Jumat, 30 November 2012

Havanese Dog Origins

The Havanese is a toy dog, weighing approximately 7 to 13 lbs. when fully grown. Bred as companion dogs, the Havenese are affectionate and playful and get along with most people, dogs, cats and other animals, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. The Havanese is an old breed, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC), and its history is long and rich.

Geography

    The Havanese is native to Cuba, and is the county's national dog, according to the AKC. It is believed that the first Havanese came to Cuba aboard trade ships from the Spanish island of Tenerife in the 16th century. The breed made it to Europe in the mid-18th century, and the United States in the 20th century, according to the Dog Breed Info Center.

History

    The Havanese, also known as the Bichon Havanese, originated from a now-extinct dog known as Blanquito de la Habana, or Havanese Silk Dog, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. With the transportation of Bichon lap dogs from Europe during the 17th century, the Havanese became smaller and its coat became silkier.

Preservation

    During the Cuban, French and Russian revolutions, the Havanese faced extinction. When Cubans began fleeing the country, some managed to escape with their Havanese. A U.S. breeder managed to find 11 Havanese and saved the breed, according to the AKC. The modern-day Havanese is a descendant of the 11 dogs that escaped from Cuba, according to the Dog Breed Info Center.

Recognition

    Because of the Havanese's past and its near extinction, it is a relatively new dog for many kennel clubs, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. The United Kennel Club was the first to recognize the breed in 1991. The AKC followed in 1996, and the Canadian Kennel Club in 2001.

Diversity

    Breeders in Germany in the 1980s found that some Havanese puppies in their litters were born with short, smooth coats, which, according to the Dog Breed Info Center, is not a breed characteristic of the Havanese. This is a recessive gene in the Havanese, and the breeders named the dogs smooth-coated Havanese, or Shavanese for short. The Shavanese cannot be shown or bred because of its coat.

Neapolitan Mastiff Male Vs. Female

Neapolitan Mastiff Male Vs. Female

The Neapolitan mastiff originates from Naples, Italy. It is also called mastino napoletano, mastino, Italian bulldog, Italian mastiff, Neo mastiff and Neo. The mastiff became a recognized breed by the AKC in 2004; the mastiff is in the working group. The Neapolitan mastiff almost faced extinction after World War II. The mastiff came out of the Molossus breed, which was a Middle Eastern war dog. They were often used in Roman arenas against lions, tigers and even gladiators, and they also fought with Roman soldiers, tracing back to 100 B.C. Some famous Neapolitan mastiffs are Alan from the film "Babe: Pig in the City," Fang from the Harry Potter films, Pansy from Andrew Vachss' Burke novels and Sweetie from Robert K. Tanenbaum's Butch Karp novels.

Temperament

    The Neapolitan mastiff is a fearless protector but is affectionate with family and family friends. This breed is wary around strangers, so it is important to socialize this dog often and at a very young age. The mastiff does not bark excessively, only when it is provoked. It is stubborn and does require repetitive training, from puppyhood on, and must learn that his master is the boss. Males tend to be more aggressive and dominant, especially to other male dogs. Females work best in a home with a family and are more docile and better with children. The mastiff can get along with non-canine pets better than other dogs, as long as they are raised together from puppyhood. The Neo is not a breed for beginner dog owners.

    Children should be taught to respect this dog, and their friends should be introduced when the dog is young. The Neo can be calm by nature when it reaches adulthood. The mastiff can be destructive if left alone for a long time or gets bored. Apartment living is not recommended for this breed, as it is large and needs plenty of space. The mastiff is a natural-born watch dog.

Appearance

    The Neapolitan mastiff is characterized by loose skin over their entire bodies and abundant hanging wrinkles and folds on the head. They have a voluminous dewlap, which is a flap of skin below the chin. They have a short, dense coat that sheds and a rugged, muscular build. Their coloring can be gray (blue), black, tawny and mahogany with some reverse brindling, which is the dominant striping on the dog's body. Sometimes, they have white feet and chest. The ears are usually half-pricked and can be cropped, as well as their tail, but most owners like the natural look. They have a blocky head and a loping gait. Of course, the most obvious difference between male and female Neos is the genitals, which are more evident in the males than the females.

Size

    The size differences between the sexes is distinguishable to the eye. A male can reach 26 to 31 inches at the withers, and a female can reach 24 to 29 inches. The female can weigh around 110 lbs.; the male can weigh approximately 150 lbs. Their body length should be 10 to 15 percent more than that of the length. Their size alone indicates that they are not suited for apartment life. They need a fenced-in, secure yard.

Care

    The Neapolitan mastiff does require a lot of care. The dog must be bathed frequently. The owner will need to keep the face and body clean and dry because this breed of dog drools more than most. The use of lots of drool towels will be necessary. If the wrinkles on the dog are not cared for properly, then they can form acne which can then lead to skin infections. The dog also snores often and loudly, so if you are a light sleeper, then this is not the dog for you. Moderate exercise is all that is needed as it can develop serious health problems if it has too much exercise.

    A female Neo requires more care when she is whelping (pregnant). She needs to have full trust in her master, and if there are any signs of aggression toward the owner, then there is a lack of trust. As her owner, you will need to devote a lot of attention to her during her pregnancy, especially from the sixth week onward. Massage her growing tummy and teats and even touch lightly around her vaginal area, so she will become used to your touch. Allow her to lick your hand to resemble the licking of the newborn puppies. Have the whelping box ready early, so she can get used to it but only when you are able to be present with her. The whelping box needs to have ample room for her and the newborn puppies. You will know she is about to whelp when she begins to dig or burrow in the box and there will be an increased restlessness interchanged with panting. You must keep calm at birth. Strangers should not be allowed to come into the whelping quarters during this time. The birthing process can take up to 12 hours, and it is necessary to make sure to keep the distractions to a minimum.

Health Issues

    The mastiff, being a large dog, only has the lifespan of about nine to 11 years and can develop many health issues. One main issue for this breed is hip dysplasia, a loose and unstable hip joint. Another serious problem for this dog is cherry eye, which is when the third eyelid, which is responsible for tear production, becomes prolapsed, visible, inflamed and red. Treatment for this is removal of the gland, which will cause you to need to administer eye drops for the rest of the dog's life. Some other health issues are OCD, gassiness, sensitivity to chemicals and drugs, ectropion (where the lower eyelid turns outward), entropion (where the lower eyelid turns inward), elbow dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, bloat, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy and skin infections. They are also prone to heat strokes. There really are no differences in health issues for male and female. Hip dysplasia may be more evident in males, however, since they are a little bigger.

Mini Schnauzer With Digestive Problems

Mini Schnauzer With Digestive Problems

Mini schnauzers are small, intelligent dogs that make popular house pets. But the breed is particularly prone to some serious health disorders.

Features

    Mini schnauzers are active, intelligent terriers. They stand from 12 to 14 inches in height, and can be prone to stomach and health ailments.

Canine Hyperlipidemia

    Mini schnauzers are commonly affected by canine hyperlipidemia, a condition that produces increased lipids (fats) in the bloodstream. This causes a mini schnauzer's digestive system to malfunction by blocking the nutrition a dog should be gleaning from its food.

Other Causes

    Other common digestive problems can be caused by things as simple as viruses, or the dog eating something that made it sick, like chocolate or grass.

Symptoms

    The most common symptoms of a mini schnauzer with any kind of digestive problems are vomiting and diarrhea. This can lead to weight loss and lack of vitality. As a more serious disorder, hyperlipidemia should be further diagnosed with a blood test.

Treatments

    The treatments for a stomach ailment vary depending on the specific ailment. For a virus, a mini schnauzer simply receives medication until it gets healthy again. For a mini schnauzer that has hyperlipidemia, a lifelong diet of low-fat, controlled food is necessary.

Considerations

    Hyperlipidemia is associated with other serious health conditions like diabetes, hypothyroidism, liver disease and nephrotic syndrome.

Characteristics of Maltese Shih-Tzus

Characteristics of Maltese Shih-Tzus

The Maltese Shih Tzu is a "hybrid" or "designer" dog that is a cross between the Maltese and Shi Tzu. Often referred to as a Malti Tzu, Mal Shi, Bichon Maltese or Malteze Shi Tzu, these little dogs are popular for their compact size, low-shed characteristics and personality traits. They are, in essence, mutts, and it should be foremost in the mind of the potential dog owner that each of these dogs is going to be different from the next. While all of these animals bear certain characteristics of their parents, there is no way to ascertain which characteristics any puppy will have.

Size

    One of the most popular characteristics of these dogs is its compact size. As a small breed, they are ideally suited for smaller homes and are usually between 6 and 10 pounds when fully grown. They are also relatively easy to care for with proper grooming and bathing. This additional effort needs to be taken into account when considering bringing a Malti Tzu into your home.

Coat

    Their bodies are covered with a double coat of long, silky fur that is either straight or wavy, and varies in color from pure white, brown, black, tan or a variety of these shades. Depending upon genetic variations, some have hair that can reach the floor, while others have shorter hair growth. Individual appearances are often the result of a groomer's handling. In spite of their luxurious mass of fur, these dogs shed very little, which is one of the reasons for their popularity. Another reason for the popularity is the ability to give them cute hairdos.

Attitude

    The Malti Tzu's disposition varies as greatly as their individual appearance. While typically considered to be a sweet lap dog that enjoys cuddling, many are extremely energetic. Housebreaking can be difficult because they are often stubborn and have a fearless nature. Most are loveable with a playful streak, and are well-mannered family pets. Early training can greatly influence your pet's behavior and make your life and their life easier.

