up the tenacious dachshund. He is a hunter, a watchdog, a comedian filled with new antics every day, and a pal to hang out with, all wrapped in the loyalty and love he has for his family.

Information on Dachshund Puppies

    The dachshund was bred in 1600 Europe for hunting badgers; hence, the breed acquired its name from the German translation of badger, Dachsen. Becoming popular on American soil in the early 1900s, the dachshund has maintained a top-ten favorite on the AKC list of family dogs for many years.

Varieties

    The dachshund comes in two sizes, miniature and standard; and in three coat types: smooth, wire-haired and long-haired.

Personality

    An active and intelligent breed, the dachshund is in need of mental stimulation and play. While he is a friendly pup, you should nevertheless supervise small children during interaction. Whatever breed interests, you, do research to be sure it will fit your lifestyle. Sources of dachshund information are available at the AKC website and Dog Fancy's on-line magazine.

Grooming

    Dachshunds with smooth coats have the least-intensive grooming requirements, needing nail trimmings and ear canal cleanings at least every four to six weeks, a degreasing bath (citrus shampoos work well) and a brushing of its coat as needed. As well as the aforementioned tasks, wire-haired and long-haired dachshunds need professional grooming every six weeks to have its pads trimmed; for ease of walking, a sanitary clip and a thorough brushing to rid him of "dead" coat.

Training a Puppy

    Start to train your dachshund puppy as soon as she arrives home. Crate training is the ideal setting for housebreaking as well as providing it with a safe zone. Basic commands, such as sit, stay are important. Being a hunter, a dachshund tends to be attracted to movement around her environment and will scout out the source. To avoid the risks of wandering, keep her on a leash when outside.

Health and Longevity

    Because of its elongated spine, a dachshund can easily be at risk for back problems. Don't overfeed her, and offer plenty of exercise to lessen the risk of injury. Discourage jumping on and off high furniture.

    With proper care and nutrition, a dachshund could live to 15 years.

How to Buy a German Shepherd Puppy

German shepherds make good pets. They are athletic, energetic and bond well with their owners. They are highly trainable as search and rescue dogs and are used in police services. When choosing a German shepherd puppy there are some health considerations and breed standards to consider. Read on to learn how to buy a German shepherd puppy.

Instructions

    1

    Set up an initial meeting to view your perspective puppy before you buy. Watch his reaction to your voice and your touch. Notice if he is affectionate and eager to make friends. German shepherds have a tendency toward aggression later in life. If untrained, it's important to choose a puppy with a good temperament to start.

    2

    Inquire about the puppy's socialization training. Since early socializing is very important to this breed, the methods employed by the former owners are crucial. Puppies must be held early and often and interact with other dogs and humans every day.

    3

    Request to see both parents of the puppy. Pay attention to the way they interact with you, a stranger. Look for signs of unwarranted aggression. The temperament of the parents passes on to the litter. Also watch to see if they move easily, unencumbered.

    4

    Ask to see the puppy's parents' Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) certification. The OFA maintains medical records on registered canines. They issue a rating based on x-rays of the dog's bone structure. German shepherds, being large working class dogs are prone to hip dysplasia. This genetic predisposition passes on to subsequent litters and dogs that present with dysplasia should not be bred.

    5

    Look your prospective puppy over carefully before you buy him. Make sure his eyes are clear and alert, his gums pink and healthy looking and his ears free from matter. He should be playful but not overly energetic.

    6

    Determine the puppy's lineage. American Kennel Club puppies will have family charts that show who their parents and ancestors were for several generations. A qualified breeder will have a copy of this family tree for you to view.

The Best Dogs to Own on a Farm With Chickens & Sheep

The Best Dogs to Own on a Farm With Chickens & Sheep

For thousands of years, farmers have used dogs to protect and manage their livestock, including chickens and sheep. However, choosing the right dog depends on what you want: a herding dog or a guard dog. If your farm is isolated from natural predators, a herding dog may suffice. However, if your farm is vulnerable to predators, a livestock guarding dog is a better option.

Assess Your Farm's Needs

    According to a 2001 study by Robin Rigg, the environment of your farm determines the best dog for your herds. If you own large herds of sheep and have difficulty controlling the herd on your own, your best bet is a herding dog. If your farm is threatened by predators, a livestock guarding dog may be necessary to secure the safety of your sheep or chickens.

Herding Dogs

    Herding dogs can be organized into two general categories: "strong-eyed" herders, and "loose-eyed" herders. Strong-eyed dogs usually observe the herd from low on the ground and stare hard at the sheep they are herding. They tend to single out individual animals to return to the herd. Strong-eyed dogs include border collies and most kelpies. Loose-eyed dogs tend to walk tall and manage the herd as a group. Loose-eyed dogs include English Shepherds, Australian Shepherds, and Rough Collies. Buy your dog from a reputable breeder, and consult him extensively as you make your choice of individuals. If you are training your first herding dog, work with an experienced herding dog trainer.

Livestock-Guarding Dogs

    Livestock-guarding dogs should behave as if they are members of the flock. Therefore, purchase an LGD when it is still a puppy and raise it with your sheep so that it will bond with them. Then, when sheep are threatened by predators, LGD's will defend them and alert you, providing "peace of mind." Common breeds include the Great Pyrenees and many types of mastiffs. Just as with herding dogs, you should buy from a reputable breeder and work with a reputable trainer to ensure your LGD puppy grows into a well-trained adult guarding dog.

Unsuitable Dog Breeds

    You should not purchase a dog that is unresponsive to training or physically unsuited to the long hours that herding or guarding dogs work. For example, pit bulls are too small and stocky physically to effectively monitor a herd. In addition, they are known to display aggression towards other animals, putting your stock (especially your chickens) in danger. Other dog breeds that display aggressive tendencies towards other animals and therefore are not appropriate include the Rottweiler. Bulldogs are generally too "friendly" and slow to be effective for herding or guarding. Finally, commonsense dictates that small "house" dogs, such as chihuahuas and toy poodles, do not have the strength, size, or speed necessary to assist in your ranching.

