Minggu, 30 September 2012

How to Make Chicken and Cheddar Dog Treats

Dogs deserve a treat every now and then, not just when they do something you think is good. Store bought treats are good, but when you run out of dog treats and don't have time to go to the store to buy them, make your own. Here's a simple recipe for homemade dog treats.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Put the chicken in a pan of water and bring it to a boil on top of the stove. Cook the chicken until it's done, about 15 minutes. Drain the chicken and shred it into small pieces.

    2

    In a bowl combine the shredded chicken, flour, vegetable oil, an egg, cheddar cheese and water or chicken stock. Mix well until a you have a ball of dough, adding water or chicken stock if the dough is too thick and add flour if the dough is too sticky. Drop the dough on a lightly floured surface and roll to the thickness you want.

    3

    Cut out the biscuit shapes, being careful not to waste any of the dough. Place the biscuits on a tray that you have greased with butter and bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the biscuits are golden brown. Take them out of the oven and let them cool at room temperature and serve to your dog. Put the leftover treats in an air tight container and they will keep for about a month.

How to Help a Puppy to Breathe in an Emergency

How to Help a Puppy to Breathe in an Emergency

Puppies are small and delicate pets. They are easily injured and become harmed by minor problems. When the puppy is not breathing properly, problems occur. There are two basic reasons that a puppy cannot breathe: something is stuck in its throat or it is newborn and has not yet taken a first breath. In both situations, the puppy can die if it does not get oxygen quickly. In any emergency situation, call the vet. In the case of new puppies, have the vet on call in case there are complications beforehand so the vet can react quickly or give further instructions according to the situation.

Instructions

Newborn Puppy Breathing

    1

    Support the puppy's head in a hand, positioning the head so your thumb is on one side and your forefinger is on the other side. Hold the puppy gently, but have a firm hold to avoid accidentally dropping it.

    2

    Turn the puppy downward in a swinging motion to make the puppy gasp. Only hold the puppy like this for a few seconds before putting the puppy straight again. If the puppy has liquid in its lungs from the birth, this will help drain the liquid. Repeat the process if necessary.

    3

    Gently wipe the puppy's face and stomach with a damp, soft cloth. This will simulate a mother dog licking the puppy and stimulates the puppy to breathe.

    4

    Look at the puppy's tongue. If the tongue is pink or red, the puppy is breathing and getting enough oxygen. If it is blue, repeat the swinging motion until the puppy starts breathing.

Puppy Heimlich

    5

    Come up behind the puppy and place your hands gently around its waist. Be careful, because too much pressure can break bones and hurt the puppy. One hand should be behind the ribs.

    6

    Press the abdomen quickly three to four times. Check the puppy's breathing. If something comes out of the throat, stop the procedure. If nothing comes out and the puppy seems to still have trouble breathing, repeat the action for three or four more presses. Repeat until the puppy can breathe. Sometimes, the puppy will swallow the item lodged in its throat rather than spit out, so watch for breathing.

    7

    Take the puppy to the vet immediately after it can breathe and have the vet look over the puppy.

Can You Give Your Dog Peanut Butter?

Can You Give Your Dog Peanut Butter?

Nothing is more amusing than watching your dog lick at the air as he tries to get peanut butter off the roof of his mouth. It may look like quite a struggle for him, but it keeps him occupied and he keeps coming back for more.

Health

    Peanut butter is a perfectly safe treat for your dog if you use it occasionally. Organic or natural peanut butter that is without salt, sugar or other ingredients is best.

Giving Medications

    Peanut butter is great for hiding those nasty-tasting pills your veterinarian prescribes. Coat a slice of bread with a layer of peanut butter, put the pill on top, and fold into a sandwich; your dog will devour this delicious treat unaware of the medication.

Store-bought Treats

    From peanut-butter-flavored dog biscuits to rawhides and bones filled with peanut butter, there are plenty of premade treats available in any pet supply store.

Treat Recipes

    Add cup of milk and 3 cups of rolled oats to 1 cup of peanut butter in a large mixing bowl. Roll into treat-sized balls and refrigerate.

    There are many hollow toys available that you can simply fill with peanut butter. Make your dog work for his favorite treat and he will be occupied for hours.

Warning

    Other nuts can be hazardous to your dog's health, specifically walnuts and macadamia nuts. Keep your dog away from all products that contain nuts other than peanuts.

About Foxes

About Foxes

Foxes are members of the dog family, and they live in different parts of the world. Some species can withstand varying climates and can live in the Arctic regions. All foxes reside in dens where they sleep and raise their cubs, so they are territorial by nature. Although foxes are adorable with their fur and bushy tail, they are not the best pets.

Types

    Foxes are related to wolves, coyotes, jackals and dogs. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the most common type, because it is hunted for its fur and as a sport in England. The color of the fox's fur depends upon where it lives and what type it is.

Identification

    Foxes have short legs and a skinny snout. Their ears stand tall and are triangular. They have thick fur and a long, full tail. The kit and swift foxes have pale gray or yellowish fur, and they usually live in deserts. The gray fox is larger than the red fox and lives in the forests. The arctic fox has rounded ears, and their fur changes from brown to gray in the summer and then to white in the winter. Some arctic foxes turn bluish gray in the winter instead of white. The fennec fox lives in the deserts and has a light cream-colored fur.

Geography

    Foxes live in the United States, Eurasia and Africa. Their habitat consists of the forest and desert, but many of the species can adapt to harsher climates that don't have steady weather patterns. Because foxes are territorial, they occupy a space of 3 to 8 square kilometers. They seek shelter in dens, because this is where they end up raising their cubs.

Considerations

    Foxes are usually solitary creatures, and they are hunters by nature. They eat birds' eggs, mice, rabbits, insects, fruit, moles and other small creatures. They defend their dens so other foxes don't invade their space. They can run up to 30 mph and are agile hunters.

Warning

    Foxes can be dangerous creatures, and because they are wild animals, they don't make the best pet. If you encounter a fox's den, you should stay away from it,. The fox may assume that you are a predator, especially if it has cubs.

How to Transition to a New Dog Food in 10 Days

How to Transition to a New Dog Food in 10 Days

Feed your dog the same kind of food every day. Unlike humans, a dog's digestive system cannot handle changes in food. It can cause upset stomach, vomiting and diarrhea. When switching to a new food, gradually transition him to the new food by mixing portions of both foods until you slowly phase the old food out. Protect your dog from getting sick while changing dog food brands. Most dog food changes will occur from life changes. Such as: When your puppy grows up and is ready for adult dog food, or when your dog ages and is ready for senior dog food, or a dietary change recommended by your veterinarian due to allergies or obesity. Here are the simple steps that will make this an easy transition for your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Day 1 - 3: Mix 75% old dog food with 25% new dog food.

    2

    Day 4 - 6: Mix 50% old dog food with 50% new dog food.

    3

    Day 7 - 9: Mix 75% new dog food with 25% old dog food.

    4

    Day 10: Feed 100% of the new dog food brand.

    5

    This slow schedule will allow your dog to adjust to the new food without indigestion, diarrhea, or constipation.

    6

    Consult with your veterinarian if there are any problems during this transition period and follow his advice. If you have any leftover old dog food, you can throw it into your yard for the birds!

Sabtu, 29 September 2012

Is There Such a Thing as a Miniature Pug?

Is There Such a Thing as a Miniature Pug?

A miniature pug, also referred to as a pocket pug or a teacup pug is a hybrid breed not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) as of 2010. These dogs are bred between a pug and a chihuahua.

Features

    The miniature pug looks much like a pug but, altered by the chihuahua's physical characteristics, tends to have a slightly longer snout. According to the AKC, a full-grown pug should weigh between 14 and 18 pounds. Because of the chihuahua genetics, the miniature pug weighs only three pounds as an adult and, due to its small size, can be quite fragile.

Designation

    Miniature pugs are a cross-breed resulting from designer dog breeding. In this case, a pug and chihuahua are purposely bred to create a new breed of dog, one that resembles a pug but is as small as a chihuahua.

Considerations

    The term "mutt" has come to describe a dog with uncertain ancestry. Designer dogs, however, are differentiated from mutts because they are descendants of two, purebred dogs. Designer dog breeders are expected to provide documentation of the purebred parentage.

End Results

    Most every purebred dog's ancestry can be traced back to some form of cross-breeding. However, the AKC only recognizes those breeds that have been bred to the point of having established and typical physical, temperamental and genetic traits. If, over time, there is enough interest and proper standards are established, the AKC may recognize miniature pugs as an official breed of dog in the U.S.

    Because the deliberate cross-breeding of the pug and the chihuahua is still in its infancy, there is no guarantee of which purebred features will dominate the physical aspects or personality traits of the breed.

Development of a Labrador Puppy

Development of a Labrador Puppy

The History of the English Bulldog

The History of the English Bulldog

The English Bulldog is an affectionate, loyal and loving companion dog. These animals are generally calm, docile and child-friendly. However, their earliest ancestors were anything but gentle. They were bred to be fierce fighters.