Grooming

    The Malti Tzu typically has a solid compact body, flat face, floppy ears and a black nose. Frequent eye infections are common, as is the dark "tear stain" that can be minimized with good bathing and grooming. There are several products on the market that can aid in preventing and eliminating these problems, but cleanliness and grooming habits are integral to the overall health of your dog. Their fur is prone to clumping and matting, and they are not particularly tolerant of high temperatures.

Kamis, 29 November 2012

Allergen-Free Dog Foods

Allergen-Free Dog Foods

Dogs, like humans, are prone to allergies and have similar symptoms, such as excessive scratching or ear and eye infections. About 10 percent of dogs are allergic to an ingredient in their food. There are several allergen-free dog foods on the market to help allergic pets get the proper nutrition without feeling miserable.

Pinnacle Holistic Allergen-Free Dog Food

    A long-standing dog food brand, Breeder's Choice has been in business since 1947. The brand's allergen-free product features no allergens or poor ingredients, and all-natural foods are the base ingredients of the product. Pinnacle's Holistic Allergen-Free Dog Food also features vitamins, minerals and probiotics from natural sources. A sampling of the flavors include chicken and oats, trout and sweet potato and duck and potato.

    The Pinnacle Peak Protein Formula is not only allergen-free, but is formulated for a healthy skin and coat. The Pinnacle website also holds contests to win free dog food from time to time. Pinnacle's Holistic Allergen-Free formula is available in several pet stores, including PetSmart and Petland.

    Breeder's Choice Pet Foods
    16321 East Arrow Highway
    Irwindale, CA 91706
    800-255-4286
    breeders-choice.com

Dick Van Patten's Natural Balance Allergy Formulas

    Dick Van Patten's dog food company features a line of products called Limited Ingredient Diets, or L.I.D. This allergen-free dog food comes in several flavors, including sweet potato and bison, sweet potato and chicken and potato and duck. Each flavor is prepared with dogs in all stages of life in mind. Additionally, the potato and duck formula also helps to rebuild a dog's immune system.

    Dick Van Patten's also features a vegetarian and vegan-friendly formula for dogs with meat-based protein allergies. According to the company's website, the Dick Van Patten brand of food, which first hit markets in 1989, is used worldwide by trainers, breeders and veterinarians. The product is available at PetCo, as well as several online stores, including Whole Pets and Online Pet Depot.

    Dick Van Patten's Natural Balance Pet Foods
    12924 Pierce Street
    Pacoima, CA 91331
    800-829-4493
    naturalbalanceinc.com

Flint River Ranch Dog Food

    Oven-baked and prepared with premium quality lamb meat and rice, Flint River Ranch adds probiotics and digestive enzymes to their allergen-free formula. The ingredients do not include wheat, chicken or corn. Additionally, the product is preservative-free and has no byproducts. Minerals, vitamins and antioxidants are added to the Flint River Ranch product. Flint River Ranch products are available through their website.

    Flint River Ranch
    245 Hembree Park Drive
    Suite 110
    Roswell, GA 30076
    800-354-6858
    frrco.com

How to Identify a Mountain Cur

How to Identify a Mountain Cur

When American was first colonized, many of the settlers brought their terrier-type curs or mutts across the Atlantic ocean with them. These dogs bred with the local Native American dogs to produce the Mountain Cur. This breed was perfect for the needs of the American settler. It was extremely protective of its master's home, was an excellent silent tracker and was capable of treeing small game animals with ease. The book "Old Yeller" was written about a Mountain Cur. Since then, the vast majority of the curs and their offshoots have been refined and delineated into their own breed categories. However, after several centuries of uninterrupted breeding in remote portions of the Appalachian Mountains, many specimens of the original Mountain Cur have been rediscovered and extensive breeding programs have been instituted to preserve this dogs future. Today, it is mainly used for hunting in the American South. Here are a few a tips on how to positively identify this breed should you come across one.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by assessing the dogs size and weight and taking note of any other bodily features. This breed can vary between 18 to 26 inches high at the shoulders and weigh between 30 and 60 lbs., which is in proportion with its height. It should be a wide shouldered, square dog of equal length to its height. This breed has a broad body and wide back, the legs should be muscular and widely splayed when the dog stands normally. Roughly half of this breed are born with bob-tails, the other half have very short tails that are held horizontal to the ground and curl upward. Many are also born with dew claws on their hind feet as well.

    2

    Examine the dogs coat. It should be short and rough with an under layer of soft, fine fur intended for insulation. The coat is often heavier than that of most coonhounds and other breeds that tree small animals, though it is still considered a short-haired breed. Colors include the famous tan-yellow, brindled brown, black, and brindle and black.

    3

    Conclude by looking at the dogs head. It should have a thick neck of moderate length. The skull should be wide and flat, vaguely reminiscent of a pit bull. The ears should be wide and rounded at the tip. Supported at the base, the ears should hang half their lengths out to the sides. The muzzle should be thick and off equal length to the skull. Muscle mass should be evident along the sides and underneath the dogs lower jaw. The tip of the nose should be squared flat as well.

How to Identify a Biewer Terrier

How to Identify a Biewer Terrier

The Biewer Terrier is also known as the Biewer Terrier a la Pom-Pom. Its a young breed named after Werner Biewer, the German breeder who introduced the breed to the dog show circuit in 1988. The Biewer Yorkie was originally a piebald genetic recessive gene occurrence from 2 Yorkshire Terriers. As such its behavior and temperament parallel the Yorkshire Terrier very closely. Because of the species youth, many people mistake the breed for the Yorkshire Terrier. For that reason here is a guide on how to identify the Biewer Terrier.

Instructions

Identifying A Biewer Terrier

    1

    Begin by looking at the dogs shape and size. It should be very small, no more than 8 inches high at the shoulder. They typically weigh between 4 and 8 pounds. This breed is obviously classified as a toy. The animal should be very compact and neat. the tail should be carried up and often curls over the back of the spine. Its usually nor more than four inches long. The outlines should give the impression of the powerful and well proportioned body in spite of its size.

    2

    Examine the dogs fur. The hair on the body should be long enough to reach the ground. It should be completely straight and silky. Hair on the chest, belly, and legs should be pure white. The rest of the body can be white, black, brown, or grey.

    3

    Look at the dogs head. It should have symmetrical coloration and boxlike in shape. The pricked ears ride high on the head and are angled outward so they point to either side of the animal. It has wide cheekbones and a short but wide snout and button nose. The eyes are widely placed, recessed and always a shining black. If the dog matches this description then youre looking at a Biewer Terrier.

Things to Know to Raise a Golden Retriever Puppy

Things to Know to Raise a Golden Retriever Puppy

The phrase "man's best friend" has been applied to dogs so many times that it has become a cliche, but there is no phrase that better describes the golden retriever. This social dog thrives as a family pet as well as a hunting companion. It is energetic, playful and intelligent. It craves the companionship of humans and loves a day of hard work in the field (or just in the backyard with a tennis ball). The American Kennel Club ranks golden retrievers as the second-most popular dog in America, and with proper care and training they can be your friend for up to 13 years.

Exercise

    Golden retrievers were bred to retrieve fowl. They are energetic and intelligent and do best when they get plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. Puppies aren't fully developed, so casual walks, swims and games are enough. Don't try any forceful activities such as jogging and agility training until your golden retriever is about 2 years old. When your puppy reaches adulthood, however, it will love the challenge of bird dog or competition training. If you purchase a golden retriever puppy, know that you are committing to a daily exercise program that will last throughout the dog's life. Don't let a day go by without giving your dog an outlet (or two) for its extra energy. This will result in an unhappy, bored and potentially destructive golden retriever.

Grooming

    Golden retrievers don't require extensive grooming. Bathe your puppy as needed. If its coat becomes greasy or you start to notice an odor, it's time for a bath. Puppies are also likely to play in the mud, if they can find it, so be prepared to bathe your puppy after a rainy day. Golden retrievers have long coats, so you need to brush your dog at least once a week. Start when your golden retriever is just a puppy to help it become accustomed to the grooming. Praise your puppy and give it treats as you brush so that it learns to enjoy the experience.

Feeding

    As puppies, golden retrievers need extra protein to help them grow. Feed your puppy a dry kibble that is formulated specifically for puppies. It needs to eat this food for at least the first year of its life. After that, you can transition to an adult-formula food that is meant for large breeds. Your golden retriever will weigh 65 to 75 pounds when it is fully grown. Larger kibble helps to clean its teeth and strengthen its jaws. You have the option of feeding your puppy a homemade or raw dog food diet as well. This requires you to prepare meats, fruits and vegetables for your dog's meals. Always discuss this type of diet with your vet to get recommendations on proper nutrition and foods to avoid.

Training

    These dogs love to learn and pick up on basic obedience quickly if you use positive reinforcement training techniques. Use treats, praise and play to reward your dog for following a rule or obeying a command. Use these same rewards to teach your dog what you expect it to do when you give a command. Playful and affectionate, your golden retriever will respond well to praise. If you try to use punishment or negative correction, your puppy could become fearful. This makes training more difficult, makes current behavior problems worse and can cause new behavior problems (such as aggression) to develop. Make training a lifelong experience for your golden retriever. After it masters the basics, teach it advanced tricks or competition skills to keep its sharp mind from getting bored.

