Minggu, 31 Maret 2013

Information About Red Shih Tzu Dogs

Shih tzus are small dogs traditionally used as pets. Red is just one of many colors that the full-blooded shih tzus' fur coats come in, according to the American Kennel Club.

Color

    Red shih tzus are completely red on their whole body. Although it is called red, the fur on red shih tzus is actually a deep and dark orange color.

Fur

    Shih tzus have a double coat of fur that is long and flowing. When a shih tzu is standing still, the fur often hides its feet and the hair will often cover the eyes.

Size

    The American Kennel Club states that shih tzus are generally between 8 and 11 inches tall at the shoulder and between 9 and 16 lbs.

Personality

    The All Shih Tzu website describes them as cheerful dogs that can be playful as well as content at watching you work. They need daily exercise and are good pets for people of all ages.

Eye Care

    Shih tzus are susceptible to eye problems and need to have the area around their eyes cleaned with a warm, wet washcloth and thoroughly dried at least once a week.

Grooming

    Shih tzus need to be brushed at least once a week. They also need to be bathed about once every three weeks.

How to Make Beef Jerky for a Dog

Beef jerky strips available at your grocery store are pretty expensive and can be loaded with preservatives. Consider making your own beef jerky for your dog that you can guarantee to be fresh and free of harmful ingredients. Making beef jerky is a simple procedure, but the jerky strips require a long dehydration time. The great thing about these beef jerky strips is that they are also completely safe for humans to consume, although you may want to add seasoning to your batch.

Instructions

    1

    Trim the beef to remove any fat.

    2

    Cut the beef into thin 6-inch slices. Try to keep the slices around inch thick, but no larger than inch. Make sure that you cut the beef against the grain.

    3

    Add nonstick spray to the racks of your food dehydrator. Place the beef jerky strips on the racks. Replace the lid on the dehydrator.

    4

    Dehydrate the beef at 145 degrees. Follow the instructions that came with your food dehydrator if you do not have a temperature setting.

    5

    Check on the beef jerky after six hours. The jerky is finished dehydrating once it bends without breaking. The meat will be pliable and dark. The beef jerky will not take longer than 12 hours.

    6

    Store the jerky strips in a plastic container in your refrigerator. Feed your dog these beef jerky strips as snacks or special treats.

What Is a Blue Pit Bull?

Blue pit bulls are pet dogs that are in high demand these days as they have a bluish colored outer coat and are quite impressive in their appearance. People often mistake them to be a separate breed of dogs. The fact is that these dogs are derived from the American Staffordshire by manipulating the black color of the outer coat.

Cause for the Bluish Coat

    For the dog to get the characteristic bluish coat, it must inherit two copies of the gene responsible for the color. When a pit bull has these genes, it results in a bluish coat instead of the usual black coat. This change occurs because the color pigments get concentrated towards the core of the hair shaft and the tips end up absent of color. This gives the coat a dusky-gray color, which is known as "bluish" to dog breeders. It's not very easy to produce such coat color variations in these pets. Expert breeders specialize in multiplying this pet variety by repeatedly working on a small number of dogs with such genetic variations and belonging to the same family. Due to continuous in-breeding, many health problems can arise in blue pit bulls.

Common Health Issues

    Mange, acute moist dermatitis and baldness are some of the skin diseases that are quite common among blue pit bulls. According to the website, "The Proper Pit Bull," "blue pit bulls are known to be more susceptible to bacterial, viral and fungal infections." Problems with temperament, vision and hearing capabilities also arise in blue pit bulls. It is believed that most of these health problems occur as the color pigments that produce variations in the coat color have some kind of interaction with the immune and neurological systems of the dog. Though some of these problems can be cured, the treatment can be rather expensive. Some of the health issues that are common to blue pit bulls include reduced vision acuity, problems with the temperament and deafness.

Warning

    While selecting a potential pet, carefully assess its health condition. The Internet contains valuable information about blue pit bulls, highlighting important facts and breeding techniques. Though there's no specific reason why you shouldn't choose a healthy blue pit bull, it's equally important to be aware of the warnings and drawbacks of owning a pet that has been genetically manipulated for commercial benefits.

Other Color Variations

    Another type of blue pit bull is the blue nose pit bull. In reality, the nose of this type of dog is grayish in color. This is quite different from the black nose prevalent in these dogs. Hence, even the blue nose pit bull is considered to be quite a novelty. A couple of years ago, every pit bull lover knew about the red nose pit bull. Since such genetic variants are considered unique, we may end up with pit bulls that have a wide variety of coat or nose color.

About Jack Russel Dogs

About Jack Russel Dogs

Jack Russell terriers are robust hunting dogs that are native to the United Kingdom. These smallish canines historically possessed fox hunting duties. Jack Russell terriers, as a breed, are big on digging, an activity that comes naturally for them. These popular companion pets are extremely lively, spry and energetic dogs.

Physical Characteristics

    Jack Russell terriers tend to grow to between 10 and 15 inches in height, and they usually weigh between 12 and 18 pounds. Their coarse, wiry or soft double coats are diverse, from patterns to coloration, although they usually are white with some other elements -- think brown, black or beige. Other noteworthy physical traits of the breed are dark noses, broad feet, elevated tails and sinewy, somewhat squat limbs.

Temperament

    Some temperament characteristics that are frequently associated with these pooches are courage, smarts, curiosity, stubbornness, devotion, docility and friendliness. In general, Jack Russell terriers do well in the company of both new people and older kids of at least 6 years in age. They may, however, run after cats and other types of small animals relentlessly. If a Jack Russell terrier is in the presence of a fellow dog, close monitoring is crucial, as they can sometimes behave fiercely to each other. Along with their penchant for digging, these speedy and nimble terriers are also often rather bark-happy and loud.

Physical Activity

    Ample physical activity is a must for Jack Russell terriers -- zero exceptions. Because of this strong need for exercise, they may not be ideal for lifestyles either in small apartments or in urban settings. Not only do these canines require extended jogs or walks at least once a day, they also need sufficient room to be what they naturally are -- spirited doggies that love to run and let off steam. Without enough regular exercise, these little guys are sometimes prone to behavioral issues as a result of their pent-up vigor and enthusiasm.

Grooming

    If a Jack Russell terrier's coat is coarse or wiry in texture, routine professional grooming and hand-stripping is essential. For those with softer fur, however, once-a-week brushing sessions to eliminate loose hairs should work well.

Life Expectancy

    With proper care and veterinary attention, Jack Russell terriers can often lead happy lives for between 14 and 15 years. They occasionally are susceptible to certain medical ailments, including cataracts, deafness, mast cell tumors and kneecap and joint problems. In general, however, Jack Russell terriers are hardy animals.

How to Get My Bulldog Muscular

How to Get My Bulldog Muscular

Although bulldogs were historically fighting dogs, they can be lovable and gentle companions to their owners. Bulldogs are among the favorite breeds for guard dogs due to their fierce loyalty, protective nature and formidable appearance. These dogs are naturally muscular with a strong bite; however, some owners may wish to aid in the muscle growth of their dogs. Much of how muscular a bulldog becomes is due to genetics; however, a healthy diet and proper exercise will contribute to the development of muscles.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your bulldog a well-balanced puppy food until it reaches a year old. As long as your bulldog puppy gets plenty of exercise, you can feed it as much as it wants. After a year old, feed a young bulldog adult dog food three times a day. In older age, you may need to reduce feedings to twice daily. There are specialized foods for bulldogs, so you may wish to consult with your veterinarian about what type of food is best for your dog. In general, however, any brand of dog food that does not contain soybean products is sufficient.

    2

    Supplement your bulldog's diet with natural, high-protein foods, such as eggs or yogurt. These additions to your dog's diet will provide the protein necessary to build muscle.

    3

    Exercise your bulldog daily. You can do this with regular walks or even a prolonged game of fetch. When your bulldog is healthy and happy with the proper care, it is more likely to develop the strong muscles associated with the breed.

What Can You Feed a Dog to Repel Fleas?

Dog guardians probably spend more time and money dealing with fleas than with all other health problems that affect canines. Feeding particular foods has long been known to repel fleas in pets. Today, there are effective flea repellent topical solutions that are available from any veterinarian. However, some pet guardians shy away from using these monthly medications on their pet. Others find that even with topical treatments their dogs aren't completely protected against the irritating parasites. Certain foods can be fed to your dogs to try to control fleas, combined with other repellents.

Brewers Yeast

    Brewers yeast is one of the most popular food remedies for repelling fleas in dogs. It can be bought at most health food stores. The general recommendation is to add one teaspoon of brewer's yeast per 20 pounds of body weight to your dog's food. For example, if your dog weighs 50 pounds, you would add two to three teaspoons of brewer's yeast to the pet's food each day. You could add one teaspoon at the breakfast feeding and two teaspoons at the dinner feeding. In addition to helping to repel fleas, many holistic veterinarians prescribe daily feedings of brewer's yeast to meet dog's daily needs for B-complex vitamins.

Garlic

    Fresh garlic is an effective flea repellent. Garlic is thought to be effective because it makes the animal taste unpleasant to fleas. Garlic and onion can be toxic to dogs in large amounts. Generally seasoning amounts aren't toxic. However, it is best to consult with your veterinarian or a holistic veterinarian before feeding your dog garlic. This will ensure you are not feeding enough to cause your pet harm. Garlic is generally fed for flea repellent in dogs by grating a bit of the fresh clove onto the pet's food each meal.

