Senin, 31 Desember 2012

What Does a Miniature Schnauzer Look Like?

What Does a Miniature Schnauzer Look Like?

A miniature schnauzer ideally looks like a smaller version of the standard schnauzer, which is the older of the breed. Although schnauzers were popular dogs in their homeland of Germany, by the late 1800s, people were moving from farms to cities and needed a smaller dog to fit in their smaller homes. The miniature schnauzer was created to fit the bill.

Size

    The average miniature schnauzer is about 12 to 14 inches high from the ground to their withers (highest point of the shoulder). They average a weight of 13 to 15 pounds, but can be much larger.

Coat

    The coat of a miniature schnauzer is called wire-haired, because it is tough and course to the touch. The undercoat, however, is softer. The breed doesn't shed, but if it is not stripped once a year it can grow into a tangled mass resembling a neglected poodle.

Color

    The usual colors of miniature schnauzers are all black, all silver and a salt and pepper mixture of grey and white. The Encyclopaedia of Dog Breeds states that purebreds many have large patches of white spots, but these are disqualified from the show ring.

Ears and Tail

    All schnauzers, standard and miniature, have long, thin tails and semi-floppy ears that fold towards the eyes. In North America, the ears are often cropped into a small pointed shape and the tail docked. This is illegal in many counties, including the UK.

Beard

    Loosely translated, "schnauzer" means "muzzle." The miniature schnauzer grows a long, curved beard and bushy eye brows that are often lighter in color than the rest of the head.

How to Care for Your Schnoodle

Schnoodles are domestic dogs that are cross-bred from Schnauzers and Poodles. Like both Schnauzers and Poodles, Schnoodles come in a variety of colors and sizes. They are generally considered good family dogs. They are also recommended for those with allergies, since they shed very little. But, like any dog, Schnoodles require a healthy diet, proper grooming, a safe environment and a lot of love and attention.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your Schnoodle twice daily and provide fresh, clean water. The type and amount of food you feed your Schnoodle in each serving varies depending on the size of the dog. According to DesignerMixes.org, most Schnoodles eat around one cup of food a day.

    2

    Exercise your Schnoodle every day. Schnoodles are very energetic dogs and enjoy walking and running with their owners, but can also be exercised through regular play. Scnoodles, which typically enjoy fetch and tug-of-war, need between 30 and 60 minutes of exercise a day.

    3

    Brush your Schnoodle often to keep its coat soft and shiny. Since Schnoodles shed very little, it is important to keep their fur clean and brushed.

    4

    Groom the dog every two to three months. Some Shnoodles with bushier or curlier coats will need to be groomed every six to eight weeks. Many Schnoodles experience extensive hair growth around the ears; this hair should be groomed to reduce the risk of ear infections.

    5

    Spend as much time with your Schnoodle as possible. Schnoodles need a great deal of attention, and can actually develop separation anxiety when left alone for long periods of time.

How to Find a Shih Tzu Dog

How to Find a Shih Tzu Dog

A Shih Tzu is known as a "lion dog." Shih Tzus are looked upon as a non-sporting breed. They're small but sturdy dogs that usually weigh no more than 15 or 16 pounds. Despite their small stature, Shih Tzu dogs are known to be courageous and loyal. Shih Tzu dogs might make good pets due to their friendly nature. Additionally, Shih Tzus are generally compatible with other pets. When buying or adopting a Shih Tzu, find out as much information from the breeder about the temperament of the dog as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Identify the age and gender you prefer. Each Shih Tzu gender has its own advantages and disadvantages. Though female Shih Tzus are more in demand, they often suffer from hormone-related coat loss. Males are considered to be easier to house break. Decide if you want to purchase or adopt an adult or puppy. Because Shih Tzus are slower to mature than other breeds, you might want to avoid purchase or adoption until the pup reaches a minimum of 3 months.

    2

    Locate a local Shih Tzu breeder. Conduct an online Shih Tzu search on websites such as Breeders.net. Other options for locating a Shih Tzu include searching the classified section of your local newspaper. Look on Craigslist.com to find Shih Tzus for sale in your area.

    3

    Adopt a Shih Tzu from an animal shelter. Ask the caregiver questions about the age, temperament and background of the Shih Tzu you're considering. Search for your Shih Tzu on websites like adoptapet.com. Indicate the age and gender you desire. Indicate the distance you're willing to travel to adopt your Shih Tzu. Pictures and contact information will be provided.

    4

    Locate an out-of-state Shih Tzu breeder. Websites like Find-a-shih-tzu.com and Nextdaypets.com will connect you with Shih Tzu breeders throughout the U.S. Age, genter, pictures and breeder contact information are provided. If you're unable to pick up your Shih Tzu, most serious breeders will ship your dog to you in a crate, with all corresponding paperwork and health records.

How to Make Dry Dog Food Morsels

How to Make Dry Dog Food Morsels

Making your own dry dog food is an economical way to feed your pet. It has the added advantage of you knowing exactly what is in the food. The basic recipe is very easy and quick to make. It does not meet all your dog's nutritional requirements so adding food such as meat, dairy, vegetables and fruit may be necessary. Your dog needs 16 percent 18 percent protein, 45 percent complex carbohydrates and 12 percent fat daily.

Instructions

    1

    Combine dry ingredients. Mix six cups flour and one cup powdered milk together. You can use all-purpose, wheat, rye or potato flour.

    2

    Combine wet ingredients. Mix three to four eggs, one-third cup of oil and 2.5 cups liquid. For oil, you can use canola, olive, safflower or corn, and for liquid you can use milk, water or broth.

    3

    Mix the wet and dry ingredients together. The mixture should be thick, like bread dough. If needed, add a little liquid or flour to get the correct consistency.

    4

    Spread onto a cookie sheet, inch thick. You can use cookie cutters to cut out shapes or break up after cooked and cooled. Put oven on 350 F and cook for 45 minutes.

    5

    Add extras to food to meet nutritional requirements. Consider lean meat, chicken, turkey, sweet potatoes, apples, cheese and yogurt. Avoid chocolate, grapes, raisins and onions; these can be harmful. Talk to you vet for additional items that should be avoided.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Tips

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Tips

Staffordshire bull terriers, or "Staffies," are popular companion animals. The are medium-sized, easy to groom and are not as prone to several of the health problems of other purebred dogs, such as progressive retinal atrophy and hypoglycemia. However, the breed was originally bred for bull baiting, rat trapping and dog fighting. They are one of the many breeds used for "pit bulls."

Basic Nature

    According to the Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds, the Staffordshire bull terrier loves human company more than the company of dogs. Because of this need for human attention, they will do anything a human tells them to do, even if the human trains the Staffie to attack. A Staffie is not born to be an attack dog; he must be trained. Also, good-natured Staffies will see the best in any human and may even jump into a stranger's car or walk into a stranger's home just to be friendly. These dogs become better behaved when they are inside the home with their people and not left outside on a chain.

Dog Aggression

    According to the book, Training Secrets for Bully Breeds, Staffies will usually not start a fight with another dog. However, they will finish a fight. Staffies are prone to stare unblinkingly at another dog. This stare may be interpreted as a direct challenge, which initiates a fight. Some Staffies are very submissive as puppies and young dogs, but by the age of four or five suddenly become aggressive to strange dogs. It is not recommended for Staffies to be let loose in dog parks or be left unsupervised with another dog.

Activity

    Staffies need to be active. They are not a breed to lounge about on the couch all day. They need at least one brisk half-hour walk each day, plus periods of play in a fenced yard. It is best to use a chest harness on the breed rather than a neck collar for the leash, as they may pull so hard they will damage their throats but will still pull despite the pain. A harness can keep them from being injured. Staffies have been successfully trained in agility, flyball, weight-pulling contests and movie roles. Staffies are highly intelligent and will find something to do like digging, chewing or roaming if they are not kept sufficiently exercised and entertained.

Information on Different Kinds of Dachshund Dogs

Information on Different Kinds of Dachshund Dogs

Interested in adding a dachshund to your family? Standard dachshunds of each type range in size from 15 to 20 pounds in adulthood, and miniature dachshunds tend to top out at 11 pounds. Originating in Germany, this type of hound was bred to be a fearless hunter prepared to go to ground, pursuing the vicious badger into its burrow. No longer prized exclusively as badger hunters, these playful dogs are often chosen by families with children and are one of the most popular breeds registered with the American Kennel Club. They do shed to some degree and require moderate exercise.

Long-Haired Dachshunds

    Long-haired dachshunds are often red in color.
    Long-haired dachshunds are often red in color.

    Calmer than their smooth- and wire-coated counterparts, long-haired dachshunds have a regal appearance. They require frequent brushing of their shiny, somewhat wavy coats. Long-haired dachshunds are noted for a gentle, comparatively quiet temperament, making them a popular choice among older adults. At home in an apartment or a house with a yard, they need moderate exercise. Long-haired dachshunds are often solid red but may also have black-and-tan or dappled coloring. They are available in both standard and miniature size.

Wire-Haired Dachshunds

    Wire-haired dachshunds like to be where the action is.
    Wire-haired dachshunds like to be where the action is.

