Kamis, 28 Februari 2013

What Are the Causes of Food Aversion in Dogs?

What Are the Causes of Food Aversion in Dogs?

Food aversion in dogs can be alarming, especially if it escalates to weight loss, vomiting, and costly trips to the vet. The lack of eating can be stressful to both the pet and the owner. The causes of food aversion are varied and often unexplained, ranging from cancer, digestive issues, medication or poison. It is important to keep a careful watch on your pet's diet. Recurring or persistent food aversion should be evaluated by a veterinarian.

Cancer

    Cancer causes dogs to avoid eating.
    Cancer causes dogs to avoid eating.

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among canines, and one of the symptoms of cancer is food aversion. According to the University of Pennsylvania's OncoLink Vet, any illness in the dog will have an impact on its metabolism. When a dog has cancer it requires more of some nutrients than others, and often the food isn't quite to the dog's taste, and the dog refuses to eat. The pet experiences rapid weight loss and rapid muscle deterioration.

Digestive Problems

    Digestive and GI problems encourage dogs to avoid eating.
    Digestive and GI problems encourage dogs to avoid eating.

    When a dog has a stomach problem with symptoms such as diarrhea and vomiting, they will often avoid eating. Just as in humans, the animal does not want to take in food, only to throw it up again or experience cramping later. Dogs that have these symptoms should be taking in plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration. Normal eating should return after the illness passes. If the symptoms persist, the dog should be taken to see the veterinarian.

Medication

    Medication can make a dog's stomach sick.
    Medication can make a dog's stomach sick.

    Medications such as those used for arthritis and pain, can cause food aversion in dogs. Carprofen is one such drug, and according to its maker it may cause digestive upset (vomiting and/or diarrhea), liver disease, kidney disease or a bleeding disorder. Prednisone and other corticosteroids used in the treatment of joint pain and arthritis may also cause similar side effects. They also increase the risk of ulcers.

Poison

    Avoid feeding your dog human foods.
    Avoid feeding your dog human foods.

    Many human foods are poisonous to dogs and can make them sick. If a dog is continually being given table scraps, it might be ingesting a food that its body does not tolerate. After time, the dog will learn to avoid the food because it causes illness. The ASPCA warns that foods such as onions, garlic, chives, milk, salt, chocolate, coffee, caffeine, avocados and alcohol not be fed to dogs.

Dapple Dachshund Facts

Dapple Dachshund Facts

With more than 300 varieties, including many different coat colors and patterns, the dachshund is one of the most diversified breeds of dog in existence, according to Dachshund.org. Dapple coloring, which involves a mottled coat of two or more colors, is just one of these coat varieties. Dappling, known as merle in other breeds of dog, is a dominant gene, and dapple Dachshunds can come in almost any color.

Dapple Dachshund Colors And Patterns

    Dapple Dachshunds come in all different colors, including chocolate and tan, black and tan, blueand tan, black and cream, red and many others. Longhaired, smooth-haired and wire-haired Dachshunds can all have dappling. These dogs usually have lighter base colors with darker mottled spots appearing across the coat. With some colors, such as red, the dappling can be difficult to see and may fade away as the dog becomes an adult. For this reason, it is always important to have your Dachshund's genes checked if you plan to breed it.

Genetics of Dappling

    Hundreds of different genes contribute to the coat color of a Dachshund. Though dappling is a dominant gene, it is impossible to tell how it will manifest itself on the puppy. A mother with dappling all over her body may produce a puppy with dappling only on the tail, or very little dappling at all. That puppy could then produce fully dappled offspring. Even if there is no visible dappling, the puppy still may have inherited the dapple gene.

Dapple Dachshunds' Eyes

    Sometimes with red dapples and other colors where the dappling is too faint to notice, the only clue that a Dachshund might be a dapple is its eyes. According to the Starlight Kennel, a blue-eyed Dachshund is always a dapple. Even a single blue eye along with a brown eye is always a dapple. However, not all dapples have blue eyes. Brown is the most common color in dachshunds both dappled and single-colored; however, some red dogs may have hazel eyes if their red genes have been diluted.

The Double Dapple

    When two dapple Dachshunds are bred together, both of the dominant dapple genes manifest themselves on the puppy, often resulting in white spots where the two types of dappling cancel each other out. For reasons unknown, the double dapple genes can be fatal or disfiguring to puppies. Some double dappleDdachshund puppies are born blind or deaf, and others are stillborn. Though double dapple is a pattern recognized by the AKC, it is a dangerous pattern to breed.

How to Choose the Best Dog Breed for Kids

How to Choose the Best Dog Breed for Kids

Owning a dog that gets along with your kids, and one your children love, is important if you want it to be a happy part of your family for years. That's why, if you want to get a new dog with kids in the house, knowing how to choose the right one is important. Although every dog is an individual, some dog breeds are better suited to kids than others. There are also certain factors you should consider before deciding on a specific dog and bringing him home.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a larger dog. Although some people think getting a small dog for young children is the right choice, in reality it's not. Small dogs often have nervous temperaments and can be more prone to biting. They are usually frailer than larger dogs and children, particularly young ones, can accidentally injure them. Large dogs are usually safer to play with. Kids often like bigger dogs too.

    2

    Consider your schedule and responsibilities. Do not choose a new dog with the idea that your kids will take care of it. Chances are they will not. That's why choosing a dog breed that is low-maintenance is important. Some breeds require hours of exercise. Others become depressed if they are home alone often. Some require a lot of attention and a lot of training. If you do not have the time necessary to train and take care of a new dog, do not get one. You will only end up with a poorly behaved dog you will eventually leave at the pound.

    3

    Think about your family's lifestyle. Are you active? Do you enjoy spending a lot of time outdoors? Are long hikes part of your weekly routine? What your family likes to do should be considered when choosing the right dog breed for you. If you love the outdoors, pick something like a German shepherd or a Labrador. If you prefer lounging around at home, an English bulldog or a cocker spaniel might be a better fit.

    4

    Pick out an adult dog. Many have already been socialized with children, so you will be less likely to have to spend months training it or worrying it may bite or otherwise hurt the kids. While kids usually like puppies, they require an enormous amount of time and energy and, as their temperament has not fully developed, they can be more of a gamble than an older dog.

    5

    Test a dog for temperament. Dogs like golden retrievers and Labradors are known for their placid personalities. Remember though, every dog has its own temperament, and you should be sure the one you like has a safe one before introducing it to your kids. Clap your hands at the side of its head. Push and pull it a little, or tug slightly on its tail. If it growls, snaps or tries to bite you, that is not a dog you should choose as a family pet.

    6

    Choose from dog breeds that are known for being tolerant of noise. Houses with children can test an adult's patience and tolerance, never mind a dog's. Think about a breed like an old English sheepdog or a Saint Bernard. Some of those dogs would not stir if an army jet flew overhead.

    7

    Make sure everyone in the family agrees about the same dog. You may think, even if your kids do not want that particular breed of dog, they will grow to love it. They may not. Owning a dog is enough work, without picking out a dog from a breed your kids do not like. Take your time choosing, and make sure everyone is in agreement before you bring your new dog home.

How to Raise a Yorkie Mix Dog

How to Raise a Yorkie Mix Dog

Yorkshire terriers are working-class dogs, originally bred to be ratters. This dog, weighing seven pounds on average, is ideally suited for apartment life and travel. Raising a Yorkie mix is relatively easy, if you understand the medical conditions they are prone to, the personality traits of the breed and their basic care requirements, such as feeding, grooming and training. Yorkshire terriers are generally mixed with other small dogs such as the Chihuahua, schnauzer, Maltese, bichon frise, Shih Tzu and poodle.

Instructions

    1

    Provide a stress-free environment for your Yorkie mix. Create a specific area within your home with such items as a bed, crate and toys so that your dog has a safe haven. Yorkshire terriers are very sensitive dogs; do not make any sudden changes in food or surroundings.

    2

    Train your dog to obey basic commands, such as "sit," "stay," "down," "off," and "leave it," rewarding it with small pieces of food and verbal praise immediately following the desired behavior. Yorkie mixes are inquisitive, bold and brave, which means they need firm and clearly defined boundaries. Never hit as a punishment; it will only lead to more aggressive behavior.

    3

    Take your pet outside to go to the bathroom frequently. Yorkshires can be hard to potty train due to their small bladders. If you see your dog sniffing the ground, walking in circles or pawing at the door or ground, it needs to go outside. Take your dog to the same place outside every time, so it associates the area with going to the bathroom; reward it immediately when it goes.

    4

    Brush your Yorkie mix daily. Yorkshire terriers have long, silky hair which mats easily. If you use a groomer, start taking your pet early in life so it gets accustomed to the process. Take your dog to the groomer at least once a month to keep its hair clean, trimmed and mat free.

    5

    Feed your mixed dog high-quality food with real ingredients to avoid hypoglycemia, a common medical condition in Yorkshire terriers. Look for food that contains whole grains, fruit, vegetables and high-quality protein. Yorkies are also prone to tartar build-up; feed it two small meals daily and brush its teeth regularly.