Vinegar

    Vinegar is another food additive that may have properties repel fleas in dogs. The general recommendation is to add one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to your dog's water bowl each day. If the taste of the vinegar deters your dog from drinking, you can add the vinegar to your pet's food. However, it may not be as effective if administered in this manner.

Homemade Diet

    Many holistic veterinarians believe that dogs that are severely infested with fleas are likely suffering from an underlying health issue. Because most holistic treatments begin by looking at the pet's diet, a holistic practitioner would likely recommend a homemade diet made of human-grade, organic ingredients for a dog suffering from a flea problem. If you are considering a homemade diet as a holistic treatment for your dog's fleas, consult with a licensed holistic veterinarian. You can find a holistic veterinarian in your area using the directory on the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association's Web site at http://www.ahvma.org/.

Sabtu, 30 Maret 2013

How do I Feed Zucchini to Dogs?

How do I Feed Zucchini to Dogs?

Dogs are just like people in that they need foods that are good for them. Making sure your dog gets the proper nutrition can take some extra time and effort, but in the end it is worth it because it will help ensure that your loving canine stays as healthy as he can. Feeding your dog zucchini can be especially helpful for your dog's health, but if your dog is a picky eater you may need a few pointers on how to feed your dog his vegetables.

Instructions

    1

    Wash the zucchini with cool water only. Cut small pieces off of it with a knife and mix it in with your dog's regular food. He will usually eat the zucchini while he eats the food.

    2

    Use a grater to remove shreds from a zucchini. You can add these shreds to your dog's regular food. This works very well for dogs who cannot eat whole chunks of food.

    3

    Roll shreds or chunks of zucchini into some cheese and let your dog have it as a nice treat. Be careful about giving your dog too much cheese, because it could make him sick.

What Fruits & Vegetables Can I Feed My French Bulldog?

What Fruits & Vegetables Can I Feed My French Bulldog?

Sheltie Pros & Cons

Sheltie Pros & Cons

The Shetland Sheepdog, or Sheltie, is a medium-sized dog that originally developed on the island of Shetland, off the coast of Scotland. The breed's long double coat, elongated muzzle and pricked ears that bend forward at the tip make it appear to be a smaller version of the rough collie, but it is indeed a breed of its own. If you are planning to bring a Shetland Sheepdog into your home, research the animal thoroughly beforehand to ensure it is suitable for your family and lifestyle.

Companion

    The Shetland Sheepdog does well as a companion dog, as it has a sweet-natured, docile temperament and is loyal and affectionate with its family. It will get along with other dogs and children, as long as it is socialized from a young age. Do this by exposing your dog to lots of different people and dogs.

Intelligence

    This dog is eager to please and intelligent, which makes it easy to obedience train with the use of positive reinforcement. It also will pick up toilet training quickly. This breed is sensitive to its owner's tone of voice, which means that you can effectively communicate your appreciation or displeasure for particular behaviors by using your voice. Show the Sheltie firm leadership to prevent it from becoming stubborn and willful.

Herding Instinct

    A negative aspect of the Shetland Sheepdog's personality when kept in a family setting is its desire to herd. This dog was developed for the purpose of herding sheep and is therefore extremely energetic with high stamina. It will attempt to herd animals and people, which could make it unsuitable for a family with young children. It is also a noisy dog. You can prevent your dog from feeling the need to herd by giving it another job to provide mental stimulation Do this with agility or trick training. Take the Sheltie on a long walk every day to help drain excess energy.

Health Problems

    The Shetland Sheepdog is prone to a number of health conditions, such as diseases or malformations of the eye. These are conditions that are passed on from the parents, so question the breeder about the parents' health and meet both the mother and father before purchasing a puppy. The Sheltie is also prone to hypothydroid problems and displacement of the kneecaps, or patella. Be careful not to overfeed your Shetland Sheepdog as it can become overweight easily.

The Average Sizes of Labradoodles

The Average Sizes of Labradoodles

A labradoodle is the result of crossbreeding a Labrador retriever with a poodle -- hence the name. First bred in the 1980s, temperament, coat type and size were unpredictable. But as the breed has developed, the weight and size of these dogs is becoming standardized.

History

    The first labradoodles were bred by Wally Conron of the Guide Dog Association of Australia in response to a search for a hypoallergenic dog that could be trained as a guide dog. A Labrador is a relaxed and easy-to-train dog, but has a coat that sheds. On the other hand, poodles are clever with a curly coat that does not fall out and cause allergic reactions. The first labradoodle litter of eight puppies was produced from a standard poodle and a Labrador. Since then, other sizes have been introduced into the mix and there are now three recognized sizes of labradoodles.

3 Sizes

    According to the Australian Labradoodle Association, a standard labradoodle should stand 22, to 24 inches high and weigh in at between 50 and 65 pounds. The medium size labradoodle grows to between 18 and 20 inches, with a weight of 35 to 45 pounds. There's also a miniature labradoodle with an average height of between 14 to 16 inches and a weight ranging from 15 to 20 pounds, which is about the same size as a cocker spaniel.

Benefits

    Whatever the size, a labradoodle from a scrupulous breeder will have inherited the best traits from both a labrador retriever and a poodle. They generally are sweet natured, easy to train and a good family dog. They do not shed, so are a boon for people with allergies, and do not emit a damp doggy smell. Labradoodles excel at agility and fitness training and are often trained as therapy or assistance dogs.

Warning

    Labradoodles have become very popular very quickly, which has caused some unscrupulous breeding. Labradoodles are so far unrecognized by The American Kennel Club, which in 2011 considers it a hybrid or crossbreed. Any time a Labrador is mated to a poodle, the resulting progeny can be called a labradoodle and without knowing the dog's bloodlines, it's impossible to know the dog's temperament, if it's allergy friendly, or indeed what size it will be. A conscientious breeder will be able to tell you the 'F' code of their dogs: F1 being first generation labradoodle; F2 second generation and so on.

How to Save Money Feeding Your Dog

Feeding your dog a quality diet is important for a long, healthy life. A good diet can result in lower vet bills and a happier dog. Learning about dog food is an important part of having a dog. Not all dog foods are created equal, therefore feeding your dog a high quality dog food is important. The following are ways to save a few bucks on food without sacrificing your dog's health.

Instructions

    1

    Feed leftovers; this is the first healthy way to lower the amount you spend on dog food. Leftovers can be very healthy for your dog. I'm not talking about pizza crust or French fries. But if you have leftover chicken, beef or fish, you can add that to your dog's food bowl. Also, leftover vegetables are a healthy addition.

    2

    Add eggs to your dog's food bowl to cut back on the amount of kibble. Eggs are an excellent low-cost food to feed your dog; they are full of protein that helps build muscle and are great for your dog's skin and coat.

    3

    Compare prices between stores. Some stores will charge higher prices, so it's important for you to check which one has the lower price. A lot of pet food stores will also run specials; check your local paper for these deals.

    4

    Find out if the pet store you shop at offers a club card. Many pet stores offer club cards and a good one will usually give you a free bag of food after so many purchases.

    5

    Load up when you can. If the pet store is offering a lower price or a two-for-one deal, buy as much as you can at that time. Dog food has a long shelf life and will not go bad if you stock up a few bags.

    6

    Start a community food program. Contact your dog-owning friends and family and see if they would like to purchase dog food together. If you have six or seven people buying two bags each, many pet stores will offer a discount. Sometimes with enough people and if the order is big enough, you'll be able to buy direct from the company.

The Temperament of Labradoodle Puppies

The Temperament of Labradoodle Puppies

A labradoodle is a mixed-breed dog that is created by crossing a labrador retriever with a poodle. Labradoodles are popular due to their trainability and temperament, and serve both as family pets and assistance dogs.

With Children

    Labradoodles are very playful and energetic, and are generally great companions for children. For the best results, labradoodle puppies should be socialized with gentle children as early as possible. However, puppy owners should ensure that the labradoodle regularly has time away from young kids in order to relax.

With Other Dogs

    Labradoodle puppies also enjoy the company of other dogs. This includes dogs other than the ones in their own family, if they are socialized properly from an early age. Labradoodles are very intelligent and respond well to behavioral training.

Considerations

    As with any dog type, temperament can vary. Puppies that take on the primary characteristics of their poodle parent breed tend to be more active and driven.

How to Avoid Foods Dangerous For Your Dog

Unfortunately, dogs can't tell you when something is wrong, and they also can't tell you what they can and can't eat. If you allow them, they'll eat whatever they can get their paws on. Take all the necessary steps to avoid foods that may be dangerous for your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Learn which foods are most dangerous to your dog. While there are a lot of food products your dog shouldn't eat, the ones that pose the greatest risk are: chocolate, coffee, other caffeine-containing products, grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts, mushrooms, milk or other dairy products, raw fish or raw eggs, as wells as moldy or spoiled foods.

    2

    Educate your household family members concerning dangerous foods. If you have young children that are likely to give food from their plates to a begging dog, inform them on the importance of not giving dogs "human" foods.

    3

    Keep dangerous foods out of reach. Most kitchens have shelves and cabinets or storage areas near the floor, so make certain that these areas are not accessible by your dogs. If they are, move all dangerous food products to higher shelving areas.

