Kamis, 31 Mei 2012

High Protein Canine Diet

Dogs love protein. The truth is, however, that dogs are not true carnivores that can exist mainly on protein. Technically, they are classed as omnivores, which means they can survive on both animal and plant-based foods. They are unlike cats in that their bodies can manufacture the essential amino acids that cats can only get by ingesting them from other animals. There a few things to keep in mind in deciding how much protein your dog needs.

Pros & Cons of High Protein Diets

    In the past, there was some dispute over high-protein diets for dogs. Some dog experts believed that a constant diet of proteins might make dogs' kidneys work too hard to excrete the excess protein and would cause kidney failure. Recent studies like the one done by Case, Carey and Hirakawa have shown, however, that in fact high-protein diets do not cause kidney failure in dogs, nor is it recommended that older dogs have less protein in their diets. For those dogs that do have kidney problems, restricting proteins in the diet may be indicated as needed. Some dog experts advise against feeding large amounts of red meat, such as beef and pork, that are implicated in the formation of some cancers.

Puppies

    Because puppies are growing quickly, they need a high-protein diet for cell and bone growth. Commercial dog food manufacturers do a good job of researching the nutritional needs of dogs, and formulate their foods specifically for different stages of a dog's life.

Pregnant Dogs

    Because of the needs of the growing puppies inside them, pregnant dogs need a diet rich in protein and nutrients. Puppy food is often given to pregnant dogs for this reason. Always choose commercial dog foods that are well-known for a good track record of nutrition. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend a good food for these special situations.

Active & Outdoor Dogs

    Dogs engaged in high-energy activities or those that spend a great deal of time outdoors in all kinds of weather need a nutritional, high-protein dog food with enough fat to burn as fuel.

Commercial Vs. Homemade

    Some dog owners have become suspicious of all of the additives that are now found in commercial dog food formulas. They may contain colorings, flavor enhancers, preservatives and other additives that may contribute to allergy or digestive problems. A number of homemade diets can be found online, or owners can try one of the many organic, additive-free commercial foods now on the market.

How to Get a Picky Poodle to Eat

How to Get a Picky Poodle to Eat

Poodles have a reputation of being finicky, high maintenance animals. This breed has a few dietary needs that should be met to keep its curly coat healthy and shiny. Generally poodles should avoid moist foods, as these are high in corn syrup and other sugary substances that, while tasty, offer little in nutrition. Specific feeding demands, such as portion size and frequency, depend on size and age of the dog. As with other picky dogs, a poodle may display poor behavioral traits and may need a little discipline.

Instructions

    1

    Try a different brand of dog food. Often, higher quality foods offer both better taste and nutrition to the dog. Specialty brands sold at pet stores are often higher quality than grocery or general store brands. Dry foods are typically the cheapest and often provide the nutrition needed for a poodle. Sometimes, the change of brands alone may be enough to get a picky poodle to eat.

    2

    Mix dry and canned food. Poodles enjoy most types of canned food; however, canned food is more expensive and at times can be too rich for the dog's digestive system to handle. Mixing dry and canned food often provides enough taste from both foods, softens the dry food and gives texture to the canned food.

    3

    Add a little bit of water to create a soup in the food. This again softens the food and may change the texture and taste enough to get the dog's attention.

    4

    Employ a bit of tough love. If the dog continues to reject its food, or periodically becomes tired of eating what is offered, then it may not be a good practice to reinforce this behavior by adjusting the dog's diet. Instead give the dog some time to eat and if it refuses, take the food away. Do not give treats or snacks until the next meal. Once it learns that it can't choose its own food, the dog will be less picky.

Rabu, 30 Mei 2012

Dogs That Are Untrusting & Timid

Dogs That Are Untrusting & Timid

Some dog breeds are intrinsically brave; they are guard dogs, herding dogs, and fighting dogs. However, some breeds of dog are more sensitive, untrusting, and timid than others due to their breeding. This timidness can manifest itself as a shy dog that avoids human interaction. Large dogs can hurt or kill a person unintentionally, if they are afraid or threatened. Even small dogs can injure adults and children, if they are shy or untrusting.

Chihuahua

    Chihuahuas are a small breed of dog native to North America. These tiny dogs appear harmless but their personalities are as distinct as large breeds. Chihuahuas are independent and require a firm hand in training, but their sensitive natures mean their trainers must use positive reinforcement to avoid further timidity. Early socialization prevents timid behavior and aggression caused by fear. Chihuahuas that don't trust their owners may become dangerously protective of their human companions.