    Lively and extroverted, the wire-haired dachshund has distinctive bushy eyebrows and a dapper beard. Its wiry coat conceals a soft undercoat, and it needs regular brushing. Wire-haired dachshunds can be accomplished rabbit hunters, but even as house pets, they refuse to be left out. Social and often funny, they want to be with their masters all the time and love to entertain. They may be standard or miniature and are regularly seen with black-and-tan coloring, as well as wild boar and red.

Smooth-Coated Dachshunds

    Smooth-coated dachshunds are playful and fearless.
    Smooth-coated dachshunds are playful and fearless.

    Smooth-coated dachshunds, also called short-haired, are the original badger dog bred in Germany in the 17th century. In a range of colors from red to piebald, smooth coats require brushing but shed very little. These dogs are known for their fearless temperament and independent spirit, but, more than any other variety of dachshund, they become deeply attached to one family member. Be prepared for loyalty and closeness from your smooth-coated dachshund.

Minggu, 30 Desember 2012

How to Make Barbecue Flavor Dog Treats

How to Make Barbecue Flavor Dog Treats

Does your dog drool every time you fire up the grill? You probably break down every now and then, giving him a charbroiled treat. But you try not to give him too much "people food," because you want to keep it all for yourself. Next time the family is cooking out, whip up these tasty treats for your dog; he'll think they came right of the barbie!

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick spray and set aside. Measure the flour, wheat germ and oatmeal into medium-sized bowl. Mix well using wire whisk or a fork.

    2

    Break an egg into the small bowl and beat well. Add the egg, along with barbecue sauce, oil and water to the dry ingredients and mix well.

    3

    Place a sheet of waxed paper on a flat surface. Sprinkle half of the cornmeal onto the waxed paper. Knead dough into a ball and place it on the waxed paper. Flatten the dough and sprinkle with the remaining cornmeal.

    4

    Roll dough out to about a quarter inch in thickness using a rolling pin. Cut shapes from the dough using cookie cutters. Roll the remaining dough back into a ball, roll out and cut more cookies out until all the dough has been used.

    5

    Place shapes onto cookie sheet and bake at 350 for 30 minutes. Turn off heat and let cookies stand for several hours or overnight for very crunchy cookies (although you might want to let your pooch sample a taste).

How to Tip Sheltie Ears

A Sheltie is a Shetland Sheepdog that originated from Scotland. According to the American Kennel Club, the Sheltie is considered a miniature Collie. This breed is long haired and very trainable. The ears are considered small and can be manipulated to stand straight up. When tipped, the pointy part of the ear folds forward. According to Vista Dei Shetland Sheepdogs, a Sheltie's ears shouldn't be tipped until it is five, six or seven months old.

Instructions

How to Tip Sheltie Ears

    1

    Comb the hair on the front of the Sheltie's ear up.

    2

    Squeeze a dime-size amount of glue onto your finger.

    3

    Apply glue to combed hair. Bend the tip of the ear so it comes in contact with glued hair. The experts at Vista Dei Shetland Sheepdogs say the glue dries in 30 seconds, so it's recommended that you work quickly.

    4

    Squeeze the ear and glued hair together. Repeat the process on other ear.

    5

    Grab both ears and squeeze them toward the middle of the head. Squeeze them until they are touching.

    6

    Put a dime-sized of glue on your fingertip. Glue ears together.

What Are Child-Friendly Breeds of Dogs?

What Are Child-Friendly Breeds of Dogs?

Breed is one of the most important points when choosing a dog for your children, but don't forget that dogs are individuals. Though members of a particular breed tend to behave similarly, there are always variations in individuals. Typically, larger breeds are better for children, especially very small children. Larger breeds tend to be calmer, less excitable and more tolerant of the antics and accidents of small children. The age of the children makes a difference, too. Choosing the right dog is just the beginning, however. You must train and socialize any dog well to live with children, as well as training the children to live with and respect the dog.

Considerations

    Children like to hold and hug their pets, and a dog this small could be injured accidentally.
    Children like to hold and hug their pets, and a dog this small could be injured accidentally.

    A dog that lives with children should have certain characteristics, regardless of breed. An individual dog must be calm and tolerant, especially if the children are very young. There are always exceptions, such as a golden retriever that bites or a chihuahua that loves children, but don't assume the exception is true of the entire breed. Although most dogs will be protective of its family, a child's dog cannot be too protective, or it may bite the child's friends. Whether small or large, the dog must be sturdy, not fragile. A dog with an elongated spine, or tiny, thin legs, for example, could easily be injured by a small child attempting to love it. Although larger breeds are generally better choices for young children, they will be rambunctious and large when they are puppies, and training and extra-close supervision is a must.

Retrievers

    Golden retrievers are well known for their tolerance and love of children.
    Golden retrievers are well known for their tolerance and love of children.

    Retrievers are bred to work closely with humans, to have soft mouths to retrieve game and then give it gently to its owner. These are all qualities that work well with young children. When a dog is said to have a soft mouth, it means that it can pick up a game bird very gently, leaving no teeth marks. These are not independent-minded dogs in most cases. Golden retrievers are legendary in their tolerance and gentleness with children. Labrador retrievers are also excellent with children. These dogs have the size and sturdiness to handle a clumsy toddler falling near them or grabbing a handful of fur when trying to get up. Some retrievers may not be quite as tolerant, such as the Chesapeake Bay Retriever. The standard poodle is not usually thought of as a retriever, but it is a hunting and retrieving breed as well and is excellent with children.

Hounds

    Beagles are usually very good with children.
    Beagles are usually very good with children.

    Hounds are generally good with children, with the beagle being a standout. Beagles tend to be docile and easygoing. The beagle is a good breed for families that don't have the space for a larger breed, but still need a gentle, sturdy dog. Some families find beagles and other hounds difficult to train, especially if small children are occupying most of the parents' time.

Working Breeds

    Boxers are great with children if you train and exercise them well.
    Boxers are great with children if you train and exercise them well.

    The working breeds tend to be large, strong and tolerant of children they were raised with, but some breeds can be overprotective or too dominant for children. Boxers, rottweilers and Dobermans are usually excellent with children if they are raised with young children early on. Boxers are high-energy dogs that love to play, so they -- and the children -- need proper training to play safely. Dobermans and rottweilers often have an uncanny ability to understand how to watch over children without being too protective.

Miscellaneous

    Newfoundlands make excellent pets for children.
    Newfoundlands make excellent pets for children.

    One of the best dogs with children is the Newfoundland. This is a very large breed, with longer hair. It is used for water rescues. This is among the gentlest of all breeds of dog. They have a shorter life span, around 9 to 12 years. On the other end of the size range, Boston terriers, corgis, West Highland white terriers, shih tzus, bichon frises and miniature poodles can all be good choices for children. The American pit bull terrier is a medium-sized breed that is great with children, despite some usually undeserved bad press. A little-known fact is that pit bulls were bred to be exceptionally gentle with all humans. They are tolerant of children, love to play and tolerant of accidental rough handling.

How to Train Sheltie Ears

In addition to their loyal, companionable personalities, one of the endearing characteristics of Shelties is an expression that is both intelligent and innocent. That look is enhanced by alert ears with peaked ends tipped forward and aligned toward the center of the head. Contrary to some views, naturally tipped ears rarely occur, no matter how carefully Shelties are bred. Fortunately, training a puppy's ears is pain-free and, begun early enough, will almost always be successful. Serious training should begin at about 10 weeks, before teething begins and ears begin to "fly" erect, and continue as needed until eight months of age.

Instructions

    1

    Cut the pieces of drinking straw. Using the scissors, cut the straws each about an inch longer than the widest part of the puppy's ear.

    2

    Place a pearl-size drop of hair-bond glue on your index finger. Be prepared to work quickly as this glue dries in approximately 30 seconds.

    3

    Hold your finger alongside the base of the ear, glue side forward away from the ear.

    4

    Comb and gather a small amount of hair up over your finger and the drop of glue.

    5

    Place and hold one of the straw pieces horizontally alongside the inside of the ear. Direct your helper to hold the straw just above your finger. The straw helps prevent a tight crease in the ear, giving it a more natural tipped shape.

    6

    Pull the top of the ear tip down over the straw and the glue.

    7

    Roll the glue into both the hair on the tip of the ear and the combed-up hair over your finger; repeat the process on the other ear.

    8

    Compare both ears to see if they are even and tipped exactly the same. If one is tipped more or less than the other, stop, use the adhesive remover and start over.

    9

    Pull the ears together, gently aligning them at the center of the puppy's head, and have your helper roll a bit of glue among several hairs together from each ear. This will form a small "bridge" between the ears.

    10

    Determine that you are satisfied with the tipping and positioning of your puppy's ears. Finish by adding a tiny additional amount of glue to both the bridge hairs and the ear tip hairs for added bonding. Remove the drinking straw pieces.

Sabtu, 29 Desember 2012

Disadvantage of Owning Yorkie Puppies

Disadvantage of Owning Yorkie Puppies

You've decided that you are ready for a puppy. Puppies are a welcome addition to many homes. However, every puppy breed is different. Each breed has a different mentality and certain types of breeds are better suited for different households. Yorkie, or Yorkshire terrier, puppies are sweet and affectionate, but they are not without disadvantages. Before deciding that a Yorkie puppy is the right puppy for you, consider the various health problems and training issues that arise with this breed.