Bloodline DNA Testing for Dogs

Bloodline DNA Testing for Dogs

DNA testing is now available that claims to tell us about our pets' ancestry. Canine DNA testing is an intriguing concept for many pet lovers who have speculated endlessly about their pet's questionable ancestry and tried to attribute their behavior to breed traits. For vets, the appeal of such testing is learning which mixed-breed dog is genetically predisposed to hip dysplasia, such as German shepherds, and which breed to watch for eye problems (a common complaint in collies).

Function

    Several different packages are available, but all of them work on similar principles. The dog owner or veterinarian takes a sample of DNA-laden tissue (cheek swab or blood sample) and sends it to the company from whom the test was purchased. The company isolates the DNA from the sample, analyzes the dog's DNA sequence, compares it with DNA sequences from a large database of various purebred canines, and uses computerized algorithms to determine the predominant breed or breeds based on specific similarities in the DNA sequences.

Various Testing Kits

    Several over-the-counter kits are available from online and pet retailers. BioPet, Canine Heritage and Wisdom Panel Insights test are the three most widely available kits. All of these kits retail for between $60 and $90, as of 2010.

    Wisdom Panel also offers a blood DNA test that is only available through veterinarians called Wisdom Panel Professional. The veterinarian draws a small blood sample during a routine office visit; that sample is used in place of the cheek swab used in the over-the-counter kits. The cost of this test to the dog owner will vary depending on the veterinary office that draws the blood.

Testing Differences

    BioPet's DNA analysis draws from a database of canines from 62 breeds, while Canine Heritage's database contains 100 breeds. The Wisdom Panel Insight draws from a database of 170 plus breeds, while the Wisdom Panel Professional claims to test for similarity to 200 breeds. BioPet is the only one of these three companies that offers confirmation of pure breeding (for 38 breeds); the other two are strictly for identification of mixed-breed dogs. The Wisdom Panel Professional uses a blood sample, whereas the others use a cheek swab; both contain the same DNA.

Results

    All of the packages offer a certificate of testing that provides, in one format or another, the dog breed(s) that the test has detected and a non-quantitative estimate of how much of each breed might be present in the dog. Most packages also include fact sheets on the characteristics of purebred dogs of the breeds detected. Because of the limitations of DNA testing and the nature of the DNA databases, the more mixed a dog is, the more difficult it is to detect the ancestral breeds. If a dog does not have any purebred parents or grandparents, for instance, it is possible that the report will return with no breed detected.

Test Accuracy

    A purebred or nearly purebred dog is more likely to yield a
    A purebred or nearly purebred dog is more likely to yield a "hit" with the DNA database.

    Since the true lineage of most mixed-breed dogs is undocumented, it is difficult to assess the accuracy of these tests. The Wisdom Panel website claims 90 percent accuracy in determining the parentage of a dog with two purebred parents of different breeds. Before investing in a doggie DNA test, it may be advisable to read reviews of different tests to see whether customers of more strongly mixed dogs have been satisfied with the results they have received.

Difference Between Miniature and Toy Dogs

Difference Between Miniature and Toy Dogs

With so many dog breeds around, it can be confusing to try to figure out which is what when it comes to telling some of the similar breeds apart. One example of this complexity is the distinction between miniature and toy dogs. The two types are definitely distinct, but the details and the differences between one and the other vary by the specific breed of dog. In order to determine which category a dog falls into, it is usually necessary to look at the individual breed standards.

Toy Group

    The American Kennel Club divides dogs into groups based on various temperamental characteristics, such as sporting, working and herding dogs. The club also recognizes a Toy Group, a group that in 2012 consisted of 21 different breeds. Some of these breeds may have larger varieties of the animal, such as the poodle, while others stand alone, such as the Chihuahua and the Maltese. The breeds that make up this group are the smallest dogs in the AKC, with some exceptions; and they generally do not have a limit on how small they can be -- only a restriction on maximum size.

Miniature Dogs

    Miniature dogs are generally larger than toy breeds but are smaller than standard-size dogs of the same breed. Each breed sets its own standards for how big a miniature should be. For example, a miniature Australian shepherd is between 14 inches and 18 inches tall while a miniature poodle is between 10 inches and 15 inches in height. Toy dogs are smaller than miniatures, and standard dogs are larger. In the Australian shepherd and poodle breeds, as with many others, the only distinction between the standard, miniature and toy varieties is the size.

Teacups

    A teacup dog of any breed is the smallest possible version of that dog. The American Kennel Club does not have a teacup category, but in most of the toy breeds a very small dog, usually one under 4 lbs., is called a teacup, though thats an informal designation. As an example, according to the AKC, the poodle exists in standard, miniature and toy sizes, but the description for toy poodles calls for any dog under 10 inches in height. That means that even the very tiny teacups qualify as toy poodles for show, registration and breeding purposes.

Other Considerations

    While many breeds base acceptable size on the height of a dog at the withers, this is not true of all breeds. Some types, such as the Chihuahua, specify a body type but do not place a limit on how tall the dog can be. Instead, breed standards for some dogs call for a weight limit, and dogs over that limit are disqualified from the show ring. In the case of the Chihuahua, for example, if a dogs weight is over 6 lbs. it cannot be shown.

Male Vs. Female Pit Bull

Male Vs. Female Pit Bull

American pit bull terriers, or simply pit bulls, are good family dogs known for loyalty and intelligence. When considering a pit bull for your home, take into account the differences between males and females of the breed. Each sex has its perks and downsides.

Size

    Male pit bulls tend to be somewhat larger on average than female pit bulls, though female pits may have a longer body. Males are usually between 35 and 60 pounds, whereas females are between 30 and 50 pounds.

Skeletal Structure

    While both sexes exhibit the classic broad pit bull skill, the heads of pit bull males are usually a bit wider than females.

Marking and Heat

    Males of this breed, if not neutered, may mark their territory throughout your home. Non-spayed females don't mark territory, but they do experience a heat cycle twice a year.

