Rabu, 31 Oktober 2012

Cairn Terrier Characteristics

The Cairn terrier originated in Scotland, where it was used by farmers to keep farms free of rats and other pests. The breed was formerly known as the short-haired Skye terrier, after the Scottish isle where it came from, and it is distantly related to both the West Highland white terrier and the Scottish terrier. The most famous example of the Cairn terrier was the dog that played Toto in "The Wizard of Oz."

Appearance

    These dogs were bred for working, not looks, and they have sturdy bodies with a thick and wiry double coat. They stand at around 10 inches at the shoulder, and weigh roughly 14 pounds. Because they were bred to catch pests they like to dig, and their large feet and strong claws allow them to do this very well. They also have strong jaws with large teeth for the same purpose. The Cairn terrier can be any color except white, and frequently has black markings on the paws, tip of the tail and face. The appearance of this terrier is relatively easy to maintain, with an hour or so of brushing weekly and only occasional bathing.

Temperament

    Alert and intelligent, their instinct as working dogs means the Cairn terrier will often try to chase small mammals. Indeed sometimes they will challenge larger dogs, as they are not short of courage. Active and friendly, they make good pets as they like to make friends with everyone they meet. This also makes them good with children, and they love to play even when they are getting older. The Cairn terrier has been known to test its owners, so obedience training is necessary to maintain good behavior.

Health

    Cairn terriers are generally quite sturdy and long-lived, with a lifespan of 13 to 14 years. However this breed is not without its problems, and there are a number of genetic issues that pure-bred dogs can suffer from. These include allergies, bone dysfunction, heart defects and eye conditions including glaucoma and cataracts. Breed organizations are working to improve the terrier and do away with these genetic problems, but if there seems to be anything wrong with a dog, it is always best to visit the veterinarian.

More Facts

    Although they are physically tough, Cairns are not well suited to living outside. They are better off in a home environment with close contact with humans. It is also best not to leave a Cairn terrier alone in a yard with neat flowerbeds, as the instinct to dig will take over. These terriers do appreciate being walked, and especially love going on long walks. They will probably need to remain on the leash when out, because if the terrier sees a cat or squirrel or other small mammal, it will set off in pursuit.

Homemade Food for Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Food for Diabetic Dogs

Canine diabetes can be a potentially life-threatening illness for a dog of any age. There are several risk factors that contribute to the development of canine diabetes, including age, gender, breed and weight. Obesity is a dangerous condition for any dog, but for a diabetic dog, being overweight can be deadly. You can control your dog's weight by feeding him homemade dog food that is low in fat and calories.

Instructions

Beef and Rice Cakes

    1

    Preheat your oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease three muffin tins with low-fat cooking spray.

    2

    Pour the brown rice into a large saucepan, and add the water. Bring the rice to a boil and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the rice is tender. Allow the rice to cool completely.

    3

    Peel and finely grate the potatoes and carrots. Chop two celery stalks into half-inch pieces. Place the grated potatoes, grated carrots, celery pieces, ground beef and eggs in a large bowl. Mix the ingredients well.

    4

    Add the salt, olive oil, rolled oats and cooled rice to the bowl. Mix the ingredients well.

    5

    Fill the muffin tins with the mixture. Pack the mixture down tightly into each muffin cup until the ingredients are level with the rim.

    6

    Cook the cakes for approximately 30 to 45 minutes, or until they are firm and lightly browned.

    7

    Cool the cakes completely before serving. Freeze the remaining cakes in an airtight container.

Dog Treats

    8

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Empty the baby food into a large bowl. Add eggs and olive oil, and slowly stir in whole wheat flour.

    9

    Place a sheet of parchment paper onto the bottom of a shallow baking pan. Pour the mixture onto the sheet, and spread it out into an even layer with a spatula.

    10

    Bake the treats for approximately 25 minutes. Allow the treats to cool completely before cutting them into squares and serving to your dog. Store the remaining treats in an airtight container.

About a Pit Bull Shar Pei Mix

About a Pit Bull Shar Pei Mix

A pit bull shar pei mix is also called a sharpull terrier. The sharpull terrier is solid and muscular like a pit bull, but covered in a layer of wrinkled skin like the shar pei. This mix is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, but it is acknowledged by the International Designer Canine Registry and the Designer Dog Breed Registry. The pit bull shar pei mix is a powerful dog and recommended for advanced dog owners only.

Parent Breeds

    To better understand the pit bull shar pei mix, you must first understand the parent breeds. The Chinese shar pei is known for its devotion to its owner, as well as being an alert watchdog, and it is a fairly powerful dog. Similarly, a pit bull is an affectionate, intelligent dog, known for its power and athletic ability. Both breeds require regular exercise, training and proper socialization. Shar peis and pit bulls are loyal dogs that are very protective of their owners. Both breeds also require a strong, consistent pack leader because they can be stubborn, but they also respond well to positive reinforcement.

Physical Attributes

    When you mix a pit bull with a shar pei, the result is a medium-sized, sturdy dog, weighing in at approximately 60 pounds. These dogs often have wrinkles and loose skin like their shar pei parent. They are also known for having small paws and a medium-length coat. Proper grooming for a sharpull terrier includes weekly brushing in the winter, summer and fall months. During the spring, the sharpull will shed its winter coat, requiring daily brushing.

Temperament and Training

    The sharpull terrier is a very loving and loyal mix. He is a companion dog who loves being in the company of his owner. Pit bull shar pei mixes are smart dogs that also inherit stubborn qualities from their parent breeds. Therefore, it is important that training and socialization begin as soon as possible. Their stubborn nature may affect training in some cases, so undergoing training with a professional is recommended. Sharpulls are quiet dogs, not known for excessive barking. In the presence of new people, the sharpull may be standoffish or dominant.

Health

    Pitbull shar pei mixes are generally healthy dogs; however, there are some health concerns of which to be mindful. The sharpull needs regular exercise along with a healthy diet, as it is susceptible to weight gain. Inverted eyelids and ear infections are also common due to the folds in the skin. These folds can trap bacteria, causing infection. The pit bull shar pei mix can also overheat easily because heat is trapped in the folds of skin. Therefore, during exercise, regular water breaks are recommended. The sharpull will also have good dental health when provided with regular teeth cleaning.

Considerations

    The pit bull shar pei mix is a strong dog, both in body and spirit, and is not recommended for first time dog owners. This breed is better suited for more advanced dog owners. With proper training and socialization, this breed can make an excellent family pet. However, it is not recommended that this breed be left alone with babies or young children. With proper exercise, the sharpull can be very happy living in an apartment setting.

Dog Food Diets for Boxers

Dog Food Diets for Boxers

The type of food you feed your boxer will have a direct effect on its health. Many boxers suffer from problems, such as allergies and cancer, that can be prevented by feeding them a quality diet. With all of the foods available, knowing which to choose can be challenging. If you know what works best for boxers and choose accordingly, you can make the right decision for your dog.

Organic Food

    According to the Boxer Buddies website, boxers are at high risk for developing cancer. If fact, they are one of the two breeds of dogs that develop cancer the most. Therefore, it is extremely important to avoid feeding your boxer preservatives, especially BHA, BHT, propylene glycol and ethoxyquin, which are some of the most dangerous ones and are found in many dog foods. Organic dog foods typically don't contain harmful preservatives but do include organic ingredients that are nutritious and haven't been treated with pesticides. Just be sure the two first ingredients are meat and that the food contains plenty of vegetables.

Hypoallergenic Food

    Allergies are a common issue among boxers, and most boxers that have allergies are allergic to the protein in their food. Hypoallergenic food contains protein sources that most dogs have typically never eaten before, such as deer or rabbit. Feeding your boxer an alternate protein source will likely help resolve its allergy symptoms. Choose hypoallergenic foods that are free of preservatives, artificial colors, substandard ingredients (such as meat by-products) and fillers (such as beet pulp or rice flour).

Homemade Food

    The Your Purebred Puppy website states that the best food to feed a boxer is homemade. Making your own food is usually less expensive than buying commercial food, and homemade food is free of the preservatives that could give your boxer cancer. The key to making your boxer's food is balance. The All Boxer Info website states that a boxer's diet should contain 35 to 45 percent fresh, wholesome, cooked meat, such as lamb, turkey or veal. Another 25 to 35 percent should be fresh vegetables, which can be raw or steamed and can include broccoli, sweet potatoes, carrots, sweet peas and green beans. Cooked white or brown rice or pasta should make up the rest of the diet.

About Rottweiler Dogs

About Rottweiler Dogs

The American Kennel Club classifies Rottweilers as part of the working-class group. The breed was developed in Germany and Rottweilers were commonly employed as police dogs during World War I.

Breed History

    According to the American Kennel Club, Rottweilers descended from a Mastiff-like breed called a drover dog. Drovers were used by the ancient Romans as herding animals. Rottweilers were recognized as an official breed in 1931.

Identification

    Rottweilers stand between 22 and 27 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 85 and 130 lb. They have black coats with brown or rust-colored markings on the face. These dogs have muscular, powerful bodies.

Exercise Needs

    Rottweilers are an active breed and need a great deal of exercise. They need long daily walks or runs to stay healthy.