Health Problems

    Hypoglycemia is also known as low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia in Yorkie puppies is often caused by missing a meal, too much stress or expenditure of energy and not enough warmth. From the ages of six to twelve weeks, Yorkie puppies are most at risk for developing hypoglycemia. While health problems can strike many dog breeds, you must also consider the health issues that are often seen in the Yorkie breed as they grow older. Retinal dysplasis, tracheal collapse,patellar luxation and tooth decay are all health problems associated with the Yorkie breed.

Temperament and Behavior

    Yorkies are intelligent, energetic and loyal. However, with the wrong training and approach to raising this breed, Yorkies often become aggressive and over protective. Yorkie puppies have a tendency to feel as though they rule the house and the owner when improperly trained. You must be prepared for the time spent learning and understanding the breed as well as the training needed to raise a well behaved Yorkie.

House Breaking

    Not all Yorkie puppy owners have problems with housebreaking. However, Yorkies are known for being difficult to house train. Early house training routines do not always work. Typically when housebreaking a Yorkie puppy, you must constantly supervise the puppy. At times, Yorkie puppies do not become fully house trained or begin to understand house training until around five to six months of age.

Children

    Yorkies are best suited for older children. Because Yorkies are small, the risk of injury is higher. Younger children have the potential of injuring a Yorkie puppy due to the breed's small bone structure and small stature. Younger children are also not as good about training and discipline for dogs. Older children are able to help train the puppy and implement rules.

Socialization

    Yorkie puppies are social. Walking the puppy and allowing the puppy around other dogs and people ensures that the puppy is receiving enough social interaction. Without any social interaction, Yorkie puppies grow up into dogs that are suspicious and often unkind to other small animals. Unsocial Yorkie puppies also grow suspicious of humans other than the owner.

The Simplest Treats to Make for Dogs

The Simplest Treats to Make for Dogs

Dogs love treats like kids love candy. They are willing to perform all kinds of tricks and practice the best behavior to earn a treat. Unfortunately, many commercial treats are either bland, expensive or unhealthy. Homemade treats can be time-consuming to prepare. Some of the simplest treats to make for dogs are tasty, inexpensive and healthy. Some common ingredients and a little ingenuity are all the requirements necessary to please both you and your dog.

Chicken

    Boil chicken breasts and cut into bite-size pieces. Bag and store in the refrigerator, ready for when your dog deserves a special treat. Boiled chicken livers and gizzards are a delicacy that your dog will love.

Cheese

    Dogs love cheese. Keep cubes of cheddar or mozzarella handy in the refrigerator. Stick to low-fat cheese to prevent weight gain.

Ice Cube Treats

    Ice cubes are a refreshing summertime treat for your dog. You can freeze them plain or zest them up to please your pup's palate. Try dropping a small piece of hot dog or chicken in the center of each cube before freezing. Your dog will rapidly lick his way to the prize. Substitute low-fat chicken broth for the water for a taste treat through and through. Yogurt can also be frozen. Drop a small piece of fruit into each yogurt cube before freezing.

Vegetables

    Most dogs love their vegetables. Cut into bite-size chunks. In his book, "Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs & Cats," Dr. Richard Pitcairn states that some vegetables, such as corn, peas, green beans and broccoli, should be cooked to help dogs digest them properly. Carrots and zucchini can be fed raw. Dogs especially like chewing carrots, much like they chew their bones. Carrots are good for cleaning their teeth and gums. Wash all vegetables thoroughly to remove pesticides. Better yet, buy organic.

Fruit

    Many dogs, like humans, have a sweet tooth. An occasional piece of fruit will help your dog satisfy this craving. Try dried fruits such as dates, figs, prunes and apricots. Chunks of apple, banana and orange can be offered fresh.

Peanut Butter

    Peanut butter can be simply spooned into the dog's dish, to enjoy plain, or added to other foods. Spread it on a salt-free cracker or small squares of whole-grain bread as little sandwiches. Dip some of your dog's fresh fruits and vegetables into the peanut butter. Either way, he will be ecstatic.

Sardines

    Sardines are not only a scrumptious snack for your dog, they are loaded with antioxidants. Dogs love the taste and smell. Simply open the tin, lift them out and plop them into your dog's mouth.

Lick the Container

    Just as kids love to lick the frosting bowls, dogs love to clean the last bits out of empty containers. Some favorites are cottage cheese cartons, peanut butter jars and yogurt containers. They taste good and the task can keep the dog entertained for some time. Watch out if you have multiple dogs. They will want to fight over who gets the containers. Amazingly, they seem to remember who had the last one.

Gifts for Yorkie Lovers

Gifts for Yorkie Lovers

Yorkshire terrier owners are loyal to the breed, and no wonder. For centuries, Yorkies have been bred for human companionship, meaning that no dog is more attentive or responsive to its owner's every move. People with Yorkies like to show their love for their pets, so a Yorkie-themed gift will please virtually any Yorkie owner.

Yorkie Figurines

    Yorkies belong to a class of miniature toy dogs sometimes called "teacup dogs" because these pampered pets can almost fit inside a teacup. Many artists create miniature Yorkie figurines that are lifelike renditions of the breed. For example, the Franklin Mint celebrates the Yorkshire terrier's diminutive size with a porcelain figurine of a Yorkie peering out of a blue teacup while the Bradford Exchange features a holiday-themed Yorkie in a Santa cap with Christmas lights draped across its back.You can also purchase a personalized gift figurine by sending a photo of the dog to artist Debby Carman, who will hand-paint a customized mug to match the image.

Yorkie Books and DVDs.

    Yorkie lovers of all ages will love reading "Tango, the Tale of an Island Dog," by Eileen Beha. In this children's book, a mishap on a sailboat washes a pampered Manhattan Yorkie onto Prince Edward Island, where a fisherman's widow rescues him and he is forced to adapt to a very different lifestyle than the one he knew in the city. Other books that feature a Yorkie as the main character are "The Adventures of Little Tyke: A Loveable Little Yorkshire Terrier Puppy," by Marjorie A. Yobe, and "BeBe...Meet the Yorkie Pup," by Libby Murray. Yorkie lovers will also appreciate DVDs that feature Yorkshire terriers, such as "Meet the Fockers," where a terrier named Moses stole scenes from actors Barbra Streisand and Dustin Hoffman.

Jewelry

    You can find Yorkshire terrier jewelry designs in a wide price range, from costume jewelry to ceramic hand-painted jewelry to platinum Yorkies set with precious stones. Delight the Yorkie-crazy friend, co-worker or family member in your life with a Yorkie-themed watch, pin, pendant, earrings or keychain.

Odds and Ends

    When shopping for a gift for the Yorkie lover in your life, don't overlook the many mass-produced dog breed gifts that you can order featuring the Yorkshire terrier breed. These include calendars, doormats, clocks and coasters. Some vendors will personalize an item with a photograph of the Yorkie lover's dog, a gift that any Yorkie fan would love to receive.

Homemade Dog Food for Liver Disease

Homemade Dog Food for Liver Disease

Canine liver disease is not a single, easy-to-define illness but rather a complex of diverse liver ailments with equally diverse causes, ranging from bacterial or viral infection to trauma. Collectively, these canine liver illnesses are the fifth leading cause of non-accidental death in American dogs, according to the Canine Liver Disease Foundation. Diet can play a key role in the treatment of canine liver disease.

Types

    PetPlace.com, an online database of pet-care information written by veterinarians, lists a number of conditions that can lead eventually to hepatic shutdown, or failure of the liver. These include canine infectious hepatitis, a viral infection; leptospirosis, which is bacterial in origin; liver cancer; bile duct obstruction; pancreatitis, an infection of the pancreas that often spreads to the liver; cholangiohepatitis; cirrhosis; copper toxicity; liver flukes; and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

    Symptoms that indicate your dog may be suffering from some form of liver disease include abdominal fluid buildup; loss of appetite; jaundice, characterized by a yellowish cast to the animals eyes and gums; vomiting; and bleeding problems, according to WebVet.com. Although it can play a significant role in the treatment of liver disease in your dog, diet alone cannot cure your pet. Consult your veterinarian if you suspect the animal has liver disease. WebVet indicates that a definitive diagnosis is usually obtained through tests that measure blood levels of bile acids, enzymes and proteins.

Dietary Guidelines

    If your dog is diagnosed with liver disease, diet recommendations will depend on the specific type of condition that your animal is suffering. However, diets for canine liver disease generally aim for high levels of nutrition while keeping your pets consumption of proteins and fats at lower levels than normal. Reductions in fat and protein ease the workload on your dogs liver, which is already operating below optimal levels because of disease.

Recipes

    The following recipes for homemade dog foods designed for animals with liver disease were presented to the 1997 Waltham International Symposium on Pet Nutrition and Health in the 21st Century by representatives of Cornell Universitys Small Animal Center. The first recipe is very low in protein. Mix together 3 cups of nonfat dry milk, 1 cup of raw wheat germ, 3 cups of cornstarch, 1 cup of safflower oil, 1 cup of animal fat, 1 cup of blackstrap molasses, 1/5 cup of bone meal and 1 tsp. iodized salt.