    6

    Purchase a harness to walk your dog instead of a collar. Yorkshire terriers are prone to a collapsed trachea due to soft cartilage rings; a single pull on the neck may cause damage. Do not play roughly with your dog; Yorkies are somewhat fragile and prone to hip disease and kneecap dislocation. Walk your dog for exercise and play gently, with toys.

How to Make Healthy Homemade Peanut Butter Dog Cookies

How to Make Healthy Homemade Peanut Butter Dog Cookies

If you like to bake, you likely create cookies for your family members and friends all the time. But don't forget about your favorite furry friend. While you can buy all sorts of healthy dog treats in stores, making them yourself ensures that you know exactly what ingredients are inside the treats. Peanut butter dog cookies are the perfect option option for a dog that enjoys peanut butter, especially if it has had stomach troubles with store-bought treats. Consider making these treats for your dog's birthday or any other occasion.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

    2

    Place the oil, peanut butter and water inside a bowl. Choose vegetable oil, peanut oil or any other light oil you have on hand. Do not use olive oil or a heavy oil. Stir the three ingredients together.

    3

    Stir the flour in one cup at a time until you have combined all of it.

    4

    Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead it several times until the dough forms a ball.

    5

    Place flour on a rolling pin and roll the dough out to a 1/4-inch thickness. Evenly roll the dough so you don't end up with cookies that are thin in places and thick in others.

    6

    Cut the dough into shapes that are 3 to 4 inches tall. Consider choosing a cookie cutter shaped like a dog bone so the cookies look like traditional dog treats.

    7

    Place the cookies on an ungreased cookie sheet and place them inside the oven. Bake the cookies for about 20 minutes or until brown on the bottoms. When the cookies cool, they will be hard like traditional dog treats.

Rabu, 27 Februari 2013

Are Pomeranians Chinese Dogs?

Are Pomeranians Chinese Dogs?

Pomeranians, or pom poms, belong to the toy group of dogs, weighing up to seven pounds. They are witty, outgoing and energetic. The breed has been recognized by the American Kennel Club since 1888. Pomeranians look like miniature chow chows, which are believed to be a breed of Chinese descent. This similarity in appearance makes some people wonder whether the pomeranians are a Chinese dog breed. However, pomeranian dogs have different origins.

The Origin of Pomeranians

    Pomeranians take their name from Pomerania, which is the name of a region in present-day Germany and Poland. They are believed to come from this region, but there is little information about these dogs before 1870. The dog used to weigh up to 30 pounds and people kept them for herding purposes. However, the breed evolved and Pomeranians today weigh between three and seven pounds. Queen Victoria liked the pomeranian, one of which she saw in 1888 while visiting Italy. She adopted it and took it with her back to England.

Pomeranians and Chow Chows

    Pomeranians are similar in appearance to chow chows. Both breeds have a fluffy double coat and a similar rounded shape. Chows come in five colors, three of which are also found in pomeranians (red, black and blue). However, the main difference is that pomeranians are toy dogs, while chow chows are between 17 and 20 inches when measured at the shoulders. Chow chows also have the distinctive blue tongue. In terms of personality, pom poms are happy and outgoing, while chow chows are said to be stubborn, independent and less eager to please.

Chow Chow Origins

    According to the American Kennel Club, the origins of chow chows are not precisely known, but they are found on pottery and paintings dating from the Chinese Han Dynasty. Certain scholars speculate that the chow chow is the among the ancestors of the pomeranian, samoyed, Norwegian elkhound and keeshond. However, there is no sufficient proof to state clearly that pomeranians and chow chows are related.

Other Chinese Dog Breeds

    Other dog breeds that originate from China include the pekingese, pug, shih-tzu, shar-pei and Chinese crested. With the exception of the shar-pei, the other breeds are all toy breeds. There are also other breeds that are said to originate in China, such as the Chinese chongqing or the Chinese foo dog, but these breeds are not recognized by the American Kennel Club.

How to Locate Breeders of Irish Wolfhounds

How to Locate Breeders of Irish Wolfhounds

As with any dog breed it is important to look for a responsible breeder from which to buy. You can find breeders in a number of ways. IrishWolfhounds.org highly recommend that you visit the breeder personally to ensure that the breeder is providing suitable living conditions for the dogs in their care. According to the American Kennel Club the Irish wolfhound is the tallest breed of dog in the world at 30 to 34 inches tall at the shoulder. This dog can make a suitable family companion, although it does need a large living space.

Instructions

    1

    Look for dog shows in your area and further afield and visit as many as you can. Seek breeders who are showing Irish wolfhounds. Approach the breeders and ask for recommendations for respectable Irish wolfhound breeders. People showing Irish wolfhounds may also breed the dogs professionally themselves.

    2

    Contact the AKC Parent Club online to be referred to a respectable Irish wolfhound breeder. This club was set up by the American Kennel Club and is now run by volunteers who are eager to put budding owners in contact with a suitable breeder.

    3

    Visit the recommended breeder before agreeing to purchase an Irish wolfhound. Assess the living conditions of the dogs under the breeder's care to ensure that this is a responsible breeder and the dogs are not being held in crates in the fashion of a puppy mill. Ask to see the puppy's registration certificate to ensure that it is purebred.

Common Japanese Dog Breeds

Common Japanese Dog Breeds

Japan has raised six native dog breeds. Of these original Japanese breeds, five remain common in modern times. Most of these canines look alike, with square bodies, short coats and wedge-shaped heads. They are all loyal to their owners, and many continue to acquire one because they make fine family pets.

Japanese Akita

    The Japanese Akita is one of the most well-known Japanese breeds, as well as one of the most ancient. This dog is named after the Akita prefecture where it was originally bred. The breed is characteristically playful, kind and energetic and said to be a fine family dog.

Shikoku

    The Shikoku is a common Japanese dog breed, especially for people who enjoy outdoor activities and excursions. This medium-size dog is known for its athleticism, toughness and energy and is a wonderful companion to take on hiking, biking and road trips.

Kishu

    The Kishu was bred and named after the mountainous Kishu region of Japan and is one of the country's most ancient breeds. The canine prefers cool weather and being outdoors and is also a proficient hunter. The Kishu is a loyal dog, making it a common pet for families.

Hokkaido

    The Hokkaido is a Japanese breed that was originally a companion to Ainu people, who were early hunters and gatherers in the country. The dog was revered by its owners because of its hunting skills as well as its fierce loyalty. The Hokkaido continues to show affection for its family and is known to howl like a wolf when it's happy to see someone.

Shiba

    The Shiba is the smallest of the original Japanese breeds but is still full of personality. It was bred to hunt boar, bear and other wild game and was named after the Japanese word for "brushwood," the terrain where it hunted. The dog remains an independent but loyal companion and is now a common breed around the world.

What Do Shitzus Eat?

What Do Shitzus Eat?

Shih Tzus originated in China and have been bred as companion dogs for centuries. Also known as Tibetan Temple Dogs, they are a toy breed with luxurious, flowing coats. Like many small breeds they may need to eat more than twice a day, and they need a diet rich in fats and essential oils to keep their coat and skin shiny and supple.

History

    One of the most ancient dog breeds, Shih Tzus were first kept as vermin hunters, then primarily as pets. Shih Tzu means "lion" in Chinese, and since lions are associated with deities, the little dogs became favorites of royalty and in temples and were often given as prestigious gifts to other heads of state. Writings and artwork document the Shih Tzu as favored house pets as far back as the Ming Dynasty in China.

Identification

    Shih Tzus are small dogs, measuring between 8 and 11 inches tall at the shoulder and weighing between 9 and 16 pounds. Smaller Shih Tzus are sometimes sold as "teacup" Shih Tzus but this is a marketing term for dogs that do not meet the recognized breed standard and undersized dogs may have more health problems. Their most notable feature is a long flowing double coat that, when untrimmed, reaches the ground. Most colors are acceptable but they are usually primarily white with black, gray or brown markings.

Considerations

    Like many small dogs, Shih Tzus can be prone to low blood sugar. They also may vomit on an empty stomach, and some owners find their Shih Tzus will vomit in the middle of the night. This is best addressed by feeding twice a day, in the morning and at dinnertime, with a small snack right before bedtime.

Prevention/Solution

    Shih Tzus have no breed-specific dietary requirements. Feed a high-quality, naturally preserved food. Avoid preservatives like BHA, BHT and ethoxyquin. Look for foods preserved with mixed tocopherols, rosemary and vitamins C and E instead. Look for foods that have meat as the first ingredient, and preferably elsewhere in the top five ingredients. Avoid foods that have corn or wheat gluten if possible. Home cooked or raw diets are fine as well, but do your research extremely carefully and avoid relying on any single source for advice. The link below has extensive nutrition information, including tips on choosing the best kibble.

Misconceptions

    Many Shih Tzus are coddled, and this is fine. But, avoid overfeeding or giving too many treats or potentially harmful foods like cooked bones, chocolate, grapes or fatty cooked meats. Avoid foods and treats with red dye 40 because many dogs are intolerant to this and will get dry, itchy skin. It's not enough to merely rely on the marketing blurbs on the dog food or treat bag, you need to read the actual ingredients to understand just what your Shih Tzu is eating.