Temperament

    Rottweilers have an inborn instinct to protect their homes and human families, making them excellent watchdogs. However, the breed can become aggressive in unfamiliar surroundings and requires early socialization with other humans and animals.

Health Issues

    Rottweilers are susceptible to hip and elbow dysplasia, a condition where the animal's joints do not fit together properly. Dysplasia can cause arthritis later in the dog's life.

About Bichon Dogs

About Bichon Dogs

An alert, happy breed, the bichon frise enjoys performing for and spending time with its owner. The bichon is quite adaptable and fits well into city or country dwelling families. The dog does not shed so is considered an ideal choice for people with allergies.

History

    According to the American Kennel Club, the bichon dates back to the 13th century as a descendant of the water spaniel. The breed became a favorite of French royalty and was depicted in many early Spanish paintings The bichon was first recognized by the AKC in 1972 and is a member of the non-sporting group. Its primary function today is as a companion animal.

Appearance

    The bichon frise is dark-eyed with a curly, cottony double coat. The coat coloring is white but may feature buff, apricot or cream shadings around the ears or on the body. His plumed tail is carried high over his body. The breed ideally stands 9 to 12 inches and weighs 7 to 12 pounds.

Characteristics

    A merry, pleasant dog, the bichon has a playful, gentle spirit. Although intelligent, the dog may be difficult to housebreak due to its desire to be the leader. You need to start showing it leadership from an early age. It is important that your bichon knows that you are the leader of the pack in order to head off any behavioral issues, which could include: biting, guarding and separation anxiety. The bichon frise enjoys being with its owner and likes the company of children and other pets. This breed does well living in an apartment.

Health Concerns

    Health problems affecting the bichon frise include: skin, eye and ear problems, epilepsy and luxating patellas. The bichon has a lifespan of approximately 15 years.

Needs

    Daily walks are a requirement for your bichon to help it work off excess energy that can lead to behavioral issues. This breed loves to play, and chasing balls and romping in the back yard are favorite activities. The bichon has a silky undercoat that does not shed but continues to grow. Regular brushing is necessary to prevent matting. Professional grooming should be done every two months. Scissor trim the hair around the eyes and ears. The eye area should be cleaned thoroughly to prevent staining.

Senin, 29 Oktober 2012

The Different Kinds of Teacup Dogs

The Different Kinds of Teacup Dogs

The term "teacup dog" is an informal designation given to various breeds of dogs that are particularly small--usually 2 to 4 lbs. The nickname comes from the fact that many of these dogs, especially while they are still puppies, are small enough to fit in a teacup. Many teacup dogs fall under the breeds designated by the American Kennel Club as toy breeds, while others are simply small variations of other breeds.

Chihuahua

    When many people think of small dogs, they think of the Chihuahua. Chihuahuas are naturally small. Very few grow to more than 6 lbs. Many believe they evolved from breeds of small foxes, many of which are in the highlands of Mexico's state of Chihuahua, from whence the breed received its name. Chihuahuas tend to be patient but alert, and react adversely to cold.

Yorkies

    Teacup Yorkies are a subset of a breed more commonly referred to as Yorkshire terriers. The breed hails from the city of Yorkshire in England. Yorkies are typically between 4 and 7 lbs., though by definition "teacup" dogs are generally no more than 4 lbs. fully grown. Yorkies are energetic but family oriented. They like to chase things because of their history as a breed used to chase rats and other small creatures in clothing factories.

Maltese

    Maltese dogs are another breed that is naturally small--generally between 4 and 7 lbs. The breed originated in the ancient trading port of Malta in the Mediterranean. Maltese are among the most well behaved of small sized breeds. They also tend to be fearless and full of energy.

Pug

    The playful pug is one of the oldest breeds of dogs in the world, existing well before 400 B.C. in east Asian areas such as China. Pugs usually weigh between 14 and 18 lbs, but "teacup" pugs are typically much smaller. These small qualities can have harmful health effects for the dogs.

Shih Tzu

    The Shih Tzu is another small dog bred even smaller for the "teacup" market. The breed itself is more than 1,000 years old and comes from ancient China where it was prized by royalty. Similar to pugs, the Shih Tzu usually weighs between 9 and 16 lbs. when fully grown, but is bred much smaller for the "teacup" market. Shih Tzus are usually energetic and alert, but also friendly and outgoing.

How to Groom a Goldendoodle in the Face

How to Groom a Goldendoodle in the Face

With both golden retriever and poodle breeding, goldendoodles have a thick, curly mane that tends to grow out around the face. With long beards, thick eyebrow and ear hair, the goldendoodle requires trimming to maintain neatness and remove stains on its fair hair. With clippers and trimming shears, you can safely groom your goldendoodle's face. Groomers tend to ask pet owners what type of look they want to create for the pet, so check out online goldendoodle galleries to get an idea of different looks for your pet.

Instructions

    1

    Bathe your goldendoodle before grooming. Allow your pet to air dry or blow dry it on cool setting to speed along the process. Press and hold a towel to the hair, rather than rubbing, which tends to create mats.

    2

    Brush from the base of your goldendoodle's neck and spine up to the base of the skull. Stop brushing at the top of the head.

    3

    Hold the bottom edge of one ear and brush out the longer hair first. When brushing the ear, work gently and slowly to avoid brush burn. Brush out the other ear in the same manner.

    4

    Brush from the brow back over the top of the head. Once finished, hold the muzzle of your dog gently and brush the sides of the muzzle and underneath the chin.

    5

    Clip the hair on the top of the head to 2 inches away from the skin. Blend down the back of the neck with trimming sheers.

    6

    Trim the beard around the muzzle to remove unsightly stains and keep it neat. The length depends on your goldendoodle's style. Groomers typically trim the bear to be an inch past the bottom of the jaw.

    7

    Trim the eyebrows to maintain neat yet thick hair that does not fall into the eyes.

    8

    Trim the bottom edge of the ear hair to remove any stray strands. Keep hair about a half to an inch long from the skin on the ear. Brush straight with a comb and avoid fluffing unless you want more of a poodle look.

American Vs. English Bull Dogs

American Vs. English Bull Dogs

Bulldogs were first created as a breed in Victorian England, where they were used for bull baiting and dog fighting. They have since mellowed as a breed and made more suitable for family life as pets. Bulldogs, like many breeds, they have become specialized into American and English types.

American Bulldogs--Features

    American bulldogs are taller than their English cousins. They have compact bodies, but longer legs. American bulldogs have wide, flat heads with short faces and drooping ears. Coloration can range from brown and black to pure white and combinations of these. American bulldogs stand at 20 to 28 inches in height and weigh up to 120 pounds. They are able to jump significantly higher than English bulldogs.

English Bulldogs--Features

    English bulldogs are wider and shorter than their American cousins. Their cheeks droop down from their wide heads, and their eyes are particularly deep. Their jaws sit in an under bite. Coats are short and glossy, and range from white to red, fawn, fallow, piebald, pale yellow, pale red or a combination of these. They stand at 12 to 16 inches in height and weigh up to 55 pounds.

American Bulldogs--Temperament

    American bulldogs are happy, reliable and brave. These dogs are very determined and can be stubborn. They are very good with children, but need extensive obedience training. Because they are relatively large dogs, it's important to train them when they're young.

English Bulldogs--Temperament

    English bulldogs are extremely gentle. They are affectionate and clownish and make dependable companions to children. These dogs can be stubborn and bull-headed. They should go through obedience training as pups, but their smaller size makes the timing less vital than with American bulldogs.

Considerations

    All bulldogs are prone to breathing and respiration difficulties due to their flat faces and shortened nasal passages. American bulldogs are prone to hip dysplasia when they are older. They live up to 16 years. English bulldogs are prone to heat stroke and skin infections. English bulldog puppies have to be delivered by C-section. These dogs only live for an average of eight years.

Minggu, 28 Oktober 2012

Is Cooked Meat Bad for Dogs?

Is Cooked Meat Bad for Dogs?

It's great that pet owners are becoming more proactive in understanding the kind of diet they're feeding the family's furry members. Unfortunately, really understanding what's good or bad for Sparky isn't so simple. There are many schools of thought about cooked and raw diets, as well as content.

BARF: Not for Everyone

    The acronym BARF refers to a popular dog diet, and can mean bones and raw flesh, bones and raw food or biologically acceptable real food. Whatever the definition you choose, it advocates feeding Sparky a raw diet. The advocates of such diets believe that raw food mimics the diet of a dog's wild ancestors, who survived on raw meat and bones. Though there are benefits to feeding raw food to a dog, particularly if you prepare the diet yourself, there also are risks. A diet including cooked meat can address some of the risks of feeding raw meat.

Domestic Animals

    Sparky is long removed from his wild ancestors. As Modern Dog Magazine points out, humans have bred dogs that range in size from tiny to extra large, and build, from slight to bulky. Applying a wild standard to a domesticated animal may not be appropriate. In fact, a 2012 study found that thousands of years of cross-breeding dogs has made it extremely difficult to trace the modern dog's roots back to its ancestors.