Dog Aggression

    Though pit bulls can have increased aggression toward other dogs, female pit bulls are less likely to fight with other dogs than their male counterparts. This is especially true if the dogs aren't neutered.

Human Aggression

    Pit bulls are, on average, not aggressive toward people. However, those that have bitten humans have tended to be non-neutered males.

How to Buy a Chow Puppy

The Chow is a proud and ancient breed of dog from China. A vibrant and protective dog, the Chow makes a great companion or a wonderful family pet. If you have decided that the Chow is the right breed of dog for you, here are some tips to remember when buying a Chow puppy.

Instructions

    1

    Research the breed. While they are loyal companions, they can also be overly protective of their personal space and belongings; that may not make the Chow the best choice for a household where there are other dogs. Understand the Chow's behaviors when deciding if this is the right breed for you.

    2

    Examine the puppy's tongue and mouth. One of the Chow's most distinguishing features as a breed is their unusual coloring in the mouth. The Chow's tongue should be a dark purple, almost black, as should the inside of its mouth. Any other coloring could be a sign of inbreeding or that the puppy is not a full-blooded Chow.

    3

    Look at the coat. Chows come in a variety of shades, and the puppy's coat may actually darken as it matures. But even when young the Chow's coat should be a uniform color and texture. Chows may have coats that are slightly darker around their ears and eyes, but the coat should not be spotted. This coloration could be another indication of the puppy not being a fully-bred Chow puppy.

    4

    Watch the puppy's tail. Another distinctive feature of the Chow breed is its full, bushy tail that curls tight when the Chow is excited or happy. When you are looking at Chow puppies look for one whose tail is full and well-proportioned with its body and that curls upward when the puppy is active or playing.

    5

    Get to know the puppy's personality. Chows may appear stand-offish or shy at first. This is a trait of the breed and should not necessarily be a cause for concern. It is still important to get to know the puppy and see if it gets used to you and becomes accustomed to you. If it does not, you may wish to look at another puppy or consider another breed altogether.

What Type of Dog Has a Laid Back Personality?

What Type of Dog Has a Laid Back Personality?

There are over 140 AKC recognized breeds of dog. There are many more that are not yet recognized and even more mixed breed dogs. Each breed of dog has its own distinct look and personality. Some dogs are couch potatoes while others would prefer to play for eight hours each day. Some live for games while some would prefer to be given serious work to do. What breed of dog you get depends heavily on what type of characteristics you find appealing. For those interested in a more laid back personality, there are a variety of breeds to choose from.

Golden Retriever

    The golden retriever is a medium sized dog in the gun dog category. It stands 21 to 24 inches in height, weighs between 55 and 75 lbs and has a medium length golden colored coat. Originally used in both England and Scotland as a hunting dog, the golden retriever is now most commonly used as a family companion dog. The golden retriever is active outside, but laid back indoors. It is typically quiet and is happy to curl up with the family. It is long suffering with children and will allow itself to be pet, poked and prodded, which makes it a great family pet.

Collie

    The collie is a medium sized herding dog originating in Scotland. It reaches up to 26 inches in height and 70 pounds in weight. The collie comes in two varieties. The rough collie has a long coat while the smooth collie has a short sleek coat. Both come in a variety colors including sable and white, blue merle, tri color and white. White collies are predominately white, but usally have sable, blue merle or tri colored markings on the head or face. Collies are calm, good-natured dogs.They are easy to train, housebreak and are a very people-friendly breed of dog. Collies do not mind lying around as long as they can do it with their owners and they have no problem being kept in an apartment as long as they get daily exercise.

Standard Poodle

    The standard poodle is a highly intelligent breed of dog. Any poodle over 15 inches in height is considered to be a standard poodle. The poodle comes in a variety of colors, which are black, white, apricot, brown, red, silver, blue, cream, cafe-au-lait and gray, according to the American Kennel Club. Standard poodles are very social dogs and easily get along with other dogs, household pets and children. They bond to all of their family members and are eager to please them. They enjoy lying on the couch with their family members and playing games, such as fetch and catch.

Shih Tzu

    The shih tzu is a small dog bred exclusively as a family pet and house dog. The American Kennel Club requires that shih tzus be affectionate, outgoing and friendly and most all shih tzus are true to that nature. The shih tzu grows up to 11 inches in height, weighs anywhere from 8 to 10 lbs and has long, silky hair. Shih tzus are resilient and forgiving and quickly overcome negative experiences. They enjoy short daily exercise and play, but will otherwise lounge around on sofas and laps.

How to Make Vet Recommended Dog Food

How to Make Vet Recommended Dog Food

Options for feeding dogs exist beyond the food that companies manufacture. It is possible for owners to make nutritionally-sound food that dogs will enjoy.



"If you know how to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet, you can apply that same principle to feeding your dog," said Paula Terifaj, a veterinarian from Founder's Veterinary Clinic in California. "Only the ratio of meat to carbohydrates and size proportions will change."

Instructions

Basics

    1
    Cook homemade food for your dog.
    Cook homemade food for your dog.

    Include a protein, carbohydrate and vegetable source. Cook and combine ingredients. Add bone meal powder or calcium citrate, and a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement.

    2

    Change the protein source to create variety. Choose fish, turkey, beef or lamb. You may also substitute with nonmeat protein such as three cooked eggs or 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese.

    3

    Vary carbohydrates with 1-2 cups potatoes, yams, sweet potatoes or pasta. Alter vegetables with green beans, squash, broccoli or cauliflower. You should use fresh or frozen varieties instead of canned to control salt intake.

    4

    Cut the recipe in half for your 10-pound dog, and double it for a 40-pound dog. If your dog is overweight, cut back slightly on the portions. Add food if your dog is underweight.

Sabtu, 27 April 2013

What Is the Difference Between the Alsatian & German Shepherd Dogs?

What Is the Difference Between the Alsatian & German Shepherd Dogs?