Expert Insight

    Give a Shih Tzu additional omega three fatty acids for superb coat conditioning. These are usually sold for both humans and dogs alike in the form of fish or flax seed oil capsules. Fish oil is better digested by dogs, and most will eat a capsule if added to the food. Some owners poke a pin in the capsule and squeeze it over the food. The fish oil sold for human consumption is fine and a 1000mg capsule every 2 to 3 days is sufficient. Pet stores also carry omega three supplements.

Daily Calorie Requirements for Dogs

Every dog has a nutritional requirement that needs to be met to stay fit and healthy, but just like humans, dogs can eat too much or too little. Certain dogs can eat a great amount without being unhealthy, but others require substantially less food to survive. Circumstances such as pregnancy, lactation, puppyhood, and heavy work and exercise all change the nutritional requirements for dogs.

Weight

    A dog's caloric requirements depend a great deal on his or her weight. A small dog, just like a small person, requires substantially less food. For example a 20-lb dog only requires about 700 calories a day, while an 80-lb dog requires about 2,000 calories.

Puppyhood

    A puppy requires substantially more calories than an adult dog because a puppy's body is continuing to grow; thus, more calories are used by the growing process. A dog that is only 25% of his or her adult weight needs between 1,000 and 4,000 calories a day depending on the size the puppy will be as an adult.

Activity Level

    Activity level also plays an active part in caloric requirements. Dogs that are mostly sedentary require far less calories because they are not burning a great deal of what they eat, so their metabolic rate is lower than those of hard-working dogs. Working dogs (that are used in fields and on farms) require a greater amount of calories to sustain their weight because of the high amount of calories burned during the working experience.

Pregnancy

    A dog needs more calories during pregnancy and lactation than she would when she is not pregnant. Just like human beings, pregnant dogs need to eat more and ingest more calories to sustain herself and the puppies she is carrying. A pregnant dog who weighs 50 lbs needs to eat about 200 more calories a day during the latter half of her pregnancy than she normally would.

Climate

    Climate also plays a role in a dog's food requirements. Outside dogs require more food when the weather is cold, especially in areas with traditionally cold winters. Food calorie amounts should be doubled for dogs in extremely cold climates, while dogs in less cold climates should have their food intake increased by half through the months of January and February.

How to Look for Boxer Puppies

How to Look for Boxer Puppies

When looking for purebred puppies such as boxers, it's important to find a responsible breeder. A good breeder will keep her dogs in a suitable environment and the dogs she uses for breeding will have a good-natured temperament. Would-be owners can ensure they aren't supporting the puppy mill industry by buying from a recognized breeder. There are also a number of boxer rescue centers throughout the United States with boxers of all ages available for adoption.

Instructions

    1

    Visit dog shows held in your area. Dog shows often have an area where the public can interact with breeders and see different breeds. Talk to boxer breeders and ask any questions you have about the breed to find out if a boxer would be a match for your family and lifestyle. According to the American Kennel Club, the boxer can make an affectionate family dog, although it does require a lot of exercise.

    2

    Look for boxer rescue centers in your state. Find these through websites, such as JLHWeb.net/Boxermap. Visit a rescue center to see if there are any boxer puppies available for adoption. Boxer rescue centers specialize in re-homing unwanted boxers with responsible owners. If you find a boxer you'd like to adopt, you'll be interviewed by a shelter representative. If the representative decides you can provide a suitable home for a boxer, you will be able to take the puppy home, although you'll be expected to make a donation to the shelter.

    3

    Contact the American Kennel Club to find a responsible boxer breeder. Arrange to visit the breeder rather than buying a puppy before you've seen it. Ask the breeder if you can see both of the puppy's parents, since this can be a helpful indicator of the puppy's temperament. Look at the environment the dogs are housed in. They should not be confined to small crates. Ask to see the breeder's registration papers to prove he is an accredited breeder.

How to Take Care of a Jack Russell Terrier

The Jack Russell terrier is bred to be a hunter. This highly intelligent, active, and will full little dog is not for everyone. If you do decide that a Jack Russell is right for your family, here are some tips to keep him or her happy and healthy.

Instructions

    1

    When you first get you Jack Russell terrier (JRT) home you need to make sure that your fence is secure and he will not be able to jump over it(you may underestimate how high these little guys can jump), or dig under it. Jack's are natural born hunters and most love to dig (mine doesn't have a tendancy towards digging but most do). Also, make sure that visitors know to not leave the gate open, or your dog might get curious and take off down the street. If this happens and he is used to riding in your car, just follow him with your car, open the door and coax him to get in, you may have to have a treat or promise of something he likes that will get his attention. I've used "wanna go to the dog park". This works like a charm. You just have to be familiar with what you dog responds to.

    2

    Talk to your vet about the type of food to feed him and the amount he should be consuming per day. If you have a puppy for example, you will have to feed him several small meals a day. For an older dog 2-3X a day should be fine. Just be careful not to overfeed. Jack Russells don't know when they are full and will keep eating. If your dog is really active, (mine is and he's 3), he will need to eat about 3X a day. Also, these dogs are sometimes picky eaters so you may have to mix wet and dry food together to get him to eat. Also, make sure your dog has clean, fresh water at all times.

    3

    Jack Russells don't need quite as much grooming as a lot of breeds. You just need to bath them regularly, about once a week is usually fine. You will need to trim your dogs nails at least once a month. Nail trimmers can be bought at any pet supply store like, Petco or Petsmart. Be sure to read the instructions. Also, brush your dogs teeth regularly. You can buy special toothbrushes and toothpaste for dogs at any pet store also.

    4

    Jack Russells need lots of outside play time, their whole world revolves around playing. Your dog will also need lots of toys to keep him happy and entertained. You don't want your Jack Russell to be bored or he can get into mischief. Toys to buy include, soccer balls (they can play with these for hours), anything that looks like a rodent(they love these since they are natural born hunters). Also, this is not the kind of dog you can leave unattended for long periods of time.

Pug Dog Rescue in Oklahoma

Pug Dog Rescue in Oklahoma

Despite being one of the oldest breeds of dogs, Pugs still rank in the top 20 of registered breeds in the American Kennel Club thanks to their charming and dignified personalities. Pug enthusiasts often say you can't stop with just one, and therefore breeders respond to this demand with more Pug puppies. But there are many Pugs who have, for whatever reason, lost their forever home and could use a new loving family. Pug Rescue organizations across the country have responded to this need and strive to make sure each Pug is matched to the right owner.

History

    As a breed, the Pugs date back to 400 B.C. Tibetan Buddhist monks used to keep Pugs as pets. They grew even more popular when William II became King of England. By owning Pugs, he made them quite fashionable for generations to come. They were recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in the Toy Group in 1885.

The Breed

    This sturdy little dog makes an ideal companion dog, especially for those who live in apartments since their exercise needs are fairly minimal. Extreme temperatures can adversely affect the breed. Prolonged exposure to extreme heat or cold can result in health issues such as organ damage or even heat stroke. This means they are not suited to be outdoor dogs. The unique shape of the Pug's face also means they run the risk of respiratory problems and owners need to be very careful around these dogs' protruding eyes. Pugs are not a good match for families with very small children.

Temperament

    This little guy is bred for companionship and oves human interaction. He will shadow you whenever possible. He also likes his way. A lot. Despite this strong willed nature, the Pug isn't generally aggressive. However the stubborn streak can lead to some training problems, especially being housebroken. They're not very active, so this is not the kind of dog to take to the park to toss around a Frisbee with. They are very tolerant dogs and make attentive and vigilant watchdogs.

Abandonment

    The Pug's difficulty in being house-trained tops the list of reasons that Pugs are abandoned. There is also the additional problem of high veterinary bills, which because of declining health in the breed from inconsistent breeding, are on the rise for owners of Pugs. While barking, hyperactivity and aggression are not typical to the breed, these reasons are also cited for dog abandonment. As with any life investment, deciding what dog to purchase requires careful thought and thorough education to prevent any abandonment situation before it happens.

Oklahoma Rescues

    Because of the need for these abandoned or relinquished Pugs to find new homes, many Pug Rescue organizations have sprung up all over the country, including Homeward Bound Pug Rescue and Adoption of Oklahoma. Using a network of dedicated volunteers, Homeward Bound will not turn away any Pug no matter the size, health, breading or temperament.

    Pug Rescue Oklahoma City is a not-for-profit organization with a private network of foster homes to provide a bridge between the home a Pug used to have and the one he will have next.

    The Midwest Pug Rescue also provides assistance matching homeless Pugs with new families, including the Laurell K. Hamilton Sanctuary, so named after the "New York Times" best-selling author and Pug enthusiast. This sanctuary was created for elderly, sick Pugs or Pugs with special needs.

Selasa, 26 Februari 2013

Small Dogs That Are Easy to Take Care Of

Small Dogs That Are Easy to Take Care Of

When choosing the right breed of dog, a number of factors should be considered, including size, temperament, health issues and ease of training. People looking for a small, uncomplicated dog breed have several from which to choose, each with traits that can desirable or problematic.

Bichon Frise

    The bichon frise is a small, fluffy white dog, standing about 12 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 4 and 9 pounds. These dogs have a sturdy build with a thick coat of curly white hair that requires some brushing. They are docile, require little room and do not need a yard. Short daily walks keep them calm and well exercised. The bichon frise is friendly, intelligent and mak a great family dog.