What Ingredients to Look for When Determining a Good Dog Food

What Ingredients to Look for When Determining a Good Dog Food

Although controlled by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), dog food quality varies widely. Dog food manufacturers confuse pet owners with meaningless food products and advertizing copy that sounds good but provides misleading information. Pictures on dog food products may include foods that are not actually present in the product's ingredients. Learning to evaluate dog food helps owners provide their dogs with quality nutrition.

Read Ingredients

    Don't base your decision on a dog food's name alone. Terms such as "premium," "natural," "choice" and "organic" are often used carelessly by dog food manufacturers and not monitored by the AAFCO. The term "recommended by vets" should also be viewed with suspicion, as the dog food company may hire its own veterinarians. Reading a dog food's ingredient list provides more accurate information on what the food really contains.

Meat Products

    The best dog foods are those that claim to contain 95 percent real meat, whether beef, lamb, poultry or fish. The term "95 percent" is somewhat deceptive, as the AAFCO does not include water or preservatives when calculating meat percentages. Avoid dog food that uses generic terms for meat, such as "poultry," "fish" or "meat." Instead, look for dog food that specifically lists the type of meat, such as "chicken," "salmon" or "beef."

Grains and Vegetables

    Most dog foods contain grains or vegetables. Unless the dog has a sensitivity to a certain grain, dog food made from barley, millet, oats, peas, potatoes, rice or sweet potatoes are acceptable, provided that meats make up 95 percent of the food. Avoid dog food that uses grain meals or lists grains as grain "products" (see reference 2). Corn is acceptable, but avoid dog foods that contain corn meal or corn gluten. Some dogs develop sensitivities to soy beans, so avoid soy products in dog food, as well.

Byproducts

    Avoid ingredient names that hint at processing or use of otherwise unusable foodstuffs. For instance, cheap dog food often contains meat byproducts. Ingredients such as "lamb byproducts" often come from questionable sources and are of poor quality. "Meat byproducts" or "meat meal" provide even less assurance of quality. The inclusion of grain meals, middlings and hulls in dog food ingredients also suggests a poor quality product (see reference 2).

Rabu, 28 November 2012

How to Adopt a Fiest

A feist is a gorgeous mutt that has been bred for certain qualities that owners originally wanted. Many were bred to be "hunting" dogs, but not all feists are blood thirsty. Quite the contrary, they make a fine pet for a child, teenager or adult. The elderly also bond quite easily with this special kind of mutt.

Instructions

    1

    Check out local animal shelters and animal rescue groups. These are the best places to find a dog in need. You'll also be helping out a great organization with a cause by obtaining your animal this way. Ask about the feists that they may have.

    2

    Learn the history of this adorable dog type. There are almost a dozen different kinds of feists. Some different kinds include the Charlie feist, mountain feist and treeing feist. They are not a new breed. In fact, these dogs were written about in a poem by Abraham Lincoln. One variation of the breed was named the "rat terrier" by Roosevelt.

    3

    Compare the needs and personality of a feist against what you want in a pet. Make sure you can give a feist all he needs. The ideal situation for these dogs would be a house with a fenced-in backyard. Installing a doggie door to allow your dog access to the house and yard as he pleases is ideal. An apartment would do for a feist, but this dog must get at least a half an hour of exercise per day.

    4

    Assess your long-term commitment to this dog. Feists typically live around 15 years. It's a perfect dog to get when your child is young. His growing companion can see him through his childhood and teenage years.

    5

    Bring every member of your family to meet your feist. Everybody needs to be able to bond and get along with this dog. Small children are especially important in this process. You do not want a dog that doesn't get along with your two-legged little one.

    6

    Take the dog for a medical exam to check his health. You may opt to do this after adoption, but it's probably the wisest choice to do it before so you have all his information up front. The organization likely does have his health history on file. Ask to see it.

    7

    Fill out an adoption application if all goes smoothly. You'll have to pay an application fee. Expect to pay one or to two hundred dollars for application fees, adoption fees and medical expenses upon adoption. This is still much cheaper than adopting a full-bred dog. It's a much better choice for you, your pocketbook, the animal organization and the adorable animal in need that will now share your home.

    8

    Have a microchip placed in your dog. Buy a name tag for your dog. Although you may keep him only inside, or perhaps you have a secure backyard, anything can happen. Protect your dog by getting him a tag and a microchip.

    9

    Bring your dog to the vet for regular check-ups. Give him medicine to prevent heartworms. Make sure he gets regular exercise. Enjoy your new friend.

Information on the Bichon Havanese

Information on the Bichon Havanese

Bichon Havanese is a breed of dog that is native to Cuba. It is a member of the Bichon family of dogs and is considered a toy breed. It is a small, yet sturdy breed of dog with a big personality. It is an excellent family dog and does well with children and other pets. The Bichon Havanese is an easy to care for and relatively healthy breed of dog.

History

    The Bichon Havanese breed originated in Cuba in the 19th century. They were developed from the Bichon lapdogs that came to Cuba from areas of Europe. These dogs were not suited to the tropical weather of Cuba. As they adapted, they became known as Blanquito de la Habana. In the 19th century, this breed was mixed with the Poodles and became know as the Bichon Havanese.

Features

    Bichon Havanese is a toy breed of dog that is slightly longer than it is tall. Havaneses range in height from 8 to 11 inches. They weigh between 7 to 13 pounds. Although they are small, they have a rugged, sturdy body and muscular legs. The muzzle is short and square. They have a double coat, which protects them from the heat. The coat is smooth, curly, or wavy. Wavy is the preferred coat texture. The color of the coat varies but includes white, cream, black, silver, chocolate or a combination of colors. Bichon Havaneses have a distinct springy gait when the walk.

Temperament

    Bichon Havaneses are playful and energetic. They seek attention and are easy to train because they are eager to please their owner. They are a very intelligent breed. They are highly sociable and play well with children and other animals. Despite being a toy breed, Bichon Havaneses are not fearful or timid and enjoy meeting new people.

Care

    The Bichon Havanese breed requires regular brushing unless the coat is trimmed. This will prevent matting and tangles. Bathing should be kept to a minimum because this can cause the coat to become dry and brittle. They are a high energy breed so they require a moderate amount of exercise.

Considerations

    The Bichon Havanese breed is a relatively healthy and long-lived dog breed. The average life expectancy of this breed is 14 to 15 years. They are prone to a number of diseases including cataracts, patellar luxation and progressive retinal atrophy. Progressive retinal atrohy is an inherited, genetic disease that can be serious.

Beagle Dog Allergies

Beagle Dog Allergies

The beagle, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC), is a sturdy hunting dog that is happy, friendly and makes a good family pet. Beagles are typically healthy dogs with few physical problems, but they do have allergies that you will want to watch out for if you are a beagle owner.

Allergies

    Beagles, according to Beagle Pro, can have internal and external allergies. Allergy symptoms can range from mild to severe, and Beagle Pro advises that you pay special attention to signs of allergies in your beagle. Many beagles are either misdiagnosed or the owner dismisses the symptoms, and a beagle's allergy symptoms can be misleading.

Symptoms

    Pay attention, according to Beagle Pro, if you notice loss of fur, where either the beagle's coat gets thin or completely falls out. Dry, itchy skin may appear on your beagle's stomach, but most likely will be in the places where your beagle is scratching. Excessive chewing on himself, a dull coat, upset stomach, eye discharge, coughing, shortness of breath and wheezing noises are signs of potential allergy problems.

Internal

    If your beagle has an upset stomach, this is a sign of an internal allergy. The most common cause, according to Beagle Pro, is something your beagle has ingested, and the common reason is the type of dog food your beagle is eating. Beagles can be allergic to anything from milk products to wheat, and this results in an upset stomach with vomiting and/or diarrhea. Eliminating that food will take care of the stomach allergy.

External

    External allergies, according to Beagle Pro, are caused by your beagle coming in contact with any number of things. These can include fleas, dog shampoos, grooming solutions and home products such as laundry detergent, carpet cleaners and air fresheners. Ragweed, dust, mold and secondhand smoke can also cause beagle allergies. Many of these types of allergies, such as dust or secondhand smoke, can cause breathing problems, coughing and wheezing.

Treatments

    If you aren't sure how to treat your beagle's allergies, consult your veterinarian, according to Beagle Pro. You can, however, take some steps at home to help your beagle combat his allergies. If your beagle is having breathing problems, use an air filter in your home to control dust and pollens. Reduce mold by using a humidifier, and air conditioning can reduce the amount of airborne allergens because you are keeping your windows closed. If you smoke, do it outside or in a room that is not part of your house.

How to Rescue a Pit Bull in Florida

How to Rescue a Pit Bull in Florida

If you live in Florida and would like to buy a Pitt Bull, consider rescuing a homeless Pit Bull instead. Often unfairly labeled as unpredictable attack dogs, many American Pitt Bulls have gentle and friendly dispositions. When properly socialized, trained, and given adequate attention, these loyal dogs can make excellent pets. Pit Bulls are not for everyone. Many rescue organizations recommend that Pit Bulls not be adopted into homes that have other pets or young children. If you have an open mind, a loving home and the time to properly train and socialize your dog, rescue a Pitt Bull in need.

Instructions

    1

    Locate a Florida Pitt Bull rescue organization. There are several Pitt Bull rescue organizations in Florida, including Pitt Bull Rescue of South Florida and Hernando's American Pitt Bull Terrier Rescue (See Resources). Search the nationwide Pitt Bull rescue organization network online at Pitt Bull Rescue Central. Contact your local humane society to help connect you with the Pitt Bull rescue organization nearest to you.