Greyhounds

    Although they are a large breed, greyhounds are thin, delicate animals. Their streamlined bodies make them excellent racing dogs. However, their personalities are meek and timid. Greyhounds used in racing are often even less trusting, due to neglect or rough trainers. To create a happy, social greyhound they must be trained using positive reinforcement and a soft tone. Due to their timid nature, greyhounds do not make good watch dogs and may flee from strangers.

Shiba Inu

    Shiba Inu are a small breed of sight hunting dogs from Japan. These dogs are intelligent and have intense gazes in order to help them hunt fast moving prey. Shiba Inu are stubborn dogs that require firm but gentle training. Unsocialized shiba inu may act aggressively towards strangers, or even attack, because they are naturally untrusting.

Welsh Springer Spaniel

    Independent and untrusting if not socialized, the Welsh Springer Spaniel is a hunting dog used to flush prey out of hiding for hunters to shoot. Excellent pets for families with children, Welsh Springer Spaniels behave well when socialized from a young age. However, this breed will ignore weak-willed owners they do not trust and may run off or ignore commands. These timid dogs react best to positive reinforcement and require exercise to prevent anxiety.

Homemade High Calorie Dog Food

Homemade High Calorie Dog Food

Highly active working dogs, pregnant and nursing mother dogs, and underweight dogs may all benefit from a high-calorie diet or high-calorie supplements. High-calorie dog food includes real meat protein and essential minerals. You can buy commercial, high-calorie dog foods, but making the food at home ensures your dogs get the protein and amino acids they need and lets you customize the feed to your dog's size. Many dog breeders and experts recommend a ground-meat-based recipe called Satin Balls.

Instructions

Preparation

    1

    Open the tops of the12 freezer bags and place on counter.

    2

    Mix the Total, oatmeal and wheat germ together in a large bowl.

    3

    Add the oil, molasses and salt, and mix well.

    4

    Crack the eggs into the bowl, then crush the eggshells and add into the mixture.

    5

    Pour in the gelatin, and mix all the ingredients well.

    6

    Add the raw hamburger and knead it until all ingredients are combined into a meatloaf consistency.

    7

    Roll the mixture into 1 to 2 inch diameter meatballs.

    8

    Place the meatballs into the freezer bags and store in your freezer until you are ready to use them. Feed them thawed and raw, as needed.

How to Buy a Jack Russell Puppy

How to Buy a Jack Russell Puppy

Owning a working dog, such as a Jack Russell terrier, requires much more effort than simply buying a dog. These dogs, bred in England to hunt red foxes, possess a level of energy that makes exercising and physical outlets a necessity, according to the American Kennel Club. The original breed of Jack Russell terriers acquired several names, different parent breed clubs and standards and many disagreements over which club and standards represent the true Jack Russell terrier. In the United States, the original Jack Russell Terrier Club changed the name to Parson Russell Terrier in 2003, according to the Parson Russell Terrier Association of America.

Instructions

    1

    Select the appropriate breeder or rescue service according to your purpose for buying a Jack Russell terrier. If you are interested in showing in current AKC events or breeding, you should only purchase registered Parson Russell Terriers. For agility, obedience and hunting trials, a family pet or hunting purposes, your options include other breeders and rescue shelters.

    2

    Familiarize yourself with health issues and genetic testing recommended for the breed. Jack Russell terriers' health concerns include heart, undescended testicles, umbilical hernias, eye problems, deafness and Von Willebrand's disease, a bleeding disorder. Additionally, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, which can cause serious lameness, and joint diseases exist in the breed. Make a list to discuss pedigree and testing with the person selling the dog.

    3

    Contact the Parson Russell Terrier Association of America and the American Kennel Club for breeder referrals and rescue contacts. Make a list of possible owners and rescues to contact.

    4

    Write down information that might be requested of you by breeders and rescue services. Information to prepare includes veterinary references, fencing or kennel details, information on past or present pets and family members and proof of homeownership or written permission from your landlord for keeping a dog.

    5

    Write down any questions you have for the dog seller and make a checklist including such issues as proof of health and genetic testing, health guarantees, type of registration (limited or full), contract requirements, refunds and costs for returning the dog.

    6

    Call the people on your list and write down information about each available dog, including cost, age and other relevant facts. Go through your checklist to help determine which dogs meet your requirements.

    7

    Discuss the list with your family or other house members if you do not live alone. Evaluate the list and narrow the dogs to your top two to three choices. Contact the owners to discuss buying the dog.

    8

    Arrange to meet the dog if possible. Breeders frequently evaluate their puppies and ship a puppy to the home they feel matches the temperament and potential of that puppy. Choose only breeders you trust to make this decision. Decide on the dog and pay the owner after reviewing and signing contracts.