Manchester Terrier

    Manchester terriers come in both standard and toy versions, with the smaller breeds reaching around 12 inches at the shoulder and between 6 and 8 pounds in weight. They are a short-haired breed, very similar in appearance to a small Doberman. An active breed, the dogs need long daily walks but are suitable for small apartments or homes with no yard. They are quick to learn thanks to their high intelligence. A few skin problems are common with the breed, generally because of sun exposure. They also have a high incidence of glaucoma.

Glen of Imaal Terrier

    The Glen of Imaal terrier is a small breed with short legs. Standing up to 14 inches at the shoulder, they are solidly built and can weigh between 34 and 36 pounds. They have a thick, gray, curly coat which needs minimal but regular grooming. With a mellow temperament, they are loyal family dogs who need short daily walks. The breed is good for small homes and apartments and does not need a yard. Due to their weight and small legs, they tend to suffer hip problems in later life.

Miniature Pinscher

    The miniature pinscher is not smaller version of the Doberman despite the resemblance to their bigger, more powerful cousins. Standing at 12 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 8 to 10 pounds, this is a solidly built breed. They are generally healthy with few inherent illnesses. They are loyal and smart and can be easy to train as long as the training is consistent. Like the Doberman, they are brave and protective of their owners. These energetic dogs need plenty of play and walks but do not require too much space.

How to Change My Dog From Wet to Dry Food

How to Change My Dog From Wet to Dry Food

Switching your canine companion from wet food to dry kibble is not something that you can do overnight. For best results, and to avoid causing your furry pal a digestive upset, you don't want to rush the transition period between the old and new food. While your dog may be resistant to the change at first, you can help it gradually become used to the dry food. The way that you present the kibble to it at mealtime will have a large influence on its acceptance of the switch.

Instructions

    1

    Put 75 percent of the wet food and 25 percent of the new, dry food into your dog's dish at feeding time. For instance, if you feed it 1 cup of wet food per meal, give it 3/4 cup of wet and 1/4 cup of dry. Continue this pattern for three additional days.

    2

    Monitor your dog for vomiting during this transition. If it vomits, feed it the 75/25 percent mixture for an additional day or two past the third day, for a total of four days.

    3

    Feed your dog a 50/50 mix of wet and dry food for four more days. Monitor the animal for vomiting or skin rashes. Contact your dog's vet immediately if the problems persist.

    4

    Adjust the mixture to 25 percent wet food and 75 percent dry for one day. Increase the dry food quantity by 10 percent each day, while decreasing the wet food percentage by 10 percent until you are feeding your canine 100 percent dry kibble. For example, feed 85 percent dry and 15 percent wet, then 95 percent dry and 5 percent wet. Finally, feed it 100 percent dry and 0 percent wet food.

Are Pomeranians Good With Kids?

Are Pomeranians Good With Kids?

Pomeranians are small dogs with fox-like faces and thick coats that come in a variety of colors, though reds and oranges are most often seen. Members of this toy breed are typically active, intelligent and outgoing, and their lively natures and bright eyes make them a popular canine companion. Some potential owners with young children wonder whether the breed is right for their families, and the answer lies in several factors.

Size

    Pomeranians are extremely small dogs, weighing only 3 to 7 pounds, so when considering this factor, the question may become whether children are good for this breed. Young children, while energetic enough to keep up with this furry ball of activity, often engage in play that could be too rough for the tiny Pomeranian. With their delicate frames and tendency toward health problems such as dislocated kneecaps, these dogs might be too fragile for some children.

Temperament

    These little dogs have a number of traits going for them as pets for families with small children. They are lively and playful, and their alert natures generally make them very good watchdogs. They are usually happy dogs who are adept at learning tricks, a feature which can delight small children. However, some Pomeranians may develop behavior problems, including a pack leader mentality. These dogs may bite when children attempt to exert their dominance.

Grooming Requirements

    Pomeranians are not among the easiest breeds to groom. Their luxurious double coats shed constantly, and the dogs need brushing often. For some parents, the toys and clutter that can come with small children is all they can handle without adding these hairy little creatures into their households. Others may look at Pomeranians' thick coats as an opportunity to teach their children about the responsibility that comes with taking care of another living creature.

Socialization and Training

    In addition to daily play, Pomeranians need regular walks. Socialization is key in order to keep this breed from becoming nervous, and a training regimen can help control its dominant tendencies. This can lead to a well-rounded pet that is good with both adults and children, and getting the kids involved in the training and socialization process may help it work even better.

How to Breed Toy Poodles

How to Breed Toy Poodles

Toy Poodles are tiny, cute fluffy things. They can also be high-strung, bark a lot and are full of energy! Extremely intelligent, Toy Poodles need firm boundaries and social interaction starting at a very early age. With proper training and care, Toy Poodles make wonderful, amusing pets. Breeding Toy Poodles will not bring in a lot of money, but it if you are willing to work hard, it can be a fun and very rewarding hobby.

Instructions

    1

    Examine your motivations. If you think that you are going to get rich breeding Toy Poodles, think again! Breeding any type of dog takes time and money. You might not even break even. Toy Poodles have high grooming needs and are prone to ear infections, runny eyes, digestive tract and heart disorders, which will cost a lot of money to treat. Also, because they are a small breed, it is possible that the female may need a cesarean section to give birth, which is also very expensive.

    2

    Examine your home. Do you have outdoor space for dogs to run around in? Toy Poodles need daily exercise. Do you have a way to keep female and male dogs apart when the female is in heat? You will need to set up separate, secure areas to keep the female dogs in. Finally, make sure you have a private, safe place for the female to have her puppies that is inside the house. You will want to be near the dogs at all times.

    3

    Examine your schedule. Can you be home for long periods of time? Puppies need constant care and attention. You won't be able to leave them alone for very long. Toy Poodles are very social dogs and should be introduced to people at a very young age. The more people they are around as puppies, the better!

    4

    Examine your finances. You will need to spend a good amount of money on breeding Toy Poodles. Stud fees start at $300 and go up from there. You will need to feed your female(s) the best food available and pay for the first shots when the puppies are born.

    5

    Examine the female. You will know she is ready to breed when you see a clear discharge, followed by bleeding. Wait 10 days, and then bring in the stud. Toy Poodles usually go into heat only twice a year, and it is not a good idea to breed the first heat, so this will take some time. Once you bring in the stud, you may need to stay nearby and hold the head of the female toy poodle in order to protect both dogs, as she might get aggressive. The dogs will separate on their own when they are finished.

    6

    Examine the puppies carefully when they are born and have a vet on standby in the event a cesarean section is needed. Toy Poodles can have from one to eight or more puppies, and some might be stillborn. Once the puppies are born healthy and growing, you can start advertising for buyers, although they should not go home until they are at least nine weeks old, as they need their mother's milk until then.

Morkie vs. Maltipoo

Morkie vs. Maltipoo

No matter whether you choose a Maltese-Yorkshire terrier mix -- a Morkie -- or a Maltese-poodle cross -- a Maltipoo -- you'll end up with a cute little dog. These hybrids take on some of the characteristics of either parent breed, so one might suit your situation better than the other would. Both make very good companions.

Maltese

    The white Maltese, the common denominator in the Maltipoo and the Morkie, matures at between 4 and 7 pounds. One of the most ancient dog breeds, the Maltese is renowned for its good dispositions and high spirits. Maltipoos and Morkies should both inherit those qualities. The Maltese is also known for bravery, not quite realizing what a tiny dog he really is. That's another characteristic shared with the Yorkshire terrier, so the Morkie might exhibit a little too much confidence in that department compared to the wiser Maltipoo.

Poodle

    Maltipoos usually result from crosses with toy poodles, not miniature poodles, so they should grow up to be the same size as the Maltese. The American Kennel Club standard limits toy poodles by size, not weight. Toy poodles can't exceed 10 inches in height at the shoulder at maturity. Poodles are known for their exceptional intelligence, and they pick up training very quickly.

Yorkshire Terrier

    Although Yorkies are small and portable, don't forget that they're terriers. These tough little dogs, 7 pounds or less, were originally bred to hunt vermin. A Morkie could take on the determined, energetic nature of the Yorkie, which isn't a bad thing.

Morkie

    A Morkie might have the wiry coat of his Yorkie parent. Both the Maltese and the Yorkie are prone to barking, so although the Morkie might be a good little watchdog, he might yap more than the Maltipoo. Although this hybrid also comes in several shades, many Morkies sport the two-tone coloring of their Yorkie parents. Morkies require brushing several times a week and regular grooming.

Maltipoo

    If your Maltipoo receives the best qualities of his parent breeds, he'll be as smart as the poodle and as sweet as the Maltese. If his coat tends toward the poodle, he might be hypoallergenic. That's good if someone in your household suffers from allergies. It also means he'll require regular grooming services. Without regular grooming, an overgrown "poodly" coat could turn him into a curly, matted mess of a small dog. Poodle heritage means the Maltipoo is available in a variety of shades, including black, chocolate, gray, apricot and cream.