Early Bulldog Ancestry

    A mastiff-like breed of dog called Molossians were developed in Central Asia. These dogs were exported to Britain, where they became the earliest ancestors of the English bulldog.

Middle Ages

    Bull-baiting, a sport where a dog was pitted against a bull, was a popular pastime during the Middle Ages. The English bulldog was developed from the Molossian line to fight bulls.

19th Century

    Bull-baiting was declared illegal in 1835 and bull-baiting dogs were no longer necessary. Breeders stopped breeding purebred bulldogs.

Breed Preservation

    Some breeders worked to keep the physical traits of the English bulldog intact while eradicating its aggressive tendencies. The American Kennel Club indicates that it took several generations of breeding to accomplish the goal of a fierce-looking dog with a gentle disposition.

Breed Recognition

    The Kennel Club of England was established in 1873. One of the first breeds to earn recognition was the English bulldog.

Jumat, 28 September 2012

Facts on Cocker Spaniels for Kids

Facts on Cocker Spaniels for Kids

"Lady and the Tramp" demonstrates the friendly and loving temperament of the American cocker spaniel, one of the most popular breeds, according to American Kennel Club statistics. Curious children can learn plenty of other facts about this dog, many of which explain its reputation as an ideal family pet.

History

    The American cocker spaniel was bred from the English cocker spaniel to create a smaller dog ideal for hunting birds. The name cocker comes from the woodcock, one of the birds it was used to hunt. The only original difference between the American and English cocker spaniels was size, but over the years they developed more differences and the American version became a breed of its own in 1945. The American version has a more rounded head and longer fur.

Appearance

    The American cocker spaniel is the smallest of the spaniel breeds, with an average height of 15 inches and average weight of about 28 lb. It has long ears that drop down and feathered hair around its ears, feet, legs, chest and tummy. The coat is silky and can be wavy or flat and in a variety of colors. The tail is often docked, which means two-thirds are removed by a veterinarian.

Personality

    It is a loyal and obedient dog that responds well to humans and is fairly intelligent and easy to train. It is a gentle and loving breed of dog that is eager to please and is good around children and other animals. Because it is a hunting dog it enjoys fetching and retrieving toys and likes plenty of exercise. Cocker spaniels can be shy if not socialized when young, and they bark and urinate in excitement if not trained properly.

Care

    The feathered fur needs plenty of grooming to avoid tangles --- especially the ears if they have dipped into the feeding bowl. They are energetic and need two good walks a day. They are suited to urban or country life and make a great first family pet. They enjoy playing with toys but do not like rough play. Their eyes need cleaning regularly, as eye problems are common. The average life span for a healthy dog is 12 to 15 years.

Blue Cow Dog Healer Information

Blue Cow Dog Healer Information

According to the Dog Breed Info Center, the Australian Cattle Dog is also known as a Blue Heeler. These highly intelligent dogs were bred to herd livestock. They are an energetic, assertive breed. Blue Heelers can become loyal, loving pets and excellent guard dogs if they are given firm obedience training.

History

    According to the Cattle Dog website, Heelers were bred by farmers who needed a breed of dog that could thrive in the harsh conditions of the Australian Outback. In 1840 a resident of New South Wales named Thomas Hall cross-bred a pair of Blue Smooth Highland Collies with an Australian dingo. Their offspring were called Hall's Heelers. In the 1870s two brothers by the names of Jack and Harry Bagust crossbred Hall's Heelers with Dalmatians and Australian Kelpies. This breed became known as the Australian Cattle Dog.

Description

    Blue Heelers have blue mottled, speckled or solid coats. They may also have black or tan markings on their heads. They have a smooth outer coat with a short thick undercoat, powerful necks and shoulders, and a stocky, compact body, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC) website. The Dog Breed Info Center indicates that these dogs stand 17 to 20 inches tall at the shoulders and weigh between 30 and 35 pounds as adults. They can live for 12 to 15 years.

Care

    Australian Cattle Dogs are an extremely energetic breed. These dogs were bred to work and do best if they have a job. They work well in the show ring, especially in herding competitions, and the Dog Breed Info center says that they can be obedience trained to high levels. Cattle Dogs do not do well if they are cooped up or left alone for long periods of time. They can quickly become bored and destructive without adequate exercise or mental stimulation. According to the Dog Breed Info site, Heelers can develop dominance issues if they do not clearly understand that their human is the alpha leader and the one in charge.

Grooming

    The Dog Breed Info Center indicates that these dogs have minimal grooming requirements. They do not need frequent bathing and should only be washed when necessary. Their coats can be groomed with a bristle brush as needed.

Health Problems

    Australian Cattle Dogs are generally healthy animals. They may develop vision problems such as glaucoma or lens luxation (dislocation of the lens within the eye), according to Just Dog Breeds. The Dog Breed Info website also notes that they can develop hip dysplasia, which is a condition where the hip joint and femur do not fit together correctly. Pet Education says that this condition can make it difficult for dogs to run or walk with ease.

Kamis, 27 September 2012

Boston Terrier Puppy Information

Boston Terrier Puppy Information

Nicknamed "the American Gentleman" because of his tuxedo-like appearance, the Boston terrier exhibits a lovable demeanor and quick intelligence that can help to make him a productive family member. Leaning all you can about the Boston before you purchase or rescue that puppy will help you make the decision whether this particular breed is the right one for you and your family.

History

    The Boston terrier became the first truly American-bred dog following the Civil War, when Bostonian Robert C. Hooper imported Hooper's Judge, a cross between an English bulldog and a white English terrier, to this country. Hooper bred Judge to a smaller, white bitch named Gyp and their progeny began the start of the breed. Called "Round Heads" because of the shape of their distinctive skulls, the name changed to Boston terriers in 1891 when the Boston Terrier Club of American formed in Boston, Mass. The American Kennel Club admitted the Boston for breed recognition and registration in 1893.

Breed Standards

    A small dog of square-build, Bostons must appear balanced in height, muscle thickness and length of leg to be considered of good breed standard, says the American Kennel Club. Their large, round, dark eyes sit wide apart on either side of their square, flat skulls and show a kind, alert expression. The Boston's short, square muzzle runs parallel to the skull and measures approximately one-third its length. Pendulous chops (cheeks) cover their broad mouths and short teeth. Known for their distinctive black-and-white or brindle-and-white coloring, short, smooth, bright hairs make up the perfect Boston's coat.

Temperament

    Boston terrier puppies need mental and physical exercise to maintain their gentle, intelligent temperament, says the Dog Breed Info website. Very friendly with strangers, these dogs tend to bark only when necessary. They are known to be good with children and the elderly and, when trained properly, grow into affectionate, playful family members. The Boston's sensitive nature allows him to interact well with other animals in the household.

Puppy Training

    As a puppy, the Boston terrier needs patient training and socialization to make him a productive family member. Highly intelligent, they learn quickly and need a firm, kind hand to help them realize they are not the pack leaders in the house--a dominance issue that creates many other behavior problems. The human in the house should display a consistent hand to keep the puppy focused on leash training and potty training as soon as he enters his new home. The untrained Boston may be difficult to housebreak and become extremely dominant and aggressive with other dogs, says the Dog Breed Info website.

Considerations

    Most veterinarians and breeders consider Bostons to be healthy puppies with few medical issues. Prospective owners need to be aware that the occasional Boston will develop atopy, an allergic skin reaction to environmental substances. According to the vets at the Pet Place website, Bostons may also contract Cushing's disease or hyperadrenocorticism, mast cell tumors on the dark skin of their bodies and cataracts on their eyes as they age. Male puppies may be predisposed to cryptorchidism, a condition where one or both testicles remain in the body and do not descend into the scrotum.

Warning

    Because of their short faces and pushed-in noses, Boston terriers wheeze and snore at night and are known for a high incidence of flatulence. They cannot live outdoors as they don't tolerate heat well, says the Pet Finder website.

Female Vs. Male Dachshunds

Female Vs. Male Dachshunds

According to the American Kennel Club, the dachshund was the eighth most popular breed choice in 2009. Both females and males have the fearless personality suited to a vermin hunter, though there are some marked differences between the sexes.

Coat and Color

    Although female and male dachshunds are similar in the colors and patterns of their coats, male dachshunds tend to have a lusher coat than female dachshunds, whether they are longhaired, short coated or wirehaired.

Body Size

    Males are somewhat larger and taller than females, but there is not a significant difference in size. All dachshunds are classified as either miniature (11 pounds and under) or standard (16 pounds or more). Dachshunds falling between those two categories are often called tweenies.

Personality

    Both Morgan's Longhair Dachshunds and Starlight Kennel report their male dachshunds to be more loyal, attentive and fun-loving and their female dachshunds to be more aloof, independent and task-oriented.

Dominance

    You might expect male dachshunds to exhibit more dominant behaviors (for example, marking and mounting), but according to Morgan's Longhair Dachshunds, females dachshunds are much more territorial, often fighting with each other and exhibiting mounting behaviors.