Cooked Meat is Safe and Healthy

    Since Sparky's not quite so wild after all, you can rest assured that feeding him cooked meat is not only safe, but also can be healthy. As Just Food For Dogs notes, cooking meat, fruit and vegetables to the recommended temperature breaks down the food's structures, making it more digestible for your dog. Just as importantly, it keeps him safe from parasites and bacteria that raw meat contains.

A Balanced Diet

    Just because cooked meat is good for Sparky doesn't mean he should eat it exclusively. Cooked or raw, meat alone won't provide him proper nutrition. Vegetables, fruits and grains provide your dog vitamins, minerals and fiber he needs to stay healthy. Cooked meat has been a safe part of the family dog's diet for years.

Feeder's Choice

    Ultimately it's up to you to determine whether Sparky will thrive most on a diet of cooked or raw meat. At this time there's nothing but anecdotal evidence on the benefit of feeding raw food; nothing scientifically proves the benefits of a raw diet. If you're concerned that cooking meat is bad for your pup, don't let that put you off a cooked diet for him.

Sabtu, 27 Oktober 2012

How to Figure a Chihuahua's Adult Weight

How to Figure a Chihuahua's Adult Weight

Originally from Mexico, Chihuahuas are classified as a "toy" dog and are the smallest known breed. Staying true to the toy classification, chihuahuas may range in size from 6 inches to 9 inches tall and may only get up to a weight of 6 lbs. Chihuahuas become fully grown when they are 18 months old. If you have a Chihuahua puppy, you can approximate how much it will weigh when it is an adult.

Instructions

    1

    Weight yourself on a scale. If you can, weigh yourself on a scale that includes ounces, especially if you have a Chihuahua that is quite small. Write this number down.

    2

    Hold the Chihuahua in your arms and step on the scale again. Write this number down.

    3

    Subtract your weight from the weight of both you and the Chihuahua. This will be the approximate weight of the Chihuahua.

    4

    Take the Chihuahua to the vet to get a more accurate weight reading. Write this number down.

    5

    Look at a Chihuahua weight chart. The chart will give you an approximation of how much the dog will weigh when it is an adult. Refer to the Chihuahua Weight Chart on the Animal Haus Chihuahuas web site in the Resources section.

    6

    Find how old your Chihuahua is on the weight chart. For example, if it is 7 weeks old, go down to the "7 weeks" option on the left-hand side.

    7

    Look to the right of the age option and stop when you find how much your Chihuahua currently weighs. For example if your dog is 7 weeks old and weighs 22 oz., move from the 7-weeks option to the right until you find "22 oz." within the chart.

    8

    Go down the column until you reach the bottom of the chart, where it will tell you how much your dog will weigh as an adult. For example, if your dog is 7 weeks old and weighs 22 oz., move down the column from "22 oz." to see that the Chihuahua will weigh 4.5 lbs. when it is fully grown.

What Is the Life Span of a Shih Tzu Dog?

What Is the Life Span of a Shih Tzu Dog?

Shih Tzu dogs were originally bred as companion animals for Chinese royalty. The word itself means "lion," alluding to the lion-shaped face of this energetic, outgoing dog. The Shih Tzu breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1969.

Features

    Standing 8 to 11 inches tall and weighing under 20 pounds, the Shih Tzu is considered a toy breed.

Time Frame

    A Shih Tzu has an average life span of 12 to 14 years, although this figure varies based on the individual health and characteristics of the dog.

Considerations

    Shih Tzu dogs have a number of genetic problems, including but not limited to hypothyroidism, respiratory problems, intervertebral disk disease, renal cortical hypoplasia and Von Willebrand disease. These can significantly decrease the expected life span of a dog.

Solution

    While there is no definitive way to determine how long your dog will live, a proper diet, an exercise routine and veterinary medical care contribute to canine longevity.

Fun Fact

    In June 2009, a Shih Tzu from Florida by the name of Smokey was declared the oldest living dog, at the age of 23.

Is Chicken Stock OK for Dogs?

Is Chicken Stock OK for Dogs?

The meaty smell of chicken broth may lead your dog to beg at the table, which can leave you wondering if it's OK to let Rover have some too. In general, chicken stock is safe for dogs to enjoy hot or cold. However, there are ingredients to avoid when preparing stock for your pooch.

Significance

    Fresh or frozen, chicken stock makes a nice treat for dogs. Add some chicken broth to Rover's dinner to give kibble more flavor. You may freeze the broth in an ice cube tray and offer your dog broth cubes in lieu of pet cookies. Or try freezing a mixture of kibble and chicken broth inside a dog toy, then offer it to Rover on a hot day.

Acceptable Ingredients

    Look for low-sodium broth if you're buying chicken stock to feed Rover. If you're making your own stock, you can moderate the salt content and all of the other ingredients so you know exactly what your dog is getting. A homemade stock might include chicken bones, water, carrots, celery, dried herbs and leafy greens like spinach.

Ingredients to Avoid

    Keep the salt content down; excess salt may cause excessive thirst and increased urination. Signs your dog's ingested too much salt include vomiting, diarrhea, tremors and a higher than normal body temperature. Avoid using onions, which are toxic to dogs, when making your own chicken stock for your pet companion. If you think Rover has ingested a toxic ingredient or consumed too much salt, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Warning

    While chicken stock is safe for dogs, chicken bones are not. The bones can cause choking and can splinter when chewed. This may puncture your dog's throat or stomach. For this reason, strain chicken stock before offering it to Rover and dispose of the bones properly.

Tennessee Breed Restriction Laws

Tennessee Breed Restriction Laws

Breed specific laws state what breeds of dog an individual is legally allowed (or not allowed) to have. These laws don't take into consideration the nature of the individual, for example, whether or not the individual is a responsible dog owner. The only factor is the breed of the dog (this is usually based on reputation and any history of violence in the breed). Tennessee, like other states, has laws regarding dog ownership.

General Laws

    Breed specific legislation is known for being quite indiscriminate in its wording and coverage -- if a specific breed of dog is made illegal, the entire breed is targeted. It doesn't matter if an individual dog has no history of violence toward another individual or breed, and it doesn't matter if the owner has never owned a dog known for attacking a human. Once a dog is on the list, all breeds become illegal for an individual to own. The laws in every state are designed to deter individuals from purchasing these breeds of dog.

Breed Restrictions in Tennessee

    Tennessee laws on breed restrictions focus mainly on pure and hybrid pill bulls. This comes from the bad reputation of pit bulls as an inherently violent breed and extensive media attention of attacks on humans and other dogs by pit bulls. Such laws are often controversial as they not only put all dogs of a certain breed in the same category (such as violent and a danger to society), the laws also put all owners in the same category (irresponsible or unable to adequately control their dogs).

Laws on Pit Bull Ownership

    Tennessee has a host of breed specific legislation -- the state also has a list of breeds that can't legally be owned. According to state law, it is illegal for any individual to own a pit bull breed of dog in certain parts of Tennessee. This doesn't just cover the ownership of a pure pit bull, but also the ownership of hybrid breeds such as pit bull terriers, American Staffordshire terriers and any other breed of dog that is more than 50 percent pit bull. Anyone found with such a breed is legally required to surrender it to the authorities.

Breed Restriction in Different Counties

    The law regarding the ownership of pit bulls are active in the majority of the counties in Tennessee. There are a few states which won legal challenges against the legislation (a controversial law as the ban is indiscriminate in its wide coverage of pit bull breeds). Some of the successful counties are Knox, Woodbury, Monterey, Bedford County and Putnam. However, the majority of the counties in Tennessee (such as South Fulton, Jefferson City, Brownsville and Rogersville) saw the legislation pass and the breed specific act become law.

What Is the Lifespan of a Sheltie?

What Is the Lifespan of a Sheltie?

The Sheltie, or the Shetland Sheepdog, is a type of herding dog. According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), a Sheltie is akin to a miniature version of a Collie.

History of the Breed

    The Shetland Sheepdog originated from Great Britain, in the Shetland islands off the coast of Scotland in 900 A.D., according to the United Kennel Club (UKC.) These dogs were brought in by the colonizers of the islands, the Norse people.

    According to the UKC, overtime the harsh climate of the island developed a small but sturdy dog, with thick fur to withstand the often savage weather.

    In 1948, the UKC recognized the Shetland Sheepdog as a true breed.

Appearance

    The Sheltie's general appearance is similar to that of a Collie. It is smaller in stature but its coat, like the Collie, is long and rough, according to the AKC. Its coat is also dense and the abundance of fur around its face gives it a mane-like appearance. According to the AKC, their colours range from black, blue merle and sable.

    Sheltie's are between 13 to 16 inches tall and weigh between 11 to 25 pounds.

Temperament


    According to Canada's Guide to Dogs, a Sheltie is an extremely loyal dog. Shelties are also affectionate and make great pets, as they require a strong companionship with their owners. Like the Collie, a Sheltie is known for its high intelligence, and according to Canada's Guide to Dogs, is a great breed for agility and obedience competitions. Shelties require regular exercise since they are an active breed.

Health Issues

    Just like all dogs, the Shetland Sheepdog may develop a few health issues. Some health problems specific (but not limited to) a Shetland Sheepdog is the Sheltie Eye Syndrome, more often known as the Collie Eye Anomaly. This results in blind spots in a Sheltie's vision, although it is not life threatening.