    More moderate levels of protein are provided in the second recipe. Combine 1 hard-boiled egg, chopped; 2 cups of cooked rice; 3 slices of white bread, torn into small pieces; and 1 pound of regular ground beef, braised with fat retained. The third recipe, which is highest in protein content at 26 percent, calls for 1 hard-boiled egg, chopped; 1 cup of creamed cottage cheese; 1 cup of cooked farina; 3 tbsp. sugar; 1 tbsp. safflower oil; 1 tsp. dicalcium phosphate; and 1 tsp. potassium chloride, a salt substitute.

Shih Tzu Dog Breed Information

Shih Tzu Dog Breed Information

Humans have raised dogs for hundreds of years. Larger breeds, such as the great pyrenees, are loyal working dogs while small breeds, such as the shih tzu, are kept as companion dogs. According to the American Kennel Club, the shih tzu has consistently been one of the most commonly registered dogs on record.

History

    The shih tzu is an ancient breed, with records of a breed resembling the modern shih tzu dating to 1000 B.C. Also known as the lion dog, the shih tzu is likely a mixture of small toy dogs bred by Chinese and Tibetan lamas to resemble lions. Shih tzu were often bred by imperial rules and given as gifts to visiting dignitaries. The modern shih tzu was given breed recognition by the American Kennel Club in 1969.

Identification

    Shih tzus stand between 9 and 11 inches tall at the shoulder, weighing no more than 16 lbs. at maturity. Shih tzus are slightly longer than they are tall, making them appear lower to the ground then they actually are. The shih tzu coat is always soft and flowing, and comes in a wide variety of colors. The temperament of the shih tzu should be outgoing and friendly, with no signs of fear or aggression.

Features

    One of the most recognizable features of the shih tzu is a long, smooth coat. The breed is also noted for short muzzles and long topknots; owners often tie up the topknot with a ribbon to prevent it from falling over the eyes. Shih tzus are one of the few toy breeds that are good with children--they love to play and rarely snap or bite.

Types

    While the shih tzu is easily recognizable, two distinct varieties of the breed exist. The most common variety of the breed is the pet-lined shih tzu. Shih tzus kept as pets are bred by small hobby breeders and are often oversized or undersized and shaved for easy grooming. Show-lined shih tzus are bred by professional handlers and breed enthusiasts who strive to keep the breed as close to the standard as possible, producing dogs within the proper size range and full show coats.

Warning

    Shih tzus are typically healthy dogs, although breedings by owners without thorough knowledge of the breed have produced a number of health problems. Eye problems such as corneal ulcers and ingrown eyelashes are common in the breed, as are hernias and hypoglycemia. Only healthy shih tzus clear of any genetic diseases should be bred to reduce the occurrence of unhealthy puppies.

Jumat, 28 Desember 2012

Samoyed Puppy Information

Samoyed Puppy Information

Samoyed puppies are adorable, and can be excellent pets. However, this breed is not for everyone. Before choosing a Samoyed puppy, it is important to do some research about the breed. Taking care of a Samoyed puppy is a great responsibility. Learning about the breed's temperament, exercise needs, grooming requirements, recommended diet and health issues are essential. It is important to make sure that a Samoyed puppy is the right choice for you and your family.

Breed History

    The Samoyed breed is named after the Samoyede people of Siberia. These people bred these dogs for pulling sleds, herding reindeer, hunting, guarding and keeping their owners warm. These working dogs were essential to the survival of the Samoyede people. In addition to providing for their owners, these dogs were devoted companions. They were regarded as members of the family, and trustworthy enough to protect children from harm. Samoyed dogs were introduced to England in 1889. From there, the breed evolved and expanded to other parts of the world. The American Kennel Club recognized the Samoyed breed in 1906.

Physical Characteristics

    A Samoyed's coat is composed of two layers and can be white, cream or biscuit colored. He also has a deep chest, strong back and muscular shoulders and legs. These traits give the breed the strength and agility to pull heavy sleds through the snow. Samoyeds carry their tails curled over their backs. They have either brown or black almond shaped eyes. Their ears are triangular in shape and stand erect. The corner of their mouths curve upwards to give the appearance of a smile. This is where the term "Sammy Smile" comes from.

    Samoyed puppies grow to be medium sized dogs, at approximately 19 to 23 inches tall at the shoulders. Males are typically larger than the females, and weigh approximately 45 to 65 pounds. Females weigh around 35 to 50 pounds.

Temperament

    Samoyeds are generally gentle, obedient and trustworthy. However, each dog is an individual. A dog's upbringing from a puppy can have a great effect on its behavior. Puppies that are about three months old should be socialized with children, strangers and other dogs. Samoyeds thrive on human companionship, and they need a lot of love and affection. They are also very intelligent, and are able to notice human emotions. A fenced-in yard is recommended, as these dogs need room to run and play. If you do not have a fenced-in yard, long daily walks are required.

Care

    Growing Samoyed puppies need the proper nutrition to become healthy adults. Samoyed puppies should be fed four times a day when they reach eight weeks of age. Premium dry puppy food is adequate. If you bought your puppy from a reliable breeder, he should be able to recommend a diet plan suited to your puppy's needs. Feed your Samoyed adult dog food twice a day after one year of age. Always provide your Samoyed puppy with fresh water.

    The Samoyed's thick coat needs to be brushed at least once a week. The coat will shed considerably during the warm months. Daily brushing may be needed during this time. Samoyed puppies should only be bathed when absolutely necessary. Adult Samoyeds need baths about once a month. A high quality pet shampoo is recommended.

Health

    Samoyeds are generally healthy dogs, but there are a few health problems associated with the breed. The most common health issues include hip dysplasia, epilepsy, renal failure, cataracts and bloat. Samoyeds are sensitive to hot weather. Do not leave your Samoyed outside in hot temperatures for long periods of time. Make sure the dog has access to shade and fresh water. With the proper care, Samoyeds can live up to 12 to 15 years.

The Best Dog Food for a Rottweiler

The best dog food for a Rottweiler depends on the dog. Most members of this breed can eat any diet you decide to feed them, unless you have a special-needs Rottweiler--one that may have dietary issues due to allergies or intolerances. If you have a special-needs Rottweiler and are used to feeding kibble, you may have to change to a raw or cooked diet.

Kibble Diets

    Kibble diets should be mixed with at least canned food. Kibble has no moisture in it and, unless you buy a top brand, you are feeding your dog lots of grains and corn. Look for kibble that has some type of meat or meal in the first three or four ingredients. If the first ingredients are meat meal, as opposed to chicken meal or pork meal, the kibble is not ideal. If the first ingredient is grains, vegetables or by-products, the kibble is also low-grade.

Raw Diets

    A raw diet is one of the best diets you can feed a Rottweiler. There are many different ways to feed raw diets, including prey model (feeding whole animals such as chicken or pork) and BARF (bones and raw food). When feeding prey, a whole animal is fed over time or small animals, such as squirrels and chicks are fed to the dog.

    Most people just weigh out the food; most Rottweilers need two percent of their body weight in raw meat each day. A 100-pound Rottweiler would get about 2 pounds of raw meat and bone per day. Many people add a few teaspoons of fruits or vegetables to the meat diet, but it is not required.

Cooked Diets

    A cooked diet is similar to a raw diet in that only good, wholesome foods are fed to the Rottweiler. The meat is cooked. You may add other elements to the meat, such as a few tablespoons of vegetables or fruits.

Food Intolerances

    Some Rottweilers have a food intolerance. This is not the same as a food allergy. An intolerance usually gives the dog itchy skin or may make the it vomit or have diarrhea. You can tell if the it has an intolerance by removing the food from its diet. If the Rottweiler's problems disappear, you know it has a food intolerance to that particular food.

Food Allergies

    Food allergies are true allergies, not just intolerances, and can wreck havoc with a Rottweiler's system. They can cause excessive skin problems, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. When you have a Rottweiler with a food allergy and you feed kibble, you must find a kibble that does not have the ingredient that is affecting your dog. Because many of the same items are in most low-cost to medium-cost kibbles, you should switch to a high-end kibble or to a raw or cooked diet.

Conclusion

    Even if your Rottweiler does not have an issue with food intolerances or allergies, the best diet is a high-end kibble, raw or a cooked diet. You will notice the difference in his coat and teeth.

Mini Dachshund Vs. Full Size Dachshund

Mini Dachshund Vs. Full Size Dachshund

What Is a Catahoula Dog?

What Is a Catahoula Dog?

The Catahoula is a rare dog breed that has its origins in America. It is named after the lake in north central Louisiana around which the breed originated, and it is the state's official dog. It was officially designated Louisiana's state dog in 1979.

History

    The early settlers of Louisiana first noticed a breed of Native American dog that likely descended from the Carolina Dog and the red wolf. The Carolina Dog was a breed that accompanied the first humans across the land bridge from Asia 8,000 years ago. With the settlers came a number of European breeds such as bloodhounds, mastiffs and greyhounds, which cross-bred with the native dog. The settlers began to use these dogs as herding animals for pigs and cattle. Today the breed is considered rare and is not recognized by the American Kennel Club.