Spay or Neuter

    Female dachshunds and male dachshunds are unlikely to develop gender-specific behaviors if spayed or neutered before they reach sexual maturity. For example, male dachshunds neutered before they reach six months old rarely lift their leg to urinate.

Traits to Look for When Choosing a Brittany Puppy

Traits to Look for When Choosing a Brittany Puppy

If you've ever been led to a pen full of 6-week-old Brittany puppies and been told to pick one out, you know how impossible it can be. They are all so cute, playful and soft as a cotton ball. Choosing a Brittany puppy is important because generally you have decided that you want a bird hunting dog, and you want to be sure you choose one that is smart and has the traits needed to be a great bird dog.

Good Traits

    The most important thing for a Brittany bird dog to have is a good sense of smell. If the pup has runny eyes, it may mean that there is a sinus problem that might relate to smell. A vet has ways of checking this out. Watch to see how much the puppy is using its nose. It should be sniffing everything around it.

    You want an assertive puppy. Don't pick a shy puppy and expect it to be a good hunting dog when hunting with other dogs.

    Choose an alert pup--the one that is investigating you, your shoelaces, its tail, the food and is very active.

Undesirable Traits

    Make a loud clap and watch the puppies' reactions. Look for the ones who come to investigate, not the ones who scurry and hide. You want a puppy that won't shy away from a gun shot.

    While you want an assertive pup, you don't want the most aggressive one. Bird dogs often have to deal with other dogs on a hunt, and you don't want to keep breaking up fights your dog started.

Considerations

    Choose a pup that has more white fur than colored fur. The pup will be much easier to see in the woods when hunting.

    Listen to your instinct in a situation where you've narrowed it down to two or three pups. Chances are this dog is going to be a companion, too. Spend some time with the top choices and eventually the right pup will make itself known to you.

What Are the Dangers of Feeding Dogs Raw Meat?

What Are the Dangers of Feeding Dogs Raw Meat?

The type of dog food you feed to your dog will determine whether the dog remains healthy throughout its life or begins to exhibit health problems. The Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association (JAAHA) published an article about this subject in November 2003 discussing the myth associated with the raw meat diet and how it harms your dog.

Salmonella

    The JAAHA has determined that a raw meat diet is posing a health risk to your dog. The main health problems associated with feeding your dog raw meat as a protein source is the increasing number of dogs getting salmonella poisoning. Salmonella is a bacteria that infests the intestine of your pet. The symptoms of salmonella poisoning include diarrhea, vomiting and can eventually lead to death.

Calcium

    Even though raw meat has a high protein content, the diet does not give your dog the calcium your pet requires. Calcium helps the dog develop the strength in its bones and teeth. Lack of calcium can also cause your pet to get blood clots and affect the dog's muscle development, as well as its nerve endings. According to Purina, feeding your dog raw meat over a long period of time will cause your pet to exhibit skeletal problems.

Vitamin A

    A report issued by Purina states that feeding your dog a raw meat diet will cause the animal to develop vitamin A toxicity. Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin found primarily in liver. Feeding your dog raw liver because of its high protein content will cause vitamin A to build up in the dog's system and poison it. Your pet can become lame or have skeletal problems because the toxicity removes the calcium from your dog's bones.

Parasites

    Feeding raw meat to your dog can infest it with parasites. Parasites, such as the tapeworm, live in raw meat. When ingested by the dog, the parasites attach themselves to the animal's system. Once a dog is infested with a dog worm, the stomach will become enlarged, along with the development of additional symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea and coughing.

What Are Indicators That a Dog Is a Pure Bred Labrador & Not a Mixed Breed?

What Are Indicators That a Dog Is a Pure Bred Labrador & Not a Mixed Breed?

Native to Newfoundland, the original Labrador retrievers worked next to fishermen retrieving nets from icy water and catching loose fish. They came on ships to England where they were crossed with spaniels and setters to breed in hunter instincts, says the Dog Breed Info Center website. Once known as "St. John's Dogs," the modern Lab arrived in the United States in the 19th century but was not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) until 1917. The breed standards require that other breeds not dilute certain characteristics of the Labrador in order for a dog to be classified as a purebred.

Colors

    Purebred Labs come in only three colors -- yellow, chocolate and black. The Labrador Retriever Club, Inc., the national organization of Lab breeders, disqualifies a dog from purebred status if the dog is any other color, or a combination of colors. They allow a small white spot on the dog's chest, but brindle or tan markings on chocolate or black dogs show the genetic influence of another breed in the animal's background. Black dogs are typically a deep black shade, while chocolates can vary in color from light to dark brown. Yellow labs show colors ranging from light cream to "fox-red," with various shades on the bellies, backs and ears of the dog.

Coat

    The dense hair coat of the Labrador retriever protects the animal from cold weather, water and ground cover. The short, straight top layer covers a soft undercoat that allows the animal's natural body oils to repel moisture. The American Kennel Club rejects dogs from purebred status if the animal's coat is sparse and slick, wooly or soft and silky as not being genetically representative of the breed.

Conformation

    Conformation standards for the purebred Lab require that height at the top of the shoulder for the male dog be 22-1/2 to 24-1/2 inches; a bitch should be approximately 1 inch smaller. The male normally weighs between 65 to 80 pounds; the bitch between 55 to 70 pounds. A medium-length muzzle with a full-colored black or brown nose sits atop the wide, square skull of the Lab. The eyes sit well apart, imparting the kindness and good temperament of the breed and are rimmed in black in yellow and black-coated labs. Chocolate labs have brown-rimmed eyes. The Lab body type includes well-balanced fore and hindquarters, with the deep chest and muscular back, or topline, that allow for freedom of movement. The Lab's thick tail gradually tapers to the tip, follows the topline, and is covered in the dog's short, dense coat with no feathering.

    Any dog with a deviation from the height standards, a pink nose or one lacking pigment, a lack of color in the eye rims or a difference in tail structure indicates the influence of other breeds and is disqualified from purebred status by the AKC.

Disposition

    Originally bred to find downed waterfowl for gun hunters, the purebred Labrador shows an instinct to retrieve, run through overgrown terrain, and swim through lakes and streams to fulfill its working potential, say Kerry Kern and Michele Earle-Bridges in their book, "Labrador Retrievers: The Complete Owner's Manual." The Lab's even temperament proves it to be amicable and friendly as a companion to a family with small children, while having the staying power to work for hours with a bird hunter. Dogs afraid of water and without the "retrieval" instinct typically indicate the introduction of another breed somewhere in the bloodline.

About Labradors

About Labradors

The Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the world and is consistently the number one registered breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC.) The Labrador's easygoing temperament, high trainability and sweet nature has made the breed a favorite family dog for decades. They are also used as service and guide dogs for the disabled, as drug detection dogs and hunting retrievers. With so many Labradors available, prospective owners should choose a puppy wisely.

History

    Early descendants of the Labrador were used for helping fishermen pull in heavy nets from the sea during the 1700s in Newfoundland. In their country of origin, they were known as St. John's Dogs, and were black, often with white on their feet and chests. They were brought to England in the early 1800s and renamed Labrador dogs. They quickly became popular as bird dogs and fanciers developed Labradors to a breed standard. They were recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1903 and the AKC in 1917.

Identification

    The Labrador is a sturdy dog weighing 55 to 75 lbs. and standing 21.5 to 24.5 inches at the shoulder. The females are on the smaller end of the scale. The coat is short, dense and waterproof. Labradors may be black, yellow and chocolate, and while a small white spot on the chest (a throwback to their St. John's Dogs heritage) is permissible, it is not preferred. The overall impression of a Labrador is a sturdy, powerful dog with a thick otter-like tail and friendly, intelligent demeanor (see Resources below).

Types


    Since Labradors are such popular and versatile dogs, breeding has resulted in two basic types. Breeding primarily for working and hunting produce field-bred Labradors (sometimes referred to as "American"). Generally speaking, field-bred Labradors are lighter boned and more athletic. Labradors bred for the show ring are usually called trial or show bred (sometimes "English"), and have heavier bones, thicker coats and are typically less athletic and energetic. While the breed standard is the same for both types, a Labrador should match the type to the purpose. A field-bred Labrador can have considerable energy, making it too exuberant for the average family, while a show-bred Labrador may not have the endurance to work all day in the field.

Function

    While Labradors were originally used as fishermen's helpers and hunting dogs, their trainability and easy temperaments have made them versatile workers and sporting dogs. They are the breed of choice for assistance dogs for the disabled. Labradors are also used as drug and bomb detection dogs, in search and rescue and as therapy dogs. They excel in competitive dog sports like obedience, agility, dock diving and hunting field trials.

Considerations

    While generally healthy, Labradors are susceptible to hip and elbow dysplasia and several eye disorders at an early age, usually progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and cataracts. They are prone to becoming overweight easily if overfed, and have a reputation for eating inappropriate objects like rocks, dog toys and garbage. Labradors are slow to mature, and remain happy-go-lucky puppies until they are about 3 years old. They need considerable exercise when younger, and training is very important to channel their energy. Labradors love to play fetch, and most enjoy swimming.