    4

    Be aware of ingredients. If you do give your dog "human" food, know what's in the food. While dog foods are "liver flavored," actually giving large amounts of liver can affect muscles and bones in dogs due to high levels of Vitamin A.

    5

    Stay alert. Your dog can obtain food from many places, such as your neighbor's backyard or their kids, trash on the street or even in your home. Watch your dog to make sure he's not trying to eat forbidden foods.

    6

    Let your guests know the rules concerning your dog and feeding her foods from the table. If your dog is a "beggar," place her in a safe area while your guests are visiting.

Jumat, 29 Maret 2013

Great Danes' Health Issues

Great Danes' Health Issues

The Great Dane is one of the giant dog breeds of the world. Optimal breeding practices strive to produce physically healthy dogs with a sound temperament, but numerous hereditary diseases continue to affect this very old and powerful breed of dog. Danes typically have a life expectancy of 10 years, which is less than that for most smaller dog breeds. Some of the inherited diseases that affect the Dane are, unfortunately, life-threatening.

Hypothyroidism

    Hypothyroidism is an inherited disease that is caused by an inactive thyroid gland. Danes suffering from hypothyroidism do not receive sufficient hormones from their thyroid gland, which affects their metabolism and immune system. This condition can be diagnosed by a blood test and is managed with thyroid replacement therapy, which must continue for the duration of the dog's life. Symptoms of hypothyroidism include susceptibility to infections and skin problems, such as hair loss and excessive shedding.

Bloat

    Bloat is common in deep chested dog breeds and Danes are therefore predisposed to this painful and potentially life-threatening condition. The stomach of Danes suffering from bloat swells and typically rotates, thereby cutting off blood to the surrounding organs. Early warning signs of bloat include noticeable swelling of the animal's abdomen and rapid breathing. The dog experiences considerable pain and begins to salivate excessively. Danes suffering from bloat must receive immediate veterinary attention, as surgery is necessary in almost all cases. Great Dane owners can minimize the risk of bloat by elevating the dog's food dishes. Danes should also be offered small, but regular, meals throughout the day and must not be allowed to drink large amounts of water after exercising.

Hip Dysplasia

    This is an inherited disease that afflicts a number of Danes. Hip dysplasia is not a fatal condition, but is both debilitating and painful. This condition is caused by an abnormality of the hip socket. The thighbone does not fit correctly into the hip socket and through normal use it continues to deteriorate, causing progressively more damage to the joint and surrounding tissue. Danes that suffer from hip dysplasia invariably exhibit an abnormal gait. These dogs may also become lame in the rear quarters and choose to move as little as possible. Hip dysplasia is correctly diagnosed through X-rays of the hip joint.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    According to the Great Dane Club of America, heart disease is one of the most prevalent fatal conditions experienced in this breed. Dilated cardiomyopathy is an inherited, degenerative heart muscle disease. The condition involves an enlarged left ventricle, which results in the heart not being able to function optimally. Dilated cardiomyopathy is unfortunately a fatal disease.

How to Identify a Polish Lowland Sheepdog

How to Identify a Polish Lowland Sheepdog

The Polish lowland sheepdog has an ambling gate, but excellent reach with its front legs, giving it a long stride to help herd sheep. It is a stable and self-confident breed and needs an owner who is not afraid to take control. This breed will need consistent training from an early age, but is clever and has an excellent memory. While quite loyal to its family, it is suspicious of strangers and can be quite aloof but never be vicious.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Polish lowland sheepdog. This is a medium sized breed, but is very muscular. Because of its strong skeleton, this is a well-balanced dog. Males are 18 to 20 inches at the withers and females are 17 to 19 inches. The legs are not long. The Polish lowland sheepdog has a rectangular appearance; its height is about nine-tenths of its length.

    2

    Make sure the head is in proportion to the rest of the body. The extra hair on the face make it look bigger than it is. The brown or hazel eyes give off a penetrating gaze and are medium sized and oval. They should not protrude. The medium sized, dropped ears are heart shaped, set somewhat high on the skull and are covered with long hair. Depending on coat color, the large nose can be black or brown and should be fully pigmented.

    3

    Notice the strong, muscular neck. It is a broad neck, but does not have a dewlap. It should set well on the broad, well-muscled shoulders. They are quite angulated and lead to a deep, broad chest. The thick, compact front feet are oval in shape and are larger than the rear feet. The large hindquarters are heavily boned and support a great deal of muscle. The rear feet are also oval, compact and thick. The short tail is low-set and should be no longer than two vertebrae. If puppies are born with long or partial tails, they are docked to the proper length.

    4

    Pet the double coat. The dense outer coat is long and shaggy and rather straight. The dense undercoat is soft. While common colors are white with black patches, white with gray patches or white with sandy patches, or gray with white or chocolate, the Polish lowland sheepdog can have any coat color.

Miniature Chihuahua Vs. Normal Chihuahua

Miniature Chihuahua Vs. Normal Chihuahua

The term "mini chihuahua" does not refer to a specific breed or variety of chihuahua. Some breeders and pet stores call exceptionally small chihuahuas miniatures or teacups. Most chihuahuas labeled as mini or teacup mature at a weight of three pounds or less. American Kennel Club breed standards specify that all pure-bred chihuahuas should weigh six pounds or less. Because of their small size, all chihuahuas belong to the toy dog group.

Chihuahua Varieties

    Naturally curious, chihuahuas love to investigate new places and objects.
    Naturally curious, chihuahuas love to investigate new places and objects.

    The American Kennel Club divides the chihuahua breed into two recognized varieties: long-haired chihuahuas and short-haired chihuahuas. Othere than their coat type, these two varieties have the same physical attributes. They display large upright ears, an apple-shaped head, a short muzzle and a bold intelligent personality. Both varieties come in many coat colors and color combinations. Meeting the breed standard is not necessarily important for the owners of pet chihuahuas, but people interested in breeding or showing chihuahuas should pay close attention to the standard when choosing dogs to work with.

Breeding for Size

    Most chihuahua breeders choose breeding pairs with the intention of promoting breed standard traits and reducing common breed flaws. Sometimes when a breeder becomes focused on one desirable trait, he overlooks physical flaws present in his breeding program. Because exceptionally small chihuahuas sell at higher prices in some markets, breeders may feel pressure to sacrifice quality in order to produce smaller dogs. Wise shoppers consider a chihuahua's physical soundness and health first and the desired size second when choosing a pet.

Common Health Issues

    Common inherited health issues present in the chihuahua breed include heart problems, eye deformities and poorly formed knees that result in luxating patellas. When inherited, these flaws reduce the quality and length of the chihuahua's life, and can lead to costly surgeries. Well-bred chihuahuas usually do not suffer from all of these health problems. A small dog veterinarian can examine a puppy and identify potential problems during a pre-purchase or pre-adoption exam.

Care

    Because all chihuahuas are quite small, they need some special care. In cold environments, they need help regulating their body temperature and will require warm places to rest. Trips outdoors should be of short duration in the cold. They need to eat often to maintain healthy blood sugar levels, and they need frequent potty breaks, especially when very young or very old. Jumping from high locations and rough handling can result in broken bones. The smaller the chihuahua, the easier it is to cause a broken bone.

Cost

    Chihuahua puppies sell for anywhere between a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. High price does not always mean the puppy is of a higher quality, so it is best to have a veterinarian or an expert help to ensure that a puppy is healthy and sound. Chihuahua adoption and rescue programs are available all over North America and Europe. These programs place puppies and adult dogs in permanent homes.

Kamis, 28 Maret 2013

Heart Disease in a Basset Hound Dog

Heart Disease in a Basset Hound Dog

Basset Hounds are not commonly affected by any specific type of heart disease. However, this breed of dog is not immune to the types of heart disease that affect all dogs including cardiomyopathy, mitral valve insufficiency and pulmonic stenosis; so it is important for owners to be aware of any potential health issue that may affect their Basset Hound.

Causes

    In Basset Hounds, heart disease can occur for several reasons including congenital or genetic defects such as an enlarged heart, parasites such as heartworms, dietary deficiencies such as low intake of taurine or L-carnitine, obesity or simply due to the natural aging process.

Symptoms

    Symptoms of heart disease will vary based on the individual Basset Hound depending on the type of heart disease affecting the dog. Symptoms include fainting spells, a heart murmur or arrhythmia, weight loss, coughing and behavioral changes such as becoming lethargic.

Diagnosis

    Diagnostic tools include blood tests to check for certain abnormalities such as parasites traveling in the blood stream or to determine the levels of red and white blood cell counts; tissue biopsies for potential cancers or other tissue abnormalities; an electrocardiogram to check the heart's rhythm and chest x-rays or ultrasounds for visible abnormalities such as an enlarged heart.

Treatment

    Depending on the type of heart disease affecting the Basset Hound, treatment options will vary. Some courses of treatment may include surgical correction of defects and medications to control specific issues, such as an arrhythmia.

Prognosis

    The prognosis for a Basset Hound will vary based on his age, weight, overall health and the type of heart disease occurring. If heart failure is occurring, it is inevitable that death with occur. However, other types of heart disease such as an arrhythmia or heartworms may have a better prognosis with successful treatment.