Selasa, 29 Mei 2012

Information on Good Quality Dog Food

Information on Good Quality Dog Food

A dog's nutritional requirements differ with breed, activity level, age and weight. However, there are general guidelines for every dog. Always consult your veterinarian or a pet nutritionalist for further information, or more-specific guidelines for your pet. Prescription foods should be fed over any other choice if they are prescribed for any reason.

The Best of the Best

    Ideal dog foods contain meats that are whole and recognized by their proper name. Rather than "meat" it is preferable to have lamb or chicken. Those meats do not rely on fillers to make the product appeal to a dog's sense of taste. Often, they have no grains and use vegetables such as pumpkin or sweet potatoes as a source of carbohydrates. The best commercial dog food available contains no by-products, no corn and no unnamed meat products.

Better Than Average

    Above-average dog foods may contain things such as dried egg product rather than whole eggs, or the primary source of protein may be meat meals instead of whole meats. These dog foods still contain no by-products or undesirables, simply a slightly cheaper source of ingredients. Grains are usually higher on the ingredients list located on the bag because these are cheaper than meats and vegetables.

Acceptable

    Acceptable but not ideal dog foods may contain ingredients that provide no real nutritional value but act as binders for the individual kibble, or chunks in wet dog food. They often have fillers in the recipe that will not hurt the dog consuming the food, but may contribute to a sensitive dog's allergies or create symptoms of upset stomach while the dog is adjusting to it. Very sensitive dogs may fully reject the food and become ill to the extreme of needing veterinary care, though that is rare.

Low Quality

    Low quality foods are foods with little to no nutritional value. They are full of things that dogs would not naturally eat, or items that are not heavily regulated. The vast majority of commercial dog foods fall under this category due to the presence of unnecessary binders, fillers and potentially harmful additives like high amounts of salt or even sugars.

Ingredients to Avoid

    All forms of corn should be avoided. Dogs cannot process corn, and they gain no nutrients from it. By-products can range from feathers to hooves to internal organs. They are the leftovers from pre-processed animals. Meat can mean any animal available to throw into the mix. It could be the remains of a cow, or it may be the remains of a wild opossum that met a tragic end on a highway. A veterinarian will be able to inform you of any other potential hazards to watch for.

Senin, 28 Mei 2012

Top Ten Holistic Dog Foods

Top Ten Holistic Dog Foods

Holistic dog foods contain high quality, natural ingredients and minimize fillers and animal by-products. Many holistic brands also include added nutrients designed to optimize overall canine health. Any dog food, even holistic brands, may not be suited for your specific pet, but the following brands provide the nutrition most dogs need.

Artemis

    "Whole Dog Journal" rated Artemis Pet Food as one of the best new dry dog foods in 2003. As of 2010, Artemis dog food no longer contains Ethoxyquin, nor does the food contain any by-products or harmful artificial additives. Artemis uses ingredients like potatoes, apples, spinach and cranberries.

Blue Buffalo

    The creators of Blue Buffalo designed the food to help naturally prevent cancer in dogs after the founder's dog suffered from cancer. Blue Buffalo contains natural ingredients and no artificial preservatives, colors or flavors, corn, wheat or soy. Additional LifeSource Bits in the dog food contain special antioxidants.

Canidae

    Canidae only uses human-grade ingredients grown and processed in the United States with USDA and FDA approval. The food contains no glutens, corn, wheat, soy or grain fractions. Carbohydrates come from good sources like brown rice and barley.

Eagle Pack

    Eagle Pack manufactures its hypoallergenic food in the United States and uses natural ingredients produced in the US and other reputable countries, namely Australia and New Zealand. The dog food also contains holistic supplements, including prebiotics, probiotics, digestive enzymes and kelp to further your dog's nutrition.

Merrick

    Merrick manufactures all products in its own United States facility and uses only ingredients grown and processed the United States. Their food is tested on-site and contains human grade components, chelated minerals, probiotics, and omega three and omega six fatty acids while remaining free of chemical preservatives.

Natura

    Natura produces a number of well received holistic and natural brand dog foods under different brands, including Innova, Evo, California Natural and Mother Nature. Each brand leaves out fillers, additives, corn and wheat, but includes all natural ingredients from United States suppliers only.

Orijen

    Orijen dog food contains a high meat content, meaning plenty of protein for your dog. Potatoes provide its primary source of carbohydrates instead of filler grains, and the food uses human-grade meats certified by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Solid Gold

    Solid Gold uses no wheat gluten or rice protein concentrate, only whole, unprocessed grains and bran. Most ingredients come from the United States, with the only exceptions coming from New Zealand and Europe. The company designs its allergy-free food to contain no wheat, corn, soy or animal fat.