Prevention/Solution

    When looking for a Labrador puppy, only buy from breeders who screen for inherited health problems like dysplasia and PRA. Both the litter's sire and dame should be screened and be at least 2 years old prior to breeding. A knowledgeable breeder will be able to tell prospective buyers whether she breeds for field or show, and recommend a suitable puppy.
    Over 50 percent of Labradors in the United States are too fat. Since this greatly contributes to joint problems and raises the risk for orthopedic injuries, it is very important to keep your Labrador lean and healthy with a high quality diet. Monitor what your Labrador chews and eats, since they tend to be oral dogs and obstruction surgery can be expensive.

How Do I Know I Have a Carolina Dog Breed?

How Do I Know I Have a Carolina Dog Breed?

It would be an understatement to say that there are many different kinds of dogs in the world. In fact, the American Kennel Club recognizes 157 different breeds of dogs as of mid-2010. The Carolina breed, also known as the American Dingo, is a wild dog whose breed was first noticed back in the 1970s. There are a few different ways you can tell whether or not your furry friend has a Carolina ancestor in her.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the way your dog is shaped. Carolina dogs are characterized by their average heights and muscular bodies that come with off-white, tan or a combination of black and tan fur. They commonly have pointed ears, thick tails and a head that is shaped like a wedge. However, if your dog is only partially a Carolina breed, he may not necessarily have all of these traits.

    2

    Watch how your dog behaves. Carolina dogs are known to be intelligent, gentle, reserved, loyal and resourceful. They are generally reserved toward new people, but once they get to know a person, they are friendly.

    3

    Consider the people your dog enjoys. Being a wild, outdoorsy breed, the Carolina dog enjoys spending time with older children, active people and other kinds of people who typically enjoy the outdoors.

Rabu, 26 September 2012

Temperament of Cairn Terriers

Temperament of Cairn Terriers

The Cairn terrier originated in the Scottish Highlands, where its job was to work its way down into rock dens, known as "cairns" and bark at a fox or badger in order to subdue it until the hunter arrived. Of course the most famous Cairn terrier is Toto from "The Wizard of Oz." In fact, a viewing of the film is actually a good window into the Cairn temperament; Toto showed his feistiness when he got in trouble for chasing Miss Gulch's cat, then later redeemed himself by showing loyalty to Dorothy in assisting with her rescue.

Loyal to Family

    The Cairn is a loyal and loving dog, eager to play and showing no fussy lap dog behaviors in spite of its small size -- in fact, it's quite a hardy animal. The Cairns love long walks and playing ball and have almost limitless reserves of energy. Generally they get along well with other dogs, unless challenged. Some behavior experts recommend being careful with the Cairn around children, although that can depend on the temperament of the individual dog.

Predator Instincts

    Cairn terriers like to chase cats and, in some instances, are capable of harming them. Supervise your Cairn before leaving him alone with a cat. Another reason a cat may not like a Cairn: the Cairn terrier is a natural hunter of rodents, putting the cats job of chief mouser in jeopardy.

Small Dog Syndrome

    Small dog syndrome is the result of owners treating their toy-sized dogs like human babies, leading the dog to grow up coddled and believing he is the pack leader. This can lead to undesirable behaviors such as aggression and excessive barking. It's important to be assertive with smaller breeds and establish yourself as the leader early on.

Obedience Training

    Because the Cairns are naturally feisty, it's almost always a good idea to start them on obedience training when they are young. These terriers are highly intelligent and learn quickly, but their drive to dominate is strong so continual reinforcement of good behaviors is imperative.

Difference Between Spanish Mastiffs & Italian Mastiffs

Difference Between Spanish Mastiffs & Italian Mastiffs

The Italian Mastiff, or Cane Corso, was developed as a personal guard dog and a companion in hunting dangerous game like boar. The Spanish Mastiff is a classic livestock guardian dog. The similarities between Italian and Spanish mastiffs will be far greater than their differences. These are both big, powerful breeds of great antiquity, bred for physical courage and aggression who require loving, conscientious owners. Both breeds are recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale, or FCI, and the United Kennel Club, or UKC.

Breed Registry

    The Italian Mastiff, or Cane Corso, is a breed recognized by the American Kennel Club. This means that Cane Corsos of proven pedigree can be registered with the AKC. Spanish Mastiffs, although a breed of great antiquity, are recognized by the AKC as part of their Foundation Stock Service, or FSS, a record-keeping service for rare breeds. The goal of the FSS is to help perpetuate rare breeds, eventually allowing them to compete in AKC events, particularly companion events such as obedience and performance events such as herding. As of 2011, however, Spanish Mastiffs are not permitted to compete in AKC-sponsored events.

Size

    Spanish and Italian Mastiffs are big dogs, but Spanish Mastiffs are very big. The Italian Mastiff may reach up to 27.5 inches at the shoulder if a male, and 26 if a female. The preferred size for Spanish Mastiffs is 29.5 inches at the shoulder of a female and for a male, 31.5 inches being preferred. There is no upper limit on height for the Spanish Mastiff.

The Head

    Both Italian and Spanish Mastiffs have large, powerful heads. However, the Italian has a drier, more elegant head than its Spanish cousin. The Cane Corso AKC Breed Standard calls for the skin of the head to be "firm and smooth." The Spanish Mastiff's UKC Breed Standard, in contrast, says "[t]he upper lip largely covers the lower lip." These overlapping lips, or flews, are loose, making the Spanish Mastiff a wet-mouthed dog, much prone to drooling.

Coat and Color

    Italian Mastiffs have a short, sleek coat with a slight undercoat. They may be black or all shades of grey, red and fawn. White markings are restricted to a patch on the chin, throat or chest, the back of the dog's ankles, and the tips of their toes. Brindling, or tiger-striping, is acceptable; black-and-tan style markings such as seen on Rottweilers are a disqualification. Spanish Mastiffs have loose skin, including a double dewlap, and a longer coat with a more pronounced undercoat than the Italian dogs. The Spanish Mastiff's UKC Breed Standard specifically says color is "immaterial." However, primitive colors that permit this dog to blend into the landscape, including "wolf color" and "deer color," are specifically mentioned.

Overall Impression

    The Cane Corso is a smaller, lighter, more elegant dog conveying an impression of great power combined with agility and speed. The Spanish Mastiff is a much bigger dog, and while a formidable opponent, even the females will not be capable of the sheer athletic ability of the Cane Corso. Though not an ugly breed, it cannot be described as elegant.

About the Shichon Dog Breed

The shichon, otherwise known as a zuchon, is not a purebred dog but rather a mix of two purebreds. The breed is a cross between the bichon frise and the shih tzu. This type of dog has not been bred extensively but is becoming popular because of its teddy bear appearance and friendly disposition.

Appearance

    Shichons may not be an exact 50 percent purebred to 50 percent purebred cross, as it can be common for breeders to breed multigeneration crosses. The shichon hair is typically more loosely curled than the bichon frise's tightly curled hair. Shichons have a double coat that includes an outer coat of loosely curled and fluffy hair and an undercoat of fine, soft hair. The hair length is 3 to 4 in. long. It can have either a white coat like the bichon frise or colors similar to that of a shih tzu, with a mixture of black and white, light brown or gray. A female shichon ranges from 9 to 11 in. tall, while a male dog can be a bit taller. The average weight of a shichon ranges from 7 to 14 lbs.

Temperament

    Shichons have a friendly temperament and are intelligent, energetic and loving companions. For these reasons, the animal can be good for families with children. This breed of dog is sociable and eager to please. Shichons grow attached to their families and do not fare well when separated from their family for a lengthy amount of time. They can be very adaptive with other pets in the family, and this dog is easy to train. Shichons enjoy attention and like to play. They are also highly alert and can act as a watchdog. Because of its relatively small size, the Shichon can be a good indoor pet, but it also will enjoy walks outside.

General Health and Maintenance

    The shichon has been bred to be hypoallergenic and non-shedding, so it is ideal for family members with allergies. Like many hybrids, the shichon often has a longer lifespan than its parents and can outlive the parent breeds. The average lifespan of a shichon is 15 years or longer. Not a lot of maintenance is required for a shichon. The dog will mostly exercise on its own. To keep the coat healthy and clean, regular bathing and brushing are required.

Breed Advantages

    Purebreds often have genetic disorders, which are caused by generations of inbreeding. The shichon's parent, the bichon frise, usually has skin allergies. The shichon's other parent, the shih tzu, will most likely have breathing and eye problems. It is possible that the shichon can inherit these parent traits, but more often than not it will be free of them. Since the shichon has a longer nose than the shih tzu, it will be less likely to inherit any breathing problems. The shichon inherits tear ducts from the bichon frise parent, which reduces the dog's chance of having eye complications. However, that being said, there is always the possibility that your pet can have progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), ear infections, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, renal dysplasia, abnormal thyroid functioning or hypersensitivity.