    2

    Fill out the adoption application. Most Florida Pitt Bull rescue organizations require you to complete and extensive questionnaire. Be prepared to answer questions about your home, your family, your other pets, your past experiences with dogs and your reasons for rescuing a Pitt Bull. Provide a list of personal references as well as the name of your veteranarian.

    3

    Choose a Pitt Bull with an even temperament. It is imperative that you have your Pitt Bull of choice temperament tested. Ask your veterinarian to temperament test the dog for you or learn to perform a series of temperament tests yourself. Find information on how to temperament test a Pitt Bull online at Pitt Bull Rescue Central.

    4

    Pay the required adoption fee. Many Florida Pitt Bull rescue organizations will ask you to make a donation to pay for the expenses incurred while caring for the dog at the rescue organization. This includes the cost of food, supplies, veterinary care, spaying or neutering and micro-chipping. Make an additional donation of money or supplies if you wish to help support the continued work of the Pitt Bull rescue organization.

    5

    Know how to properly care for your rescued Pitt Bull. Every dog breed has unique needs and demands. This is especially true for American Pitt Bulls. Pitt Bulls need extensive exercise and must be continually trained and socialized to maintain an even temperament. Establish yourself as your Pitt Bull's pack leader and immediately address any form of human aggression through the help of a professional dog trainer.

Black and Tan Coonhounds Vs. Bluetick Coonhounds

Both Bluetick coonhounds and Black and Tan coonhounds make excellent family pets or companion dogs, and both are excellent hunters. They share many characteristics, but are very different breeds. Both are genial and friendly, although the Black and Tan may be more reticent to meet newcomers. The breeds are attentive and intelligent, but the Bluetick may have the edge in the brains department. Both dogs are eager, dedicated and passionate workers.

Bluetick Coonhound

    The Bluetick coonhound is dark blue with a mottled or flecked pattern in black, silvery white or bluish-gray. Their legs are tan pointed. The tan points also can be seen on the muzzle and eyebrows. The head and ears are predominantly black. The breed has a domed skull on a broad head. The muzzle is long and square with a pronounced stop. A Bluetick has dark brown, round eyes that are wide set. His low-set ears are thin. His tail tapers to a point and his legs are long with the hind legs muscular. The smooth dark coat is short and dense.

American Black and Tan Coonhound

    One of the larger of the coonhounds, the Black and Tans are marked like a Doberman in black and tan, though mostly black. The tan markings are on the muzzle, legs and chest. They are smaller than bloodhounds, but their long ears and predominant lips make them look similar. The Black and Tan's hanging ears are set low.The muzzle is long and the long head is oval, the stop halfway between the nose and the back of the head. His eyes are round and dark brow to as light as hazel. The legs are long and straight. The wide nose is black.

Bluetick Origins

    The Bluetick coonhound was bred from a number of breeds, including foxhounds, English coonhound and French hounds. American hunters found the ancestors too slow for long trails and began working for a faster breed. They mixed the European breeds with American hounds and made better hunters for their needs.

Black and Tan Origins

    Talbot hounds, Virginia fox hounds and bloodhounds are believed to be the ancestors of Black and Tan coonhounds. The Talbot is a very old English breed. The Black and Tan is one of the oldest breeds developed in the U.S. and were used by trappers as well as other hunters.

Skills

    The Black and Tan coonhound will stay on track under all conditions. He still is used mainly to track and tree raccoons. Blueticks have endurance and are known for skill at cold hunting. Blueticks have a hunting dog's bawl. Both dogs are strong and agile, and good scenters.

Selasa, 27 November 2012

Common Illnesses of Pug Dogs

While centuries of meticulous breeding may have produced an outgoing and adorable pug dog, it has also created a myriad of health concerns that the responsible pet owner should keep in mind. From possible blindness to sliding knee caps, common illnesses can be a strain on the budget. Preventative care is essential when you have a pug dog. Consult your veterinarian if your pug dog shows signs of any of these common illnesses.

Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE)

    PDE is a swelling of the brain that is particular to pug dogs and a few other small breeds. Little is known about this condition, but the symptoms may include loss of muscle coordination, seizures, lethargy and agitation.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

    PRA is a condition that affects the blood vessels around the retina. This condition usually starts with night blindness that will eventually lead to full blindness.

Pigmentary Keratitis

    Pigmentary keratitis is caused by an inflammation or irritation of the cornea in which a brown pigment is deposited over the whites of the eye. It can usually be corrected with surgery.

Tracheal Collapse

    Tracheal collapse can occur when the rings of the trachea lose their firmness. The symptoms of this treatable condition include coughing similar to a goose honk and trouble breathing.

Luxating Patella

    A luxating patella is also called a trick knee and is usually identifiable by the pug stretching his leg backwards in an effort to realign the kneecap. If left untreated this condition can cause arthritis.

Stenotic Nares

    Stenotic nares, or pinched nostrils, is characterized by a foamy discharge from the nostrils, labored breathing and even fainting. It occurs when the nasal tissue is not firm enough to allow proper breathing. This condition can be fixed surgically.

Elongated Soft Palate

    This condition is common in breeds with short muzzles and is correctable through surgery. Snoring is a common side effect, but in more severe cases the pug dog has trouble breathing.

How to Pick a Rottweiler Puppy

How to Pick a Rottweiler Puppy

According to the American Kennel Club, the Rottweiler is "an inherent protector, ...self-confident and responds quietly and with a wait-and-see attitude to influences in his environment." This breed can be a great family companion as well as a guard dog. Choosing a Rottweiler puppy that will fit your needs is paramount to your success with owning this breed. Socialization and obedience training while your dog is still at a young age will allow you to easily manage and properly care for this powerful breed.

Instructions

    1

    Locate a reputable breeder in your area that has a strong breeding history with healthy, even-tempered, well-socialized puppies for sale.

    2

    Enter an area where you can interact with all the Rottweiler puppies at once without the mother dog present.

    3

    Observe the way each puppy interacts with each other and how they perceive or treat you. You may not want to choose puppies that run right up to you and jump all over you, tug at your clothes or growl at you, because these puppies have dominant personalities and may be hard to train and control.

    4

    Choose a puppy that is interested in you but isn't pushy and overly vocal. Avoid shy puppies that do not make eye contact or run away when you try to pet them, because these dogs may grow to be shy adult Rottweilers that are prone to fear or anxiety biting.

List of Mild Tempered Dogs

List of Mild Tempered Dogs

Senin, 26 November 2012

Papillon Facts

Papillon Facts

The papillon, a small spaniel, is a dog breed common throughout Europe for almost seven centuries. The name "papillon" means "butterfly" in French, as the dog's distinctive fringed ears look similar to butterflies. This small lap dog is notable for its smart, obedient, joyous and amiable personality. Another name for the papillon is the continental toy spaniel.

Appearance

    The papillon generally reaches between eight and 11 inches in length, and weighs between nine and 10 lbs. (for both sexes). The breed has a flowing, long and silky coat that typically is white with patches of either a red, yellow or black color. The tiny-boned dogs have round, deep eyes, small heads, slender muzzles and low-set, long tails.

Behavior

    The papillon is a relaxed and well-behaved dog breed with a playful and gentle personality. Other descriptors that are typically associated with the papillon include "graceful," "obedient," "affectionate" and "happy." The dogs generally do not display aggressive behaviors, although they can occasionally be stubborn and independent. Also, the papillon is known for its frequent barking.

Grooming

    The papillon sheds occasionally, but not to a great degree; as a result, owners should brush the dogs approximately two to three times weekly. Owners should bathe their papillon only when absolutely vital; a dry shampoo can also be effective. When brushing, the stomach and ear hairs are particularly important as matting and tangling are common in both of these areas. Generally, the papillon is a clean dog breed with no excessive odors. To prevent tartar buildup on your papillon's teeth, you should have his teeth cleaned frequently.

Health

    The papillon is usually a very healthy dog and typically lives between 12 and 15 years (and sometimes longer). Some health problems that occasionally affect papillons are a knee issue called "patellar luxation" and "PRA" ("progressive retinal atrophy"), a retinal disorder. PRA can sometimes lead to total blindness in dogs, so owners should routinely check their papillons for the condition, which can be genetic.

Exercise

    The papillon is a breed full of energy and vitality. To keep a papillon healthy, owners should walk it outdoors at least a day. If a papillon does not receive sufficient exercise, it may act out and misbehave due to frustration. The dogs are suitable for living in small urban spaces, such as condominiums and city apartments, when regularly walked.

Dog Food Recipes for Digestive Disorders

Fresh foods with digestive enzymes can hep prevent or put an end to your dog's digestive problems. Your pooch deserves the very best, so why not provide the freshest and healthiest foods you can? With a few recipes, and pointers on good food choices, you can make healthy meals that help remedy digestive disorders in dogs.

Starter Meal

    This recipe still contains kibble to help your dog transition into his new diet without too many unfamiliar changes. Combine 1/4 cup premium kibble, 1/4 cup raw meat (hamburger,beef, ground turkey or lamb will do) with one raw egg in a large steel mixing bowl. Stir in two tablespoons of whole milk yogurt and 1/2 teaspoon mix of raw honey and organic apple cider vinegar. Add to that one teaspoon of mixed sea kelp and alfalfa powder, one teaspoon of flax seed oil, one digestive enzyme tablet and finally 1/4 teaspoon ground eggshell. Stir well, and then transfer the mixture into a dog bowl. This recipe should be cut in half for puppies or dogs under 20 pounds.