Taste of the Wild

    Taste of the Wild uses a combination of bison, lamb meal, chicken meal and venison to provide high grade protein sources. Egg products and sweet potatoes, a renowned source of vitamins A, C and B6, and potassium, also appear on the ingredient list.

Wellness

    Wellness started as a branch of the Old Mother Hubbard dog treat company. The company focuses on producing vitamin-rich hypoallergenic foods free of wheat, corn and soy, and only uses FDA and AAFCO approved ingredients from the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Belgium.

Low Protein Diet for Dogs With Liver Problems

Your dog's liver is her largest internal organ. While its primary function is to remove toxins from the blood, the liver is involved in many biochemical reactions in her body and any damage to this organ can cause widespread and varied symptoms. For decades, a low protein diet was thought to slow the progression of liver disease, but new research is casting doubt on that approach. According to the Journal of Nutrition, "malnutrition can develop when protein-restricted diets are inappropriately recommended."

Causes and Symptoms

    Internal injuries associated with car accidents, liver inflammation due to hepatitis or pancreatitis, liver infections and toxic reactions to prescription medications or poisons can damage the liver. The most common symptoms of liver disease vomiting and diarrhea; frequent urination; anemia and bleeding disorders; jaundice and weight loss. There may be abnormalities in the stool or urine. Bile production disruptions may cause stool to appear very light colored and jaundice can result in orange-colored urine.

Low Protein Vs. High Value Protein

    Protein-restricted diets reduce the amount of ammonia produced during protein digestion. A compromised liver may not be able to adequately filter this additional ammonia, resulting in a toxic condition. But for most types of liver disease, eliminating protein is not the answer.
    Proteins are needed for support and maintenance of liver function and repair. Restricting proteins can, according to the Journal of Nutrition, "complicate a patient's condition, impairing tissue regeneration and recovery from disease." In most cases, a diet of easily digestible protein combined with high quality carbohydrates provides the best solution for dogs with liver problems. Dairy- and soy-based proteins can be substituted for meat-based proteins.

Hepatic Encephalopathy

    There is one exception to this: low protein diets are always recommended if your dog has been diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy. This condition is the result of advanced liver disease or a congenital defect known as a portosystemic shunt. Hepatic encephalopathy impairs brain function because the liver cannot detoxify blood.

The Role of Carbohydrates

    Carbohydrates provide energy. Rice and potatoes provide high quality simple carbohydrates and vegetables are a source of complex carbohydrates and fiber. Poor quality carbohydrates found in some commercial dog foods are not easily digested by dogs and increase bacterial fermentation in the colon and may produce excess ammonia. Adding vegetables to your dog's rations provide vitamins and fiber; fiber promotes more frequent bowel movements, which helps to flush toxins from the body.

Supplements

    Susan Eddlestone, DVM, recommends the antioxidant vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) to protect and improve liver cells. Along with other holistic veterinary practitioners, Dr. Eddlestone also recommends milk thistle, an herbal supplement. Silymarin, the active ingredient in milk thistle, protects the liver against toxins and stimulates the production of new liver cells.

How to Bathe a Teacup Yorkshire Puppy

How to Bathe a Teacup Yorkshire Puppy

A teacup Yorkshire Terrier puppy is, as the name indicates, quite small, but it has very long hair. Yorkies should be groomed on a regular schedule because of their fast-growing coats. Due to your teacup Yorkie's stature, you must take great care when bathing and grooming your puppy. Never leave your teacup Yorkie alone in the water.

Instructions

    1

    Teach your teacup Yorkie puppy the bathing ritual a few days after you bring it home, giving it time to become comfortable with you. Be consistent with commands that indicate getting into the bath, staying still during bathing and getting out of the bath. Perform these first bathing exercises using just water on your teacup Yorkshire Terrier puppy. Stay close; keep a hand on your puppy at all times. Watch for signs of stress or discomfort. You may incorporate treats into this exercise to keep your teacup Yorkie puppy attentive and to help him associate bath time with good things.

    2

    Gather all of your supplies before you get your teacup Yorkshire Terrier puppy into the tub or sink. If you don't have a handheld shower or spigot wand, a shatter-free pitcher or cup will suffice. Have your shampoo, conditioner, water supply, pitcher and towels within easy reach. It's also important to ensure that your Yorkie puppy has good footing. Place a bathmat or towel in the sink or tub to prevent your puppy from slipping. This also increases your teacup Yorkie puppy's confidence.