Living Environment

    An indoor environment with a family is best for the shichon. Having a small home base for the dog is good, as its small, short legs will often tire after outdoor playtime. The shichon can live comfortably in an apartment setting since it is small and not very vocal. Because the shichon craves attention and a family setting, it is not well suited to empty homes or for busy people that travel, since the dog does not do well when left alone.

What is a Game Pitbull?

What is a Game Pitbull?

The word "game" is often used to describe pit bulls or pit bull temperament. People sometimes mistake this term to mean the dog is aggressive or violent, but that is incorrect -- although a game dog may make an excellent candidate for the illegal dog fighting pits. Entire lines, or families, of pit bulls are said to be game, or game-bred, and often pit bulls that are shown in conformation, such as American Staffordshire terriers, are thought to lack gameness.

Gameness

    The term gameness possibly developed in the old-time sport of dog fighting, as a dog's willingness to keep to the task until it is accomplished; in those days, the task was the fight. The way it was determined whether a dog was game was by fighting it. Today, the term refers to the same drive, heart and courageous tenacity, even when speaking of dogs that are not headed to a fight ring. A game pit bull is determined to complete whatever it starts, regardless of the hardships and pain it may encounter on the way.

Reason for Game Pit Bulls

    Game-bred pit bulls should be close to the genuine breed standard, which includes extreme gentleness toward humans. There are people who claim to be breeders, who select dogs for aggression and calling it gameness. A knowledgeable breeder of game-bred dogs is intent on improving and continuing the breed's magnificent record as a "can-do" dog, which is loving and gentle to people, especially children, obedient and always giving its best, whether pulling a 1000-pound-load or excelling in some other canine sport. Give a game pit bull a job, and it will work with its whole heart until it gets the job done.

Testing for Gameness

    The ultimate test of a pit bull's gameness is the battle, whether a fighting pit or hunting large, aggressive game -- both activities for which it was originally bred. However; most pet owners have no need for a dog with such drive. You can get a glimpse of your pit bull's gameness by noting the way it never gives up when trying to solve a problem. The best way to see your pit bull's gameness is to note its complete devotion to you. The way a pit bull loves you is the best display of its gameness.

Considerations for Pets

    A game pit bull may not be the best choice for an inexperienced person or a homebody; the dog needs an outlet for its energy and drive. But it is a wonderful companion for an experienced and active dog owner who is committed to providing proper direction for the dog's drive. Sometimes, this gameness shows itself in less desirable ways, such as the lonely and bored pit bull that continuously finds ways to escape its fenced yard. Combine a determined, energetic working dog and an irresponsible owner, and you have a recipe for disaster, especially if the dog is aggressive to other animals, as many pit bulls are.

Recipes for a Natural Diet for Canines

Wild dogs don't eat overly processed and chemically treated dog food manufactured to exactly calculated calories. Yet this is exactly what most pet owners are expected to feed their domesticated dogs today. To embark on a natural food diet is to embark on a journey through healthier eating, although you can probably expect a lot of remarks from people content to feed their animals manufactured food.

Nutritional Standards

    There really aren't set nutritional standards for every type of dog. The National Resource Council calls for a minimum of 22 percent protein and 5 percent fat, but other authorities differ. The New York State College of Veterinary Medicine states that their research shows that a dog's need for protein varies with the amount of fat it eats. Dr. Richard Pitcairn subscribes to an average of 22 percent protein, 17 percent fat, 52 percent carbohydrates and 8 percent ash.

Meats

    There are two minds when it comes to feeding meat to your dogs. While some choose to feed meat raw, according to Dr. Pitcairn, fish, rabbit and pork require cooking to destroy parasites. Dogs have powerful digestive tracts and can tolerate raw meat that is past its prime for human consumption.

Bones

    Dogs have a high calcium requirement, which can be met in the form of bones and/or bone meal supplements. Be careful about feeding poultry, fish or pork bones to your dog because they can splinter and cause internal injury to your dog.

Dairy and Eggs

    Wild predators rely on raw eggs as part of their diet. This is something that your dog will love, and if you are willing to grind the eggshells, they are an excellent source of calcium. Your dog can also digest plain yogurt. Feed it to them once or twice a week to help regulate their digestive system.

Cereal and Legumes

    Cereal and legumes must be cooked. Dogs have a shorter intestinal tract than other cereal-eating animals, so some form of pre-digestion must be performed. Dogs love oats and rice, and can benefit from the variety of beans available.

Vegetables and Herbs

    Dogs are not exclusively meat eaters. Most vegetables can be fed to dogs, with the exception of onions, which are poisonous to dogs. Garlic can be fed to dogs in small amounts. It helps to purify the system and discourage worms and other parasites. Feed your dog a variety of vegetables. Eventually, you will see where their preferences lie.

Fruit

    Most dogs have a bit of a sweet tooth. Fruits are a great source of vitamins and minerals. For the best digestion, feed fruit at a different time than meat. You can add bananas and dried fruit when feeding oatmeal to your dogs.

Supplements

    Dr. Pitcairn recommends two different supplemental mixes for dogs: a dry powder mix and an oil mix. The powder mix consists of 2 cups nutritional yeast, 1 1/2 cups bone meal, and 1/2 cup kelp powder. The oil mix consists of 1 3/4 cups vegetable oil, 1/4 cup cod liver oil and 50 to 100 IU of vitamin E.

Dachshund Puppy Care Information

You have chosen a dachshund puppy as your new best friend. This petite hound is going to bring love and joy to your life, asking only for a lot of love and care. Each dachshund has a unique personality, but they have several needs that are quite similar. These needs must be met to ensure the dachshund puppy has a long, happy life.

Training

    Start training your dachshund puppy as soon as he comes home. Housebreaking should be a top priority. Set the rules and stick with them. You will be surprised by how quickly a dachshund's sharp mind can pick up on basic obedience such as sitting, staying, walking on a leash and laying down. Be sure to teach you dachshund not to jump from beds, couches and chairs to the floor. This can be dangerous for such a long, low-to-the-ground dog.

Grooming

    Begin grooming your dachshund puppy when she is still young so she will become accustomed to it. Just because your dog has short hair does not mean it doesn't need to be brushed. Brush your dachshund puppy at least once a week. Clip your dachshund puppy's nails regularly or take her to your veterinarian or groomer to have it done. Bath your dachshund at least once a month. Speak with your veterinarian about which shampoo is best.

Health Concerns

    Be aware of the health problems to which dachshunds are prone, especially back problems. Obesity also is a common problem, so be sure to feed your dachshund the dog food your veterinarian recommends. Never allow your dachshund puppy to have table scraps or any other type of "people food." They also are prone to develop heart conditions as well as diabetes. Regular checkups with your veterinarian are a necessity to keep your dachshund puppy healthy.

Behavioral Issues

    Understand the behavioral issues your dachshund puppy may develop and learn the signs of these issues. Dachshunds, both male and female, are alpha dogs. No one ever told them they were little and they automatically feel the need to take charge. Let you dachshund puppy know you are the leader of the pack or she will be running your life. Know that dachshunds believe themselves to be guard dogs and this can lead to aggressive behavior with you and guests in your home. Dachshunds are very possessive of their owners, their owner's children and their own toys.

Playtime

    Give your dachshund plenty of playtime. Never let on that it is exercise, seeing that dachshunds have tendency to be lazy. A walk around the block or a long game of fetch in your living room is usually enough daily exercise for a dachshund. Be careful about rough housing with your dachshund; this breed believes it always is the winner. This can lead to nipping and biting.

What Is the Small Collie Dog Breed?

What Is the Small Collie Dog Breed?

A Shetland sheepdog--also known as a sheltie--is a smaller version of the rough-coated collie, a type of dog that may have originated in Scotland and the northern part of England, according to the American Kennel Club. These types of dogs generally make good pets, as long as they are trained properly. They tend to thrive in environments where they have space to run, according to the American Kennel Club.

Physical Characteristics

    Shelties grow to be between 13 and 16 inches in height and between 14 and 27 pounds in weight, states the Dog Breed Info Center. The sheltie is distinguishable by its wedged-shaped face; double coat; almond-shaped eyes; flat skull; quick, easy gait; long hair; and sable, blue merle and black coat.

Personality

    Shetland sheepdogs make good pets for families because they have a gentle, alert and intelligent personality. Their owners can expect them to be loyal guard dogs. They sometimes act nervous, stubborn or aggressive around certain people, especially strangers, according to the American Shetland Sheepdog Association.

Behavior

    A type of herding dog, the sheltie often displays the need to do work. Many Shetland sheepdogs try to herd people into one place. They often enjoy playing, especially with toys such as Frisbees, according to the Dog Owner's Guide.

Care and Training

    Shelties tend to develop better temperaments when they live with owners that act as strong pack leaders, teaching them how to behave from the time they are young, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. Start training your sheltie dog or puppy to follow basic commands as soon as you get it, states Perfect Paws. Brush your sheltie's coat weekly to keep it from getting matted.