    Another disorder sometimes seen in Shelties is epilepsy, according to Bark Bytes, a canine online magazine. It is a hereditary seizure disorder that is most often bred out. Hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid, is another condition found in the Sheltie breed. Dogs with this condition often take medication for life, according to Bark Bytes.

Lifespan

    Most breeders and kennel clubs like the AKC agree that the average lifespan of a Shetland Sheepdog range between 12 to 15 years. The saying that one dog year is equal to seven human years is a myth. A dog's lifespan depends on a variety of factors such as diet, exercise, breed type and size of dog.

Jumat, 26 Oktober 2012

How to Identify a Hungarian Mudi

The Mudi, pronounced Moo-Dee, is one of three principle breeds of Hungarian herd dog that, until the 1930s, were all placed in the same classification despite their differences in appearance and disposition. Even in Hungary the Mudi is a rare dog, despite its many uses. Unlike the Puli, and Pumi, this Hungarian sheepdog is able to turn its paw to most any function one could name. It has served as a flock guardian, sheep herder, cow herder, guard dog, hunter of wild animals, killer of mice and weasels, and as a companion animal. They have been used for mountain rescue as well. Anyone who has kept a Mudi finds them to be the ideal multipurpose dog with a playful, charming personality.

Instructions

    1

    Start by assessing the dogs size and weight, paying particular attention to any notable body characteristics. It should stand between 14 and 20 inches high at the shoulder and be significantly longer bodied. The dog should weigh between 20 and 30 pounds depending on its height. Despite this relatively small size, this breed is very strong and fast. It has very sturdy legs and significant musculature. The body itself should be very thin, running back from a deep chest containing a large pair of lungs to a very thin midsection and belly. The hind legs should be widely set like an upside down "V to provide better traction for quick bursts of speed. The tail should be long and heavily feathered with long, wavy fur and curl so very tightly as to touch its own base.

    2

    Examine the dogs fur. It should have a single layer coat of dense fur roughly 2 inches in length; very wavy and shines in the light. The vast majority of Mudis are jet black. However, from a genetic standpoint any color or pattern is possible. For this reason fur color is not a very good indicator of the breed.

    3

    Finish by inspecting the dogs head. The skull and neck should resemble that of a wolfs in miniature. The head should be wedge shaped and have a pointed nose. You should notice a well pronounced stop at the bridge of the nose marking the line between muzzle and skull. The eyes should set exactly on this line. They should be oval shaped, black or dark brown, which hug against the sides of the bridge. The ear should be set to the back of the skull and stand in perfect inverted "V shapes.

What Are the Causes of Red Tint in a Giant Schnauzer's Hair?

What Are the Causes of Red Tint in a Giant Schnauzer's Hair?

Giant schnauzers are a large dog breed from Germany used for herding and farm work. Breed standard for giants recognizes two coat colors, solid black and a combination called "pepper and salt" that appears gray. Other tones in a black coat, including a reddish tint, are undesirable.

True Black

    A black giant schnauzer must be solid, rich black. A white mark on the chest is acceptable, but any other white is disqualifying in the show ring. A mixture of gray or tan hairs also is undesirable. A giant's undercoat should also be solid black. Some black giants have a reddish tint in their hair.

External Causes

    Black giant schnauzers sometimes have fading or burning of their coat that creates a reddish appearance. This red tint can be caused by long-term exposure to the sun, extensive swimming in chlorinated water or old age. Undercoat that appears red can be removed by "stripping," a special grooming technique.

History

    Giant schnauzers first bred in Germany actually came in a wide variety of coat colors, including red, brown and yellow. Old portraits of German royalty show giants with red coats. These coat colors are rarely seen today and are not breed standard. Achieving a total black coat, with no undercoat of tan or brown, was a challenge for the developers of the giant schnauzer.

Genetics

    Dogs with black coats can carry a brown recessive gene. Both parents would have to carry the recessive brown gene, which may give their offspring's coat a reddish tint. Two brown-based dogs that are bred create a double recessive gene, which overrides a pure black coat. The brown, or reddish, gene can be carried for many generations before showing up in a litter.

Expert Insight

    Diet can affect a giant schnauzer's coat color, says Cynthia Fiorino, a longtime breeder of champion giant schnauzers and past president of the Giant Schnauzer Club. "Years ago, we switched brands of dry food and found it turned our giants reddish. We talked with the manufacturer and found that other owners of black-coated dogs had similar experiences."

Mini Goldendoodle Information

Mini Goldendoodle Information

The goldendoodle is a dog that is a mix between a poodle and golden retriever. If the parent poodle is a toy or miniature poodle, the result of the poodle/retriever mix is a miniature goldendoodle.

Size

    Goldendoodles come in three sizes. The mini goldendoodle is the medium-sized variety, in between the standard and the tiny goldendoodle. They are usually 13 to 21 inches in height and weigh 25 to 50 pounds as adults.

Temperament

    Goldendoodles are very smart dogs, as poodles and retrievers are both in the top ten most intelligent dogs in the world according to PetMedsOnline. They are loyal and easily trained. Goldendoodles are great family dogs and are also good apartment dwellers.

Exercise and Grooming

    Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of exercise and are generally happiest when around people. According to "The Goldendoodle & Labradoodle Website," goldendoodles should be combed every few weeks if their fur is unclipped. If clipped, goldendoodles only require grooming several times a year.

Kamis, 25 Oktober 2012

What Kind of Food Should I Be Feeding My 5-Month-Old Puppy?

What Kind of Food Should I Be Feeding My 5-Month-Old Puppy?

You want to give your 5-month old puppy the best food possible, but you're overwhelmed by the options.There are several different types of food you can feed to your puppy, including dry, canned and even homemade food. Some pet enthusiasts recommend nothing but the B.A.R..F. diet, which means feeding your dog only bones and raw food to mirror what its ancestors ate.

What Puppies Need

    Different breeds require different nutrition, especially as puppies.
    Different breeds require different nutrition, especially as puppies.

    During the first year of life, different breeds of puppies need different nutrients. For example, smaller breeds grow at a fast rate and have a high metabolism. They require high levels of energy-boosting nutrients including fat, protein and calcium. Larger breeds grow slower, so their diets don't need high levels of these ingredients. Diets that contain high-energy ingredients can cause larger breed dogs to grow too fast and lead to bone issues.

Cost

    Puppy food can cost more than dog food, especially if it's higher-end food that can be easier to digest because the ingredients used are usually higher-end products. The cost can be even more if you decide to feed your puppy canned food as opposed to dry food. Out of the three types of food -- dry, moist and canned -- if you're trying to get the most bang for your buck, dry food is the way to go. Moist and canned food contain more water than food. Some moist foods are more than 55 percent water, and canned food can be more that 80 percent.

DIY Food

    If you choose to make your own puppy food, factor in the nutritional needs of your specific breed of puppy. This can be tricky in the beginning, so seek advice from your veterinarian about a menu that ensures you're providing everything your puppy needs. If you choose to give your dog raw meat, such as you would on the BARF diet, stay alert for signs of sickness, which can mean your puppy has a parasite.

Timing

    Regardless of what type of food you choose to feed your puppy, feed him three times a day, as close as possible to the same time every day. This puts your puppy on a routine to eat at mealtime instead of snacking throughout the entire day. In doing this, he will also set going to the bathroom on a routine. This can assist you in potty training. Once your puppy reaches 6 months old, you can drop the feedings to twice daily as long as you're following the suggested feeding amounts listed on the food label.

What Is the Difference Between a Parti Yorkie & a Regular Yorkie?

What Is the Difference Between a Parti Yorkie & a Regular Yorkie?

Yorkies and Parti Yorkies are both dogs from the Yorkshire Terrier breed. Unlike regular Yorkies, Partis are tri-colored: white, black and tan. Regular Yorkies have two colors, one that covers most of their long fur, and another that creates the appearance of a saddle on their backs. Parti Yorkies are controversial - some claim that they are rare and special, while others say that they are a dangerous genetic anomaly.

Puppy Mills and Responsible Breeders

    The Yorkshire Terrier Club of America (YTCA) asserts that puppy mills produce many puppies regularly and sell them to pet stores. The YTCA says that the mills are dirty, overcrowded, inhumane, and short on socialization and food. In contrast, responsible breeders provide their puppies with care and socialization, and make sure they are going to good homes. They only breed healthy, breed-standard dogs. The Parti Yorkshire Terrier Club (PYTC) says, "A good breeder stands behind her dogs for life."

American Kennel Club Yorkie Breed Standards For Coat

    Yorkies that are shown at dog shows must meet the American Kennel Club breed standards.
    Yorkies that are shown at dog shows must meet the American Kennel Club breed standards.

    All breed-standard Yorkies are a maximum of 7 lbs. As puppies, their fur, or coat, is black and tan, lightening to blue and tan as they mature. The blue, which is a dark, metallic hue, extends over their backs like a saddle. The rest of their fur, including that of their faces and chests, is a golden tan. Any Yorkie with white fur or colors other than black and tan is disqualified from being shown at competitions.