Fewer dog breeds appear as similar as the Alsatian (officially knows as the Alsatian shepalute or American Alsatian) and the German shepherd, and fewer breeds are so radically different. Matching only in appearance, these two breeds derive from different places and are bred for different purposes. While the Alsatian bloodline does have German shepherd in it, it has since diverged, and the Alsatian has been identified as a separate breed.

History

    This dog has the thick-body bone structure of the Alsatian.
    This dog has the thick-body bone structure of the Alsatian.

    There is no comparable history between the Alsatian and the German shepherd. The German shepherd was bred in Germany beginning around 1899 as a high-drive working dog with high intelligence and protective instincts. The Alsatian was bred by California breeder Lois Schwartz in 1987 as a large-breed companion dog with little to no working drive. In order to achieve these traits, the line started with a German shepherd/Alaskan malamute cross. That achieved the size and appearance of the dog Schwartz wanted, but both of those breeds are able working dogs. Her goal was to eliminate the working drive. In order to mellow the breed out, she added English mastiff lines, along with Anatolian shepherd. The breed stabilized and became recognized in 2000.

Function

    Always alert, the German shepherd is bred for work.
    Always alert, the German shepherd is bred for work.

    The German shepherd is a working dog. Suited for anything it can be trained for, it excels at obedience trials, protection work, search and rescue, agility, tracking, freestyle and herding. The Alsatian is a companion dog. Unsuitable for work, the dog makes a wonderful family pet. It possesses a very calm, stable temperament and is quite friendly.

Similarties

    The German shepherd and Alsatian are extremely similar in appearance and color. Both breeds are easily trained and make wonderful family pets.

Differences

    The size difference between the German shepherd and Alsatian is staggering. The Alsatian is a much larger dog, often outweighing the German shepherd by 20 to 40 pounds. Alsatians tend to live two to four years longer than German shepherds. The German shepherd breeding lines are riddled with health issues, while the Alsatian has been carefully bred to be a solid, healthy dog. Health problems haven't been seen in the Alsatian line since 2003.

Trainability

    This Alsatian carries his toy.
    This Alsatian carries his toy.

    Both breeds are easily trainable, although the German shepherd catches on far quicker. The Alsatian is a "thinker," a breed that must process and figure something out before acting on it. German shepherds immediately embody the lesson at hand and possess a need to constantly be learning.

The Best Dog Breed Matches

The Best Dog Breed Matches

Are you thinking of adding one of man's best friends to your family? Selecting the breed of dog that best meshes with your personality and lifestyle is an important first step toward many years of happy dog ownership. With the many breeds of dog out there, you're sure to find one that suits you nicely. Do some preparatory research ahead of time and you're well on your way to determining the best dog breed matches for you and your family.

Consider Your Lifestyle

    You run three miles every day and spend your weekends hiking and exploring all the nearby parks. Or maybe you're more of the couch potato type, preferring to relax around the house in your spare time. Whatever your lifestyle, rest assured that there is probably a breed of dog to match it. Thoroughly investigate the personality, exercise requirements and training needs of any breed you're considering--because what may seem like the perfect breed of dog could be a disaster waiting to happen.

Evaluate Your Finances

    A demanding career keeps you out of your home 11 hours a day, five days a week. But on the weekend, you really want your dog to be able to go running with you. Is it a lost cause? Not necessarily, as long as you can afford a dog walker or dog daycare on those weekdays. Some breeds are also more likely to require expensive veterinary care, so you should consider your financial situation before selecting the best dog breed for you.

Ponder Physical Characteristics

    A frail elderly person would be ill-advised to bring home a huge mastiff. Similarly, if you have small (and thus unpredictable) children in your home, a fragile toy breed dog wouldn't be a good choice. Consider how much time you have to spend bathing and grooming your pet and whether you have time to devote to additional care like cleaning facial wrinkles, caring for long ears or bringing your pet to a professional groomer.

Consult Resources

    There are a number of websites devoted to helping prospective dog owners match their lifestyles to the correct breed of dog. Try DogTime's Dogfinder Matchup for a quiz to help you narrow the field or check out MSNBC's interactive dog breed finder. The American Kennel Club's website offers in-depth descriptions of AKC-recognized breeds and is a useful jumping-off point because it can also connect you with individual dog breed clubs.

    Visit your local library or bookstore to find a wealth of dog breed books that can help you to narrow your selection.

Diets for Dogs With Eczema

All breeds of dog can suffer from chronic eczema, or dermatitis, which is an uncomfortable skin condition that can cause irritation and itching. Sometimes, this condition can be caused as a result of poor diet and nutrition. There are specific foods and diets that you can feed your dog to help alleviate its symptoms.

Check Current Food

    Many dog owners feed their dog the cheapest food on the market, which may be kind to your wallet but is not healthy for your dog. Inexpensive dog foods often lack high-quality ingredients as well as essential vitamins and nutrients that your dog needs. Improper nourishment can cause dermatitis to develop, and can also cause a number of other health complications. Check your current food brand and compare it to higher grade brands.

Talk to a Veterinarian

    Express your concerns to a veterinarian and ask her which food brands she recommends. Ideally, dog food should contain only human-grade ingredients, as well as all the important vitamins and nutrients your dog needs.

Switch to a Meat-Based Diet

    According to Vetontheweb.com, many pet owners are amazed to see the improvement in their dog's eczema as a result of switching to a high-grade meat-based formula. If the dog food you are using is mostly meat-based, the first ingredient listed will be beef, lamb, chicken, fish, or veal. Avoid foods that list rice and other vegetables before the meat. Protein is essential in treating nutritional dermatitis in dogs.

Add a supplement

    Sometimes an extra dietary supplement is needed in treating canine eczema. Omega fatty acid supplements are great for improving your dog's coat and skin condition. Combining this with a high-quality meat-based diet should clear up most outbreaks of eczema on your dog's skin.