Rabu, 27 Maret 2013

Giving Salmon or Tuna to Dogs

Giving Salmon or Tuna to Dogs

Fish, including salmon and tuna, offer fatty acids that support immune health and brain function in dogs. Salmon and tuna are both safe for pets and readily available. Cook the fish first to kill any parasites or microorganisms that could sicken Fido, or feed fish oils instead.

Benefits

    The omega oils found in salmon and tuna benefit skin and coat health, reduce inflammation due to allergies or arthritis, promote weight loss, help maintain cognitive function in older dogs and overall regulate pet immune systems. Plus, most dogs will enjoy a tasty treat of cooked fish.

Ways to Feed

    Feed cooked salmon or tuna that contains no bones. Tuna juice from canned tuna is safe for dogs, so strain this off and feed it to Fido next time you're preparing canned tuna. If you're eating salmon, offer your dog the leftover skin. To get more fish into your pet's diet, talk to your vet about fish oil capsules. These provide the same health benefits as tuna or salmon and require no cooking.

Amount

    For fresh fish, offer no more than 20 percent of a dog's diet. A dog receiving 1 1/2 cup of food per day could eat up to 2.4 ounces of fish. If feeding fish oil capsules, provide Fido with 100 to 150 milligrams of omega oils per 10 pounds of body weight. Dogs with health problems, such as arthritis, can consume up to 300 milligrams of omega oils per 10 pounds of body weight. For example, a healthy 20-pound dog could consume 300 milligrams of omega oils; an unhealthy dog could consume 600 milligrams.

Warning

    While it's fine to give your pooch leftovers from your plate, avoid accidentally offering Fido anything that is potentially toxic to dogs. Avoid onions, garlic, avocado, macadamia nuts and excess salt or oil. If you're unsure what foods are safe or unsafe to feed your dog, speak with your veterinarian. Additionally, make sure to debone fish before feeding it to Fido. Those small fish bones can get caught in his throat and become a choking hazard.

Pemphigus Foliaceus in Dogs

Pemphigus foliaceus is an autoimmune disorder that causes the dog's immune system to manufacture antibodies against a compound naturally found in the skin called desmoglein I. The results are multiple pus-filled blisters that form all over the dog's body, accompanied by fever and lack of appetite.

Causes

    Pemphigus foliaceus can develop spontaneously, without a discernible cause, or may be triggered by medication reactions or progressive long-term skin problems.

Breeds

    Certain breeds are predisposed to developing pemphigus foliaceus, including Doberman pinschers, Akitas, chow chows, bearded collies, dachshunds, Finnish spitz and Newfoundland dogs.

Diagnosis

    A vet diagnoses pemphigus foliaceus by taking a skin biopsy from an affected area. Your dog will receive a local anesthetic so the vet can remove a section of the skin without hurting the dog.

Treatment

    Treatment for pemphigus foliaceus concentrates on immune-suppression, to quiet the immune system's attack against the body. Corticosteroids, like prednisone, are commonly used for this purpose. Side effects of steroids include excessive thirst and hunger, weight gain, heavy panting and excessive urination, sometimes accompanied by incontinence.

Prognosis

    Prognosis is usually good, and recovery is possible over time. According to the Mar Vista Animal Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA, up to 60 percent of dogs with pemphigus foliaceus face euthanasia due to the cost and inconvenience of treatment.

How to Identify a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

How to Identify a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

The Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever is an intelligent breed and is always ready for action but not hyperactive or nervous. It loves its family members and is good with children. It is the smallest of all the retrievers and was first bred in the early 19th century for luring and retrieving waterfowl. It loves to chase sticks or balls and loves water. The Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever should have a job to keep it busy, or they may become depressed. A good walk every day plus some game playing will keep this breed happy.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever. It is a medium-sized retriever breed that is very compact and balanced with great agility. The males are 18 to 21 inches at the shoulders, with the ideal height at 19 inches. The females are 17 to 20 inches at the shoulders, with the ideal height at 18 inches.

    2

    Make sure the head is clean cut. The skull is broad and should be only slightly rounded. The length of the muzzle is a bit shorter than the length of the skull as measured from the occiput to the stop. The face should show a friendly but alert expression. The oblique eyes are set far apart and the color blends with or is darker than the coat. The eye rims, nose and lips are either black or self-colored. The triangular ears have rounded tips and are held in a dropped position. They are farther back on the skull, and the bottom of the ear is held up. The broad nose has wide nostrils that taper at the tip.

    3

    Check that the medium-length neck has strong muscles and no throatiness. It leads to a deep chest and strong, muscular shoulders. The shoulders are angulated. The slightly oval feet are webbed and have arched toes protected by thick pads. The muscular rear is strong and has a square look to it. The angulation should be in balance with the front angulation. The thighs are muscular, and the upper and lower thigh are equal in length. There should be no rear dewclaws. The well-feathered tail should reach the hock and is usually carried low, except when the dog is alert, when it is carried in a high curve.

    4

    Pet the water-repellant coat. It is a double coat with medium length and softness, and is usually straight. The back may show a bit of a wave, but there should be no waves elsewhere. Its color can be any shade of red. There may be white markings on the feet, chest and tip of the tail.

Selasa, 26 Maret 2013

Information on the Mini Schnoodle

Information on the Mini Schnoodle

It is becoming increasingly common to see mixed breeds for sale through breeders and pet stores. Some mixed breeds are so popular that they're selected for endorsement by kennel clubs like the AKC. The schnoodle is a mix that is gaining popularity for its small size, bright personality and intelligence.

Base Breeds

    Mini schnoodles are a mix between and AKC-registered mini schnauzer and an AKC-registered toy poodle. Because this mix is so new, it's possible to breed larger schnauzers with larger poodles to get larger schnoodles, and smaller parents to get smaller puppies. The breeding is not gender specific--the schnauzer can be the mother or father, and the poodle can be either the mother or father.

Features

    Mini schnoodles are smaller dogs that weigh between 10 and 25 pounds and grow to a height lower than would reach a person's knee. They can range from white to brown, black and gray, and might be a combination of any of those colors. Their very soft, fluffy coats are somewhat like a schnauzer's.

Temperament

    Schnoodles take after both schnauzers and poodles in their happy, intelligent attitudes. They are very loyal, good with families and are easily trained through their natural curiosity. They are also self-confident and protective of those that they love.

Health and Maintenance

    Mini schnoodles don't shed, but their long coats do require grooming and regular bathing. As a hybrid breed, they do not have as many of the health problems that are passed down in pure blooded dogs.

Considerations

    Many schnoodles are first-generation, which means that they are puppies that come from one schnauzer parent and one poodle parent. Because this breed is not yet established, or set, breeding one schnoodle to another schnoodle does not necessarily result in schnoodle puppies. People are advised to purchase schnoodle puppies rather than trying to breed their own.

How to Find a Westie

How to Find a Westie

The West Highland terrier is a dog breed known for being energetic, companionable and intelligent. Because of their historical use as hunting dogs, Westies are somewhat independent and enjoy time spent outdoors. Deciding to adopt or purchase a Westie for your family pet is a something that should be thoroughly discussed prior to beginning the adoption process. Finding a Westie may take several months to a year, depending on your location and the number of Westies born in your area.

Instructions

    1

    Research Westie breeders nationwide by utilizing directory websites such as NextDayPets.com that list Westie dealers located in a variety of states. Choose a breeder and contact the company to begin the process of looking for a Westie for your family. Make sure that the dealer is reputable by requesting to visit the premises. When you visit, check to make sure that all animals appear healthy and safe, with clean cages and enough food and water.

    2

    Put your name on the list at the Westie breeder. Keep in mind that because Westies give birth to small litters, it could take several months to a year before you get your Westie.

    3

    Research local Westie rescues in your area by using nationwide Westie rescue websites such as HelpWesties.org. These groups rescue Westies that have been abandoned or abused and attempt to find loving homes for the animals. Contact the Westie rescue to see if they have Westies available for immediate adoption, if waiting for your Westie is not preferred.

    4

    Contact your local Humane Society to see if any Westies have been brought to its shelter. Inform Humane Society representatives that you want to adopt a Westie and see if they will save your information and contact you if a Westie is brought to the shelter.

List of Short-Hair Dog Breeds

List of Short-Hair Dog Breeds

The decision to own a dog is sometimes based on the length of the dog's hair. Getting a short-haired dog has some advantages, as they require minimal grooming with an occasional brush. Tick and fleas can be easier to find on a short-haired dog too. Less hair means less clean up, leaving you more time to spend with your dog. There are many short-haired dog breeds to choose from.

Dogs Under 10 lbs.

    Dogs under 10 lbs. are known as "toy" breeds. These little dogs have big personalities and are full of energy. These breeds include the chihuahua, toy dachshund, mini dachshund, Italian greyhound, toy Manchester terrier, miniature pinscher and xoloitzcuintli, which is a breed from Mexico.

Dogs 11 to 20 lbs.

    There are several varieties of small to medium dog breeds with short hair. These dogs are manageable and low maintenance when it comes to grooming than larger dogs. Some of these breeds include the Boston terrier, standard dachshund, Jack Russell terrier, standard Manchester terrier, Parson Russell terrier, pug, shih tzu and West Highland white terrier.

Dogs 21 to 50 lbs.

    There is a large selection of medium-sized short-haired dogs ranging in weight from 21 to 50 lbs., which includes several terriers and hounds. These breeds are: American Staffordshire bull terrier, Australian cattle dog, basenji, basset hound, beagle, Eurasier, French bulldog, harrier, pharoah hound, plott hound, shiba inu, Staffordshire bull terrier, whippet and the standard xoloitzcuintli.