Appearance

    Catahoula is a large breed that grows to between 20 and 26 inches at the shoulder and weighs between 55 and 80 lbs. It has a robust, muscular body shape and its skull is broad and flat. It has a medium-length muzzle.

Coat and Color

    The Catahoula's coat is short and single-layered and is best kept indoors during cold weather. This short coat has fairly minimal grooming requirements. Coloration varies from solid colors to mixed patchwork-type patterns of black, tan and white. Eye color can also vary from brown to blue; one of each color is common.

Temperament

    The Catahoula is a highly energetic dog. It is a very pack-orientated breed that needs to know its place in the family or it can become overly dominant. This pack mentality also makes the dog protective of its masters and family. It is deeply loyal to its owners and those it sees as higher pack members. The breed is likely not suited to young families and is best with owners who are strong willed.

How to Rescue a Pit Bull in Atlanta

The pit bull is not a breed recognized by the American Kennel Club, but instead is a term used for the American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Terrier or American Pit Bull Terrier. They are difficult to find homes for. Here's how to rescue a pit bull in Atlanta.

Instructions

    1

    Learn about pit bulls by volunteering for one of the Atlanta-area rescue groups. All or Nothing Pit Bull Rescue, operated by tattoo artist Brandon Bonds, actively advocates on behalf of former fighting dogs. Pit Prints Pit Bull Rescue & Rehabilitation is a state-licensed shelter that specializes in bully breeds.

    2

    Check with your city and county animal control department to make certain that pit bulls are not banned in your area. The list of areas banning pit bulls is growing, and different counties have different jurisdictions in the Atlanta area. The SPOT Society website provides contacts for all Atlanta-area animal control agencies and shelters.

    3

    Ready your home for your new dog. Before you rescue a pit bull, make necessary changes in your home and yard so your dog can live a safe life. It is dangerous to leave dogs, especially bully breeds, outside when you are not home. Pet theft is a real threat, and bully breeds are stolen for fighting rings and research labs. Repair or install a fence so that it surrounds your yard.

    4

    Work with All or Nothing Pit Bull Rescue, or Pit Prints Pit Bull Rescue & Rehabilitation Shelter to find the right dog for your family. Both agencies will help choose a dog that needs a home and has the right personality traits for your family.

    5

    Visit a veterinarian with your rescue dog right away. Get all necessary vaccinations, heart worm testing and make an appointment for spay or neuter. Contact the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association for a referral to a small-animal veterinarian in your area. Consider positive-reinforcement obedience training for the dog. All or Nothing Pit Bull Rescue can recommend trainers that works with your breed.

Kamis, 27 Desember 2012

How to Make an Elevated Dog Feeder

Raising the level of your dog's food bowls eases strain on your pet's neck and back and can even help him digest the food better. Elevated feeders also mean you don't have to bend over as far to pick up your pet's dishes, and they can lead to less mess on the floor. You can buy expensive elevated dog feeders, or you can make your own. Make a single feeder, or try a double one that holds both food and water bowls.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the distance from the ground to your dog's shoulder. This will be the height of your feeder. Next measure the diameter of your dog dishes. Add 4 inches to this measurement. This will be the width of your feeder. Multiply the diameter of your dog dish by two and add 6 inches. This will be the length of your feeder.

    2

    Cut a piece of plywood for the top of your feeder. This piece should measure the length and width you determined earlier. Trace two circles on the top of your feeder with the pencil where the dog dishes will sit. These circles should be inch less in diameter than your dog dishes. Leave 2 inches between the circles.

    3

    Use the router to cut out the circles of plywood. Sand the inner edges to smooth. Test to make sure the dog bowls fit snugly into these openings.

    4

    Cut out the sides, back and front of your feeder. The sides will measure the width of the feeder by the height. The back and front will measure the length of the feeder by the height.

    5

    Apply wood glue to the top and side edges of each piece and attach them to the top. Hammer in wood finishing nails at the corners and every 4 inches along the sides. Allow the glue to dry overnight.

    6

    Finish the wood with a coat of polyurethane varnish or stain.

Games to Play With My Labrador Retriever

Games to Play With My Labrador Retriever

Many pet owners are won over by Labrador Retrievers' charm and buoyant personalities. Their adaptability means that Labs, whose origins are in Newfoundland, can participate in myriad games and activities, as long as their owners are involved too. Those who care for Labs can find collaborative, exciting experiences in which the breed excels.

Freestyle Dance

    You and your Lab can boogie together by participating in canine freestyle programs. Known as the "tail waggin' sport," Labs that have been trained for basic obedience can dance to the music alongside their owner in a choreographed routine. The World Canine Freestyle Organization claims that dog enthusiast Val Culpin started canine freestyle in British Columbia, in the late 1980s. The WCFO encourages the use of costumes, dressage movements and variations on classic obedience steps like "Down" and "Shake hands."

Canine Good Citizen

    Also inaugurated in the late 1980s, the American Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen encourages good behavior in dogs, both at home and in their communities. Though it may seem like canine charm school, CGC is actually an amusing and engaging activity for Labs and their owners. To earn the CGC title, a dog must successfully pass 10 test items, which include coming when called, walking through a crowd and reactions to a distraction.

Agility

    Agility is an ideal activity to capitalize on Labs' natural assets, like their affable nature and inherent athleticism. A competitive yet fun sport, canine agility evaluates an owner's ability to train and guide her dog through a timed obstacle course. Hurdles, ramps and seesaws are only a few of the challenges making up such a course. Agility teams are scored in a system that mirrors that of equestrian sport jumping, where points are deducted for faults. Nevertheless, agility remains a community sport that promotes dog-and-owner bonding.

Field Trials and Hunting Tests

    They aren't called retrievers for nothing; Labs were bred to fetch game brought down by gunmen. Naturally, events like field trials and hunting tests cater to Labs' skill set. In field trials, hunting dogs compete against one another for the title of top performer, whereas canines are evaluated against a predetermined standard in hunting tests. Certain Labs will take to such retrieving activity better than others. For instance, Labs specifically bred for field trials exhibit much more energy and will than English-type Labs, which are more sedate.

10 Quick Facts About German Shepherds

German Shepherds are one of the most registered dogs, which proves how popular they are as a breed. These large and powerful creatures are just as loyal and compassionate. They make great pets for families because they are good with children and can be trained to protect the house. The following are some things you may not have known about this breed.

Max von Stephanitz

    Max von Stephanitz has been credited as the creator of the German Shepherd. He was trying to breed the best dog for working, and many people believe that the product of his breeding created a dog with the best combination of loyalty, strength, intelligence and appearance.

Size and Color

    German Shepherds are large-breed dogs that are generally between 22 and 26 inches long, with an ideal height of 25 inches. They weigh between 49 and 88 pounds. The coats of German shepherds come in different colors, with typical mixes being tan/black and red/black. Full white and full black varieties are also found.

Intelligence and Aggression

    German Shepherds were bred in part for their high intelligence level. Stanley Coren, who wrote "The Intelligence of Dogs," ranked the German Shepherd as the the third most intelligent species of dog. In terms of aggression, these dogs are known to be more likely to bite a person than most other breeds. Their aggression, however, does not generally affect their owners.

Loyalty

    German Shepherds show a high degree of loyalty toward the people they are most familiar with, including young children. If not socialized well, however, they can become too attached and wary or aggressive to outsiders.

Health and Lifespan

    There are two health problems common to German Shepherds. They tend to experience arthritis at later ages, especially in the hips. They are also prone to ear infections because of their large ears. The average lifespan of a German shepherd is 7 to 10 years.

Jobs

    German Shepherds are known to be one of the best breeds of working dogs. They are often employed by the police, military, and search and rescue operations.

Coat

    These dogs have a double coat. The undercoat is composed of short hairs that are not shed often, while the outer coat is shed constantly and features short or medium hairs, with long hairs being less common.

How Much Food Should You Feed an Irish Wolfhound?

It Depends on the Dog.

    According to the Irish Wolfhound Society, how much and what kind of food you feed the large, lovable and loyal Irish wolfhound depends on its age, its size, the type of food you intend to feed it and what the dog's purpose is, such as working or pet.

Some General Rules Apply.

    According to Dog Time, most adult Irish wolfhounds require a total of 4 to 6 cups of dry food each day, fed over two meals. The Irish Wolfhound Society recommends a higher protein diet for working dogs, a lower protein diet for family pets. Older dogs tend to need less food; puppies need more mealtimes.

Bottom Line

    According to The Irish Wolfhound Society, you can judge an Irish wolfhound's weight by feeling for its ribs. You need to be able to feel the outline of its ribs or the dog is overweight, but if you can feel the entire rib when pressing through the flesh, the dog is too thin.

    The Irish Wolfhound Club of America strongly recommends developing a feeding plan with your breeder that is tailored to your specific dog.

Facts About Shiba Inu Puppies

The Shiba Inu is one of the nine AKC-recognized breeds that originated in Japan. These bright, affectionate dogs are popular pets in the United States, but before you buy a Shiba Inu puppy, you should know what to expect from the breed.