How to Feed a Pit Bull Dog

How to Feed a Pit Bull Dog

Pit bulls are a highly intelligent dog with huge energy levels and raw athletic ability. The breed has earned a somewhat undeserved reputation for bad behavior that usually owes more to the poor ownership skills of people than the personality traits of the dog. Diet is an important factor in the life of a pit bull. Their lean and muscular athleticism should be complemented by an hourglass figure with a tucked-in stomach without any fat over the withers or the rump.

Instructions

    1

    Avoid free feeding your pit bull. Never leave bowls on the floor all day as the dog will fall into the habit of picking at food throughout the day and this can make it more difficult to establish scheduled eating times when free feeding stops. Keep food bowls away from the pit bull for at least 30 minutes after exercising to maintain health, prevent hunger and aid digestion.

    2

    Choose a diet that consists of good quality food. Read the sides of food packaging carefully so that the correct portions are fed based on the size and weight of the pit bull. Use healthier dry foods that are fortified with essential nutrients, but avoid using semi-moist alternatives because of their high sugar content. Consider a combination of canned meat and dry food if your dog finds dry food unappetizing on its own.

    3

    Create a scheduled diet plan with regular feeding intervals and stick to it. Break meals into smaller portions and feed more often so that the pit bull never feels hungry. Consider feeding your dog three small portions each day instead of a single, larger meal. Use regular meal times as a training tool so that the dog understands that feeding is imminent and that there is no need to beg for human food.

    4

    Adjust diets for pit bulls if their age or physical condition demands it. Give puppies and pregnant dogs food that contains high levels of protein and additional fats. Use similar puppy foods for pit bulls that are highly active, underweight or stressed but reduce fat content for dogs that have weight or heart problems. Increase protein content in the diet of an older pit bull but make sure the rest of their diet is balanced.

    5

    Reduce snacks and treats to just one serving a day, ideally after a scheduled feeding time. Avoid rewarding good behavior with food and simply offer praise or fuss instead. Monitor the weight of your pit bull and make regular vet appointments so the health and condition of the dog can be monitored to ensure all dietary needs are being met.

Can two Pitbull Puppies be kept Together?

Can two Pitbull Puppies be kept Together?

Keeping two puppies together has everything to do with the care and socialization of those puppies and nothing to do with the breed of the puppies.

Myth

    Aggression toward other dogs are as common in the Pit Bull breed as with any other breed according to The Real Pit Bull, a website dedicated to researching and dispelling myths regarding the breed. Therefore it is no more of an issue to keep two Pit Bull puppies together than it would be to keep two Golden retriever puppies together.

Importance of Socialization

    As with any breed of dog, if the American Pit Bull terrier is raised correctly and socialized at an early age, it will have no more likelihood of instigating confrontations with other dogs than any other breed of dog would.

Aggression

    Aggression is not the norm for Pit Bull terriers. The Pit Bull terrier genetically has the temperament of a goofy, stable and friendly breed. In fact since the breed is so people-friendly and eager to please they do make poor guard dogs contrary to popular belief and the conceived notions due to media reports.

Example

    If a Cocker spaniel is abused, beaten, neglected or trained to fight they are just as at risk of becoming fearful of humans and aggressive toward other dogs as the Pit Bull is. It just so happens that the people who fight, abuse and neglect dogs usually choose the Pit Bull terrier as their victim because of the undeserved stigma that goes along with the breed.

Considerations

    Safely keeping two puppies together of any breed has nothing to do with the breed but with the care and socialization those puppies receive.

How to Look for Westies to Adopt

How to Look for Westies to Adopt

One of the most popular small breeds of dog in North American and Europe is the West Highland white terrier, or Westie. But there is no need to buy a Westie puppy when so many puppies and adults are available for adoption. Westies are surrendered to shelters often through no fault of their own. According to Westie Rescue USA, reasons for Westies being surrendered include the owner dying or becoming ill; owner losing a job and owner moving to a place that does not allow dogs.

Instructions

    1

    Contact your local animal shelter and tell them that you are looking to adopt a Westie. Keep contacting them weekly because they may be too busy to contact you. The shelter may also be able to give the contact information of a local Westie rescue group. In the meantime, research the dog adoption process for that particular shelter. Understand their requirements for potential adopters such as fees involved, providing references from your veterinarian and to allow inspections of your home from shelter workers.

    2

    Go online to your favorite search engine and type in "westie rescue" or "westie rescue" and your state or country's name. You may find a Westie rescue organization in your own hometown. Click on the Westie rescue group website and download a dog application form. Read it before filling it out. Email or telephone the rescue group in case you have questions about the form, eligibility requirements and to find out if there is a waiting list.

    3

    Talk to your veterinarian and/or the vet's office staff. They may know of any Westies available for adoption or of any owner about to relinquish his or her dog or of any breeders looking for homes for retired breeding or show dogs. Ask if you could post a "Westie Wanted to Adopt" notice on the office billboard.

How to Improve Taste of Dry Dog Food

Dog food contains complete nutrition, offering a healthy diet for your dog. However, dry dog food is not the tastiest for your dog. You can make your dog's food more tasty and still keep it healthy. You can use a variety of additions such as warm water, wet dog food, chicken broth and even yogurt. Your dog will enjoy a delicious meal while you can ease your mind knowing that the meal she is eating is safe and healthy.

Instructions

Water

    1

    Pour water into a microwave-safe cup and heat on medium high for 30 to 45 seconds.

    2

    Pour the warm water over the dry dog food, ensuring that you are getting the dog food evenly covered so that all the pieces are equal in moisture.

    3

    Allow the food to cool for about 20 seconds if needed.

Wet Dog Food

    4

    Mix half wet dog food to half dry dog food.

    5

    Stir thoroughly to mix all of the dry dog food pieces and the wet food pieces together.

    6

    Decrease the amount of wet dog food over the week until the serving size of the wet dog food is one part to four parts of dry dog food.

Chicken Broth

    7

    Pour some low-sodium chicken broth into a microwaveable cup and heat on medium high for 45 seconds.

    8

    Pour the chicken broth over the dry dog food evenly to allow the dog food pieces to be soaked completely.