Dogs 51 to 80 lbs.

    Medium to large dogs that generally weigh between 51 to 80 lbs. offer the largest selection of short-haired breeds, with many from the sporting, hound and working dog groups. These breeds include: appenzeller, azawakh, Belgian laekenois, Belgian malinois, black and tan coon hound, boxer, bull terrier, Chesapeake Bay retriever, dalmatian, Doberman pinscher, Eurasier, American foxhound, English foxhound, German short-haired pointer, greyhound, harrier, labrador retriever, vizsla and weimaraner

Dogs Over 80 lbs.

    Large dogs have big needs, but owning a large short-haired dog may be a bit easier since grooming is minimal. Many short-haired dogs are found in the working group breed for their size and strength. The short-haired breeds are: American bulldog, bloodhound, bluetick coonhound, boerboel, bullmastiff, Doberman pinscher, great dane, greater Swiss mountain dog, mastiff, Rhodesian ridgeback and rottweiler.

Maltese Dogs Information

Maltese Dogs Information

According to the American Kennel Club, the Maltese ranks as the 20th most popular breed in the U.S. as of 2009. Maltese make devoted and affectionate pets; with minimal training and proper care, this intelligent breed can make for the ideal canine companion.

History

    The Maltese has been around for more than 2,800 years and were the preferred breed for many aristocrats and royal families. This breed originated in Malta and was recognized by the AKC as a toy breed in 1888.

Character

    The Maltese is a joyful and happy toy dog that is very playful. This breed tends to be well-mannered and not prone to aggression. The Maltese tends to be unaware of its small size and is braver and more courageous than his size may warrant when faced with larger dogs or strangers. Its intelligence makes this an easy dog to train.

Health and Life Expectancy

    Maltese, like all breeds, are prone to certain health conditions. Their skin might be prone to sunburn where the fur parts. They are susceptible to certain eye conditions such as glaucoma; proper eye care is needed to prevent tear staining on their white coats. Maltese tend to live about 15 years or longer; good dental hygiene throughout their lives should ward off tooth loss during their later years.

Special Care

    The beautiful white Maltese coat requires consistent care. They require daily grooming and regular bathing. Their silky coat is considered to be hypo-allergenic, making them ideal for people allergic to dogs. To minimize grooming needs, many owners prefer a "puppy cut" for their Maltese, making them short and fluffy.

How to Care for Beagle Dogs

How to Care for Beagle Dogs

Beagles are energetic, playful hunting dogs that originate from Great Britain. They are medium-sized dogs with a good-natured temperament and usually live for between 12 and 15 years. Although beagles require regular exercise, they are low-maintenance dogs and are usually good with children and other pets. They are very inquisitive and have a keen sense of smell; they should always be walked on a leash to prevent wandering.

Instructions

    1

    Find a local veterinarian who will advise you on the appropriate vaccines and care for your dog. Young puppies will need their initial vaccination shots, followed by periodic booster injections. Your vet can also advise you on diet, exercise and other aspects of your dog's care. Make sure you also remember to get your dog dewormed regularly.

    2

    Familiarize yourself with potential health problems your beagle might be susceptible to. These include epilepsy and heart disease, as well as problems with their backs and eyes. It is also important to keep beagle's ears dry and clean them regularly to avoid infections. However, according to canine information website K9 Obedience, beagles are a healthy breed and don't usually suffer from serious ailments.

    3

    Feed your beagle high quality dog food. According to the American Kennel Club, beagles need a surprisingly small amount of food given how active they are. They recommend 1 to 2 small cups of dried premium dog food each day.

    4

    Exercise your beagle at least once every day. This breed is very energetic and could develop behavioral problems and destructive habits if they can't walk off some of their energy. Giving them a secure, fenced area to roam around in during the day will also help keep their exercise needs satisfied.

    5

    Groom your beagle weekly. The breed's short hair means that it doesn't require daily brushing, but grooming the dog once a week will help remove any excess hair and give you a chance to check its ears and nails to make sure they are healthy. Unless they become dirty while walking, beagles need to be bathed and shampooed only occasionally.

How to Identify a Great Dane

How to Identify a Great Dane

The Great Dane has a regal appearance and a well-formed smoothly muscled body. It is a giant working breed, but never appears clumsy and has a powerful drive. The Great Dane is known as the Apollo of dogs. The gait shows off the Great Danes strength and power with long, easy strides. Danes are spirited, always friendly, dependable and courageous, but never timid or aggressive.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the Great Danes general appearance and size. The physical and mental combination mentioned in the introduction is the characteristic that gives the Dane the majesty that no other dog can claim. The male should appear more massive than the female and has a larger frame and heavier bone than the female. The Dane should be square, though females have a somewhat longer body. The male should not be less than 30 inches at the shoulder, but the preferred height is 32 inches or more. The female should not be less than 28 inches at the shoulder, with a preferred height of 30 inches or more.

    2

    Make sure the head is rectangular, long, expressive, finely chiseled and distinguishedespecially below the eyes. The forehead should be strongly set off from the bridge of the nose. The plane of the nuzzle and the plane of the skull are straight and parallel to each other. The masculinity of the male is pronounced in the structural appearance of the head. The females head is more delicate. The eyes should be medium-sized, deep set and dark. They are almond-shaped with well-developed brows. The ears should be set high, are medium in size and are folded forward, close to the cheek. A Great Danes ears may be cropped, and the ear length should be in proportion to the size of the head. The ears should be carried erect. The nose is black, except in the blue Danethen it is blue-black. A harlequin Dane may have a spotted nose. The neck is firm and high set with a good arch, and is long and muscular. The tail should be high and set smoothly into the croup, but it is not quite level with the back. It is broad at the base and tapers down to the hock joint.

    3

    Check the fore- and hindquarters. Viewed from the side, the forequarters will be strong and muscular. The ligaments and muscles holding the shoulder to the rib cage are well-developed and securely attached to prevent loose shoulders. The elbow is half the distance from the withers to the ground. The feet are round and compact with arched toes that do not toe in or out. The hindquarters are strong and well-angulated and have well let down hocks. The hock joints look straight from the rear and should not be turned toward the inside or the outside. The rear feet should be round, compact and have well-arched toes.

    4

    Look at the coat. It will be short and thick with a glossy appearance. There are several different colors, marking and patterns, including brindle, fawn, blue, black, harlequin and mantle.

Senin, 25 Maret 2013

How to Find Dog's Ancestry Using Canine DNA Testing

How to Find Dog's Ancestry Using Canine DNA Testing

In the Bahamas, they have a dog called a "potcake." The name came about because the Islanders would feed the leftover cakes to the dogs. All the potcakes look pretty much alike. If you wake up every morning next to a wonderful mixed-breed dog, consider yourself lucky. But if you have ever wondered what breeds of dog went into your little prince or princess, try one of the products on the market.

Instructions

    1

    Understand how a canine DNA test is performed. The most common technique for testing a dog ancestry through DNA is by collecting saliva with a cotton swab from the cheeks. Using a commercial DNA test, the sample collected is sent to the testing company for analysis and results. Each company offers different types of canine DNA tests and analysis to uncover ancestry.

    2

    Choose a dog's DNA test to find ancestry. A breed DNA test is performed to find out which breeds are in a dog's ancestry. A parent verification test can identify the true parents of a dog in order to validate pure pedigree's ancestry. For this test the dog's parent samples must be collected as well. An inherited disease test identifies illnesses in the dog's ancestry. These illnesses may potentially affect the dog in the future.

    3

    Find a commercial canine DNA test kit for evaluation. There are many tests on the market that can be performed at home. Evaluate DNA testing services based on the company's reputation, test's costs, number of breeds the test can identify and veterinarian recommendations. Follow the chosen company's instructions on collecting the DNA samples and on finding and interpreting the test results.

    4

    Use the veterinarian's office to perform canine DNA testing. Many veterinarians offer dog DNA testing services at their office. This is an alternative to the home DNA tests. The doctor's test is performed using the dog's saliva and/or blood samples. The results are obtained directly by the veterinarian and shared with the dog's owners.

Food to Help a Dog With a Yeast Infection

Canine yeast infections are most commonly found in the ears or on the skin of dogs. The yeast causes sores on the dog's body, which may also be accompanied by scaliness, greasiness, odor and/or hair loss. Your veterinarian can best advise you as to the proper treatment for your dog's yeast infection. One common treatment is to change the dog's diet by incorporating certain foods and removing others that may make a yeast infection worse.

Foods to Avoid

    Eliminate foods from your dog's diet that are known to cause yeast infections. There are certain foods that your dog simply must avoid when placed on an anti-yeast diet. These foods can be avoided long-term to prevent reoccurance of a yeast infection, or short-term in order to clear a current yeast infection. Foods to remove from your dog's diet include buttermilk, cheese/cottage cheese, packaged cereal, crackers, flour enriched with vitamins derived from yeast, mushrooms, peanuts, pretzels, potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams, bread, sausage, bacon, lunch meat, sauces/gravies, all grains and sugar or anything sweet.