Needs

    It's important that people who are thinking about adding a Shiba Inu to their family consider the care this breed requires. Although they can live in apartments, they need plenty of exercise. Puppies especially do better with access to a yard. As puppies, Shiba Inus should be made part of the family so they don't feel left out.

Features

    Shiba Inus are medium-sized, very solid dogs. They come in a range of colors, from solid beige to red and black. They have double coats even as puppies, and will grow to 13 to 16 inches and 15 to 25 pounds.

Personality

    Shiba Inus are bright and personable. They are courageous, bold dogs that are loving and dedicated to their owners. These dogs are easily trained and very good with children. Puppies should be socialized early to help them grow into healthy dogs.

History

    Shiba Inus are Japanese dogs originally bred to hunt wild game like bear and boars. These dogs nearly died out during World War II, but breeding programs managed to save the breed.

Considerations

    Shiba Inus are prone to hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy and slipped knee caps. The dogs live for 12 to 15 years. They also shed very heavily.

Rabu, 26 Desember 2012

How to Identify an English Sheepdog

How to Identify an English Sheepdog

The Old English Sheepdog is a strong, compact balanced dog. Dont let this breeds tendency to amble or pace along at a slower speed fool you. At a trot, the breeds movement is free and powerful and it will cover maximum ground with minimum steps. Old English Sheepdogs are intelligent dogs and have a good disposition. They should show no sign of aggression, shyness or nervousness.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the Old English Sheepdogs general appearance and size. The breed is a strong yet compact, square balanced dog. While heavily coated, it is not profusely coated. The breed is a thick breed and while very muscular, is also quite able-bodied. The male Old English Sheepdog is about 22 inches or more in height, and the female is 21 inches and taller. The length of the dog should be about the same as the height. The dog should be well-muscled and have plenty of bone.

    2

    Make sure the head features are correct as to the breed standard. The dog should have a general intelligent expression and brown or blue eyes. It may have one blue or one brown eye. The ears are medium-sized and are carried flat to the side of the head. The skull itself is squarish, and the parts over the eyes are well-arched. The whole forehead areas is covered with hair.

    3

    Look for the distinguishing characteristic of this breedthe breed stands lower at the withers than at the loin. There is no indication of softness or weakness. The body is short and compact, and is wider at the rump than at the shoulders. The tail is docked close to the body or can be naturally bob-tailed.

    4

    Check the fore- and hindquarters. The shoulders should be laid back and narrow at the points. The forelegs are straight and have plenty of bone. The distance from the withers to the elbow and from the elbow to the ground are about the same. The hindquarters are rounded and muscular. The metatarses are perpendicular to the ground, no matter which angle the dog is viewed. The feet should be small and round, with well-arched toes and thick pads. The feet should point straight ahead.

    5

    Make sure the coat is of a good hard texture. It is not straight, but shaggy and does not have any curl to it. The coat should not be soft and flat. The undercoat is a waterproof pile. The whole skull is covered with hair. The neck is coated with hair, as are the forelegs. The hams are densely coatedmoreso than any other part of the body. The Old English Sheepdog can be any shade of gray, grizzle, blue or blue merle. It may have white markings. The dog should not have any shade of brown or fawn.

Top 10 Large Breed Dog Foods

Top 10 Large Breed Dog Foods

According to Dog Food Scoop, there are four things to consider when choosing a quality dog food for your dog: make sure it has human-grade ingredients, ingredients are locally sourced, fat is not at the top of the ingredients list and the protein source is at the top of the list. Your large breed dog will also benefit from added vitamins and minerals to enhance nutrition and glucosamine chondroitin for joint health.

Wellness Large Breed Adult Health and Large Breed Puppy

    Wellness has products in their line specifically for large breeds. They include large breed puppy and large breed adult formulas. Wellness has 26 percent protein to promote lean muscle. Salmon oil and meal are added, providing DHA, which supports brain development. The food contains less fat to fuel the high energy level of larger dogs without weight gain. chondroitin sulfate is added to help maintain joint health. The larger size kibble helps prevent the dog from gobbling food.

Eagle Pack Dog Food Large Breed Puppy and Large Breed Adult

    Eagle Pack contains quality protein and fat sources. Appropriate amounts of L-Carnitine are included to promote healthy body weight. Glucosamine for joint health and DHA for brain development are also part of the recipe.

Natural Balance Large Breed Bites

    Natural Balance has large kibble to promote slower chewing. Their limited-ingredient formula helps reduce allergic reactions. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, canola oil, vitamin E and biotin are added for optimal skin and coat condition. No artificial dyes are added.

Artemis Medium and Large Breed Puppy

    Artemis is an all-natural formula containing no dyes, colors or bleach. Artemis uses high-quality proteins, fruits and vegetables. Vitamins are included for healthy growth and nutrition. Lower fat percentages help dogs maintain a healthy weight.

Solid Gold Large Breed Adult Dog Food

    Solid Gold contains 22 percent high-quality protein consisting of bison and ocean fish. This food has only 9 percent fat. Ingredients include carrots, blueberries and broccoli. Added vitamin E increases the antioxidant quality of Solid Gold. Added salmon and canola oils enhance skin and coat condition.

Innova Large Breed Adult Dog Food

    Innova contains wholesome ingredients from five food groups. Added glucosamine chondroitin promotes joint health. The formula contains all-natural ingredients with no artificial additives.

California Naturals Large Bites Dog Food

    California Naturals has a single meat source of 100 percent lamb. Brown & white rice and sunflower oil help to enhance nutritional quality. The recipe is made with natural products and contains no artificial colors, dyes or preservatives.

Evo Ancestral Diets Dog Food

    Evo contains no grains, which can cause an allergic reaction in some dogs. It is low in carbohydrates and uses premium quality meat protein sources. Herring & sunflower oils are included for skin and coat health. Nutrient dense, Evo is fortified with vitamins and minerals.

Canidae Dog Food

    Canidae is an all-natural dog food containing over 50 percent high-quality, hormone-free meat protein. Digestive enzymes are added to promote digestive system health.

Merrick Dog Food

    Merrick is a human-grade dog food that is hormone and antibiotic free. It is enhanced with vitamins, minerals, probiotics and Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. Fruits and vegetables are added after the cooking process to preserve the nutrients.

How to Identify a Keeshond

How to Identify a Keeshond

The Keeshond makes a great family companion, especially for children. It is a lively breed that shows alertness and intelligence. It learns quickly, but should be trained with a gentle, patient hand. While most Keeshonds are affectionate and outgoing with people and other animals, if not properly socialized when young, may show some shyness or be reserved towards strangers. This breed was originally a worker on Dutch boats, but has now become a companion, instead of a worker. This is a cold-weather breed, and does not tolerate warmer temperatures because of the profuse coat.

Instructions

    1

    Notice the general appearance of the Keeshond. This is an alert, intelligent breed with a foxy expression, highlighted by short, pointy ears. The overall breed is well balanced and profusely coated around the neck and shoulders, giving it a square look.

    2

    Make sure the size and proportion of the Keeshond is correct. This is a medium-sized breed. Males are 18 inches measured at the withers and females are 17 inches at the withers. The dog should look sturdy, but not so heavy that the dog looks bulky.

    3

    Check to be sure that the head has the Keeshonds distinctive characteristic markings. The markings in the eye area include a dark line at the outer corner of each eye, slanting toward the lower corner of each ear. These lines, matched with meaningful eyebrows, give the Keeshond is pleasant appearance and alert expression. The almond-shaped eyes are dark brown, medium in size and do not protrude. The ears are small and triangular and are carried straight up. The medium length muzzle should be proportioned to the head.

    4

    Look at the body lines. The neck is slightly long and sits well on the shoulders, leading to a short back before sloping down to the hindquarters. The tail is long and has profuse hair feathers. It curls over and lies close to the back. The front legs are well boned and lead to a slight angulation between the shoulder and upper arm. The rear angulation complements the front angulation, give the Keeshond great balance and agility. The compact feet are cat-like and lead to arched toes and black nails.

    5

    Notice the double coat. The outer coat has long harsh hair that stands out over a thick undercoat. The abundant undercoat is soft and downy. The head and muzzle is covered with short hair and is very smooth. The neck is profusely covered with hair, giving the Keeshond a ruff that covers the area under the jaw through the chest and into the front of the shoulders. The hair on the legs is short and smooth, except for the pants caused by feathering on the back legs. The feathering should not extend past the hocks. The hair on the tail forms a deep plume.

    6

    Observe the coloring of the Keeshond. The coloring of the Keeshond is complicated, giving it its distinct look. The base color is a mixture of gray, black and cream. The black coloring on the tips of the outer coat causes the shading. The undercoat may be gray or cream. It should not be tawny. The muzzle is dark. The ears are also dark, and should be almost black. The ruff, shoulders and rear leg hair feathers are a lighter color than the rest of the body. The area between the lighter shoulder color and the rest of the body should be well defined. The tip of the tail is black, but the plume is a light color when it is curled over the back. The leg and feet do not have any black on them, and are usually cream.