Different Kinds of Pomeranians

Different Kinds of Pomeranians

Pomeranians, often referred to as Poms, are a breed of dog most frequently known for being a toy dog because of their size and overall aesthetic. While there is no variation in the actual breed of Pomeranians, Poms differ greatly from dog to dog in terms of hair length, coloring, size, and personality.

Hair Lengths

    Pomeranians can appear different because of their hair length. Pomeranians have two coats of hair: an undercoat, which is soft and fluffy, and a top coat, which is long and straight. Most Pomeranians have long, fluffy hair. Generally, this is considered a sign of being a purebred Pomeranian. Pomeranians with short hair are less common and may not be purebreds. In most cases, only Pomeranians with long hair are used in dog shows. Longer-haired Pomeranians will be better off outside without shelter, but they also shed more inside.

Colors

    Pomeranians may be one of a variety of colors. Most commonly, Pomeranians are reddish brown in coloring. Others may be a chocolate color, black or cream. Others may be a mix of colors. For example, "beaver" Pomeranians are a mix of white, gray, brown and black. "Sable" Pomeranians are silver or gray with black-tipped fur. Also, some Pomeranians are predominantly white with a few patches of brown, black or gray coloring.

Size

    Most Pomeranians are 8 to 11 inches in height and weigh between 3 and 7 pounds. While there are not differing breeds of Pomeranians, some people consider smaller Pomeranians to be "Miniature Poms." These are dogs which fall under the typical weight of the Pomeranian breed. In most cases, these miniature Poms can actually fit into a teacup, earning them the nickname of "Teacup Poms." On the opposite side of the spectrum, other Pomeranians have been known to weigh up to 18 pounds. However, this is extremely unusual.

Personality

    Pomeranians vary greatly in personality and demeanor. They are not considered to have any specific inherent traits or characteristics. Rather, they tend to emulate the personality of their owners. Pomeranians with energetic, loud owners frequently find that their Pomeranians bark more and display more energy, while quieter, more low-key Pomeranian owners generally experience a similar nature in their pet. In general, the adaptive nature of the Pomeranian is specifically characteristic of the breed.

Senin, 25 Februari 2013

How to Prepare Raw Diet Dog Food

How to Prepare Raw Diet Dog Food

There are many benefits to a raw food diet for dogs. For example, because dogs have been domesticated over time, they have become used to store bought wet and dry foods, but raw foods are more reminiscent of their intended diet. Other benefits are shinier coats, improved digestion and fresher breath. There are also certain dangers of purchasing premade dog foods, such as safety recalls.

Instructions

    1

    Visit a vet for tips and help into beginning a raw diet. A dog's diet is an integral part of its overall health. Before beginning this or any other dietary change for your dog, it is important to seek the advice of a licensed and trained professional. If your dog has any preexisting conditions, such as Canine Parvovirus, the bacteria from raw foods such as eggs could be potentially fatal.

    2

    Choose only organically grown products. Meats and vegetables grown with pesticides or chemicals can be dangerous to a dog's health. If it is not possible to grow your own vegetables, you will need to rely on organically grown, chemical-free alternatives. Visit local family farms for help in finding safe raw foods for your dog.

    3

    Rinse raw meats lightly. The meat should be free of any feathers. It is not necessary to use boneless cuts of meat, in fact, the dog will enjoy eating the bone as well. Because the food is raw, there is no danger of the bone splintering and cutting the dog's gums or intestines like there is with cooked dog bones. Meats such as chicken, oxtail, pork or livers are ideal for helping a dog to attain his fat and protein needs.

    4

    Feed your dog to its body size. As a general guide, your dog should eat about 2 to 4 percent of its weight on a daily basis. For example, if your dog weighs 20 lbs., it should receive 0.4 to 0.8 lbs. of meat and vegetables. Too little will leave your dog hungry, but too much can lead to health problems such as canine diabetes. If your foods are not already cut, weigh and slice as needed.

    5

    Feed your dog whole raw vegetables. Rinse them lightly to remove dirt and bacteria, but there is no need to peel them. Vegetables such as carrots and broccoli are ideal for a dog's raw diet. Also keep on hand chunks of gourds, such as pumpkin and butternut squash.

Pig Hide & Pig Ears As Related to Dog Health

Pig Hide & Pig Ears As Related to Dog Health

Chewing helps satisfy your dog's need to chew. Treats from pigs include pig ears and hide (or rawhide) bones, strips and rolls. Health benefits and risks depend on various factors.

Function

    Pig hide and ears provide enjoyable activity for your dog, according to Vetinfo. Treats differ in designs and some are intended for eating. Other kinds can function just for chewing.

Risks

    Pig hide and ears potentially create risks that include esophageal blockage, choking and intestinal blockage. According to Vetinfo, rolled rawhide bones increase risks of teeth and jaw injuries. The fat content of pig ears contribute to obesity.

Contaminants

    Pig hide and ears problems include allergic reaction and upset stomach. According to the University of Wisconsin, outbreaks of salmonella infect both pets and humans who handle the treats. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration reported findings of melamine, a potential deadly contaminate for dogs, in pig ears in 2007.

Prevention

    Steps to increase the safety of pig ears and hide include choosing the proper size, buying from safe sources and limiting consumed treats. According to Vetinfo, safe suppliers test the ears for contamination. According to the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress, pig ears sold in large bins lack quality control. Supervision of your dog with chew treats provides you with the ability to act quickly if it chokes or breaks off pieces that potentially could cause problems.

The Different Breeds of German Shepherds

The Different Breeds of German Shepherds

German Shepherds are a popular breed of dog known for their remarkable abilities to learn and follow commands, as well as their loyalty and protective nature. Because of their obedience and intelligence, they are used by police forces as K-9 units, sniffing out drugs and explosives and assisting in the capture of fugitives. Almost all breeds of German Shepherds originated in Germany or Eastern Europe, where they were originally bred in the late 1800s to herd sheep.



German Shepherds are known for their long muzzles, brown eyes and long ears that stiffen into an upright position as they grow to adulthood. They are also known for their familiar tan-and-dark "saddle" coloration, although there are exceptions to this pattern.

East German Working Type

    These are some of the original breeds of German Shepherds, bred with the intent of working herds of sheep. Hair length of these dogs is stock, or short, length. Coloration deviates from the now-familiar "saddle" of dark brown or black fur over the back transitioning to reddish-brown around the legs and underside in that females have a grey sable coat that covers most of their body, transitioning to red only at the legs or extreme underbelly. Males have a dark saddle that extends down to the legs.

East German/Czech Working Type

    This breed is another of the original breeds of German Shepherds, bred to work herds of sheep. The hair length of these dogs is long, with an undercoat. This breed does not have a saddle coloration; instead, they are all black.

West German Working Type

    Another of the original breeds from Germany intended for shepherding, these are one of the most widely-recognizable breeds of dog. West Germans have the classic black/red saddle with tan coloration on the undersides, legs, shoulders and hips. They have a close stock coat, and patches of black and tan on their faces.

West German Highlines Type

    This breed is similar to the West German Working Type, but sometimes has a longer coat and a slightly smaller black saddle.

American AKC Type

    This breed is more recent, with an average-to-heavy black saddle with light tan underside. The hair length is stock.

Minggu, 24 Februari 2013

What Are the Behaviors of Maltipoo Puppies?

What Are the Behaviors of Maltipoo Puppies?

Maltipoos are a cross between Maltese and poodle breeds. They were originally bred to be hypoallergenic dogs, since both poodles and Maltese are non-shedding and considered to be good pets for people with allergies. Small in size, these dogs weigh from five to 20 pounds and stand about 12 inches tall. The maltipoo's adult size depends on the lineage of the parent poodle, and whether it was standard size or toy size. Maltipoos are intelligent and lively, and make good family pets.

Maltipoo Personality

    Your maltipoo puppy will be sociable and friendly with people. Begin its training early with brief sessions and basic commands to engage your puppy. These dogs are intelligent, learn quickly and train easily, making them wonderful pets for the elderly and families with children. Maltipoos make excellent therapy dogs. They need attention and regular exercise and prefer being with their human families to being alone. Maltipoos should live indoors and not in outdoor kennels or doghouses. These dogs are gentle, affectionate and devoted to their people.

Maltipoo Puppy Care

    Have a crate ready for your maltipoo puppy when you bring it home. This will be the puppy's den, where it should sleep. Line the crate with paper under old towels or blankets, and take your puppy out every 30 minutes to potty for the first few weeks. Maltipoo puppies are energetic, crave attention and enjoy playing. The puppy will nap frequently between play periods. Feed your puppy three times a day until it's six months old. Your breeder will tell you how much to feed, depending on your puppy's size. Ask your breeder for your puppy's lineage so you will know what size to expect.

Environment and Exercise

    Maltipoos do well in apartments or homes. They are good watchdogs and do bark, however, which can be a consideration in apartment buildings. As your puppy grows, it will need regular exercise, but indoor games or daily walks are sufficient. The maltipoo can suffer from separation anxiety when left alone for long periods of time, so an owner who is home most of the time is the ideal living environment for your puppy. A bored maltipoo is likely to chew, so provide safe puppy toys. A hollow rubber toy that you can fill with baby food or yogurt and freeze will help the puppy teethe.