    9

    Allow the dog food to cool for about 20 seconds if necessary.

Bones, Rice and Vitamins

    10

    Put chicken or beef meat bones into a skillet and cook the bones on medium high to high heat. Allow the juices of the meat to stay in the skillet. Remove the bones and discard them.

    11

    Put a small amount of brown rice into the meat juices and allow the rice to soak up the meat broth.

    12

    Add a dog vitamin supplement to the mix if you are able to. Ask your veterinarian first. Crush the vitamin up and add to the brown rice and meat mixture. Stir the mixture into the dry dog food.

Yogurt

    13

    Get a tablespoon of plain yogurt. Make sure it is not flavored or artificially colored.

    14

    Mix the yogurt into the dry dog food.

    15

    Place the dog food on the floor so your dog can enjoy it. The enzymes in the yogurt will help with healthy bowel movements

Dog Treat

    16

    Break up a dry dog treat in your hands.

    17

    Mix the dog treat into the dry dog food.

    18

    Feed the food to your dog, and praise him to make him happy while eating it.

Fleas & Greyhounds

Fleas & Greyhounds

Greyhounds are beautiful and sensitive canines. With regal lineage dating back thousands of years, these delicate, lean animals are prized for their speed. After finishing careers as racing dogs, greyhounds are often adopted by caring individuals to avoid death by euthanasia. They are clean, intelligent, loyal and gentle. Although they are a relatively healthy breed, their sensitive skin and system precludes some traditional flea treatments from consideration by responsible owners.

Bedding

    Machine wash your greyhound's bedding and toys regularly to avoid fleas.
    Machine wash your greyhound's bedding and toys regularly to avoid fleas.

    Greyhounds have sensitive spines that require them to sleep on soft bedding as opposed to hard floors. Soft beds can become havens for fleas if not washed regularly. To protect your greyhound from flea infestation, wash its bedding weekly in hot water with mild detergent, such as the kind suitable for infant laundry. Include all blankets and toys your greyhound uses.

Grooming

    Blessed with smooth, short-haired coats, greyhounds are easy to groom. Although they shed their hair constantly, it is so fine and short that many owners dont notice it. In the summer, greyhounds shed so much on their chests that they often go hairless in that spot. This characteristic makes fleas easy to spot on light-colored greyhounds. Brush them daily with a fine-toothed comb and soft brush to maintain a healthy coat. This helps to remove any fleas the dog may pick up while playing or exercising outside, before the pests have a chance to infest and lay eggs. Avoid over-washing your pet; limit its baths to once a month or every other month.

Traditional Treatment

    While greyhounds are relatively healthy animals, they do have a sensitivity to medication due to low body fat that makes some common prescription flea medications inappropriate. Their skin is sensitive to insecticides commonly used to kill fleas. Greyhounds can break out in hives or develop a rash from traditional flea preparations. Owners have reported sensitivity in their dogs to flea collars and dips. Instead, use brand name prescription flea treatments, such as Advantage or Frontline or their generic equivalents. Observe the dog to see if it develops an adverse reaction to either medication. Talk to your veterinarian about using capstar flea pills or their generic equivalent. Discuss with your vet or lawn service about spraying insecticides in areas where your greyhound plays.

Natural Treatment

    If your greyhound develops a reaction to traditional flea treatments, opt for natural procedures. One natural flea treatment is to boil lemon slices with rosemary leaves. Let the solution boil for 10 minutes, then cool completely before spraying on your greyhounds coat. Test the natural repellent on one part of your dogs coat to test it for a reaction before applying it to the entire coat. Alternatively, spray a mixture of boiled eucalyptus leaves and water to your yard and outside your home. Discuss all natural options with your veterinarian before applying them to your greyhound and monitor your dog for any adverse reaction during treatment.

Jumat, 26 April 2013

How to Get Your Chihuahua to Eat

How to Get Your Chihuahua to Eat

Refusing to eat can result in serious health issues for a Chihuahua and for other small dog breeds, particularly small breed puppies, according to veterinarian and VeterinaryPartner.com educational director Wendy C. Brooks. Problems with maintaining blood sugar levels in toy breeds make regular meals critical to avoid hypoglycemia -- a potentially life-threatening condition.

Instructions

    1

    Take your dog to the veterinarian for evaluation of any medical conditions that might impact eating, including mouth, tooth or gum injuries; metabolic disorders; kidney disease; parasites; diabetes; medication side-effects; or gastrointestinal blockage, advises Vetinfo. Inform your veterinarian of any incidents involving vomiting, diarrhea or possible exposure to toxins. Treat medical conditions in order to help your dog regain its appetite. Discuss vitamins and other supplements with your veterinarian.

    2

    Establish a routine time for meals. Avoid adding foods with low nutritional value, such as gravy. This habit creates picky eaters and causes an unbalanced diet, advises veterinarian James W. Randolph. Feed your dog a balanced diet to help improve appetite, advises Vetinfo.

    3

    Help your dog develop an appetite by giving it regular exercise. Provide your dog with attention and play to avoid depression, which can cause appetite loss.

    4

    Consider a new diet with a different protein. To determine preference, try changing from a chicken-based to a fish-based food suggests Vetinfo. Mix the new food with the old, gradually increasing the percentage over several days to avoid causing gastrointestinal problems.

    5

    Use high quality foods that allow your dog to eat smaller amounts with more nutritional value. Offer your dog food, then, after not longer than 30 minutes, put it away to help encourage your dog to eat all of the food on schedule, advises Chihuahua Club of America.

    6

    Contact your veterinarian regarding appetite stimulants such as cyproheptadine, an antihistamine that helps increase appetite through suppression of serotonin, according to PetsMD. Inform your veterinarian prior to giving cyproheptadine if your pet has heart or bladder problems or is pregnant.

What Breeds Are Guide Dogs?

What Breeds Are Guide Dogs?