Ten Reasons to Love a Maltese

Ten Reasons to Love a Maltese

The Maltese is an ancient breed of all-white longhaired toy dog that originated on the Island of Malta. The Maltese commands a loyal fan base of breeders, owners and rescuers in Europe and North America. Ancient Greek Maltese owners built tombs for their beloved companions, according to "The Howell Book of Dogs." Owners would argue that there are far more than 10 reasons to love a Maltese.

Small Size

    Maltese dogs are portable without being too fragile. Although the breed standard prefers Maltese to be 4 to 6 pounds, "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs" notes that they can weigh up to 8 pounds. This makes the Maltese great for living in apartments, trailers or other small homes.

Less Exercise Needed

    Although Maltese dogs still needs a brisk daily walk and a daily game such as fetch, they do not require the major exercise of dog breeds bred to herd livestock, hunt or pull sleds. Maltese were bred as home companions, states "The Howell Book of Dogs."

Highly Intelligent

    Maltese learn tricks and basic commands quickly if trained with positive reinforcement, Maltese want to please their people, which makes them more attentive to people's commands.

Good With Cats

    Unlike many other dog breeds, Maltese can get along with cats, especially if introduced to cats when they are still young puppies. Maltese may chase cats but are not prone to harming cats, according to "Maltese."

Good Watchdog

    Despite its small size, the Maltese makes a great watchdog, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs." They will fearlessly warn their humans about any stranger with loud and fierce barking.

Always In Fashion

    The Maltese has been a fashionable breed for centuries. According to the American Kennel Club, Maltese dogs sold for the equivelent of $2,000 back in the 1500s. But many purebred and part-bred Maltese can be adopted for far less money from animal shelters.

Good with Older Children

    The Maltese's natural playfulness makes it a great companion for gentle, quiet children over 8, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs." However, in general, no dog and child should be left unsupervised.

Normal Nose Length

    Unlike brachycephalic or flat-faced breeds such as the bulldog, pug or Pekingese, the Maltese sports a nose length proportional to its body. The Maltese is free from health and breathing problems that plague brachycephalic breeds.

Life Span

    The Maltese tends to live longer than larger breeds of dogs, averaging 13 to 15 years. Compare this to the Irish wolfhound, which only averages 6 to 8 years, according to "The Howell Book of Dogs."

That Face

    As one of the world's oldest toy breeds, Maltese certainly resemble toys with their bright white or silver-white faces and shining black eyes and noses. Although show dogs need to sport full-length coats that cover the face, pet Maltese owners can clip their dogs' coats so hair does not cover that remarkable face.

Selasa, 25 Desember 2012

About Bluetick Coonhounds

About Bluetick Coonhounds

Bluetick coonhounds are known for their ability to track and corner animals such as raccoons, opossums, cougars and even bears. In fact, the "coon" in coonhound comes from the breed's ability to track and tree raccoons using their sense of smell. When bluetick coonhounds corner their game in a tree, they call out to their owners with a bawling bark to signal a successful capture. Since bluetick coonhounds have a keen sense of smell and excellent eyesight, they can hunt prey with ease during the day or night.

Breed Origins

    Bluetick coonhounds may be descended from a cross between the Grand Blue de Gascogne of France and the English Foxhound. When this breed originally arrived in America, it was known as the English coonhound. Breeders in the Louisiana area wanted to maintain a line of coonhounds that hunt with a cold nose. A cold-nose scent hound has the ability to track older scents that may have a weaker or cold trail. The English coonhound line in England decided to breed a hot-nose line that would be faster at tracking prey but less likely to pick up on colder scents. In 1945, American breeders broke off into their own group. English coonhounds were then bred with other breeds such as American Foxhounds and the Black and Tan Virginia Foxhounds. Bluetick coonhounds arose as a result of this breeding for a cold-nosed coonhound in America.

Appearance and Size

    Bluetick coonhounds get their name from their dark blue coat pattern covered in a speckled or ticked pattern. There may or may not be tan markings around the eyes, cheeks and chest. The bluetick coonhound's short, dense fur lies close to the body and has a smooth, glossy look. The breed standard is 22 to 27 inches tall for males and 21 to 25 inches tall for females. Males weigh in around 55 to 80 lbs. while females range from 45 to 65 lbs. Bluetick coonhounds should look muscular and speedy, carrying their head and tail upright when moving.

Temperament

    Bluetick coonhounds are loyal, intelligent and hard-working dogs that enjoy hunting, obedience and agility trials. They make good companion dogs and do well living indoors where they can be part of the family. A gentle, loyal breed, bluetick coonhounds do well around children and family. Their hunting and tracking instinct makes them less trustworthy around cats and other pets as well as wild animals such as raccoons, squirrels and opossums. Because of their keen sense of smell and excellent eyesight, bluetick coonhounds should be leashed or contained in a fenced backyard to keep them from wandering after whatever catches their interest.

Exercise

    Bluetick coonhounds are active dogs that benefit from long, brisk walks each day. Since they were bred to track and follow prey for hours, they don't tire easily and need vigorous exercise to keep their minds and bodies busy. They do best in large fenced yards where they can stretch their legs and run.

Grooming

    Brush the coat once a week with a medium bristled brush and shampoo as needed to keep coat clean and shiny. Pay special attention to the ears to keep them clean and free of dirt and bacteria that may cause infection.

Life Expectancy and Common Health Problems

    Most bluetick coonhounds live about 10 to 12 years. Overall, the bluetick coonhound is a very healthy breed. Common health problems include hip dysplasia, cataracts, Krabbes disease and bloat.

Is It Good to Feed Raw Chicken Backs to Dogs?

Is It Good to Feed Raw Chicken Backs to Dogs?

    Raw chicken is readily available and inexpensive.
    Raw chicken is readily available and inexpensive.

Raw Chicken Backs Are OK

    Longtime German Shepherd breeder Yuliya Matvyeyeva states on the Kennels von Lotta website that raw chicken backs can be part of a well-balanced canine diet. Chicken backs are inexpensive and provide a source of fat and protein, and the risk of salmonella is very low. In addition, chicken bones are soft and easily digestible.

Raw Chicken Backs May Spread Disease

    Animal rescuer and author Katie Merwick, of the Second Chance Ranch website, indicates that dogs would receive the same nutrition found in a chicken-based diet from alternative vegetable-based sources. Raw chicken, she writes, is full of bacteria and parasites. Dogs can spread these bacteria and parasites to their owners and other dogs through their saliva and feces.

Bottom Line

    In general, today's meats are clean, free of parasites and safe. Neither side of this issue offers a lot of scientific evidence to support its claims; however, much anecdotal evidence exists that dogs that eat a raw diet have good coats and cleaner teeth and smaller stools than those fed kibble. If safe handling practices are used to avoid spreading bacteria, then dogs may benefit from eating raw chicken backs.

The Best Dog Breeds for Walking

The Best Dog Breeds for Walking

How to Raise a Blue Heeler

How to Raise a Blue Heeler

Blue heelers are the "blue" version of the Australian cattle dog, or ACD. The red variety is often called a red heeler. It's the same breed, just differently colored. The coat has an appearance of a bluish speckling over a majority of the body, called merle. This is a lively, energetic dog that can weigh between 30 and 50 pounds. The ACD is very intelligent and determined, bred to move cattle by nipping at their heels, hence the name "heeler." This breed requires a firm, positive approach to training, and an owner who is committed to working with the dog daily. As a family pet, the ACD tends to revert to heeling -- nipping at your heels, moving the cat around or herding your children -- if not trained, socialized and exercised properly.

Instructions

    1

    Take your heeler to the veterinarian as soon as you can after adopting it. Puppies need a series of vaccinations every three weeks until they are about 16 to 18 weeks old. Adults need yearly vaccinations. Besides vaccinations, your heeler needs a complete examination to determine its overall health. Discuss potential health issues that are common to this breed with the vet, such as hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and deafness.

    2

    Socialize your cattle dog well from the earliest age possible. Blue heelers are not mean dogs, but they tend to be very active and dominant, and their heeling instinct easily takes over. Your heeler should be introduced in positive ways to many situations, animals and objects while it is a young puppy. Teach the puppy not to chase or nip at small animals or children, using the methods for mouthing taught by the Humane Society of the Silicon Valley. Also teach children not to run from the heeler. Instincts can suddenly take over despite careful training.

    3

    Crate train your blue heeler for the best house and bathroom manners. Think of the crate as you would a playpen for a baby, and use it only when you can't supervise. No dog can tolerate being locked in a crate or pen for hours on end, and especially not an energetic blue heeler. Wire crates are generally better than the plastic airline crates, as they provide better ventilation.

    4

    Learn and apply the "Nothing in Life Is Free" program (see resources), so that your blue heeler learns to earn its rewards and attention. This is a safe method for keeping your dog in its place as subordinate to the human leaders. Dominance can become a big problem with Australian cattle dogs, because they are independent thinkers.

    5

    Take your cattle dog to puppy kindergarten and obedience classes. Practice the lessons every day at home, as well. A heeler has lots of energy, a keen mind and a desire to work -- all of which must be brought under your control.