Grooming

    Maltipoos require regular trimming to keep their coats neat. While it's a puppy, until its adult coat grows in, your maltipoo will only require regular brushing with a soft pin brush. Depending on the puppy's lineage, it can be clipped in a poodle puppy cut or trimmed as a Maltese would be. Adult dogs should be brushed several times a week to prevent tangles and bathed monthly. The maltipoo's coat should be clipped or trimmed every two months. Maltipoo puppies that favor Maltese parentage are usually white or light colored, while those that favor poodles can be darker colors.

What Kind of Raw Veggies Can You Feed a Dog?

What Kind of Raw Veggies Can You Feed a Dog?

Dogs might appear to have cast iron stomachs given the things, intentional or not, that canines can eat and seemingly go on unharmed. However, when it comes to a dog's regular diet, there are certain fruits and vegetables dogs and other animals should avoid. Feeding vegetables to a dog, in broad terms, is acceptable and healthy, provided owners avoid certain plants and plant families.

Nutritional Value of Veggies for Canines

    Dogs are naturally carnivorous creatures, although they do derive nutritional value from the vegetables and plant matter ingested by herbivores. In the wild, dogs would choose a primarily carnivorous diet, although an omnivorous diet would also sustain a canine indefinitely. The ASPCA recommends that owners feed dogs vegetables as treats, rather than as a dietary staple. While dogs can derive nutritional value from vegetables, a diet high in animal protein is a healthier option.

Raw Versus Cooked Vegetables

    Many vegetables, such as leafy greens like parsley, lettuce, or alfalfa sprouts, provide minimal essential vitamins and nutrients for dogs. Such vegetables offer the most benefit when fed raw to canines. However, other vegetables, especially starchy options like legumes and potatoes, are too hard for dogs to digest in their raw form. These vegetables are still a healthy treat option, but require cooking first to better aid a dog's digestion.

Safe Raw Vegetables for Dogs

    Vegetables deemed safe by veterinary professionals and the ASPCA include leafy greens like lettuce, sprouts, and chopped parsley. Carrots, beets, zucchini, and squash are also healthy and safe for dogs, although require fine chopping or grating to prevent choking hazards. Additional raw vegetables include corn, bell peppers, and the fleshy parts of tomatoes. According to the ASPCA, additional choices may include eggplant and some fruits in the melon family. ASPCA professionals recommend limiting such choices to less than 10 percent of the dog's diet, since not all fruits and vegetables offer substantial nutritional value to canines.

Vegetables to Avoid

    Some vegetables offer nutritional benefit while others deliver only empty calories. Of greater concern to pet owners are the other vegetables to avoid. The leafy green parts of tomato plants can cause severe stomach problems, slow the heart rate, and lead to central nervous system issues. Avocado and parts of the avocado plant contain Persin, a known stomach irritant for dogs. Onions, garlic, and chives also cause stomach irritation, but can also lead to red blood cell damage in canines.

How to Tell if a Dog Is Half Chihuahua & Half Jack Russell

How to Tell if a Dog Is Half Chihuahua & Half Jack Russell

You love your mixed dog no matter what breed it is -- yet many dog owners are still curious to find out more about their dog's ancestry. If you think your dog might be half-Chihuahua and half-Jack Russell Terrier, there are a variety of ways to find out its heritage, or at least have a better guess. Researching the dog's past and the two breeds you suspect can lend some clues as to the animal's makeup, while a dog DNA test can let you know for sure.

Instructions

    1

    Track down where the dog came from. If the animal came from a pet store or breeder, the seller should be able to provide you with information about its parents. Check if these dogs were a Chihuahua and Jack Russell Terrier. Even if you adopted the dog from an animal shelter, you might be able to find some information about its background. Ask the staff at the center if they have any information about the dog's past and where it came from.

    2

    Look for Chihuahua characteristics in the dog. This short, stocky breed typically weighs 2 to 6 pounds and is 6 to 9 inches tall. While the animal comes a variety of colors, almost all Chihuahuas have an apple-shaped head with a short, pointed muzzle, round eyes and pointy ears. Personality-wise, Chihuahuas are lively, and often energetic and cocky. They crave attention and can be protective of their family.

    3

    Search for Jack Russell Terrier traits in your dog to better understand if it has this breed in its genes. This breed typically weighs 10 to 15 pounds and is 15 to 18 inches tall. Jack Russells have flat heads, medium-length muzzles, almond-shaped eyes and black noses. Their coats are tough and are usually white with tan, brown or black markings. Jack Russell Terriers are full of personality. They are intelligent, which can lead to them being crafty, cunning and bold. These dogs have a lot of energy and love to exercise whenever they can.

    4

    Talk to your veterinarian to find out more information about your dog's breeds. This professional probably works with dogs everyday and will be able to pick out what kind of breeds make up your dog. Also, if your dog has any health problems, the doctor will be able to tell you if these problems are common in either Chihuahuas or Jack Russell Terriers.

    5

    Get a DNA test for your dog. The Wisdom Panel Insights Dog DNA Test can break down your dog's genetics to determine what breeds are in its ancestry. The test, which in 2011 cost about $70, is done at home. The owner collects a saliva sample from the dog's cheek, which is sent to the company and its lab. The results of the dog's genetic makeup and various breeds are available within two to three weeks.

How to Donate Dog Food to Shelters in Atlanta, Georgia

How to Donate Dog Food to Shelters in Atlanta, Georgia

According to the ASPCA, about 5 million to 7 million companion animals enter animal shelters each year. Some are traditional shelters, while others are private, "no-kill" shelters that depend on the generosity of volunteers to provide the basic needs for these homeless animals. Atlanta has several shelters and rescues that could benefit from your generosity, and your options range from donating money online to dropping off food in various locations in the city. You can even donate through an Amazon.com wish list.

Instructions

    1

    Drop food off at handy locations. Save Our Pets Food Bank provides drop-boxes in various stores, such as Highland Pet Supply and Barking Hound Village locations. A happy dog face adorns the boxes, where you can deposit pet food and treats that the food bank will get to animals in need. This includes those in shelters or with foster families, or those whose owners need a little help providing for their pets.

    2

    Buy products from PetSmart to donate to the shelter of your choice. The national chain offers an easy way to donate food right from your computer. Simply go to the PetSmart website's Shelter Donation Station, select a state, choose a shelter and then pick a product to donate.

    3

    Fulfill shelter wishes. The Atlanta Humane Society has its own wish list on Amazon's website, where you can buy a variety of products, including pet food. You can buy the product from your computer with a credit card, and it will be delivered to the Atlanta Humane Society.

    4

    Organize a food drive through your school, church or business, where you can become your own drop-off location for family and friends. Check with the shelter, rescue center or food bank to see what you can do to organize a fundraising event.

How to Care for a Great Pyrenees

How to Care for a Great Pyrenees

A dog named after a mountain range has to be mighty. And if that's not proof enough, the Great Pyrenees was originally bred to guard flocks of sheep and protect the homes of shepherds from wolves and bears. In addition to being great protectors, other traits of The Great Pyrenees (known as a "Pyr" for short and Pyrenean Mountain Dog in Europe) are: courageous, loyal, gentle, affectionate and devoted. Of course, a great dog needs some great care. And the following steps will show you how to provide it.

Instructions

    1

    Spay/Neuter your Great Pyrenees. Spaying females before the first heat prevents breast cancer and decreases the likelihood of uterine infections. Neutering males before the age of four prevents testicular cancer, helps prevent prostate problems and curbs aggression.

    2

    Keep your Pyrenees' vaccinations, flea and heartworm preventative current and schedule regular medical exams. You can also do a monthly home exam of the skin, eyes, ears, nose, teeth and gums. Have your Pyr's teeth professionally cleaned and scaled on a periodic basis as suggested by your veterinarian.

    3

    Feed your Pyrenees a quality dog food with meat listed as the first ingredient and the proper balance of protein, carbs, fats, fiber, vitamins and minerals or a homemade diet. Don't overfeed, especially since Pyrs have low metabolism. An ideal weight for this breed can be between 85 to 125 lbs., with females being smaller.

    4

    Provide your Pyr with a decent-sized yard and regular exercise. It doesn't have to be vigorous, but needs to be regular for them to stay in shape. They are not the best candidates for apartment living because they need space.

    5

    Brush your Pyr's double coat regularly to keep it in good condition. More brushing is needed when they shed the dense undercoat once a year. The outer coat doesn't get matted, so care is relatively easy. Bathe your Pyr when necessary; it doesn't have to be frequently.

    6

    Give your Great Pyrenees motivational training. They don't respond well to harsh corrections or repetitive training. It is best to train and socialize them as puppies before they get bigger and harder to handle. Pyrenees often end up at rescues because they can be a handful for people unaccustomed to dealing with big dogs that have a strong-willed and independent nature.

Bearded Collie Types

Bearded Collie Types

The bearded collie breed is believed to have originated in Great Britain in the 1800s. It has a history of being a herd dog used on sheep farms and cattle drives. In more recent history, the bearded collie has been bred as a show dog and is also popular as a family pet. In the beginning, there were two different types of this breed. However, there is now only the standard bearded collie breed that is recognized.