Foods to Include

    Feed your dog a healthy, yeast-free diet. Some foods help boost your dog's immune system, rid the body of toxins, and aid in building up a resistance against the yeast that cause infections on your dog. These foods should be included in your dog's diet to aid in prevention and speed the healing process of canine yeast infections. Foods that help prevent and heal canine yeast infections include asparagus, broccoli, parsley, squash, celery, green and yellow beans, dark leafy greens, beef, duck, chicken, fish, rabbit, lamb, plain yogurt and water.

Make It Yourself

    In order to be certain that your dog's food contains only ingredients suitable for an anti-yeast diet, you may consider making your own homemade dog food. A good example of a homemade anti-yeast dog food could be comprised of one package chicken theighs (cooked and deboned), two chicken boullion cubes, two cloves garlic, 1 1/2 cups water, and one bag frozen vegetables (be sure to thaw before use and be sure to use one listed in the Foods to Include section). Combine the ingredients and serve at room temperature. Store unused portion in the refrigerator for up to six days.

How to Select a Doberman Pinscher

Regal in appearance, the Doberman pinscher comes from Germany and is bred to be a guard dog. The Doberman is kind, loyal and very protective of its family and property. However, because this breed can be very dominant with people and aggressive with other dogs, it isn't a good pet for first-time dog owners.

Instructions

    1

    Know that you'll need to devote much time to socializing, training and caring for your dog. Dobermans can be hard to handle, and need firm and consistent guidance.

    2

    Reconsider getting a Doberman if you plan to leave the dog outdoors or won't be able to offer it companionship during the day. Dobermans are family dogs and need constant attention.

    3

    Select a Doberman pinscher if you're looking for a good watchdog. Dobermans are bred to guard and watch and are eager to do so.

    4

    Choose a Doberman pinscher if you're looking for a loving, family dog. Contrary to popular rumor, this breed can be very gentle and affectionate with people and safe with children if properly socialized and trained.

    5

    Note that Dobermans don't do well in cold weather and are definitely not outdoor dogs. But they do need a good-size yard to play in.

    6

    Look at a Doberman pinscher's features when choosing yours. The dog should appear energetic and bold, with a powerful body that is compact and muscular. The short, smooth coat will be colored either black, red, blue or fawn with rust markings.

    7

    Understand that Doberman pinschers are prone to certain health conditions such as cervical spondylitis (skeletal abnormality of the three cervical vertebrae), Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder), obesity, bloat, hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint) and heart problems.

    8

    Check out potential breeders very carefully, being sure to ask if they are members of breed clubs, specialty clubs or obedience clubs. Affiliation with a club means you can check their references to make sure that they don't run a puppy mill (a place where puppies are constantly bred for financial gain without consideration of the integrity of the breed) and that they screen for health problems before they breed.

    9

    Note that male Dobermans will grow to 26 to 28 inches and weigh 66 to 88 lbs. Females will grow to 24 to 26 inches and also weigh 66 to 88 lbs.

    10

    Realize that you'll probably pay between $300 and $1,500 for a purebred Doberman pinscher.

    11

    Know that a Doberman's life expectancy is 13 years.

How to Raise a Doberman Pinscher

How to Raise a Doberman Pinscher

While an adult Doberman Pinscher has many traits that dog owners just love, these traits are not always so easy to see or appreciate when your Doberman is just a puppy. If you choose to raise a Doberman Pinscher from a pup, you need to be prepared to put in lots of time and effort. These puppies need to be watched closely to keep them out of trouble. But with the right amount of guidance and love, your Doberman Pinscher will grow up to become an obedient, well-trained dog.

Instructions

    1

    Give your Doberman Pinscher lots of attention. This is important part of socializing the dog and preventing behavioral problems. Do not leave a puppy home alone for more than a few hours and allow your Doberman Pinscher to be around you and your family at all hours. Never leave your Doberman outside for extended periods of time unsupervised.

    2

    Train your Doberman Pinscher in a crate that is large enough for your Doberman to stand, lie down, turn and sit comfortably. Start with small periods of time, such as just while being fed, and gradually increase it. Use meal times to help your Doberman associate the crate with something positive.

    3

    Schedule a vaccination appointment with your veterinarian. Your Doberman Pinscher needs core vaccinations, such as a rabies shot, as a puppy, at 1 years old, and then every three years of its life. More specific vaccinations, such as kennel cough vaccine, are needed only after a veterinarian's recommendation, based on environment and current health level.

    4

    Feed your Doberman Pinscher a high quality chicken or lamb based food. As a puppy, your Doberman should be eating the puppy formula. Soak the dry food in water until it completely expands before feeding a Doberman puppy. This helps prevent the food from expanding in the puppy's stomach, which can cause issues.

    5

    Keep your Doberman Pinscher clean with regular bathing. A puppy needs to be bathed every few weeks or as needed. Also, keep your Doberman's kennel clean and disinfected to prevent health problems.

    6

    Clean uncropped ears with wet wipes. Nails need to be trimmed when the tip gets sharp. However, since Doberman's have black nails, it can be tough to see the quick inside, which should never be cut.

Common Female Boxer Traits

Common Female Boxer Traits

Female Boxers are smaller than their male counterparts. They are 3 1/2 inches shorter in length and weigh approximately 15 pounds less than male Boxers. They are friendly dogs that love to be around people. Female Boxers are good with children too and will protectively watch over them.

Physical Features

    Boxers are medium-sized dogs. The females can reach lengths of 21 1/2 inches, and typically weigh between 50 and 65 pounds. These dogs have a short coat that lays close to their body. Boxers' coats can come in two color varieties -- fawn and brindle. The fawn coats may vary from a striking red pigmented coat to a tanned tawny color variety. The brindle coats are usually more sparse, but have either a clear fawn background or black, defining streaks. Some Boxers may be predominantly white; but according to the American Boxer Club, "are not used by breeders." Thus, they are not as common as fawn and brindle Boxers.

Character Traits

    Female Boxers are gentle and good natured. These dogs make great pets because they are smart and obedient, and can be trained by owners. They are playful and show an eagerness to learn new things. In addition, Boxers like to pick all kinds of things up and carry them around. These dogs do like to jump and may need reminders to settle down when guests come to the house.

Heat Cycle

    Female Boxers have heat cycles twice a year. The length of the cycles vary from five days to three weeks. During this time, female Boxers will begin to menstruate. Owners should consider spaying Boxers if they do not plan on breeding them. However, dog diapers can be used to keep things from getting messy. In addition, owners can place towels in areas where Boxers are prone to lay down.

Pregnancy

    Female Boxers are only pregnant for nine weeks. The signs that a Boxer is pregnant include enlarged nipples, a sudden pronounced stomach, moodiness, changes in appetite and showing dominance in the home. A veterinarian can confirm pregnancy suspicions by performing a blood test or an ultrasound. Female Boxers have litter sizes that average from three to 12 puppies.

How to Care for a Brittany Spaniel

How to Care for a Brittany Spaniel

Loyal, obedient, friendly and intelligent all aptly describe the Brittany or (Brittany Spaniel). The breed is still commonly referred to as Brittany Spaniel, although the AKC removed "Spaniel" from the name in the '80s and they are now officially known in the U.S. as Brittany or American Brittany. But no matter what you call them--Brittanys are an energetic and jolly breed--known for their attention-getting antics. Here are ways to care for this charming and relatively low-maintenance dog.

Instructions

    1

    Spay or neuter your Brittany. Spaying females before the first heat prevents breast cancer and decreases the chance of uterine infections. Neutering male dogs before age four prevents testicular cancer, helps maintain a healthy prostate and curbs aggression.

    2

    Take your Brittany for regular medical checkups and stay current on vaccinations, flea and heartworm preventative. You can also do a monthly home exam of the skin, eyes, ears, nose, teeth and gums.

    3

    Have your Brittany's teeth cleaned regularly by a trained professional or veterinarian. Ask them to recommend a schedule. Preventative dental maintenance can include: feeding dry dog food (which can be mixed with canned or moist), safe tartar-control chew toys and dog biscuits as treats. You may also choose to clean your dog's teeth weekly with a dog toothpaste.

    4

    Feed your Brittany a nutritious diet with the proper balance of protein, carbs, fats, fiber, vitamins and minerals. If feeding a commercial dog food, choose a quality brand with meat as the first ingredient.

    5
    Halley in the field

    Make sure your Britt gets regular exercise such as brisk walks or jogs. They are a high-energy breed and tend to get restless without sufficient exercise. A good-sized yard to play in is ideal, but they can, however, adjust to apartment living.

    6

    Brush your Brittany's coat occasionally. Their shedding is generally light to moderate. Brushing with a pin brush followed by a natural bristle brush works well.

    7

    Bathe your Britt occasionally. Check the ears regularly, especially if he's been out playing in grass or brush. Clean the ears with baby oil or an ear cleaning solution for dogs. Trim the nails regularly to a comfortable length.

How to Register a Hybrid Dog

How to Register a Hybrid Dog

With approximately 150 breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, finding the right type of dog seems relatively easy. Yet new hybrid breeds--also called "designer dogs"--continue to appear and gain popularity. The most recent, both popular and widely accepted, are Goldendoodles (a mix of Golden Retriever and Poodle) and Labradoodles (a mix of Labrador Retriever and Poodle). If you have purchased a hybrid dog or bred two purebreds to create a new hybrid, there are three associations for hybrid dogs that are currently registering new mixed breeds.