Guide dogs act as the eyes for humans who cannot see and give them the ability to get out and live a life less defined by their disability. Like most guide-dog associations, Guide Dogs of America uses just three dog breeds.

Labrador Retriever

    Labradors are the top guide dog choice.
    Labradors are the top guide dog choice.

    The Labrador Retriever is the top breed for use as a guide dog. Up to 70 percent of the dogs trained and supplied by Guide Dogs of America are Labradors. The breed has the ideal temperament, being friendly, even tempered and gentle by nature. High intelligence means that the dog is easy to train and learns quickly. This, coupled with an eagerness to please, makes the dog a good worker. The breed is also rarely aggressive, which is a vital trait.

Golden Retriever

    Golden Retrievers are mild-mannered dogs, well suited for being guide dogs.
    Golden Retrievers are mild-mannered dogs, well suited for being guide dogs.

    The Golden Retriever is also a commonly used breed, but much less so than the Labrador. Around 15 percent of the dogs produced by Guide Dogs of America are Goldens. Just like the Labrador, Goldens are even tempered, friendly and have a trustworthy nature. They are also intelligent, so the training aspect is easy. It is a confident, energetic breed that does not become startled and stays alert. These traits are important while leading those who cannot see.

German Shepherd

    Alertness and intelligence makes German Shepherds good guide dogs.
    Alertness and intelligence makes German Shepherds good guide dogs.

    The German Shepherd is equal to the Golden in popularity as a guide dog breed. Around 15 percent of Guide Dogs of America's animals are Shepherds. It is an alert, intelligent breed which also possesses a courageous nature. It is vital that dogs do not become startled by car horns or huge crowds. so the Shepherd's nature makes it a suitable choice. It is an even tempered breed, like both guide-dog Retrievers are, but may be more inclined toward aggression. Like all guide-dog breeds it has intense focus which is vital, as distracted dogs put their owners at risk.

Creating a Guide Dog

    The dogs used by guide-dog associations are generally bred by the association itself. In doing this, greater control is possible to produce animals with the best temperaments. At eight weeks of age the puppies are given to foster families who give the dogs their formative training and socializing. At 18 months puppies are assessed to go onto the main training stage. Training takes four to six months and those dogs that graduate go into the program and are matched to a blind recipient. Trainers match dogs with recipients based on character, size, walking speed and several other factors to create an ideal pairing.

Kamis, 25 April 2013

How to Identify a Scottish Terrier

The Scottish Terrier is an alert, spirited and stable breed. It is a great family dog, as it loves its people, but can be aggressive with other dogs. This is a small, compact breed with short legs, but it is sturdy. It is a lot of power in a small package, giving this dog its confidence and dignity.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the size and proportion of the Scottish Terrier is correct. This breed has a thick body and is heavily boned. Males and females are about 10 inches at the shoulders. It has a slight rectangular shape, as its length as measured from the back of the shoulders to the rear is about 11 inches. Males weigh 19 to 22 pounds and females weigh 18 to 21 pounds.

    2

    Look at the long head. It is quite long, compared to the rest of the dog. The length of the muzzle is about the same length as the skull. The muzzle slightly tapers to a black nose that has some projection over the mouth. This makes upper jaw look longer than it really is. They small, bright eyes sit wide on the skull and are sunk in under the brow. They are dark brown - almost black, and are almond shaped. The small ears sit up on top of the skull and are pointy. They stand straight up and are covered with short hair that feels like velvet.

    3

    Check that the moderately short neck is strong and muscular. While short, it should not be too short, making the Scottish Terrier look clumsy. It blends smoothly into well angulated shoulders. The chest is wide and deep - it extends quite a bit in front of the legs and should not be flat. The front legs are heavily boned, leading to front feet that are larger than the rear feet. The muscular thighs are extremely powerful for this small dog. The rear feet are smaller than the front feet. The tail, thick at the base, tapers to a point.

    4

    Pet the wiry outer coat. The undercoat is dense. The outer coat is "broken." It is longer on the legs and beard. Colors can be black, brindle or wheat. If there is any white at all, it should only be a small amount on the chest and chin.

How to Identify an American Foxhound

The American Foxhound was the result of two gift dogs given to George Washington by Lafayette. He was given an English Foxhound and a French Foxhound. Over the years of mating, the result is the American Foxhound. In the 1700s, they were used for hunting Indians and later have been found to be untiring hunting dogs. Two characteristics are a great nose and a musical bay when giving chase.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the dog from a short distance away. The American Foxhound is definitely a hound in their look. They are about two feet in height and should weigh about 65 to 75 pounds.

    2

    Examine the color of the dog. The American Foxhound can be any color but tends to be a mix of white and red, tan, brown or black.

    3

    Note the ears. They are a bit large and hang like pendants at the side of the head. They are somewhat long and the shape of the head between them is slightly domed. The hanging ears are almost like a frame for their face.

    4

    Check to see if the dog is interested and inquisitive. They are rather friendly and hold their tail in a happy upward curve. They can be very friendly though some are more protective.

    5

    Regard the overall appearance of the dog. The dog has long somewhat thin legs. The legs are pretty straight boned but give the dog its agility and speed.

Maltese Hyperactivity & Biting

Maltese Hyperactivity & Biting

Maltese have been popular dog breed choices for centuries, and most are loving, affectionate, gentle animals who are eager to please their owners. Like all small dogs, however, Maltese are also prone to hyperactivity, nervous barking and defensive biting. Proper training, begun as early as possible and continued on a consistent basis, is essential for avoiding or curbing these problem behaviors.

Hyperactivity

    The Maltese is a breed that bonds closely with their owners and requires almost constant attention. If left alone for long periods of time, Maltese may become destructive and develop a nervous chewing or barking habit. Anxiety can also translate into hyperactivity, causing a Maltese to react as a way of gaining their owner's attention.

Biting

    All puppies bite when they are teething, and nipping is common Maltese puppy behavior when playing with their owners. If not taught to do otherwise, adult Maltese will bite when they feel nervous, anxious or when threatened or approached by strangers.