    3

    Use the commands you practiced when getting your Yorkie in the tub or sink for a real bath. Don't start bathing your Yorkie puppy until both of you are calm and ready. As practiced, always have a steady hand on your Yorkie puppy.

    4

    Gently pour warm water over the Yorkie puppy's body using either the pitcher or wand. When your Yorkshire terrier puppy is completely wet, apply the shampoo and work it through its coat from neck to hips. Work in the direction of your puppy's hair growth and avoid its head.

    5

    Once you've worked up a good lather, completely rinse your Yorkshire terrier puppy. Be careful to wash away every bit of shampoo residue.

    6

    Apply the conditioner or hair detangler to your Yorkie puppy in the same way that you applied the shampoo. Gently work itt through the Yorkie's hair in the direction of hair growth, then completely rinse out all of the conditioner.

    7

    Gently dry your puppy with a fresh towel. Brush your Yorkie's hair to remove tangles while it's still damp.

Are Boxers Good With Children?

Are Boxers Good With Children?

Boxers are medium-sized, powerful dogs that are intelligent, alert and love to be with people. Boxers are square-built, typically of fawn or brindle colors, sometimes have white markings and are known for standing up on their hind legs. They have been used for different purposes, including as seeing-eye dogs for the blind, and they are often chosen as family pets.

History

    Boxers originate from Germany, where they were developed in the 19th century. They were originally used for dog fighting and as hunting companions. This dog breed was imported to the United States after World War I and were often used as couriers during war time. Boxers started becoming popular pets in the late 1930s and, at the time of publication, ranks as one of the most popular dogs in the U.S., according to American Kennel Club Registration Statistics.

Character

    One of the most important traits of a boxer is its character. Boxers are hearing guard dogs that are alert, rather than biting guard dogs, and they are described as dignified and self-assured. Boxers are desirable family pets because they are intelligent, loyal, affectionate and easily disciplined. Boxers have a joyful character and need attention. Therefore, they should be attended to and cared for by everyone in the family and not by just one family member.

Temperament

    Another important traits of a boxer is its temperament. Boxers are playful with family and friends and are patient and stoical with children. Although the breed is curious, they are deliberate and show caution with strangers. Additionally, boxers are fearless if threatened. Boxers are known for their desire for human affection, especially from children, to whom they are patient as well as protective, making them good as a pet in a family with children.

Considerations

    Be aware that boxers need to be trained because they are highly energetic. Aside from training, each family member should be able to walk the boxer on a leash as well as to give simple commands, such as "sit" and "stay," that need to be obeyed. Boxers that are not trained may become aggressive. This breed is often described as "hyperactive," so if you're looking for a calm dog, a boxer is not the right choice for your family. Make sure that you are attentive to boxers or they may become destructive.

Minggu, 27 Mei 2012

How to Make Nutritious Homemade Dog Food

How to Make Nutritious Homemade Dog Food

Since pet food is not regulated as strictly as human food, some people have decided to turn to making their own dog food to ensure a better quality. This way the owner is sure of what ingredients are being put in and can avoid any harmful substances while creating the ideal nutritious meal for their pet. According to Paula Terifaj, D.V.M., a nutritious homemade dog food consists of a balance between protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. If your dog has any health problems, is a puppy or an older dog, you may want to consult a vet to see if there are any special nutrients that will make a good addition to your homemade food.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a lean ground meat such as turkey, chicken, extra lean beef, or lamb. Use 1/4 to 1/3 lbs.of meat for a 20-pound. dog. Cook the meat thoroughly to ensure all parasites and bacteria are killed but do not season, since some seasonings can be harmful to dogs. You may wish to feed your dog an organic meat product. You can also use a deboned fish such as salmon.

    2

    Choose another protein source such as eggs, cottage cheese, or yogurt using 1/2 to 3/4 c. for a 20-pound dog. Cook the eggs as desired, again without seasoning.

    3

    Prepare 1 to 2 c. of a carbohydrate for your 20-pound dog such as oatmeal, barley, different rice, pastas, or potatoes.

    4
    Vegetables are a good source of fiber
    Vegetables are a good source of fiber

    Add an additional 1/2 to 1 c. cooked vegetable from either a frozen or fresh source. Be sure to avoid any vegetables that are poisonous to dogs such as onions and garlic. Suggestions from Terifaj include green beans, squash, broccoli, cauliflower, peas, and carrots.

    5

    Avoid a calcium deficiency with the addition of bone meal powder or calcium citrate, says Terifaj. She recommends 1/2 tsp. or 250 mg for a 20-pound dog. Besides this, there should also be a vet approved vitamin and mineral supplement in or with the food. Other supplements that Dr. Tracy Lord, D.V.M. suggests for a 25-pound dog include: 1 tbsp. olive oil, one capsule fish oil (if not feeding the dog an oily fish like salmon), 500 mg vitamin C and 400 iu vitamin E. Mix all ingredients for your nutritious dog food.