Argument For Parti Yorkies

    Partis are considered rare and beautiful, a resurfacing of a genetic trait that was present at the dawn of the Yorkie's existence, approximately 165 years ago. Yorkies are thought to originate from several other dog breeds; one of these is the Maltese, which has silky white fur. When dog showing became a part of American culture, breeders bred for the blue and tan dogs only, but the genes for tri-colored fur remained dormant, only to surface again in the 1980s.

Argument Against Parti Yorkies

    Members of the American Kennel Club (AKC) and many breeders feel strongly that the Parti Yorkie is not an acceptable manifestation of the breed, and should not be recognized by the AKC (it is not). The concern about Parti Yorkies is that only genetic anomalies may cause a Yorkie to be born with colors other than the breed standard, and thus, the presence of different markings might signal the potential for other, more serious health problems.

What Are the Different Kinds of Detrimental Inherited Traits for Purebred Dogs?

What Are the Different Kinds of Detrimental Inherited Traits for Purebred Dogs?

Purebred dogs come from a much more limited gene pool than do mongrels, crossbreed or random-bred dogs. Purebred dogs are usually only bred with other dogs of the same breed. This limited gene pool can enhance many undesirable characteristics in the puppies, because the chances of both parents carrying mutated or recessive genes are high. Mutated and recessive genes tend to contain health problems, although just how is not entirely known.

Health Problems Due To Physical Build

    The most obvious detrimental affects are health problems that are directly caused by the exaggerated shape of a particular dog breed. For example, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel often grows a head that is too small for its brain. Pugs, Pekingese, Boston terriers and other flat-faced, or brachycephalic, dogs have troubles breathing because their noses and airways are too small for them to breathe properly. Dachshunds and dogs with long backs and short legs often have spinal troubles due to their long spines.

Health Problems Due to Genetics

    Many illnesses or severe medical conditions do not develop until after a purebred puppy is brought home. These illnesses are passed on through genes. Illnesses and medical conditions known to contain a strong genetic component include epilepsy, progressive retinal aphasia and hip dysplasia. Some of these conditions are unusual but not deadly, such as blue Doberman syndrome or color mutant alopecia, in which dogs of blue or fawn coloring such as Doberman pinschers, Italian greyhounds of Irish setters lose their hair. Some dog breeders are trying to remove these inherited traits by simply neutering any dog with the health problems. For example, there is a national group called the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals that certifies dogs that are free of certain inherited conditions like hip dysplasia.

Behavioral Problems

    Purebred dogs were often bred to perform a specific function, such as herding livestock or fighting other dogs. These traits have not been bred out over the generations. If a dog was bred to fight other dogs, which would be any bulldog breed, then they may need to be supervised when they are around other dogs. Herding dogs and hunting dogs were bred to be on the go all day, so they need a lot of exercise or they could have mischievous tendencies. Herding dogs in particular will round up people or children in a bossy or threatening manner because that is what they have been bred to do.

How to Adopt a Toy Rat Terrier

How to Adopt a Toy Rat Terrier

Toy rat terriers are a miniature version of the full-sized rat terrier. This short-haired breed is small of stature but big of heart and is known as a very intelligent breed with lots of natural curiosity. Toy rat terriers love human companionship and thrive on attention and play, often shadowing their owners and actively begging for physical interaction. Originally bred as farm dogs, rat terriers and their toy counterparts can be adopted via numerous local and national organizations that can be found on the world wide web.

Instructions

Contact Your Local ASPCA

    1

    Surf to aspca.org, the website for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

    2

    Click on "Adoption" in the links bar across the top of the webpage.

    3

    Click on the "Search Our Shelter Database" link in the area beneath the links bar and to the right.

    4

    Enter your zip code into the "Zip/City" field, choose a radius of miles near your home, then click the "Go" button.

    5

    Peruse the ASPCA shelters in your area and call each one and ask if they have toy rat terriers available for adoption. If they do not, see if they can put your name on a list of potential adopters should a toy rat terrier become available.

Contact Toy Rat Terrier Rescue Organizations

    6

    Enter "Toy Rat Terrier Rescue" into the search field of any Internet search engine.

    7

    Peruse the list of rat terrier rescue organizations. Two of the most popular are Ratbone Rescues (ratbonerescues.com) and Rat Terrier ResQ (ratterrierresq.com).

    8

    Visit the websites of the rat terrier rescue organizations and locate the "Contact" link that allows you to contact each group. Send them an email asking if they have toy rat terriers available for adoption. If they do not, ask them to take down your name so you can be contacted once a toy rat terrier becomes available.

Find Toy Rat Terriers for Sale on the Internet

    9

    Enter "toy rat terriers for sale" into the search field of any Internet search engine.

    10

    Peruse the list of businesses selling toy rat terriers. One of the most popular sites specific to the breed is Tiny Toy Rat Terriers (tinytoyratterriers.com).

    11

    Contact the business or organization via email or phone to check on the availability of toy rat terriers for sale or adoption.

Rabu, 24 Oktober 2012

Yorkies & Silkies Dogs

Yorkies & Silkies Dogs

According to the Humane Society of the United States, 39% percent of U.S. households own a dog. Yorkies, also known has Yorkshire terriers, and Silkies are breeds of toy terrier. The American Kennel Club recognizes both these breeds as pure breeds. Yorkies and Silkies make popular pets for people who want small dogs.

History

    The Yorkshire terrier is descended from the Waterside Terrier and was brought to Yorkshire, England, in the mid-19th century by weavers from Scotland. The earliest record of a Yorkshire terrier born in the United States dates to 1872. Dog breeders developed the Silky terrier in the early 1900s in Australia from crossing native Australian Terriers with imported Yorkshire Terriers. It was originally known as the Sydney Silky Terrier.

Yorkies

    A purebred Yorkshire terrier should not weigh more than seven pounds. It has a small, rather flat head, a black nose, medium eyes and small, V-shaped, erect ears. Its body is well-proportioned and very compact. The forelegs and hind legs should be straight and the feet rounded with black toenails. Puppies are born black and tan and develop into blue and tan colorings.

Silkies

    The Silky terrier is larger than the Yorkshire terrier. It has a true terrier personality and can hunt down domestic rodents. The Silky's body is moderately low set and is from 9 to 10 inches high at the shoulder. It has a strong, wedge-shaped head and small, dark, almond-shaped eyes. It has strong and straight forelegs and well-muscled hindquarters.

Scottish Collie Facts

Scottish Collie Facts

Choosing a breed to fit a family lifestyle can be a daunting, but fun, task. When debating between breeds it is important to know as many facts and information about the breed as possible before making the final decision. The collie is one of hundreds of different dog breeds and may or may not not be the right choice for some families.

Origins

    The exact historical origins of the collie are shrouded in mystery but the breed has been around for several centuries in and around the United Kingdom, particularly in Scotland. Traditionally the dogs were used to herd sheep and cattle out to market. Today, they are still used for herding but are also used for show and sport competitions, as well as for companionship.

Alternate Names

    The Scottish collie goes by multiple names. It is referred to as both the rough collie and the smooth collie, with the only difference between the two names being the type of fur coat. The Scottish collie has also been referred to as the Scotch collie but most recently goes by just "collie," as recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1991.

Coat

    The coat of the collie can be either rough or smooth. The rough coat features a straight, harsh outer coat with a softer, dense inner coat. The rough coat also features a larger mane and feathering on the legs. The smooth coat variety features shorter, hard and dense fur. Both varieties come in the same colors: sable and white, tri-color, white and blue merle.

Size

    Male collies range in size from 24 to 26 inches at the shoulder, with weight ranging from 60 pounds to 75 pounds as accepted by the AKC. Female collies can range from 22 to 24 inches and can weigh between 50 and 65 pounds. However, as with any living creature variation can occur with individual dogs being shorter, taller, lighter or heavier.

Health

    Collies are known for being relatively healthy dogs but like many larger breeds they can suffer from hip problems, which in turn can result in additional health issues such as arthritis or lameness. Some lines within the breed can suffer from heart disease or eye problems such as Collie Eye Anomaly. The lifespan of a collie can vary greatly from as little as 4 years to as long as 16 years.

Sunblock

    Owners and potential owners of collies should keep in mind that the nose is a sensitive area. The skin is thinner and the fur is thinner in volume and length, therefore sunblock is recommended as this area is more sensitive to the effects of the sun.

Queen Victoria

    Queen Victoria is credited for the rise in popularity of the collie breed. According to the American Kennel Club in the 1860s Queen Victoria visited the Scottish Highlands. It was there that she fell in love with the breed and went on to introduce them to the rest of the world. From then on collies grew significantly in popularity.

Famous Collies

    Aside from the beloved dogs of Queen Victoria there is one particular dog who is extremely famous: Lassie. The show of the same name ran for 19 seasons. Lassie is one of three dogs who has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Though Lassie is a well known dog several collies actually played the part of Lassie throughout the series, including the original dog who was a male collie named Pal.

Recognition

    The collie breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885. It was later recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1914. Over the past decades several clubs have also formed, including the Collie Club of America, American Working Collies Association, and various location-specific clubs including the Collie Club of Colorado and the Collie Club of New England.

About the Jack Russell

About the Jack Russell

The Jack Russell is a small terrier breed known in competition since 2003 as the Parson Russell. It is a member of the terrier group and was originally bred for hunting foxes. It was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1997 and had its competition breed standard set in July of 2004.