Advanced meal

    After a few weeks of the kibble mixed in you can remove the kibble and add more ground meat or meat organs. Combine chicken necks, wings, backs and frames along with turkey necks, beef necks or ribs in a bowl. Add in lamb ribs and flax seed oil, along with an enzyme tablet to aid in digestion.

Organic meal

    Sometimes a more organic recipe can help get your dogs digestive system back on track. Try mixing an all natural dog supplement with brown rice, 1 cup of water, organic veggies and fully cooked internal organs from chickens with organic milk. Bring it to a boil with a few extras like garlic and canned sweet potatoes. Your dog will love the hearty addition to the diet.

What Type of Breed of Dogs Is the Strongest?

What Type of Breed of Dogs Is the Strongest?

Dogs have been bred for thousands of years for desirable traits such as intelligence, temperament and strength. This breeding has produced some massive dog breeds with immense power that have been used historically for various tasks. They have pulled carts and sleds, and some of the strongest breeds were also designed for war.

English Mastiff

    The English mastiff is an ancient breed dating back to the Roman conquest of Britain. It is a massive dog, growing to 30 inches at the shoulder and weighing around 160 lbs. Historically, the breed was used as a war dog to fight wild animals such as bears and lions and as a family protector against wolves. In more modern times, it is used as a guard dog, search and rescue animal and in weight pulling competitions.

Great Dane

    The Great Dane, or dogs much like it, are thought to date back to at least 33 B.C. It is a massive breed, growing to 34 inches at the shoulder and weighing more than 200 lbs. Thought to be descended from the tall slender Irish wolf hounds and the broad muscular English mastiffs, it is a strong animal. Historically prized for its ability to bring down bears and wild boars, the breed was also used as a household protector. Today it is seen as a good tracker, watchdog and is even used to pull carts in competition.

Bullmastiffs

    The bullmastiff is a more recent blending of the powerful English mastiff and the tenacious bulldog which dates back to around 1860. Smaller in size than the English mastiff, it grows to 27 inches at the shoulder and weighs up to 133 lbs. It has much of the natural power of its mastiff ancestor with its docile gentle nature, along with the tenacity and greater speed of the bulldog. Early on, the breed was used by games keepers to catch poachers, using its power to pin them down until the gamekeeper arrived.

Great Pyrenees

    The great Pyrenees is a large, powerful, cold-region breed which originated in central Asia and Siberia. Growing to 32 inches at the shoulder and weighing up to 100 lbs., the breed has a thick, white all-weather coat. Historically, it is a herd dog, used to protect against wild animals such as wolves and bears. The breed has also been used as a pack-carrying animal, cart and sled puller, and a war dog.

Minggu, 25 November 2012

Top Ten Dog Breeds of the U.S.

Top Ten Dog Breeds of the U.S.

According to The American Kennel Club's 2009 registration statistics, the top ten dog breeds in the United States include returning contenders, some making their way up the list and a few new additions. The bulldog is one of the newcomers, joining that perennial favorite the Labrador retriever---which has reigned supreme for 19 consecutive years. The list is quite varied, from dogs often found working for Homeland Security to the ones whose primary job is sitting on your lap.

Labrador Retriever

    Consistent winner of the prize for most popular breed, the gentle Labrador retriever is a working dog that enjoys having a job to do. They especially love retrieving hunted game and also make superb service dogs. The Lab loves children and is devoted to and protective of his family. The Lab comes in black, chocolate and yellow.

German Shepherd

    The German shepherd took over the Number 2 spot on the list of most popular dogs in 2009. The German shepherd is fiercely loyal and self-confident, and thrives in a family---but can be wary of strangers. The colors of the coat are commonly black and tan. She requires regular exercise and grooming.

Yorkshire Terrier

    The tenacious little "Yorkie" was unseated for the Number 2 spot this year. A favorite as a lap dog, the Yorkshire terrier was originally bred to chase down vermin. The breed moves fast and fits nicely into snug spaces. The Yorkshire terrier is persistent and does not give up easily. A member of the toy group, this dog's coat is silver and tan.

Golden Retriever

    Its origins in the Scottish highlands, the golden retriever was bred for hunting. Gentle, intelligent and devoted, the "golden" is the perfect fit as a family dog. She is protective and playful with the children of the family. The golden retriever comes in colors ranging from cream to dark gold.

Beagle

    The beagle, an English import, is happy and care-free, making him an ideal family dog. The beagle's coat is usually tri-color: white, lemon and reddish brown. This breed needs regular exercise to suit his curious, adventurous and energetic nature.

Boxer

    The boxer loves people and is a protective guardian of the children in the family. The boxer got its name from the way he'll stand up on his hind legs, batting at his opponent, appearing to box. Coat colors of the boxer are brindle, fawn and white. The breed requires minimal grooming but does need daily exercise.

Bulldog

    The bulldog is another new arrival on the most popular dog list. The affectionate, dignified bulldog likes to think of herself as a lap dog. The bulldog requires minimal grooming and exercise. This non-sporting breed adores children.

Dachshund

    A member of the hound group, the dachshund is native to Germany, where his name means "badger dog." The breed comes in colors of red, brown and black. The dachshund is playful and affectionate and fits well into family life.

Poodle

    The charming, playful and highly intelligent poodle is another breed native to Germany. A poodle love kids and often sees himself as one of them. This is one of the hypoallergenic dog breeds, so she will fit in well among allergy sufferers. Poodles need frequent grooming to prevent matting. Coat colors include white, apricot, black, brown and silver.

Shih Tzu

    The Shih Tzu is a courageous dog, despite his gentle, playful nature. A spirited, lively animal that loves children, the breed requires minimal exercise but must have frequent grooming to keep his long coat tangle-free. The Shih Tzu comes in colors of brown, red and black.

How to Feed Raw Tripe to Dogs

How to Feed Raw Tripe to Dogs

For humans, raw tripe is an acquired taste to say the least. For dogs, though, raw unwashed tripe -- the stomach of hoofed animals such as cows or sheep -- is a delectable treat that gets tails wagging. We are not talking about the bleached white, processed tripe readily available in butcher shops and grocery stores. This is raw, untouched "green" tripe that is smelly, brownish in color, full of natural enzymes and sometimes hard to find. So avert your eyes and hold your breath while you serve up this raw food to your beloved pooch. Feeding your canine raw tripe regularly can help slim down a dog suffering from obesity, shine up his coat and please the pickiest eater who may turn up her nose at other raw foods.

Instructions

    1
    Dogs love 'live food' such as raw tripe since they are born predators.
    Dogs love 'live food' such as raw tripe since they are born predators.

    Call some area butchers to track down farmers or a slaughterhouse. A little homework will help you get your hands on the raw stuff. Frozen raw tripe is more expensive than the alternative, priced about $3.50 per pound. The advantage being that you don't have to handle the squishy, raw tripe yourself. Raw tripe is unwashed, unprocessed and slightly brownish in color because it still contains grass particles eaten by the cow, sheep, deer or goat. Remember, the white beef tripe packaged and sold in grocery stores has been processed and, in the making, drained of natural enzymes. Some co-ops sell raw "green" tripe from local suppliers.

    2
    Handling the squishy, raw tripe is a job meant for the kitchen or backyard, but the frozen tripe is less messy.
    Handling the squishy, raw tripe is a job meant for the kitchen or backyard, but the frozen tripe is less messy.

    Suit up as if you are going into surgery. Slap on a heavy-duty apron, slip on a pair of latex gloves and consider wearing a dust mask to better weather the smell.

    3
    Dogs will love the smell of raw tripe, but humans may want to wear a dust mask while preparing it.
    Dogs will love the smell of raw tripe, but humans may want to wear a dust mask while preparing it.

    Grab two buckets and find an outdoor spot close to a garden hose. Over one bucket, drain and rinse the excess hay and grass out of the raw tripe. Toss the rinsed raw tripe into the second bucket.

    4
    Raw tripe is good for dogs' coats, teeth and digestive systems.
    Raw tripe is good for dogs' coats, teeth and digestive systems.

    Take a large knife and cut the raw tripe into sizes of your choosing. Medium to large dogs will love working their jaw muscles on larger pieces, while smaller dogs will prefer little chunks.

    5
    Dogs can eat raw tripe along with other raw foods or kibble.
    Dogs can eat raw tripe along with other raw foods or kibble.

    Serve up several pieces of the raw tripe to your dog, along with other raw foods or some kibble. Measure it according to your dog's size, the way you would any food. The raw food diet experts recommend feeding healthy, active dogs 2 percent of their body weight per day. A 5-pound dog may get enough from 1 pound of food per day, while a 100-pound dog may eat 2 pounds of raw food each day. Every dog is different depending on age, weight, health and appetite.

How to Raise a Dogo Argentino

Dogo Argentinos, or Dogos, are large dogs with a pit bull like appearance. They have a short white coat and are extremely active dogs who enjoy vigorous exercise, such as running. While it may seem that raising a Dogo is the same as raising any other dog, there are some things that must be done differently.

Instructions

    1

    Get regular veterinary care for your Dogo. This is very important for any dog, but because of its size, a Dogo is more prone to joint problems. Regular check ups at the vet will help to lessen the chance of these problems. Make sure that you Dogo gets all of the shots it needs.

    2

    Feed your Dogo a premium dog food made for large breed dogs. This will help your Dogo to grow at an appropriate rate so that it can stay as healthy as possible. Over feeding your Dogo may cause it to gain weight too quickly and this can lead to health problems such as heart disease and obesity.