Types of Bearded Collies

    The two original bearded collie types were the border and the highland varieties. The border had a somewhat wavy coat that was white and brown in color. The highland bearded collie had a coat that was white and gray. Over time these two types were interbred, and now the bearded collie only has one variety of the breed.

Appearance

    The bearded collie is a medium-build dog. It has muscular legs and is very strong and agile. The bearded collie is covered in long, shaggy hair. The head has a strong muzzle, and the eyes are large with arching eyebrows. The ears are hairy, medium-sized and hang freely. The beard of this dog is made up of longer hair hanging from the chin, lower lip and cheeks. The bearded collie may range in various shades of brown, black or fawn, with or without white blended in.

Personality

    The personality of the bearded collie is very friendly and outgoing. This dog enjoys being active and playful. Its friendly temperament makes it a favorite family pet, however it can be a bit overactive for playing with small children. It is eager to please its owner, but needs supervision to prevent it from getting into mischief. While the bearded collie does bark, it may not be suitable for a watchdog.

Lifespan

    The lifespan of the bearded collie is normally from 12 to 14 years. They don't usually have any major health problems. In rare cases, some may develop coronary heart disease, cataracts or epilepsy. It is a good idea to have the vet to keep a yearly check on the eyes, hips and heart of this breed.

Pet Nutrition and Training

Pet Nutrition and Training

A pet's nutrition and training are vital parts of an animals life. It can be difficult for the pet owner to incorporate proper training and nutrition for a pet while maintaining a hectic schedule at the same time. But just like humans, pets can face ailments due to poor nutrition. Lack of training may lead the pet into a dangerous situation.

Commands

    It is important to train a pet (or have them trained) to understand basic commands. For example, if a pet runs out of the house, it would be much less dangerous to them if they came back in when called, rather than running into the street.

Potty Training

    Training a pet to use a potty pad, litter box or to eliminate outside, is an essential part of pet ownership. Learning this skill early can lay the foundation for future training.

Sitting

    A pet's ability to sit still is extremely important. It is critical for pets to be trained to sit so that they will be manageable at veterinarian visits and while being groomed.

Water

    Pets should always have access to clean, fresh water. This will help your pet to stay hydrated, maintain proper body temperature, aid in digestion and lubricate muscles.

Food

    A pet's diet generally needs to contain proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, fatty acids and fats. Different animals may have different specific needs. These ingredients can be obtained through dried, canned or fresh foods. It also is important to ask a veterinarian how much food the pet needs daily. Being overfed or underfed could affect the pet's health.

Every Type of Poodle

Every Type of Poodle

The poodle breed is one of the most popular breeds worldwide. Originating from Germany, this dog is a type of retriever, designed specifically for water. The poodle is an extremely smart and obedient dog. Poodles come in solid colors, ranging from white, grey, black, brown and sometimes red. They live between 12 and 15 years. There is no such thing as a French poodle. The name originates from the traditional cut that poodles sport in order to help them float in the water better.

Standard Poodle

    The standard poodle is the largest of all poodle types. This type is considered a medium to large sized dog, standing over 15 inches and weighing between 45 to 70 lbs. The standard poodle, like other large dogs, is prone to bloat, a type of gastrointestinal disorder that affects large dogs. These active dogs are full of energy and need to be exercised with a daily walk.

Miniature Poodle

    Miniature poodle is the second largest of the poodle sizes that are AKC certified. This breed stands between 11 and 15 inches, weighing between 15 and 17 lbs. Like the standard poodle, the miniature poodle is intelligent, but can be high-strung if not given enough exercise.

Toy Poodle

    The toy poodle is the smallest of the AKC certified poodles. This type stands only up to 10 inches and weighs between 6 to 9 lbs. Like many small dogs, this type can develop the "Small Dog Syndrome" and must not be allowed to believe that he is the pack leader. The toy type tends to bark a lot and may develop stressed relationships with other, bigger dogs, so early socialization is a must.

Klein Poodle

    The Klein poodle is not an AKC certified type of poodle. It is the second largest of all the types, standing slightly smaller than the standard poodle, between 15 to 20 inches in height and weighing 20 to 30 lbs. The Klein poodle is very similar to the standard type and requires a daily walk to keep the energy levels at a normal level.

Teacup Poodle

    The teacup poodle is the smallest of all the poodle types, but it is not accepted by the AKC, however, has become a very popular variation. Like the toy poodle, the teacup poodle can also easily develop the "Small Dog Syndrome" and tends to bark a lot. Proper socialization is a must.

Kidney Insufficiency Diet for Greyhounds

Kidney Insufficiency Diet for Greyhounds

Dogs can experience kidney problems resulting in insufficient kidney functioning. Racing greyhounds may be at a higher risk than some other breeds for kidney problems, so it is important to be prepared. Dogs with kidney insufficiency may benefit from a diet adjustment, and you should closely monitor what your dog eats if it has kidney insufficiency.

Kidney Problems in Greyhounds

    Most veterinarians diagnose kidney problems when blood tests show high levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. The problem for greyhounds is that they naturally have higher levels of BUN and creatinine in their blood, so if your veterinarian diagnoses kidney insufficiency and your greyhound hasn't shown any signs of kidney trouble, you may want to get a second opinion.

Diet Components

    Greyhounds with kidney insufficiency need a diet lower in protein than healthy dogs; however, the protein provided should be of the highest nutritional quality possible. Restricting protein in your greyhound's diet will also help you to restrict phosphorus, which vets recommend limiting for greyhounds with kidney problems.

    To help restrict the amount of phosphorus your greyhound gets in its diet, some vets recommend phosphorus "binders" like calcium carbonate. Unflavored antacids are usually safe for greyhounds and are a good source of calcium carbonate, but you should talk to your veterinarian before administering any over-the-counter medications to your greyhound.

    According to Vet Info, omega 3 fatty acids may protect already damaged kidneys from further damage. However, greyhounds with insufficient kidneys should not consume excessive amounts of omega 6 fatty acids, because these could further damage the kidneys. A good source of omega 3 fatty acids is fish oil, which can be found in supplement form.

    The 2nd Chance website suggests that diets high in fiber may allow some unfiltered waste buildup to be filtered through the large intestine.

    Greyhounds with kidney problems sometimes lose their appetites, so if your greyhound refuses to eat, try increasing its intake of B vitamins, which are appetite stimulants.

Foods

    Perhaps the most important foods to avoid feeding a greyhound with insufficient kidneys are foods that are high in phosphorus. Foods high in phosphorus include meat, poultry, fish, dairy, peas and beans. In order to decrease the amount of phosphorus in the diet, it is safe to limit the amount of protein the dog eats; however, remember that cooked egg whites are a complete protein source and yet they are very low in phosphorus.

    If you are interested in increasing the amount of fiber in your greyhound's diet, try feeding limited amounts of oatmeal (as long as it doesn't contain cow's milk, garlic or onion), carrots or canned pumpkin.

    If you are worried that your greyhound's new diet limitations may cut out the essential vitamins it needs, talk to your vet about supplementation with a multivitamin.

    If you do not want to feed your dog any homemade foods, formulated foods are suitable for greyhounds with kidney problems. Talk to your veterinarian about which brands are safe for your dog.

What Are the Differences Between a Tibetan Terrier & a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier?

What Are the Differences Between a Tibetan Terrier & a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier?

At first glance, the Tibetan terrier and soft-coated wheaten terrier often look alike. Both are medium-size dogs with shaggy coats and merry dispositions. They both sport black noses and V-shaped ears, and are intelligent dogs that make good family pets. However, for all their similarities, Tibetan Terriers and soft-coated wheaten terriers have some significant differences.

Origins

    Tibetan Terriers are smaller than soft-coated wheaten terriers.
    Tibetan Terriers are smaller than soft-coated wheaten terriers.

    Tibetan terriers were originally kept by Tibetan monks, who considered them good luck and refused to sell them, only giving them as gifts. They actually are not related to other terriers, but were given the terrier label because of their size when they were brought to England in the 1920s. Soft-coated wheaten terriers originated in Ireland, and are related to Kerry Blue and Irish terriers.

Appearance and Size

    Tibetan terriers come in white, black and gold or a mix of all three colors, while soft-coated wheaten terriers come only in shades of pale beige to gold. While the Tibetan always has dark brown eyes, the wheaten's eyes are reddish brown to medium brown and even shades of yellow. The Tibetan's ears hang like pendants beside the head while the wheaten's ears fold forward and are level with the skull. The wheaten terrier is larger, measuring 18 to 20 inches tall and 35 to 45 lbs., while a Tibetan terrier stands 14 to 17 inches and weighs 18 to 30 lbs.

Disposition

    Tibetan terriers are considered "big dogs in little dogs' bodies." Although they are playful, athletic and agile, they are also naturally calm, gentle and laid back, according to The Tibetan Terriers Club of America. Wheaten terriers are also lively, active dogs, but they are known for being much more exuberant, jumping and licking people to show their dominance. They require much firmer handling from their owners than do Tibetans. Daily walks and play times are vital for both, but the Tibetan is more likely to chill on the couch with its owner during downtime.