    6

    Exercise your blue heeler daily, regardless of the weather. This is a working breed that needs a lot of exercise, even though it may be on the smaller side. Provide both leashed walks and off-leash romps in a fenced area. Do not allow an Australian cattle dog to roam free. This is a breed that can easily find trouble, between its high energy and dominant attitude.

    7

    Keep your dog's mind and body active by teaching it a canine sport, such as agility, tracking, canine dance or herding trials. When you leave your dog home alone, provide strong chew toys filled with peanut butter or other tasty treats, and a treat-dispensing puzzle toy. These will keep your dog occupied with a job to do, so it will be less inclined to dismantle your house.

How to Start Your Dog on a Raw Food Diet

How to Start Your Dog on a Raw Food Diet

The raw food diet for dogs is a controversial subject in the dog world, partially because veterinarians are rarely educated about raw feeding in vet school; and because there aren't many studies on the long-term effects of raw feeding dogs. If you are inclined to believe proponents of the raw food diet that it is healthier than serving your dog commercial food; it is vital to change your dog's diet in the proper manner to prevent intestinal stress.

Instructions

    1

    Reduce how much commercial dog food you serve by 25% on the first day. Substitute that 25% with a small amount of raw meat, bones, chopped starchy vegetables, chopped fruits, dairy and eggs.

    You may wish to mix a large portion of the raw mixture and keep in the refrigerator to save time. Any of the raw mixture that you will not use within a few days, freeze in meal-size portions in plastic baggies. The raw food diet is not an exact science: So play around with how much you include, remembering that the largest ingredient should be raw meat.

    2

    Serve half commercial dog food and half raw dog food on the second day. When feeding your dog raw food, make sure to always serve it in a clean, sanitized bowl. Although there is bacteria on the raw mixture to which your dog is naturally resistant, you do not want extra bacteria to build up in your dog's bowl.

    3

    Prepare 3/4 raw food with 1/4 of commercial food for your dog on the third day. Carefully monitor your dog's behavior and stool for unusual signs like listlessness or loose stool. If your dog appears to react adversely to the change in its diet, return to step 2. If your dog seems oblivious to the diet change, proceed to step 4.

    4

    Serve your dog 100% raw food on the fourth day. Observe your dog's weight and adjust the amount of food accordingly.

What to Feed a Coonhound

Coonhounds are a robust breed with a genetic profile that makes them durable hunters. If you have a coonhound who is more of a house dog than a hunter, his dietary needs will be different from coonhounds burning up extra calories in the woods. There are a number of dietary choices to consider for your coonhound including whether to feed him a raw homemade diet or a commercial brand.

Dietary Recommendations

    Although dietary needs for coonhounds are dependent upon their level of daily activity and exercise, there are general guidelines for fat-to-protein ratios that should be followed in order to keep your animal properly nourished.

    According to Jay Benton, D.V.M., breeder of Treeing Walker Coonhounds for 20 years, dogs who are hunting regularly should be fed diets with protein levels of 25 percent to 28 percent and fat levels of 15 percent to 18 percent. These higher levels of protein aid in supporting endurance and muscle mass. The higher fat content provides the energy needed for hunting.

    However, coonhounds tend to be rather laid-back animals. If you are not hunting them or working them hard, they will expend very little energy. If your coonhound is more sedentary you will need to cut these protein and fat levels and be careful with your portion control. Choose a diet of about 8 percent to 10 percent fat to avoid weight gain. The amount of food you should provide will vary with the animal's size and type of food you are feeding him. Check with your veterinarian for personal recommendations on the proper amount of food to feed your coonhound.

Commercial Diets

    There are many advantages to purchasing a commercial brand diet for your hound: the convenience of storage and purchasing; less preparation time; a tendency to be more economical and formulas that are researched and processed for balanced nutrition. In addition, commercial raw foods available for purchase undergo a heat processing technique that makes them safer from bacterial contamination.

    Unfortunately, there are also some cons to purchasing commercial dog food for your hound. The quality regulations of the USDA and FDA are not as stringent as they are for foods consumed by humans. There have been numerous cases of tainted dog food from other countries entering the canine food supply. In addition, heat processing can damage vitamins and nutrients or alter the protein structure found in commercial mixes, many of which have artificial preservatives. To keep the prices down, many commercial feeds are packed with cheaper ingredients and therefore may be rampant with fillers such as wheat, soy, bone meal and rice mill. They also may contain low-quality sources of protein.

Homemade Diets

    One of the largest advantages to feeding your coonhound a diet of homemade food is that you have complete control of what goes into it. You have the ability to choose a raw or cooked diet from wholesome, high-quality ingredients. You also can prevent your dog from ingesting harmful pesticides and herbicides in the vegetables you use. In addition, you may choose organic meats that are free from hormones or antibiotics. Raw diets are easier for dogs to digest. Raw meat bones are safer than cooked ones and they promote good dental hygiene for your dog.

    On the downside, it is much more time-consuming to prepare your own dog food and certainly more expensive. Homemade recipes have not undergone some of the more stringent nutritional testing that commercial brands have. If you are going raw, food-borne illnesses such as E. Coli and salmonella are a worry and something you will need to weigh the pros and cons of before deciding upon your coonhound's diet.

Senin, 24 Desember 2012

Bulldog Skin Disorders on the Back of the Neck

Bulldog Skin Disorders on the Back of the Neck

Purebred dogs are usually more prone to health problems because of their limited gene pool. As is the case with many purebred dogs, bulldogs are genetically very susceptible to skin disorders and allergies that can trigger skin conditions. The bulldog's excessive skin requires immediate care and attention in the case of inflammation.

Dermatitis

    Dermatitis, Pyoderma and Staph infections are common skin disorders in bulldogs and often begin in the folds of the skin. The bacterial infections would cause inflammation on the back of the neck. The infections start from a small opening like a flea bite or skin that has been rubbed raw. The bacteria can penetrate to various levels of the epidermis and can lead to mange. The infection is characterized by raised, swollen bumps that can ooze puss if left untreated. A collar rubbing on the back of the neck could cause the initial irritation and subsequently dermatitis. Switching to a harness while treating the infection can prevent it from coming back.

Eczema

    Bulldogs are genetically susceptible to eczema. The condition can worsen in hot weather and if the dog is stressed. Eczema in bulldogs is similar to the condition in humans; the skin is dry, flaky, itchy and can become inflamed. When the condition worsens and open blisters and sores occur, it is called wet eczema. Eczema outbreaks can intensify if the dog has food allergies, flea bites or a hormonal imbalance, and outbreaks can be seen on the back of the neck.

Folliculitis

    Folliculitis is a congenital skin disorder in bulldogs that results in a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The infection often occurs when the skin is already irritated by allergies or another skin condition. A mild case of folliculitis can cause raised hairs, scaly skin and hair loss. If the infection is not treated with antibiotics and travels below the follicle into the dermis, it can cause puss filled bumps that can rupture and crust over.

Allergies

    An allergic reaction can be the cause of skin irritation on the back of the neck. An allergy to food, flea bites or an outside irritant like chemicals could cause a reaction in a bulldog's skin. A slight allergic reaction in the sensitive skin folds on the neck can quickly deteriorate into a larger problem. If the bulldog is flea free, a change in food, bowl, bedding and collar can help determine if contact with something in the bulldog's environment is causing an allergic reaction.

Facts on Bichon Frise Dogs

The bichon frise is a descendant of the water spaniel introduced in the early thirteenth century and originated in the Mediterranean. Originally, they were traded by sailors and eventually ended up in the royal French courts during the sixteenth century. They also have a past history of being used as circus animals and in fairs as trained dog acts. However, today their main occupation is as companion animal. The Societe Centrale Canine of France, adopted by the official standard of the breed on March 5, 1933. The bichon arrived in the United States in 1955. The American Kennel Club admitted the bichon frise in 1972 within the non-sporting group..

Coat

    Bichon frise coats are typically white and may have some apricot, buff or cream shading on the body or by the ears. They have two coats of hair. The hair is course and curly on the outer-coat and on the undercoat is softer and more dense. They are considered to be hypoallergenic as they do not shed. Their hair continues to grow and any hair that does fall out, usually gets trapped within the curls of the existing coat. Daily brushing and regular grooming are important for this reason.

Grooming

    Bichons should be groomed approximately every 6 weeks. The coat should be cut and trimmed to accent the outline of the body. The cut should always appear rounded and not squared off. When groomed properly, the coat should feel like velvet and appear plush.

Temperament

    Bichons are known for their easy, gentle temperament and are purported to get along well with children. They are considered playful, learn quickly and are very affectionate. They tend to get along well with other dogs and have a high energy level.

Height and Weight

    Female bichons tend to weigh slightly less than the males and their weight range is typically from 10 to 15 pounds whereas the males weigh from 11 to 16 pounds. Height measurements are measured at the shoulder and on average from 9 to 11 inches for females and from 10 to 12 inches for males.

Health Concerns

    Bichons can be very sensitive to flea bites and other skin ailments. The breed is prone to watery eyes that can be caused by allergies and tear duct blockages. Bichons are also prone to developing cataracts. Some develop dislocated knee caps and epilepsy.

Life Expectancy

    The life expectancy is between 12 and 15 years for a healthy bichon. The oldest bichon was 16.5 years and lived in the UK.