    3

    Teach your Dogo basic commands. Dogos are large dogs and any large dog can be dangerous if it isn't taught basic commands such as sit and come. Part of raising your Dogo is teaching it that you are the boss and teaching it to respect you as the alpha dog or leader of the pack.

    4

    Socialize your Dogo with other animals and people. Any dog who is under socialized may react in a negative manner when it is put around unfamiliar people or animals. This can become dangerous. A well socialized Dogo is calm when it is out in public.

    5

    Use a leash when you are out in public. You can use either a collar or harness on your Dogo. A harness may make it easier to control your Dogo if it pulls a lot.

    6

    Be a responsible pet owner. Dogos are active and like to jump, and they are powerful. Because of this, it is best to have a tall fence, at least 5 feet high, if your Dogo is kept outside. Dogos can break tie out chains so this method is usually unsafe.

    7

    Exercise with your Dogo. Dogos have a lot of energy, so you have to find ways for your Dogo to exert that energy. A bored dog with energy can be a destructive dog.

How to Select an Akita Inu

The Akita Inu comes from Japan ("inu" means dog). These dogs were once used as bear and boar hunters, hunting in pairs and under the control of the human hunter. Today, they find work as guide, sled and therapy dogs. Helen Keller was so charmed by this breed that she introduced the first Akita to the United States.

Instructions

    1

    Choose an Akita if you want an intelligent, loyal, affectionate companion. They are aggressive and make good watchdogs. Akitas don't bark without a good reason.

    2

    Try this breed if you're looking for a good family dog. They're affectionate with children in their own family but should be supervised with visiting children because they're very protective (boisterous play can incite an Akita's protective instincts). Keep in mind that Akitas will accept children if the children are there first, but may need time to adjust to new children in the home.

    3

    Note that with diligent training and careful watch, Akitas can get along with other pets. This will take time and effort on your part - and don't expect your Akita to coexist with ducks or chickens; they're too tempting as a snack.

    4

    Expect your Akita to grow to 24 to 28 inches at the shoulder when full-grown (females are about an inch shorter than males) and weigh between 70 and 120 lbs.

    5

    Anticipate paying between $500 and $1,200 for a good-quality dog.

    6

    Consider adopting an Akita from a rescue group. Many are already house-trained and finished with the chewing stage. There is usually nothing wrong with the dog; the owners didn't research the breed and later discovered that they and the dog were incompatible.

    7

    Remember that Akitas learn easily and respond well to a firm and consistent trainer.

    8

    Be prepared to enjoy a good 10 to 13 years with your Akita - this is the average life expectancy of an Akita Inu.

How to Get a Cur Dog

How to Get a Cur Dog

Choosing to adopt a dog is a life-changing decision. There are many decisions to be made, such as choosing the breed of dog to adopt. In the South a working breed mixed to bring out specific traits is sometimes called a cur. Types of cur include Catahoula Leopard Dog, Southern Blackmouth Cur and Tennessee Treeing Brindle. As a mixed breed, curs are free of many of the genetic predispositions to disease and injury suffered by purebred dogs. Cur dogs can be adopted from reputable animal shelters.

Instructions

    1

    Use an online directory such as the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (aspca.org/adoption) or Pet Finder (perfinder.com) to locate a shelter in your area. Online directories have photographs of dogs available for adoption that can be filtered by characteristics such as age and breed. Use the search term "cur" to restrict your search to cur dogs.

    2

    Identify a cur dog that you would consider adopting. Note any details about its temperament available on the website, including any history of aggression toward children, other dogs or small animals. Use your gut instinct, but also rely on reason and foresight. Your new dog will be your companion for many years.

    3

    Visit the dog in the shelter. When you first approach the cur dog, pay attention to how it greets you. Ears forward and tail up is a sign of a friendly greeting. Ears back and tail down can signal fear and aggression. Visit at least two times to walk and pet the dog to be sure you are compatible.

    4

    When you pick up your new pet to take home, bring a collar, leash and chew toys for the ride home. Be sure to collect documentation of shots and medical history.

Skin Disorders of the Bulldog

Skin Disorders of the Bulldog

While bulldogs are susceptible to parasitic infestations, certain non-parasitic skin disorders are known to affect these dogs more so than others. Skin problems unrelated to parasites can be caused by bacteria, fungus, allergies and even hormone levels.

Eczema

    Eczema, also known as canine atopic dermatitis, is the most common non-parasitic skin disorder in bulldogs. The condition causes scaly skin, blisters, lumps and open sores.

Canine Acne

    Acne in bulldogs is caused by dirt entering the pores or an allergic reaction to certain materials, such as a plastic food or water dish. Canine acne causes pimples and blackheads on the muzzle, lips and chin.

Seborrhea

    Seborrhea is a skin disorder that causes changes in the appearance and texture of the fur. Bulldogs affected by this condition may have very oily or dry skin and fur with the presence of noticeable dandruff.

Allergic Reaction

    Much like humans, bulldogs can develop an allergy at any time. Unfortunately, allergic reaction in bulldogs presents with fairly vague symptoms, including scratching and biting.

Warning

    Skin disorders in bulldogs can be difficult to diagnose and require veterinary help. Never attempt to treat a skin problem without consulting with your veterinarian.

When Does an American Bulldog Stop Growing?

When Does an American Bulldog Stop Growing?

American Bulldogs are muscular and athletic medium-sized dogs. With a compact build and well-balanced frame, this alert and inquisitive dog breed is known for having great stamina. The American Bulldog goes through multiple developmental stages on the way to adulthood, and it stops growing at about 3 years old.

Young puppy stage

    American Bulldog puppies are cute and loveable. Until puppies reach 14 weeks, they spend most of their time sleeping. After 14 weeks, your puppy will begin to display independence and begin exploring his surroundings in detail. This is the time to firmly, consistently and gently establish boundaries.

Teenage stage

    When an American Bulldog puppy reaches 5 months old, he becomes extremely curious, expanding his territory. The puppy will push previously learned boundaries and may act rebellious. His behavior will be inconsistent, respecting your commands one minute and testing you the next. It is during this stage that your dog is learning how he fits into the family structure. Teenage dogs begin developing skills that allow them to interact properly with you and with others. Be patient during the teenage stage, it will pass quickly.

Young adult stage

    After five or six months, American Bulldogs reach young adulthood. This is a good time to enroll your dog in an obedience class. Group classes will not only teach your dog basic obedience skills but will also make him more comfortable interacting with strangers and socializing with other dogs. Additionally, training classes are a good opportunity for you to bond with your American Bulldog.

Adult dog stage

    An American Bulldog hits adulthood at around 18 months. When your dog reaches 3 years, he is considered fully mature and will stop growing. A full-grown American Bulldog's height and weight can vary. The typical weight range for a standard American Bulldog male is 85 to 95 lbs. Females commonly weigh between 65 and 75 lbs.

Sabtu, 24 November 2012

How to Pick a Dog Breed

How to Pick a Dog Breed

Choosing a dog breed is work-you must be sure the dog fits your lifestyle and personality, and that it isn't coming from a puppy mill or other disreputable place. Every dog breed has its own personality, quirks and needs (just like humans), and to find the perfect fit, you need to get to know the different types of dogs available. You must also know yourself, as your lifestyle plays the predominate role in which type of dog you pick. Owning a dog is a joy, but only if you know what you are getting yourself into, so you want to choose your breed wisely.

Instructions

    1
    Adopt a retired racing greyhound and make a
    Adopt a retired racing greyhound and make a "fast friend."

    Think about the different breeds of dog you have seen and favor. You will have many dogs from which to choose, including purebred or mixed breed dogs. You will find wonderful dogs in shelters or at private homes. According to the Humane Society of the United States, 25 percent of the dogs in shelters are purebred dogs. You can find any size, shape or color and dogs of all ages and types in the shelter. However, since many dogs from pounds have come from abused backgrounds, they may need a little more socializing. Always be sure to ask many questions regarding the background of the dog, particularly any health conditions he might have. This is necessary no matter what breed of dog you get, or where you get him from.

    2
    Big dog or little dog? Which is the right dog for you?
    Big dog or little dog? Which is the right dog for you?

    Go through all the different types of breeds that you think you'd be interested in, keeping your own personality in mind. Make a list of your own personality traits to use as a barometer by which to measure the dog breed personalities. It's much easier to find a dog match if you know exactly what type of person YOU are. If you don't like to exercise, for example, a Weimeraner is not for you. If you don't know where to start in terms of breeds, visit a dog park and ask dog owners questions. They will be happy to share insight into their dogs.

    3
    Parson Russell dogs are wonderful for those who want to participate in agility trials with their dogs.
    Parson Russell dogs are wonderful for those who want to participate in agility trials with their dogs.

    Research how much time the breeds need devoted to them (are they lap dogs that need your constant attention but not a lot of exercise, or retriever-type dogs that need lots of exercise but not as much constant attention), how often you need to walk them, if they have any known medical conditions (Labrador Retrievers, for example, are prime candidates for hip dysplasia) and the cost associated with owning the dog (ie., how much food do they consume, do they need a special diet). Dogs are expensive animals, not just in purchase price, but also in upkeep. They need regular check-ups and have medical bills, just like people. If you are never home, or will be leaving the animal locked in your apartment from 6:30am to 9:00 pm, you shouldn't get a dog.

    4

    Think about the differences between a puppy and an older dog. Puppies take a little more work, as they need more training and will be teething (which means they may chew everything). Dogs that are two years or older are typically already house-broken, past the teething stage, and overall a little mellower.