How to Cook Food for Dog Proportions

How to Cook Food for Dog Proportions

Everyone that loves a dog wants to ensure their pet is happy and healthy. Taking control of what a dog eats is an excellent way to make sure you consistently meet your pet's nutritional needs. Many people mistakenly believe dogs should not eat the same food as people, but dog food manufacturers use the same food that people eat to make dog food. The good news is that you can cook nutritious meals for your dog while cooking for yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Remove any bones from the meat.

    2

    Pour a tablespoon of soybean oil into a skillet and cook the meat until done.

    3

    Use your knife to chop the meat into bite-sized pieces and set aside.

    4

    Boil water in the cooking pot, add the vegetables and cook until tender.

    5

    Cook the rice until done according to the directions.

    6

    Combine all of the ingredients, place them in the plastic storage container and keep the container in the refrigerator until meal time.

    7

    Heat the homemade dog food at mealtime and serve. The food should be warm but not hot.

Sabtu, 26 Mei 2012

How to Train an Italian Greyhound to Use a Litter Box

How to Train an Italian Greyhound to Use a Litter Box

Italian greyhounds are graceful and majestic dogs. They have an air of dignity and elegance most breeds do not possess and somehow they seem to know it. Yet, they come with one rather hefty drawback--they can be quite difficult to housetrain. With such little fur and thin frames, it is not surprising that Italian greyhounds are often reluctant in inclement weather and dislike wind, cold, snow or rain. This leaves Italian greyhound owners with quite a dilemma when the dogs won't go outside to eliminate waste. Difficulty in housetraining is the number one reason that Italian greyhounds are abandoned by their owners. By following these steps, Italian greyhounds and their owners can come to a compromise.

Instructions

    1

    Start by setting up an area in your home you want to use for the Italian greyhounds litter box. A low-traffic secluded area like a large closet or laundry room works best. Keep in mind that this area is going to essentially be for doing business so you wouldnt want it in your dining room, for example. Try creating a den-like atmosphere to give the dog a sense of privacy.

    2

    Place a large dog-sized litter box on the floor of the designated area and line it with either specialized dog litter, newspaper or a puppy pee pad. Dog litter can be difficult to use, especially with puppies because they tend to chew it. Newspaper will not be as absorbent nor will it eliminate odors and puppy pee pads can be costly over time, so think long and hard about which type of filling you want to use.

    3

    Pay attention to the dog's behavior. As soon as you notice your Italian greyhound signaling that it has to go, take him over to the designated area, plop him in the litter box and say go potty or whatever cue you normally use. Be patient and repeat this process regularly. Be prepared for some slip-ups.

    4

    Scooping some of the Italian greyhounds feces and placing a small amount for scent into the litter box might help him get the message.

    5

    Once the Italian greyhound gets it right, praise him enthusiastically and give an immediate treat. Italian Greyhounds often have a whats in it for me attitude, so the treat sweetens the deal for them.

    6

    Clean the litter box regularly. Often an Italian greyhound wont use the litter box repeatedly if it is soiled.

The Best Breed of Dog for Elderly People

The Best Breed of Dog for Elderly People

Weed Names for Dogs

Weed Names for Dogs

Noxious weeds, invasive species of plants that are non-native and in some way harmful to the environment, often have nice-sounding or funny names. Some of these names may make very good names for dogs because they paint a mental image that evokes an attitude or appearance. To pick a weed name for a canine, imagine calling out the name and picture what type of dog would come running.

Thistle

    The word "Thistle" rolls prettily off the tongue. Thistles--even the nastiest weed of them all, the star thistle---have lovely yellow, pink, white and even crimson flowers that are fluffy and perky, and smell fairly nice. Poodles, and their designer dog offshoots---cockapoos, affenpoos, bernedoodles, bossi-poos, cadoodles, and doxiepoos to name a few---are all fluffy and smell nice if bathed regularly. Poodles are smart and perky; their derivative breeds share these characteristics. Thistle is not a gender-specific name, so apply it to either sex.

Spurge

    Spurge isn't a particularly unattractive weed, but its name certainly is; it sounds like a term for snoring or flatulence. Dogs with scrunched-up faces have problems in both these categories. They snore because their noses are "smooshed" in. They are gassy because they gulp air when eating and drinking. Known as brachycephalic dogs, these breeds include: Old English bulldog and other bulldogs, pugs, Boston terriers, boxers and shih-tzus. Use this name for male dogs; it's not ladylike.