Breeding

    Shetland sheepdogs can have around two litters of between four and six puppies each year, according to Animal-World. If you plan to have puppies for yourself or others, wait until your dog is around 2 years old, so she can develop fully, according to Peteducation.com.

Lifespan

    Shelties generally have a lifespan of between 12 and 15 years, according to the Dog Breed Info Center. Common problems that affect the Shetland sheepdog include collie eye anomaly, progressive retinal atrophy, heart disease, von Willebrand disease, deafness and epilepsy.

History

    Shetland sheepdogs descended from the border collie, a type of dog that people used to herd sheep in the Shetland Islands. People in the Shetland Islands may have bred the first shelties in the 18th century.

Selasa, 25 September 2012

How to Identify a Toy Fox Terrier

How to Identify a Toy Fox Terrier

The toy fox terrier is not only alert and friendly, but very loyal to its family. It is an intelligent breed and learns new things quite quickly. Its intelligence, loyalty and eagerness to please, combined with its terrier attitude, makes it a very active dog that is a good companion. Here's what to look for in a toy fox terrier.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the dog. The toy fox terrier is a well-balanced breed that is graced with agility, strength and stamina. It measures from 8 inches to 11 inches at the shoulders. It is a square-looking dog, so the measurement from the shoulders to the rear is approximately the same as the height. The bone is strong but not coarse.

    2

    Make sure the elegant head is well balanced with the body, and shows an intelligent and alert expression in its carriage. The clear, bright eyes are dark, round and prominent, but not bulging, and should show that the toy fox terrier is very interested in things. The eyes are set quite far apart on the skull. The ears stand straight up and are v-shaped. The nose should always be black, except in chocolate dogs. Chocolate dogs have self-colored noses.

    3

    Check that the neck is proportionate to the rest of the body and is carried proudly. It arches into well-angulated shoulders and is muscular but not throaty. The head and neck are approximately the same length. The deep chest is very muscular. The shoulders should be muscular, but not to the point of looking overdeveloped. The small feet are ovate in shape and lead to strong, arched toes protected by deep pads. The muscular rear is also angulated. The muscular upper and lower thighs provide power for this little dog. The tail sits up on the rump and is held straight up. It is docked at the third or fourth joint.

    4

    Pet the shiny coat. It is a fine coat, and feels almost like satin. It may be tri-color either black, tan and white, or white, chocolate and tan. It may also be white and tan, or white and black.

Different Ear Crops for Dobermans

Different Ear Crops for Dobermans

Doberman puppies have long floppy ears that do not function like normal dog ears. Cropping is a cosmetic procedure that removes the outside membrane of the ear so only the hard ear remains. This allows the ear to perk-up, lay flat and move toward sound. Cropping is not necessary and entirely up to the owner's discretion. However, when choosing to crop your Doberman's ears, do not take this situation lightly. Cropping is a craft that takes careful skill and attention to detail. Typical breeders have three options when it comes to ear cropping: military, medium and show. Each type serves its own function depending on how the dog will be used by the owner.

Military Ear Cropping

    Doberman puppies are born with floppy ears.
    Doberman puppies are born with floppy ears.

    Military ear crop is when the Doberman has shorter cut ears with a larger base. Puppies quickly heal from this procedure, so the surgery is considered easier as the ears do not take a long time to stand on their own. This procedure requires far less positioning than the other two methods.

Medium Ear Cropping

    Medium ear cropping leaves the ears a bit longer than the military crop, as well as leaving a narrower base. The surgical procedure takes longer to fully heal as the ears have to be positioned over time. Medium ear cropping is the most common among dog owners who purchase Dobermans with the sole intension of having them as pets and not show dogs.

Show Ear Cropping

    The name is misleading as all ear cropping methods are suited for showing a Doberman; in fact, Dobermans lacking ear cropping have also won competitions. Show ear cropping leaves the ear longer and the base wider. This means the ear needs to be trained to fully stand and takes much longer to heal. If the ear is not trained to fully stand over time, the procedure will lead to a floppy ear, so it is important for the owner to work with the dogs ears after the procedure.

Ear Cropping Care

    Dobermans usually have upright ears by six months of age
    Dobermans usually have upright ears by six months of age

    Quality breeders will have the entire litter's ears cropped before adopting the puppies out. Doberman pups should have their ears cropped between seven and eight weeks after birth. Older pups develop cartilage in their ears that will inhibit the process and may result in injury. The procedure requires pups to be anesthetized and normally takes 30 minutes. Choose a qualified veterinarian with a long history of Doberman ear cropping to ensure quality of the crop. After the procedure, your pup's ears will be cupped. They must remain this way for seven to 10 days, and must remain clean and dry.

    A BFI powder may be applied to dry out the edges of the ear. Once the scabs heal, the ears can be taped. It can take 4 to 5 months for ears to stand upright, and most pups have upright ears by 6 months of age.

Schnoodle Vs. Goldendoodle for Children

Schnoodle Vs. Goldendoodle for Children

Generally, a goldendoodle may be more suitable for children than a schnoodle. In recent years, consumers have reacted positively to many different designer hybrid dog breeds, including schnoodles and goldendoodles. Poodles are most often used in these breeds because they come in a variety of sizes and because their fur does not shed, which makes them suitable for owners with allergies. Although some breeders breed specifically for temperament, the temperament of both breeds can come out in hybrid dogs, and it is not possible to be certain of a dog's temperament until it is grown.

Goldendoodle Physical Traits

    Also known as a groodle, the goldendoodle is a comparatively new hybrid, resulting from a cross between a poodle and a golden retriever. Goldendoodles range from 50 to 90 lbs in weight, depending upon whether the retriever is crossed with a standard or miniature poodle. Their coats may be shaggy, curly or smooth. They do not shed a lot, but they need regular brushing and may be better clipped if they are curly like a poodle's coat.

Goldendoodle Temperament

    Goldendoodles are generally gentle dogs, and they may even tend toward shyness or nervousness. For this reason, they are not recommended for guard dogs. Goldendoodles are sociable dogs and hate to be left alone. They get along with children and other family pets and make excellent family dogs. They should be allowed to run around and get plenty of exercise, but they prefer to live in the house and interact with their family. If they are true to type, goldendoodles are good with all ages of children.

Schnoodle Physical Traits

    A schnoodle is a cross between a poodle and a schnauzer. Its size can be small if a miniature schnauzer is crossed with a toy poodle, mid-size if a standard schnauzer is crossed with a miniature poodle or more than 70 pounds if a giant schnauzer is crossed with a standard poodle. A schnoodle's coat does not shed a lot, but it needs to be brushed regularly and stripped, and it may need to be clipped if it is more like that of a poodle.

Schnoodle Temperament

    Schnoodles are high-energy dogs and need to be exercised regularly. They are loyal and protective and make good guard dogs, but the giant schnauzer temperament, which needs a firm hand, can prevail. They are extremely intelligent and need regular mental stimulation or they will become destructive. Schnoodles can be stubborn and independent, and as such, will love to romp with older children, but they may not be the best breed choice for a family with small children.

Breeds of Dogs Compatible With Cats

Breeds of Dogs Compatible With Cats

Most dogs, regardless of breed, can be good companions with cats when living in the same household, provided they are raised together from a very young age. There are, however, some breeds that are generally better with cats than others, due to their temperament. This is particularly true when a full-grown dog is introduced into a home where a cat already lives, or a cat is introduced into a home with an already grown dog. Breeds that are less aggressive are generally a better choice.

Golden Retriever

    According to Stanley Coren's "The Intelligence of Dogs," golden retrievers are the fourth-most intelligent dog breed. They are typically gentle, loving, playful, happy and easy to train. They are not aggressive, making them an excellent breed for cohabitation with cats. Although they are very playful and may strike up a game of chase with a cat, they are not likely to harm it. If the golden retriever does get a little too rough, the cat will normally hiss or claw at the dog, letting it know to back off.

Labrador Retriever

    Labrador retrievers are popular family dogs, as they are an intelligent, playful and easygoing breed. They are very social with people, other dogs and other animals alike; they do well with other dog breeds as well as cats. Labs have a reputation as gentle souls and are unlikely to harm smaller household pets.

Great Pyrenees

    Regardless of its huge size, the Great Pyrenees is a welcome dog for families with other animals. They often serve as guardian dogs for breeders of animals such as alpacas and will faithfully protect the other animals they live with, including cats and other dogs. They are intelligent, easy to train and patient. According to the American Kennel Club, "The Great Pyrenees is a quiet and tolerant dog".

Bichon Frise

    The Bichon Frise is a small dog with a happy, friendly, playful disposition. It gets along well with people and other animals, making it a wise choice for people with cats. This breed loves being with people and other animals, preferring not to be by itself, thus making it good company for a family and an excellent playmate for a cat. Because it is small, a Bichon Frise is not intimidating to most cats, so they can get along peacefully together.

Senin, 24 September 2012

The Size of a Miniature Dachshund

The Size of a Miniature Dachshund

The popular dachshund is a friendly and energetic breed of dog. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes the dachshund in two sizes: standard and miniature. In Europe, there is a third designation, the toy dachshund. In all cases, dachshunds have long bodies that are low to the ground and short legs. Dachshunds are bred with three types of coats, long-haired, wire-haired or smooth.