    5
    Great Danes and bulldogs make great companion animals, but each have different personalities and needs.
    Great Danes and bulldogs make great companion animals, but each have different personalities and needs.

    Go to the breeder's house if you decide on a purebred dog. Never purchase a puppy from a pet store (unless the dog is there as part of a rescue organization's adoption efforts) and always visit the home of anyone who is selling a dog. It is much wiser and less costly to get a purebred dog from a breed rescue organization such as "Golden Retriever Rescue" or "Poodle Rescue of North Dakota" or where ever you live. Every breed has a rescue organization where you can find dogs of all ages. Petfinder (Petfinder.org) is an excellent resource for learning about dogs and finding the perfect fit for you.

How to Care for a Saint Bernard

The secret to success with the Saint Bernard, as with any large dog, is early training. Teach it to obey as a puppy, and its large size will be quite manageable when it matures. Remember that the Saint Bernard is a family dog and does not like to be alone.

Instructions

    1

    Vaccinate your Saint Bernard and follow up with yearly booster vaccinations to maintain the dog's immunity to diseases. Worm your adult dog every three months, and consult your veterinarian about defleaing products.

    2

    Plan to feed your Saint Bernard 6 to 12 cups of food a day. Because the Saint Bernard is prone to bloat, remember to give it two or three small meals a day, as opposed to the normal one to two daily meals.

    3

    Give your Saint Bernard high-grade dog food. The first ingredient should be meat if you want a quality product. Crude protein should be no less than 30 percent, and crude fat no less than 20 percent. Also, the fiber content needs to be 4 percent or less.

    4

    Contact the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals to learn more about hip dysplasia

    5

    Train your Saint Bernard early in life to socialize with children, people and other pets. Although a loyal and obedient dog by nature, the Saint Bernard can be difficult to manage because of its size alone.

    6

    Take your Saint Bernard on daily walks, but keep it on a leash. Because of its size, a Saint Bernard can quickly become unmanageable if it so desires. Bear in mind that they are slow-moving.

    7

    Be careful not to overexercise your Saint Bernard puppy in its first two years of life, when its delicate bones are still forming.

    8

    Brush your Saint Bernard's coat with a firm-bristled brush, as needed. Bathe your dog as needed. Keep in mind that they do shed a lot, so the more often you brush, the easier it is to handle the large amounts of fur.

    9

    Trim nails every two to three weeks.

    10

    Clean your Saint Bernard's eyes frequently with a moist cotton-wool pad. Be sure to use a new one for each eye.

    11

    Understand the health problems that a Saint Bernard is prone to. These include wobbler syndrome (a spinal disorder), heart and skin problems, hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint) and extropion (folding eyelid).

    12

    Be prepared to enjoy a full 8 to 10 years with your Saint Bernard - this is the Saint Bernard's average life expectancy.

Types of Long-Haired Dogs

Types of Long-Haired Dogs

Dog breeds have varied coats: hairless or short-haired, long or thick. Long-haired dogs with well-maintained coats can look lovely but can be a great deal of work, requiring regular grooming and trimming. People with the time to devote to a long-haired breed can be rewarded with a beautiful and adoring animal.

Afghan Hound

    The Afghan hound is a tall, slender dog breed. It grows to 27 inches at the shoulder and weighs up to 60 pounds. It has a thick coat made up of long, fine silky hair that hangs down all over its body. As its name suggests, the breed comes from Afghanistan. The dog's coat takes a lot of grooming to avoid matting. It is an energetic breed and needs plenty of exercise.

Bearded Collie

    The bearded collie is a large dog that grows to 22 inches at the shoulder. It has a thick, shaggy, medium-length coat. It is one of Scotland's oldest dog breeds and is used as a herding animal in harsh, cold environments. The coat needs regular grooming and attention to avoid matting. It is a loyal and energetic breed that also needs plenty of exercise.

Bergamasco

    The Bergamasco is a large breed that grows to 22 inches at the shoulder. It has a long, thick coat that naturally mats to give it a sheep-like fleece texture. Left to grow naturally, the dog's coat reaches the ground and covers its legs by the age of six. It is a herding breed with high intelligence and a sociable nature. Grooming is not crucial in this breed, since the natural coat state is matted.

Briard

    The briard is a tall, well-muscled breed. It grows to 27 inches at the shoulder and has a thick, long, straight-haired coat. The breed originates from France, where it is a common herding breed and watchdog. The coat needs constant attention to avoid mats. The breed is lively and independent and bonds with the family but distrusts strangers.

Maltese

    The Maltese is a dog of the toy class, generally weighing between 4 and 6 pounds. It has an allover long, straight coat that grows down to the ground, completely hiding the dog's legs. The dogs are brave and energetic animals with gentle natures. Its coat requires a lot of attention to avoid matting.

Skye Terrier

    The Skye terrier is a medium-sized breed that weighs up to 35 pounds. It has a long body and short legs, with a shaggy, two-layer coat that grows to the ground and hides the dog's legs. It is a vermin-controlling breed, designed to locate foxes, badgers and otters. Its coat requires regular grooming to avoid matting.

What Is the Difference Between a Pug & a Bulldog?

What Is the Difference Between a Pug & a Bulldog?

A dog described as short-legged and robust with a flattened, heavily wrinkled face could be either a pug or a bulldog. Beyond this simplest of descriptions, however, the two breeds are notably different. The history, physical look and temperament of the breeds distinguish them greatly from one another. As established American Kennel Club breeds, the pug and the bulldog were both recognized in the mid 1880s.

Origins

    The pug and the bulldog are both old breeds with uncertain origins. The pug dates back to at least 400 B.C. and is of Asian origins. Kept as a revered pet in Tibetan monasteries and also a favorite of high society in Europe for centuries, it has a regal past. The bulldog originated in England where until 1835 it was used in the blood sport known as bear baiting. Sharply contrasted from the regal pug, bulldogs have been the dog of the common man.

Description

    The bulldog is the larger of the two breeds, growing up to 50 pounds compared to 18 pounds for the pug. Both dogs have large rounded heads with short muzzles, but the bulldog tends to have more pronounced jowls. The bulldog has a broader, more heavily muscled body type with either a short straight or screwed tail. The pug's tail is always curly and for the purposes of competition, the tighter the curl the better.

Coat and Color

    The pug and the bulldog have short close coats that are smooth, soft and glossy. The skin is also loose and slightly wrinkled for both breeds. Pugs only come in two colors, either fawn or black. Fawn-colored pugs generally have black muzzles. The bulldog comes in more colors including brindle, white, fawn, red, piebald and fallow. Whereas pugs are generally solid colored, bulldogs often have combinations of color in patchy patterns.

Temperament

    Pugs have always been companion dogs with calm temperaments. They are a loving, loyal breed with playful natures and outgoing personalities. At one time, while still bred for bull baiting, the bulldog had a strong aggressive streak. Since bull baiting was outlawed, the breed has been bred to be more relaxed and friendly. The old traits of the breed do shine through in a courageous resolute nature. Both breeds are gentle and docile and considered good family dogs that get along with kids.

How to Preserve Dry Dog Food

Dry food is quite popular among pet owners, accounting for more than 60 percent of purchased pet food in the U.S. It is made via a process known as extrusion, introduced in the 1950s, that functions by mixing a dough from various ingredients and then heating, drying, and cooling the dough to make dry food. The same process is actually used for many breakfast cereals. Like any dry food item, dry dog food requires careful storage to prevent spoilage and pest infestations.

Instructions

    1

    Estimate how much food your dog consumes. If you have a large dog, you will need a large airtight storage container. For small dogs, it is better to buy smaller amounts of food in increments, rather than store dry food for months at a time.

    2

    Purchase high-quality dry dog food to prevent early spoilage or drying.

    3

    Purchase an airtight container. Many containers are made especially for dog food. As an alternative, consider a large plastic storage container.

    4

    Sanitize the container with soap and warm water before using. Allow to air-dry completely.

    5

    Place the bag of food in the airtight container.

    6

    Pour out any old food when you add a new bag if you are not storing the food in the bag. Then put it on top of the new food. This will ensure that your dog is getting the freshest food possible. Check the expiration date on all your dog food.

    7

    Store the container in a dry place at room temperature.

Jumat, 23 November 2012

Description of a Basston Dog's Traits

So-called "designer dogs," the offspring of two different purebred dogs, are becoming increasingly popular with pet-owners. Dogs resulting from this type of hybrid breeding typically have a combination of traits from the breeds of their parents in terms of both physical characteristics and personality. One of these hybrid breeds is known as the Basston.

Basstons

    The Basston is a mix of Basset Hound and Boston Terrier breeds. Although this particular hybrid breed is fairly recent as of 2011, the breed is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club and Basston puppies can be registered through the organization. As in other hybrid breeds, the intent in mixing these two breeds is to combine two pure breeds and eliminate issues relating to genetic inbreeding while bringing about the most desirable traits of both breeds.

Physical Characteristics

    Basstons have short, fine coats that require very little care other than occasional brushing and bathing. A Basston's fur is typically white, with markings that may be brown, sand- or chestnut-colored. This hybrid breed is ideal for pet-owners with a more sedentary lifestyle, as Basstons don't require a great deal of exercise. The average Basston weighs between 15 and 40 lbs. and ranges from 12 to 16 inches in height. The Basston's lifespan is usually between 12 and 15 years.