History

    The Jack Russell breed originates from Trump, a female terrier purchased from a milkman by Parson John Russell while still at university in Oxford, England. Parson Russell acquired Trump in 1818 and took the dog back to Devonshire where he began to breed her. Parson Russell did not begin recording his breeding efforts until 1868, but the descendants of Trump were starting to form the breed known today. The dogs became known as fox terriers in the early days, and in 1876, a club was formed with a breed standard for the animals. Parson Russell's tireless work with and in support of the breed led it ultimately to be named after him.

Description

    The Jack Russell is a medium-sized terrier that grows to between 10 and 15 inches tall at the shoulder and between 14 to 18 lbs. in weight. It has a sturdy body type, built for strength and endurance, but also to allow the dog to track foxes underground in dens. The legs are medium length to strike a balance between remaining compact and keeping pace with the larger hunting hounds. It has a small skull with a medium-length muzzle and an alert expression. Its ears are small, partially erect and V-shaped.

Coat and Color

    The dog comes in three coat types: smooth, rough and broken, all of which are double layered. The smooth coat is short and smooth over the entire body. The broken coat is similar but has areas of coarse hair around the head, face, body and legs. The rough coat is the other end of the scale with coarse longer hair all over the body. The dog's general coat color is white with differing shades of brown or tan.

Temperament

    The Jack Russell has an energetic, friendly nature and requires a lot of attention from its owners. It has a tenacious hunting instinct when used as a working dog, and is ready to chase and stand its ground against any animal or even larger dogs. The dog enjoys to play and shows deep affection to its owners. It is not an overtly aggressive breed by nature, but weak training can lead to a troublesome dog.

Dachshund General Information

Dachshund General Information

The dachshund is one of the smaller breeds of dogs that have become quite popular in America. They are a lovable little dog that is extremely affectionate and loyal. Dachshunds are active dogs and enjoy lots of playing and attention. Dachshunds have a tenancy to become antisocial and slightly aggressive if they are not given proper care and attention, but if you treat these wonderful animals nicely, they will be loyal and true friends for many years.

Description

    There are three varieties of dachshund--short-haired, wire-haired and long-haired. Each variety has three different sizes of dog: standard, miniature and toy, in descending order according to size. The dachshund is longer than it is tall, with short muscular legs. It has an elongated head and it keeps its relatively short tail in line with its back. Dachshunds come in myriad colors, ranging from a deep chocolate brown, to red all the way to platinum blond.

Temperament

    Dachshunds are naturally curious and brave, willing to investigate anything, which can lead to problems. They are also affectionate and fiercely loyal to their family. Dachshunds were bred to dig, so they will most likely be diggers, though they can be broken of the habit with training. Dachshunds have a tendency to become jealous and irritable if not given proper care and affection.

Care

    One of the most important care tips for your dachshund is to show it who's boss. Many will hear this and scoff, but if a dachshund is not taught that the humans are the pack leaders, than it will try to be the pack leader, which will lead to horrible behaviors such as being over-protective of furniture, food or toys or biting at people and other animals. Assert your dominance by not allowing the dog to get away with bad behavior, taking it on walks regularly and making sure it knows who is boss.

History

    The dachshund breed was developed in Germany in the 1600s, primarily for hunting badgers. The dog was bred specifically for its height, strength and tenacity, so that it could handle a badger and chase it in to its hole. The word "dachs" is German for badger, so the "dachshund" is literally the "badger-hound." Dachshunds originally weighed between 30 to 40 pounds, whereas today they commonly weigh between 7 and 30 pounds.

Other Information

    Long-haired dachshunds need to be groomed frequently to ensure a healthy coat. The dachshund is perfect for apartment living, due to its small size and its ability to be active indoors, without outside play time. These little dogs need to be exercised a lot, walking at least once a day, if not more, as well as frequent playtimes. However, dachshunds also tire easily and need to be exercised in short bursts instead of all at once. Dachshunds are prone to spinal injuries, so they should be discouraged from jumping and should be assisted down from heights, such as beds or couches.

Which Dogs Have Wrinkled Faces?

Which Dogs Have Wrinkled Faces?

Selasa, 23 Oktober 2012

Adding Oil to Puppy Food

Adding Oil to Puppy Food

Adding healthy oil to your puppy's food contributes vitamins, essential fatty acids and other nutritional powerhouses that will help him grow up healthy and strong. Many dog parents are aware of the benefits of fish oil, and there are many other oils that can be added to a pup's food.

Why Add Oil?

    Healthy oils offer a range of benefits. They offer beneficial essential fatty acids (EFAs) omega-3, omega-6 fatty acid and arachidonic acid, along with fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. They can improve skin condition, boost immunity, improve digestion and nutrient absorption, and can help balance insulin and thyroid levels. If your puppy doesn't consume enough fat now, he can experience dry and itchy skin, dull coat, fur loss and other health issues later in life.

A Range of Choices

    Fish and olive oils are two that are commonly used. Many other options exist, too. Safflower oil contains all the EFAs dogs need. Flaxseed oil is another healthy option, but should be used sparingly, as it can cause diarrhea in some dogs. Coconut oil contains lauric acid, which has antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties; it also has capric and caprylic acids, containing antifungal properties.

How Much to Offer

    Fats should total somewhere between 15 and 20 percent of a dog's diet, and this should begin in puppyhood. Use this percentage to calculate how much oil to add to your puppy's food over the course of the day, keeping in mind that oils have about 120 calories per tablespoon, with all of the calories coming from fat. If you're feeding commercial puppy food, check the label as your brand may have oils already added into the recipe.

Precautions

    When adding oil to your puppy's food, start with 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon at a time. Monitor him and make sure the oils agree with him. If your puppy experiences diarrhea or other tummy issues, he may be getting too much oil, or the wrong type. If that happens, reduce the amount or change oils. Mixing the oil into food helps your pup's digestion and vitamin absorption. Before changing diets, consult your vet to address any concerns.

How to Understand a Dog's Nutritional Requirements

Our pets have the same basic nutritional requirements as humans. We all need six essential elements for optimum health: water, protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Here is a breakdown of each element--what it does for your dog, and what the best sources are.

Instructions

    1

    Provide a full bowl of fresh, clean water whenever he finishes it (or at least every day). Water is important as it plays a key role in how nutrients and wastes are transported throughout the body.

    2

    Increase the amount of protein to make it the largest source of calories provided by the pet food. Protein plays a crucial role in a dog's diet and is responsible for health, tissue growth and repair. Meat meal is the preferable, highly concentrated form of protein you'll want to see in the ingredients list, as the water has been removed and only the digestible nutrients remain.

    3

    Supply natural fatty acids because they're important for your dog's skin and hair condition. Plus, they add flavor and texture to her food. Look for omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, derived from fresh fish sources. These healthy fats are also suppliers and natural sources of Vitamins A, D, E and K.

    4

    Keep some carbohydrates. Some say dogs are carnivores and, as such, have no need for grains and complex carbohydrates. But in the wild, dogs would ingest whatever is in their prey's stomach as the carbohydrate, grain and vegetation portion of their diet. So look for real vegetables, fruits and whole grain real brown rice to maintain healthy digestion and bowels.

    5

    Check on the vitamin supply. There are two types of vitamins: fat-soluble, stored in the body fat, and water-soluble, which must be replaced on a daily basis. Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat-soluble, but all the complex B vitamins and C vitamins must be eaten on a daily basis for optimum dog health.

    6

    Mind the minerals. You need to protect your dog's teeth and bone health, so calcium and phosphorous should be included in your dog's daily diet. Also include magnesium, potassium and sodium, which help to regulate your pet's body systems properly.

Senin, 22 Oktober 2012

Information on Yellow Labrador Retrievers

Information on Yellow Labrador Retrievers

Hunting dog, companion and family friend -- it's no wonder Labrador retrievers are the most popular dog in America year after year, according to American Kennel Club statistics. Though they were bred to retrieve fowl and other game, Labradors are loyal, friendly and intelligent. They come in three colors: yellow, black and chocolate. Aside from coat color, there is no difference between the dogs. One litter of Labrador puppies can boast all three coat colors. If you are considering adding a yellow Labrador to your family, do some research to make sure the dog is truly right for you.

Physical Traits

    Labradors are a large breed, weighing on average 55 to 80 lbs. They have short fur that easily sheds water. They were bred to retrieve fowl from water and are powerful swimmers. They have a thick tail and webbed paws that help them move through water. In general, Labs love to swim, though some individuals may be less fond of water. Labs are flop-eared, meaning that their ears hang down rather than stand up straight.

Temperament

    Don't be surprised if your yellow Lab wants to be where you are. They are social dogs that crave human attention and affection. They thrive in families and are patient and gentle with children. Labradors are social and want to be part of the action. They are affectionate with strangers as well as their family members, and they tend to get along well with other dogs and pets. Labs are eager to please, intelligent and playful.