Height

    Miniature dachshunds reach a height between five and seven inches. These small dogs have muscular bodies, alert, energetic expressions and are often thought to have an intelligent look in their eyes.

Weight

    Miniature dachshund show dogs are in the same classification as standard dachshunds. The only difference is that miniatures compete in a group that must be 11 pounds or less at an age of 12 months and older.

Breed Considerations

    Miniature dachshunds have a long spine and short rib cage. For this reason, these dogs are susceptible to back problems, especially slipped disks. Allowing the dog to jump from the furniture to the floor is discouraged. When handling a miniature dachshund, it's important to provide their long bodies with proper support. Excess weight puts an unhealthy strain on a miniature dachshund's spine.

Life Expectancy

    Miniature dachshunds have a long life span. On average, a healthy dog will live between 12 and 15 years. Some dachshunds live to be 16 years old or more.

Tibia Bone Deformity in a Redbone Coonhound

Tibia Bone Deformity in a Redbone Coonhound

The Redbone coonhound was bred from foxhounds for its stunning red coat and highly developed ability to track and tree prey. A healthy and active breed, Redbone coonhounds breed true and experience few genetic or breed-related diseases.

Tibia Deformity

    While tibia deformities are not common among Redbone coonhounds, a genetic disorder exists among dogs in general called osteochondrodysplasia (OCD). OCD expresses itself throughout the body affecting the normal growth and development of bones and cartilages. A form of OCD is achondroplasia specifically affecting the bones of one or more of the legs.

Hip dysplasia

    Redbone coonhounds are not subject to a breed specific genetic disorder. However, all Redbone coonhound owners should monitor new puppies for symptoms of hip dysplasia. This malformation of the hip joint generally occurs early on and becomes diagnosable at four months. If not treated, hip dysplasia can cause persistent arthritis and/or loss of function.

Food For Thought

    Redbone coonhounds did not exist as a breed until the 1800s when hunters began a selective breeding program to create a solid-red coated hunting dog. The close selection of its progenitors may explain why Redbone coonhounds have so few genetic disorders.

How Big Will My Husky-Boxer Mix Get?

How Big Will My Husky-Boxer Mix Get?

Calculating any puppy's adult size, whether that puppy is a mixed-breed dog or a purebred dog, is an educated guess. Even within purebred dogs, adult size can vary widely. However, you can feel reasonably certain that your husky-boxer mix puppy will grow to be a good-sized medium dog because its breed mixes fall within a 35- to 70-lb. weight range and stand 20 to 35 inches in height.

Breeds

    Boxers' adult size is usually between 53 and 70 lbs.
    Boxers' adult size is usually between 53 and 70 lbs.

    Female dogs will more likely fall toward the smaller end of the size range most common for their breed. A purebred boxer usually measures between 21 and 35 inches tall and weighs between 53 and 70 lbs. A husky usually measures between 20 inches and 24 inches tall and weighs between 35 and 60 lbs. when full grown. If you know the parents of your puppy, take a look at them. If your puppy's father, for example, is on the large side of the breed range, your puppy will likely be larger than average.

Calculation

    Huskies' adult weight usually ranges from 35 to 60 lbs.
    Huskies' adult weight usually ranges from 35 to 60 lbs.

    A common way of calculating a mixed-breed puppy's estimated adult size involves dividing the puppy's current weight by its current age in weeks. Multiply the quotient by 52 to give you an estimated weight in pounds. This calculation is most accurate when a puppy is between 21 and 24 weeks old. At this age, a boxer/husky mix puppy will still be growing quickly, while smaller dogs' growth will have slowed somewhat.

Environment

    A key factor in the adult size of your husky/boxer mix puppy is not related to breed or parentage. Your puppy's environment, care, nutrition and health will play a role in how big it grows. A puppy kept in a clean, sheltered environment, allowed to nurse from its mother for longer and provided with regular access to quality food and fresh water will grow larger than a puppy in a less-than-ideal environment. A puppy that contracts parvovirus, distemper or another serious illness will likely have its growth somewhat stunted and may be smaller than would have been expected of its breed mix.

Body Proportion

    Another indicator of your husky-boxer mix puppy's eventual size is its range of body proportions. Paw size is an indicator of eventual adult size, but it just gives you an idea of your dog's eventual proportions. The larger the paws, the larger your puppy will be at its full adult growth. Also look at the looseness of your puppy's skin. If the skin is loose, the dog still has a lot of "filling out" to do to reach its eventual bodily proportions.

Minggu, 23 September 2012

Facts About St. Bernards

Facts About St. Bernards

Depicted as a huge, clumsy but lovable breed in the "Beethoven" movies, the Saint Bernard is indeed a gentle giant. It is a breed with ancient roots and a reputation as a savior to many an avalanche victim. Since the 17th century, thousands of lost and weary travelers through the Swiss Alps have owed their lives to the Saint Bernard.

History

    The exact origin of the Saint Bernard is not certain, but the American Kennel Club suggests it is likely that the breed descends from the now extinct Asian Molosser. The Molosser was a breed favored by the Romans and was likely taken to Switzerland before 200 A.D. The dogs are thought to have mixed with local breeds, with the resulting crosses being used on farms for herding, guarding and cart-pulling. The Saint Bernard was refined to be the dog we know today at a hospice opened in the Alps by Archdeacon Bernard de Menthon. Large dogs were taken to the hospice as guard dogs and this closed-off breeding stock formed the base for the breed.

Description

    The Saint Bernard is a large, sturdy dog with a broad, heavy body. The dogs grow to between 25 and 27 inches at the shoulder and weigh 130 to 180 lbs. The head is large, with a medium-length muzzle and heavy jowls. A Saint Bernard's expression may appear stern and serious, and the ears are wide, drooping to the sides of the skull. The body is powerfully muscled and well proportioned.

Coat and Color

    Suited to the cold Alps mountains, the coat on a Saint Bernard can be long or short. Short coats are dense and coarse in nature but not generally rough to the touch, and the coat is longest at the tail. Longhair types have dense, wavy, medium-length coats that are longest along the back and at the haunches and tail. General coat color is red and white but shades of brown to yellow are also common.

Temperament

    As a large breed, the Saint Bernard has the confident demeanor that size brings. Because of this, the dogs tend to be even-tempered and rarely aggressive unless absolutely necessary. The laid-back personality and gentle nature makes it good breed for children and a suitable family pet. Saint Bernards have high intelligence and are easy to train. Strong, disciplined training from a young age keeps the dogs from being a handful when they get larger and stronger.

The Differences in a Toy Poodle and a Mini Poodle

The Differences in a Toy Poodle and a Mini Poodle

The poodle is a popular purebred dog breed that is recognized by the American Kennel Club. In 2010, according to AKC registration records, poodles were the ninth most popular dog breed in terms of registration. The AKC recognizes three subcategories of poodle: the standard, the miniature and the toy. The AKC has set certain guidelines to differentiate between the types.

History

    The poodle originated in Germany as early as the 15th century and is named for the German word "pudeln," which means to splash in the water. They were initially used as water retrievers. This led to the development of the poodles' distinctive grooming patterns, mostly shaved for better swimming but with hair over the joints and organs to keep them warm in water. The standard poodle was developed first, but the smaller varieties appeared soon after.

Standards

    Poodles are considered to be active and intelligent dogs that are sturdy and well-proportioned. Their grooming tends to give them an elegant appearance. The AKC has established standards for the poodle as to head, neck, body, fore and hindquarters, coat and grooming, color, carriage, gait and temperament. However, these standards apply to every variety of poodle. In fact, if a particular dog meets the overall guidelines, the only feature that differentiates the three subcategories is height.

Height

    Poodles are measured for height at the highest point of the shoulders. The AKC considers a poodle that measures more than 15 inches to be a standard poodle. Miniature poodles must measure between 15 inches and in excess of 10 inches. Toy poodles must measure 10 inches or less at the shoulder. A poodle is considered to be of a particular variety based upon the size range in which it falls.

Determining the Variety

    A poodle that is over 15 inches is disqualified as a miniature poodle and is considered a standard poodle. Likewise, a poodle that measures in excess of 10 inches is not a toy poodle, but is considered a miniature poodle. The AKC states that "as long as the Toy Poodle is definitely a Toy Poodle, and the Miniature Poodle a Miniature Poodle, both in balance and proportion for the Variety, diminutiveness (height) shall be the deciding factor when all other points are equal."

Innova for Dogs

Innova for Dogs

Natura Pet Products, Inc. manufactures a wide range of natural pet food products. Innova for dogs, one of Naturas product lines, is designed to be healthy, well-balanced food for all sizes and stages in life. Innova uses only fresh, whole ingredients in their dog foods, which are minimally processed in order to maintain important nutrients and flavor.