Poison Ivy

    Poison Ivy is a very pretty weed, but makes people scratch like dogs. Since Drew Barrymore seduced Tom Skerritt in the movie "Poison Ivy," the term has acquired naughty female connotations. All dogs are good dogs with good "parenting," but some are just naturally mischievous: Brussels griffons for instance. These spunky, wiry little pranksters became famous in another movie, "As Good as It Gets," in which the canine star endeared himself to a reluctant Jack Nicholson. Almost any pretty, prank-loving female terrier breed would answer to Poison Ivy, but only if she wanted to.

Kudzu

    Kudzu has taken over the eastern states from Maryland to Florida; its vines grow up to 12 feet a day and can literally tear apart old wooden buildings. It's a tough weed with a tough name. Pit bull tough. Rottweiler tough. Bull terrier tough. Of course, these breeds are only as tough as their owners make them, but they can do some karate moves on other dogs if provoked. Kudzu sounds like a karate move. Use it for muscular, loyal boy dogs only.

Tumbleweed

    "I'm a roaming cowboy riding all day long...Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweeds." Bob Nolan made a very unpleasant weed popular with this song; the lyrics, and the nature of tumbleweeds, epitomize cowboy dogs. These are the breeds that work on ranches and farms and can go all daylong, rolling from one responsibility to another. They include herding dogs like Australian cattle dogs, shepherds and sheepdogs, and even corgis and pulis. Dogs that guard the flock and live free and wild with their charges fit this category as well: Anatolians, Great Pyrenees and komondors, for example. It's not a gender-identifying name, so give it to a girl or boy dog.

Jumat, 25 Mei 2012

Information on Bichon Frise

The Bichon Frise is a member of the non-sporting group of dogs. This active breed is a pleasant companion dog that works well with individuals as well as families. They also make good pets for allergy sufferers because of their hypoallergenic coats.

Breed History

    The Bichon Frise is a descendant of the water spaniel. During the 13th century, Spanish sailors transported the breed from its native Mediterranean home to various other European countries.

Nature

    The Bichon Frise is an extremely happy and cheerful dog breed that loves to play. They are also very loving and affectionate with their owners.

Size

    The Bichon Frise is a small and compact dog breed with muscular, medium-boned legs. It typically measures between 9 /12 and 11/12 inches in length.

Coat

    The coat of the Bichon Frise is dense, curled and pure white in color. It is also soft to the touch. The outer coat is coarse, while the undercoat is soft and silky.

Maintenance

    The Bichon Frise has a coat that grows steadily and without shedding. Therefore, you must groom and trim the coat regularly to remain in good condition.

Information on Teacup Yorkie Dogs

Information on Teacup Yorkie Dogs

Teacup yorkshire terriers, commonly called yorkies, are bred for their extremely small size. They share the black-and-tan coloring of the breed as well as the glossy, fine coat. Teacup dogs are smaller than miniature and toy sizes and require special care.

Size

    Teacup yorkies range from 4 to 7 pounds in adulthood, with their puppy weight hovering around 2.5 pounds at 6 months of age. Their height at full growth is 6 to 7 inches.

Features

    Most teacup yorkies have a baby-doll face, meaning their muzzles are short. Wide eyes and a black nose are set in the small, flat head covered with abundant silky hair and pointed ears. Black claws are present on round feet. The tail is often docked and dewclaws removed by the breeder. Their life span can be up to 15 years.

Temperament

    Teacup yorkies are energetic and dominant. These adventurous small dogs may become aggressive if untrained, seeking to lead their owners and being wary of strangers. Very active, they need long walks daily. Teacup yorkies are alert and make excellent watchdogs.

Cautions

    Due to their miniscule size, teacup yorkies are not recommended for families with small children, who may hurt the dog accidentally. There is a danger of harming a tiny teacup yorkie by dropping it, tripping over it or stepping on it---they have fragile bones.

Health Issues

    Prone to tooth decay, teacup yorkies should eat dry food and have regular teeth cleanings at the veterinarian. Females often have difficulty delivering pups and may require a caesarean section. Herniated disks in the back pose a danger of paralysis in teacup yorkies---lift your teacup yorkie rather than encouraging it to jump up, which could damage its back.

German Shorthaired Pointers Information

The Dog Breed Info website states that the German shorthaired pointer is an energetic dog that is by nature a hunting breed. The German shorthaired pointer is protective of its family and intelligent, two admirable traits that allow it to get along well with children. The German shorthaired pointer is a long-lived breed; the average dog lives between 12 and 15 years and some as long as 18 years.