Instructions

    1

    Get a copy of the registration papers for your hybrid dog's parents. Bloodlines in purebreds are extremely important; a hybrid dog's lineage can be harder to prove. Any available information that can be given to register a hybrid dog is advantageous for breeding and future bloodlines.

    2

    Contact the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC) to inquire about registering your dog as one of the hybrid breeds currently recognized--and listed on their website--or to register a new hybrid. They are located at:

    American Canine Hybrid Club

    10509 S & G Circle

    Harvey, AR 72841

    479-299-4415

    ACHC.com

    An application will be taken, and the ACHC will advise you of the fee (currently not listed on their website) to register your hybrid dog.

    3

    Apply for hybrid registration through the International Designer Canine Registry. Complete and sign an IDCR Single Registration Application; submit a copy of the hybrid dog's pedigree information, as well. The application may be downloaded from their website and mailed to:

    IDCR

    P.O. Box 26

    Keene, California 93531

    661-822-0362

    DesignerCanineRegistry.com.

    The fee is $20 to register a single dog; multiple registries are accepted by the IDCR.

    4

    Notify the Designer Breed Registry that you wish to register a hybrid dog. They may be reached at:

    Designer Breed Registry

    919 Lakewood Farmingdale Road

    Howell, NJ 07731

    989-644-0410

    Their website lists no fee schedule to register a designer dog; additionally, if you need to know what group your dog will be listed under as a hybrid, you will be advised only after the application is completed and accepted.

Minggu, 24 Maret 2013

Characteristics of Dutch Shepherds

Characteristics of Dutch Shepherds

The Dutch shepherd (Hollandse herder) is a dog breed native to Holland. Originally bred for farm labor, including sheep herding, today this versatile and intelligent breed is often used in guide dog programs and police K-9 units. Dutch shepherds can make great pets, as long as they are given proper training and allowed to stay active.

Physical Characteristics

    Dutch shepherds come in three varieties: short coat, long coat and rough (sometimes referred to as wire) coat. Their fur is brindle patterned, with colors ranging from light brown to black. They are well-muscled, medium-sized dogs that can reach a height of 26 inches and weigh between 50 and 80 pounds, when fully grown. The average lifespan of a Dutch shepherd is between 12 and 14 years of age.

Versatility

    In the eighteenth century, Dutch shepherds were bred as sheep dogs in farms across The Netherlands. They kept sheep away from crops and accompanied flocks to pastures, markets and ports. On the farm, the dogs herded cows, pulled milk carts and guarded against intruders. By the mid-nineteenth century, industrialization in Holland led to a decline in sheep herding, while dog training was just becoming popular. Dutch shepherds began to transition into a new role as trained police, search-and-rescue, tracking and guide dogs.

Disposition

    Sheep herding and guard dog work required a breed of strength, stamina, agility and obedience; traits that the Dutch shepherd is known for to this day. They often excel at canine sports, such as agility, flyball and (not surprisingly) herding. The breed is generally affectionate, loyal, hard-working, devoted and reliable.Yet Dutch shepherds also can be stubborn. Without clear direction from their owners, they tend to follow their own initiative.

Considerations

    Dutch shepherds require ample physical and mental stimulation to keep them happy, healthy and alert. Most are not aggressive and get along well with children and other pets. Yet, Dutch shepherds require strong leadership and consistent handling, or else they can overrun a household. If provided proper guidance, obedience training and regular activity, the Dutch shepherd can be a loving and dedicated family companion.

How to Choose a Pug

How to Choose a Pug

If you're thinking about adding a pug to your family, there are some things you might want to consider. A small but social breed, pugs have many things to recommend them, but the selective breeding that has resulted in a cute and affectionate pet has caused some maintenance challenges, too.

Instructions

    1

    Evaluate your current household. Pugs are good with children, but can't tolerate rough treatment. If your kids are boisterous, or want to ride their pets and wear them like fur stoles, pugs aren't designed for that kind of roughhousing.

    2

    Check your environment. Pugs suffer in high heat and humidity. If you live in an area that has year-round or seasonal hot spells that you can't control with air conditioning, reconsider keeping a pug as a pet. If the temperatures soar in summer but you have it under control with a good air conditioning system, be sure you can monitor your pug when he goes out in the heat.

    3

    Find sources of company during the daytime. Pugs are very sociable and need interaction during the day. If you work, consider ways to get your pug some company when you're not around. Pugs that are kept alone can develop behavior problems like chewing their fur or the furniture.

    4

    Learn to live with shedding. Pugs have short coats, but they still shed. Shedding doesn't seem like a problem when you're checking out the adorable pug in the pet store window, but they have dense coats that shed seasonally and need regular grooming. This can be a problem for allergy sufferers and require more vacuuming than you're used to.

    5

    Rethink quiet time. Pugs make noise. Their breathing is raspy and they snore and wheeze when they're sleeping. Although this is something you can get used to, be prepared for some adjustment to the new noise level when a pug is around.

    6

    Dial down the tricks. Pugs aren't good on-demand performers. They are smart when it suits them, but they aren't good at fetch, sit, stay, and the other standbys you may want to train a dog to perform. Part of it may be that they're stubborn and just don't understand the concept of doing something that has no purpose.

    7

    Get a checkup for the dog. Have any potential pet evaluated by a vet, and make sure that your new pet comes from a reputable breeder. National pug societies or those in your area can give you an idea about good breeders.

How to Identify a Blue Heeler

How to Identify a Blue Heeler

The Blue Heeler, also known as a Queensland Heeler, Australian Heeler and Australian Cattle Dog, is a canine well-suited for life in a large house and an open field. Blue Heelers may prove frustrating to owners who live in apartments, since the animal's constant desire for outdoor life is a natural component of its breed. In the 19th century, Dingoes were cross-bred with Dalmatians, Collies, Kelpies and Bull Terriers to eventually create the Blue Heeler. If you live on a farm and need help herding goats or other animals, this dog is for you.

Instructions

    1

    Identify common traits. Notice the wisdom and resourcefulness of the animal in its proactive and hard-working demeanor. Blue Heelers train easily, and require training to keep them in line. Watch the neck and ears of the Blue Heeler perk up immediately at any foreign sounds, sights or smells. Take the dog for a walk at least twice a day or be sure to have a large piece of land -- with a fence -- to let Blue Heelers expend their massive amount of natural energy running, digging and exploring.

    2

    Notice physical characteristics. Look at the medium build and multi-colored fur, often consisting of white, brown and grey. Identify the tall, pointed ears, curved tail and black snout. Measure the height of a mature Blue Heeler at 17 to 20 inches, and the weight at 30 to 35 lbs. Watch the scissor-like bite of the Blue Heeler -- with the upper incisors naturally fitting in front of the lower. Watch for Blue Heelers to chew daily on rubber toys, during which its bite can be observed. Notice the white coat of Blue Heeler puppies -- attributed to the Dalmatian DNA -- which turns multiple colors as it ages during its 12 to 15-year lifespan.

    3

    Understand bad habits and diseases. Watch out for nipping and biting unless the dog is trained to avoid this behavior. Offer Blue Heelers plenty of toys to chew. Blue Heeler dogs are more likely than other breeds to develop hip dysplasia and deafness in their later years.

What Are the Characteristics of a Samoyed?

What Are the Characteristics of a Samoyed?

Of the working group as designated by the American Kennel Club (AKC), and the northern breeds as classified by the United Kennel Club (UKC), the Samoyed dog was developed by the Samoyede people of Siberia for hunting, herding their reindeer and dog-sledding. The AKC recognized the Samoyed as a breed in 1906, fairly soon after the Samoyed had been first brought to the United States.

Appearance

    A Samoyed dog should be white, cream, biscuit-colored or a combination of white and biscuit with black lips that seem to "smile" in the corners, dark eyes and usually a dark nose. Since the Samoyed was developed in the cold climate of Siberia, the dog's coat should be double-coated, with the undercoat being soft and the top coat consisting of tough guard hairs. Around the neck, the dog should have a ruff where the hair is longer (male dogs will have a more obvious ruff) and the dog's plumed tail should curve up over the back. A Samoyed dog should appear big-boned, but the size of the bone should always be proportionate to the dog's size.

Measurements

    A female is 19 to 21 inches tall, and a male is 21 to 23.5 inches tall (all measurements from the ground to the withers, the top of the shoulders). Weights range between 35 and 65 pounds.

Temperament

    The Samoyed dog is known for loyalty, gentleness and intelligence, and is considered a good family dog. A Samoyed is also a very active dog, though, and will need a job or activity, such as weight-pulling or agility, to keep the dog from getting into trouble by chasing or chewing things and barking incessantly. A Samoyed may also be a good choice for someone with more than one dog, according to the "Original Dog Bible."

How Much Should a Lab Puppy Weigh?

How Much Should a Lab Puppy Weigh?

    Lab puppies grow quickly within the first 10 months of life.
    Lab puppies grow quickly within the first 10 months of life.

Lab Puppies Should Gain About Two Pounds A Week

    An eight-week old labrador puppy should weigh about 14 pounds. It is normal for lab puppies to gain about two pounds per week for the first 10 months of life. Puppies that gain weight should be exercised more often and fed less, since labs are prone to weight gain.

Every Lab Is Different

    Some labs are naturally smaller or larger than others, and males generally weigh more than females. Lab mix puppies may weigh more or less than average, depending on the breeds that they are mixed with. Don't be concerned if your lab weighs more or less than stated averages.