Description

    Innova follows the U.S. Department of Agricultures food pyramid recommendations by incorporating the five food groupsdairy, meat, fruit, vegetable and grainas well as essential fats, oils, vitamins and minerals for a balanced diet. Innova brand dog food is made with all natural ingredients, without the use of meat by-products and artificial preservatives or fillers. Innova comes in a wide variety of flavors and formulas, each designed to meet the needs of a dog at various life stages.

Types

    Innova brand dog food is available as a wet, canned dog food or as a dry food. Each Innova dry dog food variety comes in small bites or large bites. Canned dog food is also available for each life stage and follows the same ingredient requirements as the dry food.

Formulas

    Innova dry and canned foods are specially formulated for puppies, adult dogs and senior dogs and also for large breeds in those categories. A low-fat adult variety, which contains 35 percent less fat, is also available in both the canned and dry food. All of the wet and dry food varieties are available for the different stages in a dog's life. The formulas are designed to meet the needs of the dog based on age and size.

Health Bars

    Innova dog treats come in both small bars and large bars. The health bars are made using ingredients from all five food groups. The ingredients in the health bars, including chicken, turkey, fruits, vegetables, cottage cheese and grains, are baked slowly at low temperatures to preserve the natural flavors. Health bars are designed to be a treat used to supplement a dogs diet and are not meant to be a substitute for regular feeding.

Purchasing

    Innova brand dog food is available in several pet food stores and through many online distributors. The Natura Pet website allows customers to search for local pet food stores based on zip code or city and state. The search feature also includes a map for locating the stores. Natura Pet encourages customers to purchase Innova dog food through local businesses whenever possible.

American Boxer Dogs Vs. German Boxer Dogs

American Boxer Dogs Vs. German Boxer Dogs

Boxers first became popular in the US after World War II, when returning soldiers brought some home. They are crossbreeds of English bulldogs and the now extinct Bullenbeisers. They are medium-sized dogs and, based on American Kennel Club 2009 Statistics, they are the sixth-most popular breed in the U.S. Boxers derive their name from their habit of using their front paws in play or during fights.

Appearance

    Boxers are medium-sized dogs. A male German boxer stands from 26 to 28 inches, weighing 65 to 90 pounds, while a female German boxer reaches anywhere from 24 to 26 inches and weighs 60 to 85 pounds. American boxers are slightly smaller, the males 23 to 25 inches tall and the females averaging at 21.5 to 23.5 inches. Both breeds have either fawn or brindle coats. Boxers with white markings on their coats are considered flashy, but an excessive amount--more than a third of the coat--leads to disqualification from dog show registries. White boxers are more prone to sunburn, skin cancer and other related diseases and will sometimes lose their hearing over time. The lower jaw is slightly heavier than the upper jaw and protrudes slightly. They have broad chests and wide skulls.

Temperament

    Boxers are commonly used as guard dogs, but both breeds are very playful and energetic and often double as family dogs. They are very patient with children, although due to their exuberance they may accidentally injure a small child. While friendly, many boxers do not get along with smaller dogs and cats. They are naturally suspicious of strangers, but are friendly when approached honestly. Boxers require strict obedience training from an early age, before they become too unmanageable.

Diet

    Unlike many dogs, boxers are able to practice self-control as they eat and will leave food untouched if not hungry. Both breeds can suffer from hip dysplasia, and in order to counter this, owners should consider feeding their boxers dog food formulated for large dogs even though boxers are technically considered medium. Like all animals, they require plenty of fresh water to be available at all times.

Exercise

    The German boxer breed is suspected to have descended from a type of Tibetan fighting dog. Their reputation for fierceness and savagery has diminished, and they are now recognized as being very gentle and friendly when unprovoked, but they remain energetic and require long daily walks. Otherwise, they become restless and destructive, which is both frustrating and expensive for their owners. They are not well-suited for living in apartments. The ideal home would include a well-fenced backyard, so that they have room to exercise even when left alone.

Functions

    As noted earlier, boxers make very good family guard dogs. German boxers are currently being used as police K9 companions and as an extra security measure, harking back to their original use in Germany as war dogs. While American boxers can and often are used as security dogs, they are more often found as family pets because of their retention of playful, puppy-like traits well into adulthood and their more stubborn, disobedient temperaments.

About Newfoundland Dogs

About Newfoundland Dogs

The Newfoundland area of Canada is a beautiful island known for it's scenic views and secluded, quiet homesteads. One of the island's most famous products, however, is the Newfoundland dog. The Newfoundland is a large, hardy breed nearly 200 years old. These gentle giants have been used has hunters, guardians and lifesavers since the breed's development, and continue to be popular dogs for sport and companionship.

History

    The Newfoundland is a breed with ancient roots. Thought to be descendants of the massive black bear dogs the Vikings imported in the early 11th century, the Newfoundland still holds true to those large, black ancestors. The local dogs of the island were crossed with large mastiff breeds brought over by Portuguese immigrant fisherman in the 1400's, increasing the overall size and bone density of the developing breed. By the late 19th century, the Newfoundland was reproducing true and the sturdy, heavy black dogs had become a fixture on the island.

Identification

    Newfoundlands are a heavy-bodied, thick breed developed to withstand the cold, brutal winters of the northern Canada. Newfoundlands are large dogs, with males averaging 28 inches tall and 150 pounds, while females are a bit smaller at 25 inches and 115 pounds. The Newfoundland has a large, rounded head with small, triangular ears set low on the skull. The breed sports a rounded muzzle with a normally black nose, although dark brown noses may be present on brown or gray dogs. The coat is generally a medium to long length and lays flat against the body, with moderate feathering along the legs.

Types

    The Newfoundland has developed into two distinct lines: the solid-colored Newfoundland and the Landseer. Both variations of the breed are basically the same in size, structure and temperament, with the main difference being coat color. Solid-colored Newfoundlands are normally recognized in ether black, chocolate or gray, with white markings allowed on the chest, chin, tail and the toes. Landseer Newfoundlands are broken-colored dog, with large amounts of white along the back, chest and legs.

Considerations

    Newfoundlands are a gentle, loving breed that has found its way into some very prestigious places. The breed has been a favorite in the White House of Presidents Grant and Buchanan, and is the original breed of Nana, the dog made famous in the children's story "Peter Pan." Despite this popularity, owning a Newfoundland can be a challenge. The Newfoundland is a very large, intelligent breed that can make them difficult to own. Their size makes them difficult for many people to adequately contain, and their intelligence often leads them into mischief unless they are properly stimulated.

Warning

    Newfoundlands are very large, and their size alone can make them dangerous. While they are not known as a vicious breed, a bite from much a massive set of teeth can cause severe damage. The Newfoundland's size also makes for a much shorter lifespan than other breeds. The typical lifespan for a Newf is only 8 years, so one should take this brevity into consideration before adding a Newfoundland to his home.

About Dog Breeders

About Dog Breeders

There are reputable dog breeders and then there are the so-called "backyard breeders." For a person looking for a pet dog (versus a show dog) it can seem silly to look for a reputable breeder with pedigree rather than just calling someone in the paper. However, backyard breeders have helped to promote health and temperament defects which can be a concern, even for an ordinary dog lover.

Defined

    A dog breeder is of course someone who raises dogs for the purpose of breeding them. In essence, a person requires no actual qualifications or training to become a dog breeder. It's for this reason that while there are many qualified dog breeders in the U.S., there are also many puppy mills and "backyard breeders." A good dog breeder's primary concern isn't profit, but the welfare of the breed.

Code of Ethics

    A good dog breeder will work closely with the kennel club of the dog they breed. Most kennel club's have a code of ethics which members have to adhere to. A person searching for a good breeder should look for a breeder that follows the code of ethics. Some of the rules you can find in the code of ethics include breeding only for the purpose of improving the quality of the breed, knowledge of inherited health issues, providing copies of health clearances and not releasing a puppy until it is at least 7 weeks old.

Kennel Club Registration and Pedigree

    The term "papers" can be found in many "puppies 4 sale" ads. However, this can be deceiving. While many breeders do offer American Kennel Club papers, all this means is that the parents of the puppy were registered with the AKC. AKC registration has no bearing on the health of a puppy. Conversely, a dog's pedigree will show the dog's lineage going back several generations. It can also highlight health conditions by showing cause of death.

Identifying a Responsible Breeder

    The Humane Society has an excellent article regarding what to look for in a good breeder. Some of the items included on their list are: a breeder that keeps dogs in their home as part of the family, not in an outside kennel; a breeder who encourages you to spend time with the puppy's parents; someone who only breeds one or two types of dogs and is able to show you a veterinary record. In addition, many responsible breeders are willing to take back the dog at any time should you no longer want the dog.

Considerations

    One major concern with dog breeders is that it helps to perpetuate certain genetic health-related problems. Hip dysplasia is one such problem, which is why it is important to work with a reputable breeder. Reputable breeders won't breed their dogs until the dog is two years of age. Two is the also the minimum age in which a dog can be cleared of hip dysplasia and other genetic health conditions. The best way to avoid such genetic health problems is to choose a reputable breeder.