Learned Behaviors

    Many adult Maltese are fearful, anxious and inclined toward hyperactivity, nervous biting and barking because they are used to being coddled and spoiled by their owners. When forced to look out for themselves, they resort to these behaviors out of fear. The kindest thing a Maltese owner can do is to resist the temptation to carry her dog constantly instead of letting him walk and forgo normal obedience and leash training. When taught to behave like a normal dog, a Maltese will do so.

Training

    Because of their separation anxiety issues, it is important that a Maltese not be left alone for long periods of time. When you must leave them, you can make the separation easier by accustoming them to be away from you for shorter periods of time in advance.

    Biting should be discouraged immediately each time it happens, even if it just a "playful" nip. If you're not sure how to train your Maltese, enroll him in a local obedience class.

Considerations

    Because of their small size and temperament, Maltese are not considered to be good pets for children under 10. Never leave a young child and a dog unsupervised.

Characteristics of the Scottish Terrier Dog

Characteristics of the Scottish Terrier Dog

Scottish terriers or Scotties, as they are commonly called, are the original and oldest terrier breed of the Scottish Highlands. Anatomically designed for power and endurance, these dogs were initially bred to track and kill rodents and small game. Introduced in America in the 1890s, these hard working dogs rank in the top 50 registered dogs of the 148 breeds presently recognized by the American Kennel Club.

Size

    Full grown Scottish terriers reach a height of around 10 inches tall at the withers. The length of the back from the withers to the tail set should measure approximately 11 inches. Females weigh approximately 18 to 21 lbs. and males weigh around 19 to 22 lbs.

Appearance

    Scottish terriers have a small, compact, sturdy confirmation designed for endurance and power. They have a fairly short body, short legs, muscular hindquarters and a deep, broad chest. In proportion to the rest of the body, the head of a Scottie looks long and the skull has a flat, vaguely rounded appearance. The muzzle has an equal length to that of the skull with a slight taper to the large, black nose. The nose extends slightly over the mouth, giving the appearance that the upper jaw is longer than the lower jaw. Their small, almond-shaped dark brown to almost black eyes are positioned wide apart in under the brow bone. The small, pointed ears set far up on the skull define the alert and intelligent expression of the Scottish terrier breed. The thick, short and muscular neck blends evenly into laid back shoulders.

Coat and Color

    Adult Scottish terriers have a harsh, wiry, weather-resistant outer coat and a thick, soft undercoat. Slightly softer, longer hairs grow on the beard, lower body and legs. Common Scottish terrier coat colors include gray, wheaten, black and brindle. Many blacks and brindles have scatterings of white or silver hairs and a touch of white on the chest or chin.

Behavior

    Scottish terriers have a characteristically spirited nature which often necessitates obedience training. These busy, playful and investigative dogs require regular exercise on a leash, as they have a strong instinct to chase. The determined and thoughtful Scottie makes a gentle, loving house pet but they can be aggressive with other dogs.

Fun Fact

    The Scottish terrier holds the record for being the only breed of dog that has lived in the White House three times. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower and George W. Bush were owners of this breed.

What Is a Good Puppy Food to Help Puppies Gain Weight?

What Is a Good Puppy Food to Help Puppies Gain Weight?

Nutrition is a vital part of taking proper care of your dog. If you are raising a puppy, it is important to ensure she is receiving the right nutrients for optimal growth. Either underweight or overweight during this time of growth can lead to developmental problems, including orthopedic diseases and skeletal abnormalities. If your puppy is underweight and otherwise healthy, feeding the proper amount of a good puppy food should take care of the problem.

Poor weight gain

    If your pup is not gaining weight, consult your veterinarian.
    If your pup is not gaining weight, consult your veterinarian.

    If your puppy is failing to gain weight, the first step should be to have him assessed by a veterinarian. There are several medical conditions that could be affecting optimal growth, and even the best foods will not work unless the underlying cause is addressed. For instance, a puppy that is eating well and not gaining weight may have a heavy parasite infestation, developmental abnormalities, bacterial or viral infection, malnutrition or intestinal blockage, according to San Francisco veterinarian Erich Barchas. To get your pup off to a good start in life, have him checked by a vet as soon as you acquire him.

Prescription Puppy Foods

    If your puppy is found to have a medical condition that is causing him not to thrive, your veterinarian may prescribe a special diet. Hill's P/D for instance, contains natural DHA, a fatty acid responsible for the development of the brain and nervous system in puppies. This food also contains a balanced ratio of calcium and phosphorus, along with high levels of proteins and minerals intended to aid a puppy's recovery from acute or chronic debilitating diseases and parasitism.

Commercial Puppy Foods

    Search for a good-quality puppy food for optimum growth.
    Search for a good-quality puppy food for optimum growth.

    If your pup is healthy, feed a premium puppy food enriched with vitamins, minerals, fats, balanced ratios of calcium and phosphorus, and other important nutrients a growing puppy requires. Stay away from cheap dog foods that mostly contain lots of grains and little nutritional value. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says high-quality brands to consider include Iams, Eukanuba, Hill's Science Diet, and Purina Pro Plan.

Considerations

    Large-breed puppies must grow slowly and steadily.
    Large-breed puppies must grow slowly and steadily.

    If your puppy needs to gain some weight, don't overfeed him in your concern. Feed him properly, and he'll put on the weight if he is clear of other health problems. Divide a pup's daily nutrition into two or three feedings per day, depending on the age of the pup. Don't overload a young pup's digestive system. If you are unsure how much to feed, use the feeding guidelines on the bag, or ask your veterinarian. The amounts fed may need to be adjusted a little if your puppy is very active or is still not gaining weight. Look at any dog of any age when you feed it, and notice if it is gaining or losing weight. Special attention is required in feeding large-breed puppies during periods of rapid growth. A large-breed growth diet that has passed Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) animal-feeding tests should be fed until the puppy has reached about 80 percent of its expected adult weight, says Jennifer Larsen, a veterinarian specialized in Small Animal Clinical Nutrition.