Training

    Labradors' willingness to learn and please their humans makes them easy to train. They are obedient if their training is consistent. Labs are sensitive dogs, however, that crave affection, and they respond best to positive-reinforcement training methods. Reward your yellow Lab with treats, praise and play when it displays a desired behavior or obeys a command correctly. Interrupt mischief with a noise and reward your Lab for stopping the behavior. Don't punish your Labrador or you can cause resentment, fear or even aggression. You should also help your Labrador get plenty of exercise every day to prevent boredom from leading to bad habits and behavior problems. Labradors are extremely energetic and need at least two 30-minute walks per day, along with play time and bones or toys to chew on. Bored Labradors can get into trouble and will be less easily trained.

Health

    In general, Labrador retrievers are healthy dogs if they are well cared for. They are susceptible to some genetic disorders however, including hip and elbow dysplasia, eye problems (such as cataracts or retinal dysplasia) and gastric torsion. These problems can be identified early if you have your yellow Lab examined by a veterinarian on a regular basis. Take your Lab in for annual checkups and keep it up to date on vaccinations to help it stay healthy.

How to Pick a Cocker Spaniel Puppy

How to Pick a Cocker Spaniel Puppy

According to the American Kennel Club's website, cocker spaniels are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. They're intelligent and make great family pets. Overall, the breed is active, yet gentle. Although most cocker spaniels tend to share the same temperament, individual dogs' personalities vary, so it's important to learn how to pick the cocker spaniel that is right for you. There are several important steps to take to find the cocker spaniel that will eventually join your family.

Instructions

    1

    List the qualities you want in your cocker spaniel. Decide if you want a calm dog that enjoys snuggling or a dog with boundless energy. Once you've decided what type of dog best suits your family, you're ready to begin your search.

    2

    Find a reputable cocker spaniel breeder or rescue organization. You can visit the American Kennel Club's website to find a list of responsible breeders in your area. Rescue organizations also offer cocker spaniel adoptions. Adoption through a rescue organization is usually much less expensive than buying a dog from a breeder. However, many rescued dogs are fully grown, so if you're looking to adopt a puppy it may be difficult to find one through a rescue organization.

    3

    Observe the litter of puppies. Watch each puppy to see how it behaves and interacts with its litter mates. According to The University of Perdue's Extension Service, you want to "observe its behavior and avoid extremes. Desirable characteristics include curiosity, playfulness and confidence. Undesirable characteristics include dominance, bullying, apathy, excessive barking and biting, and submissive urination." Careful observation will help you decide which puppy best fits the list of qualities you desire in a dog.

    4

    Perform tests to assess the dog's personality. Purdue's Extension Service advises prospective owners to perform a few tests and observe how the puppy reacts, to help determine how it will behave as it ages. For example, The Extension Service recommends holding the puppy on its back in your lap while stroking its belly and talking to it. A normal dog will struggle at first and then become calmer, whereas a dominant dog will bark and bite, and a submissive dog will panic. Another test the Extension Service suggests is to hold the dog a few inches off the floor. A normal dog will struggle and then become calm, whereas a dominant dog will bite and bark, and a submissive dog will simply dangle.

    5

    Buy food, toys, bowls, bedding, grooming supplies and bones to prepare for your new cocker spaniel. Thorough preparation enables you to enjoy your dog more, once you bring it home.

How to Identify A Basenji Dog

How to Identify A Basenji Dog

The Basenji is an African hound that is used for hunting small game. Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics depict a kind of dog that was used for the same purpose many thousands of years ago. It bears a striking resemblance to the Basenji and may very well be its predecessor. With the appropriate training this breed of dog can make a fine companion, though it is still an uncommon species to find in Europe and America. For that reason here is a guide on how to identify a Basenji should you see one.

Instructions

Identifying A Basenji

    1

    Look at the dogs overall shape and size. For a hound, this is a small breed that rarely grows over 17 inches at the shoulder. They are elegant and have a good upright posture, being straight backed and long legged. They also have short tails that curl up so the tip touches the base of the spine. If you get the opportunity, watch how the dog runs. They have a very distinctive horse-like gait.

    2

    Examine the dogs coat. They have very sleek, short fur that comes in only a few colored patterns. These colors are red, black, copper, and tan. Each of these colors will be accompanied by white feet, a white chest and underbelly. Some also have white collars and white spots on the face and bridge of the nose.

    3

    Look at the dogs head. It should have a thick neck leading to a flat skull and furrowed brow that makes the dog look worried or nervous. They have tall, triangular, forward facing ears. Its eyes are small and almond shaped which seem to be hooded or squinted rather than fully open. The Basenji will also have a long snout, but a narrow under slung jaw giving it the impression of an under bite. If the dog matches this description then youre looking at a Basenji.

Minggu, 21 Oktober 2012

How to Care for Your Chihuahua's Teeth

Chihuahua teeth may be tiny, but they need the same level of care as the teeth of any other dog breed. For the first few months of a chihuahua's life, their teeth don't need brushing. They will keep their baby teeth for only a few months before they fall out and are replaced with adult teeth. At this phase, you simply want to avoid the retention of any baby teeth.

Instructions

    1

    Give your puppy a mixture of both hard and soft foods. This will make it easier for your puppy to eat with a tooth or two missing and will allow the loose teeth to become looser. Provide a young chihuahua with several small rubber toys to further help their baby teeth to become loose. Look for the smallest rubber toys on the market to ensure that the puppy can fit the toys into his mouth.

    2

    Provide plenty of hard dog biscuits as treats when your chihuahua's adult teeth come in. Choose the small-breed variety and allow the biscuits to clean away some of the plaque on the dog's teeth. Look for dog biscuits that advertise cleaner teeth for dogs. Those are the crunchiest varieties, and they generally provide the best plaque removal.

    3

    Brush your chihuahua's teeth regularly with a small, soft toothbrush. Brush close to the gums to remove the tartar. There are dog toothbrushes made specifically for dogs as well as dog toothpaste. If you have trouble finding a dog toothbrush small enough for your chihuahua, try a soft-bristle human toothbrush made for infants. These are generally small enough for an adult chihuahua. Brush your dog's teeth about once a month to prevent tartar buildup from causing dental problems.

    4

    Take your chihuahua for regular dental checkups with your veterinarian. Most vets recommend a professional dental cleaning about every 6 months. This consists of a more intensive removal of tartar buildup, and it may include a fluoride treatment.

Holistic Diet for a Dog

Holistic Diet for a Dog

Natural Hypoallergenic Dog Food

Natural Hypoallergenic Dog Food

Just like humans, dogs can be allergic to a wide variety of different triggers, including the ingredients in their food. If your dog is suffering from allergies, and is fed a commercial pet food diet, one or more of the ingredients may be the culprit. One solution to this problem is to turn to natural, hypoallergenic dog food for support.

Symptoms

    The most common symptoms associated with food-related allergies will appear in the skin, such as dry or itchy skin, dull coat and irritation. A dog suffering from skin allergies will chew on and itch his irritated skin and coat until he hurts himself, causing a never-ending cycle of healing and re-aggravating the irritations. Many visual cues exist, including hair loss, dry skin, red and irritated skin and open sores on the skin, indicating that a serious problem is afoot.

Solution

    The solution to dog food allergies and the symptoms they cause is a hypoallergenic diet using natural sources of protein and carbohydrates while limiting additives and fillers. The most common proteins used in hypoallergenic dog foods are venison, egg, fish and duck. The most common carbohydrates are rice, peas and potato. Most commercially available hypoallergenic foods contain only one type of carbohydrates and protein per recipe, making it easier to pinpoint the allergy by feeding only hypoallergenic ingredients rather than a mixture of multiple carbohydrates and proteins in the same recipe.

Homemade Dog Food

    Create your own dog food diet as an alternative to commercial dog food products. Follow the same principles as these commercial diets do, and experiment with different carbohydrates and proteins one at a time until you find the right mixture. You can follow one of several different schools of thoughts for homemade dog food, such as processing and cooking the food or feeding a raw diet.

Time Frame

    Feed each type of homemade food you create for a period of two weeks and observe the dog closely to see if anything changes, according to Caroline Tanaka, DVM. If you have successfully eliminated the allergen, your dog's skin will clear up drastically within a two-week period. It may take some time to arrive at the right combination for your dog, but the aforementioned carbohydrates and proteins are generally hypo-allergenic, making them the best bets for the job.

Warning

    Dog treats and some dog toys contain additives, dyes and other substances that may be creating an allergy. In order to completely remove all allergy triggers from your dog's life, you should also examine the treats and toys that you give your dog. There are natural treats and toys that you can buy that severely limit additives and dyes to help create a more hypoallergenic environment. Choose organic treats with the fewest number of ingredients possible, and aim for natural ingredient lists free of dyes or additive names you are unfamiliar with.

Difference Between Purina Senior Dog Food & Large Dog

Difference Between Purina Senior Dog Food & Large Dog

As your dog ages, it requires slightly different nutrition than it did when it was in the prime of its life. Purina, a trusted animal food provider for over 100 years, has developed types of dog foods that address the special needs of all manner of dogs -- from old to young, large to puppy, active to sedentary. Knowing the appropriate food to feed your dog is important for the health of your pet.