Bottom Line

    Focus on diet, not size. Feeding healthy, high-quality food two to three times per day and making sure that your puppy gets enough daily exercise is more important than focusing on its weight. Helping your puppy to develop healthy eating habits early will keep it healthy as an adult.

Healthy Homemade Dog Food Recipes

According to some veterinarians, dogs should eat a balanced diet that includes more than just proteins. Based on physiology, veterinarians will tell you that dogs, unlike cats, are not true carnivores. As such, a healthy, homemade diet includes carbohydrates along with proteins. While there is some controversy over whether a dog needs (or should) eat grains, evidence shows that dogs can digest 100 percent of cooked grains.

For Something Simple

    Cook brown rice as a base. Add to this some cooked peas and carrots, like those you can get premixed. Frozen vegetables are generally preferable over canned ones. For protein, top this off with cooked, ground turkey meat, or chicken or beef. You can find canned, ready-to-serve chicken and turkey (much like canned tuna). Simply heat it up. Of course, you can also take the chicken or turkey meat directly off the cooked bird, in which case you should use only the meat, peeling off any skin.

Chicken and Sardines

    Determine the amount of each ingredient based on the size of your dog. Start with cooked elbow macaroni. Add to this some cooked poultry meat (skinless and cut into bite-sized portions) and a couple of tablespoons of canned sardines in tomato sauce. You might add in a tablespoon of canola oil. If desired, crush and add in a few bone meal tablets (no more than 4) and even a multi-vitamin tablet (crushed up).

Beef, Eggs and Clams

    This homemade dog food recipe is a protein-rich one. It starts with cooked, lean ground beef. Add to this half of a hard-boiled egg and 1/2-ounce of clams. As with any meal, you can add in crushed bone meal tablets and a multi-vitamin. Because this is so protein rich, you can also opt to serve it over rice or macaroni.

Mac and Cheese Muffins

    Note that some dogs are lactose intolerant, so this recipe may or may not be one your dog can eat. However, many dogs enjoy meals with cheese. Start with a cup of four-cheese sauce. Mix in 1/4-lb. of a mild sausage (cooked and cut into small chunks). Add to this 2 cups of cooked elbow macaroni. Once mixed together, put into muffin cups and bake for 15 minutes at 400 degrees. This dog food recipe makes about a dozen mac and cheese muffins.

The Best Diets for Large Dogs

Having a large dog means you have another big mouth to feed in your household, but doing it properly is the key to keep your pet healthy and happy. Whether you choose to feed your dog Purina or Iams, it's important to cater to its specific needs. Large dogs often require a drastically different feeding schedule and diet than other smaller animals you may own. Consult your veterinarian on what's best for your large dog's breed, and then make a decision that both you and your pet will be happy with for years to come.

Adding Wet Food

    Large dogs need to get the right amount of protein to stay healthy and active. Chicken and beef are the most common sources of protein in dog food, and they're best found in cans or pouches. There's nothing wrong with feeding your large dog dry kibble, but add something new to the mix: wet food. Stir in half a can or one pouch of wet chicken or beef dog stew. Not only is this a special bonus for your pet, but it will add the necessary protein to their diet to keep them healthy and lively for longer.

Low Fat Diets

    It may sound silly to put your dog on a low fat diet, but for some breeds, it's necessary to keep them healthy. For larger dogs in particular, weight can quickly become a problem. Fat can increase the amount of stress on a dog's joints, which is why it's important to keep large breeds active and slender. Bigger dogs typically only have one or two large meals a day, so do them a favor and make it a healthy one. Look for low or reduced fat when you're buying dog food, regardless of whether it's in a can or in a bag. Food specifically catered toward large breeds will often already have this issue taken into account.

Essential Acids

    Like humans, dogs need essential fatty acids to keep their skin, teeth, and coats healthy. Many dog food companies are beginning to add Omega 3 and 6 acids to their products for this reason, and you have every reason to take advantage of it. Look for dog food that mentions these acids and proteins on the label, and try to incorporate it into your large dog's diet. With the right proteins and acids, your dog will have a shinier coat and not to mention, healthier bones. You can add years onto your dog's life just by making sure it gets the nutrition it needs to be healthy.

Sabtu, 23 Maret 2013

How to Feed a Pregnant Dog

How to Feed a Pregnant Dog

Pregnant dogs have different nutritional needs, since they are feeding both themselves and a litter of developing puppies. If these needs are not met, pregnant dogs could miscarry or develop complications during labor, some of which can even be deadly. These guidelines will help give you a basic understanding of how you should go about feeding your dog during this sensitive time.

Instructions

    1

    Feed the dog as you normally would during its first six weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant dogs do not need any extra nutrition during the very early stages of gestation. In fact, since many dogs develop morning sickness, they may not be able to eat much anyway. Yet, if it looks like your dog isnt eating anything, you will want to get them checked out by a vet.

    2

    Increase your dogs diet by 25% each week after the first six weeks of gestation. So, at week six, the dogs food would be increased 25%. This is the first time you would change her rations. At week 7 you would increase her food again by 25%, making the amount bigger than what she ate at week 6. You continue following this pattern until her puppies are born.

    3

    Use puppy food or lactation dog food. At week six, pregnant dogs should eat puppy food or lactation dog food, since they contain the most amount of nutrients.

    4

    Give your dog several small meals throughout the day. As your dogs puppies continue developing, they may compress her stomach, limiting how much food she can consume at one time. To counteract this problem, you will want to feed your dog smaller rations consistently throughout the day.

    5

    Avoid overfeeding or underfeeding your dog during any stage of its pregnancy. Overfeeding a pregnant dog could result in fat developing over her reproductive organs, which could make labor difficult if not impossible. And, if labor cant occur at all, your dog may have to undergo a Cesarean section, a procedure that is costly and slightly risky (since it is still a surgical procedure). However, if a dog is underfeed, they could risk developing eclampsia. This is a condition where a dog develops a very low blood calcium level. And, if its not treated, eclampsia could result in seizures and eventually death.

How Much Should We Feed Our Lab Puppy at 8 Weeks?

How Much Should We Feed Our Lab Puppy at 8 Weeks?

    Lab puppies are prone to overeating.
    Lab puppies are prone to overeating.

Lab Puppies Should Be Fed Often

    Like most puppies, eight-week-old Labrador puppies should be fed two or three times a day, depending on their size and activity level. Feed them a high-quality, specially formulated dry food and offer occasional wet food as well.

Labradors Are Prone To Obesity

    Labradors are particularly prone to overeating. Puppies, in particular, may whine or beg for food often. Stick to the feeding schedule recommended by your veterinarian and resist the temptation to give extra food or table scraps to them.

Bottom Line

    Overfeeding your lab puppy will pave the way for a lifetime of bad eating habits. Stick to the portion servings on the dog food bag and remember that Lab mix puppies may have different nutritional needs than purebred Labs, depending on the size of the breed they are mixed with.

Labrador Retriever Puppy Growth

Labrador retrievers continue to be America's most popular purebred dog, and for good reason: This gentle breed is an excellent family dog.

Size

    "Labs" average 50 to 75 pounds at full growth. Male dogs average 65 to 80 pounds and females 55 to 70 pounds.

Time Frame

    Labrador puppies usually reach their adult size at about 14 months, but they continue grow until 18 to 24 months, according to Club Labrador.

Considerations

    To monitor growth, weigh your puppy every week. Switch to food with more protein if he seems hungry all of the time.

Misconceptions

    Labs need puppy food until they are at least one year old. Puppies need three meals a day. Follow the feeding rates listed on the puppy-food packaging, as different feed companies use different formulas.

Warning

    Monitor your puppy's growth. If it grows too fast, it may experience pain; if it limps or whimpers when it walks, see a veterinarian immediately.

Expert Insight

    Your Lab puppy's first two years are most important for growth and long life. A Lab has an average life expectancy for dogs, at 10 to 12 years.

Yochon Dog Breed Information

The Yochun, the latest designer breed of dog, is a cross between a Yorkshire Terrier and a Bichon Frise. A designer, or hybrid dog, is the cross of two purebred breeds to make another, hopefully taking the best traits from each breed to make a newer, better breed of dog.

Size

    As a hybrid from two small breeds, the Yochon varies from 5 to 10 pounds in size.

Theories/Speculation

    The Yochon is ideally supposed to take on the best genetic qualities from both the Yorkshire Terrier and the Bichon Frise. These traits include their small stature, different color coats, being hypoallergenic and having friendly personalities.

Yorkshire Terrier

    The Yorkshire Terrier originated in Yorkshire, England. It is known for being a small, hypoallergenic dog who is a great companion that has a silky, blue-and-tan coat. They are very upright in their stature and personable.

Bichon Frise

    The Bichon Frise is a small breed of dog from France that has a white, double-layer coat of curly hair, and is known for being hypoallergenic. They have a sturdier stature than the Yorkie. They are also known for having friendly personalities.

Identification

    Yochons also known as Yo-Chons and Bichon Yorkies.

Fun Fact

    Unlike other hybrid breeds, it does not matter which breed, the Yorkie or the Bichon Frise, is the mother or the father. For size sake, most breeders use a Yorkshire Terrier stud and a Bichon Frise bitch. Because the Bichon is a little larger, it makes for easier births.