Temperament

    As a hybrid breed, the Basston offers a combination of the best personality traits of its parents, blending the docile friendliness of the Basset Hound with the Boston Terrier's perky energy. Basstons are generally good with children and get along well with other dogs, as aggression is almost nonexistent in this breed. In fact, Basstons are good-natured and extremely friendly and tend to greet both people and other dogs in a warm manner.

Training

    Training Basstons, however, presents challenges. Despite the Basston's good-natured disposition, the stubborn mentality of the Boston Terrier is evident, making house-training difficult. The best results will come from training that is both patient and consistent. Basstons are also highly intelligent and can be well trained if you put in the time. Basstons will typically not nip at humans, although it is possible that they may. One feature to watch out for when training is the Basston puppy's tendency toward destructive chewing and digging.

The Best Temperament Dog Breeds

The Best Temperament Dog Breeds

When a family seeks out a dog as a pet, i.e., primarily for companionship, it will look for qualities of a good family member. Particularly when young children are about, gentleness, friendliness and patience are prized characteristics. Fortunately, many breeds from American Kennel Club classifications possess these traits, giving dog shoppers a wide variety from which to choose.

Toy Breeds

    Toy dogs are small canines bred specifically for companionship, thus many breeds of this group are good-tempered. Among the most agreeable toy breeds is the pug. Originating in the Far East, this breed is known for its playful yet stable personality. Pugs are eager to please and are not known for causing trouble. Likewise, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel is known for its gentleness and devotion, although it can express its love with a good deal of vim and vigor. Whether running or napping, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel is content. Other even-tempered toy breeds include the shih-tzu and the Havanese.

Terriers

    The original purpose of these breeds was to chase off rats, mice and other pests. But terriers adapt quite well to keeping company. The miniature schnauzer, for example, was bred in Germany to control farm vermin. Today this breed is as comfortable in an apartment as in a barn or on a pasture. Miniature schnauzers learn quickly and respond well to training. Another terrier breed, the soft-coated wheaten terrier, originally was used by poor farmers to police the perimeters for pests. While they need ample exercise, these terriers are loyal companions for adults and children alike.

Working Breeds

    Working dogs originally were bred to serve as beasts of burden, guardians of property and searcher-rescuers. Perhaps the most widely known example is the Saint Bernard. The image of this noble beast saving the life of an avalanche victim is factually based, since that was the dog's purpose. The Saint Bernard takes well to obedience training and is a loyal and loving family member. A prospective owner with infants or toddlers, however, does well to remember that a puppy will grow very large, its amiability notwithstanding. The boxer is also illustrative of a well-tempered working dog. It is a natural people pleaser and low-maintainance with respect to grooming.

Sporting Breeds

    Sporting dog breeds were developed to assist in the hunting of game fowl. Because these dogs have worked side by side with people for generations, they have grown comfortable among them. Any reader of the LL Bean catalog is familiar with the Labrador retriever. This is the most popular breed in the United States due to its deep desire to please and its training aptitude. Most labs enjoy water, and are happiest in the midst of family. Like the lab, the Welsh springer spaniel thrives among people, and does not like to be alone. It was first bred in Wales during the Renaissance, and is easily taught if training starts early. Welsh springers love exercise, but also require daily grooming. The Sussex spaniel and Irish water dog are additional sporting breeds known for their good nature.

Non-Sporting Breeds

    This classification of dogs consists of primarily companion breeds. The Tibetan terrier, looking perfectly suited to weather the harsh climate of its original region, was first bred in Buddhist monasteries. These dogs are very in tune with the emotions of their family members, and always seek to be a comforting presence. The French bulldog performs a similarly soothing role. A typical lap dog, the Frenchie needs minimal exercise and next to no grooming.

Kamis, 22 November 2012

About the Samoyed Dog Breed

About the Samoyed Dog Breed

The Samoyed breed originated in Siberia, where the dogs herded reindeer and accompanied their masters on hunting trips. The American Kennel Club officially recognized the Samoyed in the working breed class of dogs in 1906.

Size

    Male Samoyeds usually stand 21 to 23.5 inches in height at the shoulders, while females are 19 to 21 inches, reports the Dog Breed Info Center website. A full-grown male averages 45 to 65 pounds, and females weigh an average of 35 to 50 pounds.

Fur

    A Samoyed's fur is usually white, cream and white, or beige. Typically, the coat is long and full with a ruff of fur around the neck.

Appearance

    A samoyed's ears usually have a triangular shape and stand straight upward rather than drooping. The breed has a large bushy tail that curls upward with the tip pointing toward the dog's head.

Temperament

    Samoyeds are gentle dogs and good with children and other pets, including cats, reports Dog Breed Info Center. The breed is rarely aggressive or hyperactive and can live in an apartment or small home, provided the dog receives enough exercise outdoors.

Lifespan

    Samoyeds live an average of 10 to 12 years, explains Dog Breed Info Center.

How to Feed a Papillon

How to Feed a Papillon

The papillon's beautiful floppy ears inspired its name --- papillon is French for butterfly. Also known as the dwarf spaniel, the papillon is a playful and intelligent dog and an ideal companion pet. Like most toy dog breeds, the papillon does not have enormous feeding requirements, but does require a balanced diet for optimum health.

Instructions

    1

    Feed papillon puppies 1/3 cup of food each day until they are six months old. Feed papillons older than six months 1/2 to 3/4 cup of food every day. Puppies require three meals a day, but older dogs can be fed in one to three sittings.

    2

    Blend good quality wet and dry dog food containing chicken, lamb, potato, wheat or corn for a balanced diet. Add a teaspoon of cottage cheese to a papillon puppy's food to provide extra calcium.

    3

    Offer your papillon fruits and vegetables to nibble on during the day. Cut small pieces of raw carrots, apples, cucumbers or bananas and feed your dog. Avoid feeding papillons raisins or grapes.

    4

    Keep a steady supply of fresh water available for your papillon to drink at all times.

    5

    Supplement your papillon's diet with multivitamins. Check with your vet for recommendations on the appropriate multivitamin and dosage. Do not feed your dog vitamin C supplements, as vitamin C can cause kidney and liver damage in papillons.

The Care of Young Male Yorkie Poos

A Yorkipoo is a Yorkshire terrier combined with a toy poodle. Yorkipoos soft, silk coats are non-shedding and hypoallergenic, making them a terrific breed for allergy or asthma sufferers. Yorkipoo males are a toy breed, weighing from 7 to 14 pounds and averaging 6 to 9 inches in height. They are often referred to as designer dogs. A Yorkipoos easygoing temperament and keen intelligence makes it a highly sought after breed of dog.

House training

    Success with a Yorkipoo puppys house training will depend on your consistency as an owner, and the dog itself. Traditional Yorkies can be tough to train, whereas, typical poodles are rather easy to train. Crate training is a popular method of housebreaking in a new puppy. The theory is that a dog will not go to the bathroom where it sleeps, so you must keep the puppy in the crate at night, until youre ready to take it out to relieve itself in the morning.

Socialization

    Yorkipoos are the social butterflies of the dog world. They can get along with other dogs, or even cats that theyve been raised with. Yorkipoos enjoy mixing it up with other dogs at the dog park, but also need plenty of downtime to nap at home. While amiable in temperament, young male Yorkipoos can turn destructive by barking incessantly, or chewing furniture, books and clothing if they are bored, or left alone for long periods of time.

Health

    All puppies should be seen by a regular vet and put on a vaccine schedule. A Yorkipoo puppy is small and can be fragile. If your dog is acting sick, throwing up, or seeming lethargic, its best to take the dog to your local vet. Healthy dogs have wet noses and seem alert. If a dogs nose is dry, or a dogs eyes are no longer alert, take your young dog to a vet. Diarrhea, especially in young, small animals, should be considered a sign that something is wrong and should not be taken lightly. Get your pet examined by a vet if it has diarrhea to check for dehydration or parasites. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar can affect Yorkipoos from 6- to 12-weeks old. Poor diet, expending a lot of energy without eating enough, stress or chill can bring on low blood sugar in a young Yorkipoo; if you suspect hypoglycemia, consult your veterinarian.

Hazards

    Be very careful what kind of treats you give your Yorkipoo puppy. Small dogs have fragile systems and should not be given bones, which can either choke the dog or be digested, then break into sharp shards in the intestines and cause tears that may lead to infection and death. Its also very important to monitor your puppy with rawhide chews, which can get small enough to be digested, but still large enough to get stuck in a dogs throat and cause choking. Young puppies are similar to babies in that they put everything in their mouths and can choke easily. Its crucial to monitor your puppy whether youre giving it treats or dog toys, which can come apart and become hazardous.

Grooming

    Yorkipoos have silky coats that can be straight, wavy or curly, depending on whether they take after the Yorkie or the poodle side of their gene pool. While they rarely shed, Yorkipoos do need to be brushed every day to avoid mats in their long hair. Regular trips to the groomer for bathing, haircut and nail trimming are important to maintain a healthy coat.

Neutering

    Male Yorkipoos can be spayed at 2 months of age, with the average procedure being performed on a dog at 4 months. According to The American Veterinary Medical Association, dogs recover more quickly from surgery when they are young. Spaying not only controls the animal population, it helps keep your dog healthy by preventing urinary issues that arise in unaltered dogs and prevents the growth of some cancerous tumors. Spaying may also keep your dog from marking its territory by urinating in your house, as well as every tree in the neighborhood. Neutering your dog will also save you some money, when you register your dog for his license; most towns charge substantially more money to a dog that is unaltered.