Coat

    Both dogs need extensive grooming to care for their long coats. Tibetan terriers have double coats, so they are considered "non-shedding" and need to be brushed every two or three days to remove loose hair and prevent matting. Wheaten terriers have single, wavy coats that require daily combing instead of brushing to create a natural fuzzy look.

How to Feed Puppies Goat's Milk

How to Feed Puppies Goat's Milk

Puppies require a lot of care and attention in the first few months of their lives, and in some cases the mother of the puppies cannot provide this. One thing to try for young puppies that need nourishment is feeding them goat's milk to give them the vitamins and minerals that they need. If you've got young puppies that haven't quite moved to kibble, but can't get food from mom anymore, learn how to prepare a healthy goat's milk formula to keep them energized and strong.

Instructions

    1

    Pour 10 oz. of goat's milk into a bowl and add in 1 tbsp. of corn syrup, 1 cup of plain white yogurt, and one egg yolk. Mix up the ingredients well using a whisk or electric mixer.

    2

    Measure out how much mixture you want in your bottle, and replace the cap on the bottle. See your veterinarian for exact amounts to feed your puppy, or puppies, as each puppy varies by breed on how much it requires for food.

    3

    Warm up your bottle a little by either microwaving it for about 15 seconds, or putting it in boiling water for a few minutes. You want the mixture to be slightly warm, at about room temperature, but not hot. Test the mixture on your arm to ensure it isn't too hot for your pup.

    4

    Refrigerate the remaining mixture to be warmed up for future feedings. The mixture will spoil, so discard it and make a new batch after four days.

    5

    Rub the nipple of the bottle gently against the puppy's lips, squeezing a little bit so that some of the mixture is on the tip and your puppy can taste the food. Allow the puppy to latch on and suckle the formula from the bottle, don't squeeze the bottle or try to force too much mixture into your puppy's mouth.

How to Identify a Standard Schnauzer

How to Identify a Standard Schnauzer

The standard schnauzer is an intelligent breed and is easily trained. It is bred for endurance and a high-spirited temperament. It is a heavy breed that is built with lots of muscle and bone. Its terrier-like personality is perfect for this working breed. It will also make a great watchdog. It does have a tendency to be over-protective, so the standard schnauzer should be socialized as a pup. This breed should not be around small children, but it does like older children.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the standard schnauzer. Males are 18 to 19 inches at the shoulders and females are 17 inches to 18 inches at the shoulders. This is a square-built breed, so the measurement from the withers to the rump is approximately the same as the height measurement. Males weigh 30 to 45 pounds and females weigh 30 to 40 pounds.

    2

    Make sure the strong head is rectangular shaped and quite long. It measures about one-half the length measurement (measured from the withers to where the rump meets the tail). Its expression shows its intelligence with alert, spirited eyes. The medium sized eyes are dark brown and oval-shaped. They do not protrude and are not sunken in, even though the brow gives a sunken-in impression. The ear leather is somewhat thick. The ears are carried straight up if they are cropped. If they are uncropped, they are v-shaped and are carried so that the inner edge rides close to the cheek. The muzzle sports whiskers that accentuate the squarishness of the skull.

    3

    Check that the neck and body are proportionate to the rest of the dog. The strong neck is somewhat thick and long. It arches into the shoulders and medium width chest. The skin on the throat should be tight with no wrinkles. The shoulders are well angulated, providing a maximum forward reach. The round feet are compact, have arched toes and are protected by thick pads. The rear is well muscled and balances with the forequarters. The rear feet are also round and compact with arched toes and thick pads. The tail is set rather high on the rump and is carried straight up. It is docked to 1 to 2 inches long.

    4

    Pet the wiry coat. It is very tight and thick. The wiry outer coat rides over a soft undercoat. The undercoat is thick enough to make the outer coat stand off the back. The outer coat may be salt and pepper or black. The undercoat is also black.

Sabtu, 23 Februari 2013

Physical Characteristics of Pitbull Puppies

Physical Characteristics of Pitbull Puppies

It's important to know that the term "pit bull" is often used incorrectly to describe several breeds of terriers: American Staffordshire terriers, Staffordshire bull terriers and bull terriers, as well as American pit bull terriers. However, the American pit bull terrier is the only real pit bull. There are several physical characteristics that will help you identify a real pit bull puppy.

Head

    Even as a puppy, the head of the American pit bull terrier is square. Pit bull puppies have loose skin around their heads, making their heads look wrinkled. As they grow, the wrinkled skin stretches out over the cheeks and thick neck. The pointed ears fall forward and remain that way unless they are cropped. Many pit bulls have faces that are white with light brown or chocolate brown circles around one or both eyes (think Petey from the "Little Rascals"), or faces that are dark brown with a white stripe starting between the eyes and stretching down the nose.

Body

    Pit bull puppies are about 10 pounds and 8 to 12 inches long at birth and grow to be 35 to 55 pounds and 18 to 22 pounds in adulthood. Puppies have short legs, a small, pointed tail and larger chests and broader shoulders than most other puppies of the same size.

Coat

    Although their coats are thick, American pit bull puppies' hair is extremely shiny and can come in a wide range of colors. Puppies can have coats that are one, two or three colors, ranging from tan, brown and "blue" to brindle. The coat remains thick and shiny into the dog's adulthood and is easy to groom. Pit bulls do shed, but you'll rarely find large clumps of hair balls.

How to Identify a Border Collie

How to Identify a Border Collie

The Border Collie originated in Northumberland on the Scottish/English border. This breed has incredible stamina and agility--able to run at full tilt for hours on end. They are very hardy and live to work. The Border Collie is incredibly loyal as well as intelligent. They are considered the finest sheepdog in the world and can adapt to herding other animals as well. This breed is known for being relatively quiet. Rather than barking to get the attention of its herd, a Border Collie will stare the herd down until the animals do as the dog wishes. Its very surreal to watch. Here is a guide on how to identify a Border Collie.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by examining the dogs general shape and size. A Border Collie is typically between one and a half and two feet tall at the shoulder and weighs anywhere from 30 to 45 pounds. The tail reaches at least to the hock and is sometimes raised when the dog is excited, but is never carried over the back. The dogs legs should seem a little short, its chest reaching all the way down to the dogs front elbows.

    2

    Look at the dogs fur coat. It should be long, soft, and shaggy except for the lower legs and face. The coat colors can be pure black, red and white or gray and black. Black is always the primary color which covers the majority of the dogs back, upper portion of the skull and upper tail. The secondary color will cover the lower legs, tip of the tail, underbelly, chest, throat, sides of the neck and a vertical slash on the forehead.

    3

    Finish by examining the dogs head. The skull is fairly wide with a distinct stop. The muzzle tapers to the black nose. The ears are usually half-perked. The oval eyes are generally dark brown, except in merles where one or more eyes may be blue. The hair on the face, ears and front legs is always short and sleek. If the dog matches this description then youre looking at a Border Collie.

Special Concerns With English Bulldog Puppies

Special Concerns With English Bulldog Puppies

English bulldogs were originally bred as bullfighters during the 1400's. This courageous breed is famous for its strength, loyalty, and endurance for pain. Although the bulldog has a sturdy body, it does have disabilities that all English bulldog owners should be aware of. Before bringing your English bulldog puppy home, be aware of these five health considerations.

Skin Problems

    The folds of skin on an English bulldog need to be cleaned daily.
    The folds of skin on an English bulldog need to be cleaned daily.

    English bulldogs are prone to dermatitis, which causes inflammation between the folds of skin. Bulldog puppies have many wrinkles, creases, and folds where moisture becomes trapped, causing dermatitis. Excessive skin irritation often develops into infections in the folds of the lips, face, and tail. Cleaning the puppy's folds should be done every day to prevent dermatitis, hair loss, and foul odor.

Overheating

    English bulldog puppies and adults do not tolerate heat. They cannot be left outside during hot weather and should be kept in an air-conditioned house. Keeping puppies calm during hot weather is a must. Exercise in hot weather causes excessive panting, increases phlegm production, and swells the dog's throat, which can lead to death. Covering the bulldog puppy with a wet cloth helps prevent overheating.

Skeletal Disorder

    In a case study, Kari L. Anderson of the University of Minnesota says that most screw-tail dog breeds like the English bulldog run a high risk of skeletal disorders. These most common skeletal problems are spina bifida, which can cause the puppy to become incontinent, vertebral displacement, and dysplasia of the elbows and hips, which results in limping and joint stiffness.

Respiratory Problems

    The short snout and flat head cause respiratory problems in English bulldogs.
    The short snout and flat head cause respiratory problems in English bulldogs.

    Both adult bulldogs and puppies exhibit trouble breathing. Their short, pushed in snouts and flat skulls prevent them from taking deep breaths. Because of this, many bulldogs snore while sleeping and pant all the time. The long soft palate of English bulldogs also causes restricted breathing and in some cases may result in suffocation. Some bulldog owners opt for surgically fixing the soft palate.

Drowning Risks

    Drowning is a danger for all English bulldogs. They are unable to swim because of their short legs and heavy body weight. A bulldog puppy can drown within minutes of falling into water, so cautionary measures are necessary when taking the puppy near pools, beaches, or docks. When near any type of water, fit the bulldog with a life jacket.