Higher Fat

    Purina Large Breed Adult Formula has a higher fat content than the Purina Senior. This is for several reasons. Large breed dogs burn more energy and have a higher metabolism than smaller dogs, so they need more calories to keep in good condition. Fat is an easy source of calories for dogs to digest. In addition, older dogs can sometimes struggle with digesting too much fat, so the senior dog food has less -- 8 percent versus the large breed formula's 12 percent.

High Antioxidants

    Antioxidants have been shown to combat the negative effects of free radicals that can affect the health of cells during the aging process. By including higher levels of antioxidants in their senior formula, Purina provides the older dog the benefits of these nutritional supplements already added into the food itself. The large breed formula also contains antioxidants, but with an addition of joint health supplement formula in the form of glucosamine, because many large breeds have a tendency towards arthritis or hip displasia.

Easy to Chew

    Older dogs often have issues with decaying teeth or gum disease, and chewing hard food can be a problem leading to loss of overall health and condition. Purina Senior dog food is formulated with easily chewable pieces, alternating with crunchy pieces that will help keep existing teeth clean and gums healthy.

Fiber

    As the digestive system of the dog ages, it becomes less efficient, allowing more nutrition to slip by and also causing common problems such as constipation. By increasing the fiber in the Senior formula and using whole grains, the Senior formula helps keep a dog regular while optimizing nutrition. The Large Breed dog food contains 4.5 percent fiber, while the Senior formula contains 7 percent.

Cockapoo Puppies Information

Cockapoos are a cross between miniature or toy poodles and cocker spaniels. Either English or American cocker spaniels can be used as parents, but there are fewer genetic problems with English cocker spaniels, according to Mary Foley of the Cockapoo Club of America.

Size

    Since the cockapoo isn't a recognized breed, there isn't a standard. Sizes range from a 6-pound "toy" to the "standard" or "maxi," which can weigh in at more than 20 pounds.

Features

    Cockapoo puppies typically have short, curly fur which grows longer as they mature. The exact length and curliness of the adult coat depends on genetics and can't be predicted in a mixed breed puppy. Most cockapoos are odorless and do not shed.

Temperament

    Both poodles and cocker spaniels are friendly, easily-trainable dogs. Most cockapoos make friendly, trainable pets, especially if they are trained and socialized as puppies.

Health Problems

    The Cockapoo Club of America suggests buying cockapoo puppies from breeders who have tested their breeding stock for problems common to both breeds. These include several eye disorders, luxating patellas (a painful condition where the kneecap slips out of place), and hip and elbow problems.

Identification

    Cockapoo puppies may not always be the result of breeding a purebred poodles to a purebred cocker spaniel---they can also be a result of breeding two cockapoos, or a cockapoo to a purebred dog, according to the Cockapoo Rescue Organization.

Sabtu, 20 Oktober 2012

Pomeranian Dogs 101

Pomeranian Dogs 101

The Pomeranian may resemble a fluffy pompon with feet, but that's not how this feisty little member of the toy group acquired its name. The breed originated in Pomerania, south of the Baltic Sea. The Pom was the breed of choice for such historical notables as Michelangelo, Mozart, Marie Antoinette and Queen Victoria, as well as Hollywood celebrities including Nicole Richie, Sharon Osbourne and Sean "Puffy" Combs. Pomeranians are the epitome of lap dogs, meaning they are inside dogs all the way. If you are thinking of including a Pomeranian in your family, get to know the breed to make sure it is a good fit for your lifestyle.

Physical Appearance

    Pomeranians stand between 7 and 12 inches tall at the withers (shoulders) with a weight range of 3 to 7 pounds. They come in a variety of colors, including red, yellow, cream, brown, merle, white, reddish-orange and black. They may also be parti-colored, that is, more than one color. The AKC allows all colors and there is no one color that is preferred over the others. The Pomeranian looks something like a fox, with small facial features and triangular, erect ears. The Poms feathered tail lies flat on the dogs back, not curled. The tail plume usually touches the back of the dogs head. The Pomeranian's dual coat comprises a dense and fluffy undercoat and a rough overcoat of long, straight guard hairs. The dogs eyes are alert and intelligent. The Poms carriage is proud and commanding.

Temperament

    The Pomeranian breed combines intelligence and loyalty with high energy. Despite their diminutive size, Pomeranians often try to become the leaders of their pack, or family. They possess keen confidence and self-assurance. They are usually good with other dogs, but small children who are not trained to be respectful around dogs may trigger a defense mechanism, causing the dog to bite. Pomeranians need to be leashed during walks to prevent them from taking on larger breeds. This breed may become destructive and develop behavioral problems when left alone. Barking, a problem with many other toy breeds, is generally not an issue with Pomeranians. Poms crave personal attention and playtime, require only one daily walk and adapt well to apartments.

Care

    Clean your Pomeranian's teeth daily to prevent dental disease. Mist the dog's coat with water and brush it daily, using a pin or bristle brush, which prevents excessive shedding and keeps the dog's coat free from tangles and mats. Your groomer can counsel you on the many ways a Pomeranian can be groomed. By far, the most popular cut is the lion cut, which leaves the body shaved and smooth, the head with a full mane and a tassel of fur on the tail.

    Bathe your Pomeranian as needed but never more frequently than once every two weeks. Excessive bathing will dry out the dogs natural oils and cause itchy skin. Trim your dog's toenails at least once every three months.

Health

    A number of genetic problems are inherent in Pomeranians. These problems include cataracts and other eye problems, undescended testicle(s), liver failure, endocrine and musculoskeletal disorders and gastrointestinal diseases. Pomeranians also have been known to develop disorders of the blood and nervous systems. Small-breed dogs must have their teeth checked by a veterinarian annually as they are more prone to dental problems which can lead to infection. Life expectancy is about 12 years, but some Pomeranians live much longer. Keeping a dog within an ideal weight range helps extend its lifespan. Altering the dog early in life will significantly reduce the risk of certain cancers.

Foods That Build the Immune System in Dogs

Feeding him a nutritious diet low in chemical additives and preservatives is the first step in helping your dog build and maintain a healthy immune system. Adding fresh foods and supplements can keep your dog healthier and prevent some common conditions like ear and urinary tract infections. Good nutrition will keep your dog's coat shiny and benefit his overall health.

History

    Dogs evolved from wolves and are still classified as carnivores. However, unlike cats, who must have meat to survive, dogs can live on a varied diet. Some dogs do fine on a vegetarian diet, although this is not recommended by most experts. Historically and worldwide, dogs have been fed human leftovers and cooked cereals with meat added. Now that commercial diets are available, most dogs eat a kibbled diet high in cooked grains and chemical additives and low in meat and fresh foods. Many theorize this accounts for the rise in allergies and chronic illnesses like diabetes and cancer. In response, some pet owners have started feeding their dog raw or home-cooked diets, and some pet food manufacturers are producing premium kibbles that are naturally preserved and have fewer unnecessary chemical additives.

Types

    There are many ways to feed a dog a healthier diet. The link below has extensive information on different feeding choices. Many people feed their dog a raw or "BARF" (biologically appropriate raw food) diet consisting mainly of raw meats and bones, with a little cooked or pulped vegetables on the side. Others swear by a home-cooked diet, which takes a little more time but with practice can be put together efficiently and inexpensively. There are now many excellent kibbled and canned foods available, using minimal grains, high-quality whole meats and natural preservatives like mixed tocopherols and antioxidants.

Function

    Dogs digest cooked grains inefficiently, which is why they produce gas and large, smelly stools when fed low quality kibble. They have a short gastrointestinal tract designed to efficiently digest high-protein foods like meats. Their teeth are designed for gripping and tearing food, unlike vegetarians and omnivores with large flat molars for chewing more slowly. Many people find that their dog's health improves when they stop feeding him low-quality, grain-based proteins like brewers rice or corn and wheat gluten. Look for higher protein grains in the ingredients list, like millet, oats, pearl barley or rice. Many foods are now grain free and higher in protein, using sweet potatoes as a carbohydrate source. Although some of these foods are more expensive, much less needs to be fed because the dog utilizes the proteins more efficiently.

Misconceptions

    It is a common misconception that dogs need carbohydrates (grains) in the diet. They do not, although they can utilize them. Those who have fed generations of dogs a raw diet with few if any carbohydrates will attest to healthy, long-lived dogs with fewer chronic problems. However, the raw diet is not feasible for many owners, and choosing better carbohydrates as outlined in the step above will go a long way toward building a strong immune system.

Theories/Speculation

    It has been speculated by some veterinary nutritionists that a diet based on low-quality grains may cause certain cancers. Others have found that such diets promote yeast overgrowth in the ears, which can cause frequent ear infections. Many of the preservatives and colorants used in lower quality foods are known carcinogens. In particular, avoid food and treats containing BHT, BHA, ethoxyquin and red dye 40. Some studies indicate that low-quality, grain-based diets can cause diabetes in dogs, just as a high-carbohydrate, low-quality diet promotes diabetes in people.

Prevention/Solution

    A monotonous diet can compromise health, give a dog an unnaturally finicky "sensitive tummy" and may promote allergies. Feeding him a variety of foods and protein sources is better and can prevent food allergies. Adding omega three fatty acids in the form of fish oil (the ones sold for human consumption are fine) will help with skin and coat health and may help dogs with arthritis because it is a natural anti-inflammatory.