Identification

    The typical male German shorthaired is between 23 and 25 inches high at the shoulders and weighs in the range of 55 to 70 lbs. The females are 21 to 23 inches tall and weigh about 10 lbs. less. The muzzle on this breed is broad and long, the eyes and nose are brown and the coat colors are some combination of liver and white, with some being all liver-colored.

History

    Although the exact date of its origin is unclear, as with many breeds of dogs the German shorthaired pointer breed came into existence at some point during the 1800s. The dog is the result of a cross between Spanish pointers and breeds such as foxhounds, English pointers and German birddogs. The dog that breeders created can bring back birds and small animals on the land or from the water. The American Kennel Club recognized this breed in 1930.

Activities

    The German shorthaired pointer is not a dog that should lead an inactive life. The animal requires plenty of opportunities to exercise, and you can take your pointer on long walks or jogs almost every day. The dog is primarily a hunting breed and is the perfect companion for individuals or families who enjoy this pursuit. The dog will also take pleasure from such activities as swimming, agility training and running alongside as you bicycle.

Considerations

    The Terrific Pets website says that because German shorthaired pointers can easily scale a 6-foot high fence, a much higher fence is necessary if you keep your dog in an enclosure. The site suggests that this breed not live in a kennel setting but rather with you in your home. A pointer that is kept constantly caged can suffer from hyperactivity and become aggressive. The dog's coat is short but the fur is thick, allowing it to withstand extremes of cold and heat. The German shorthaired pointer is ill-suited for city living; a country home where it can run about in a closed-in yard is the ideal setting for this dog.

Health

    Like many dogs with floppy ears, a German shorthaired pointer may be prone to ear infections. If you take the dog swimming, dry its ears out so bacteria cannot take hold. Epileptic seizures and deterioration of the hips are two other concerns. A disorder of the eyelids known as entropion can occur, and these pointers can also suffer from cancerous lesions in the mouth.

Kamis, 24 Mei 2012

Should I Feed Fiber Wheat Bread to the Dog?

Should I Feed Fiber Wheat Bread to the Dog?

    Wheat bread contains a wide variety of vitamins and minerals.
    Wheat bread contains a wide variety of vitamins and minerals.

On One Hand: High in Carbohydrates

    According to the experts at Raw Learning, dogs require a protein-based diet and very few carbohydrates. Wheat bread provides little nourishment, says the Sirius Dog website, and some dogs have wheat allergies that will be aggravated by bread. Wheat bread can also contain additives that upset a dog's stomach.

On the Other: Additional Fiber & Energy

    Wheat bread does contain more fiber than most commercial dog foods or raw diets. The carbohydrates in wheat bread also provide an easily digested source of energy for a dog, say the experts at The Pet Center. Dogs with low energy, or who are struggling to pass stools due to a lack of fiber, can benefit from a slice of wheat bread.

Bottom Line

    Although wheat bread is not a required part of a healthy diet for a dog, it does have some occasional uses as a supplemental treat. The dog diet experts at Raw Learning warn not to include it as part of your regular feeding schedule.It won't harm your dog to eat wheat bread occasionally.

How to Make Dry Food for My Dog at Home

How to Make Dry Food for My Dog at Home

Having a dog is expensive, and no matter how much you love your pet, you probably dislike spending a lot of money on dry dog food. Of course you can buy dry dog food at the store, but not only is it costly, you don't really know what is in the dog food. Make homemade dog food at home to ensure your dog is eating only the best ingredients and save yourself some money in the process.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large cookie sheet with cooking spray.

    2

    Pour 1 cup of rye flour, 2 cups of whole wheat flour, 1 cup nonfat dry milk powder and 1 tsp. bone meal into a large mixing bowl. Stir with a spoon to combine these dry ingredients. Add 1 cups of water and stir well.

    3

    Beat two eggs with a whisk in a small bowl. Stir in cup vegetable oil. Add two cloves of minced garlic and 2 tbsp. of Worcestershire sauce and mix well.

    4

    Fold the egg and oil mixture into the flour mixture. Stir thoroughly. Add 2 cups of cooked ground beef, veal or pork, and mix well, so the meat is evenly distributed.

    5

    Spread the mixture onto the cookie sheet in a -inch thick layer. Bake for 45 minutes, allow it to cool completely, then break into bite-sized pieces.

Rabu, 23 Mei 2012

How to Identify a Boykin Spaniel

How to Identify a Boykin Spaniel

The Boykin spaniel breed has evolved from a single stray dog found by Alexander White of Spartanburg, South Carolina, with crosses to American water spaniels, springer spaniels, pointers and Chesapeake Bay retrievers. South Carolina has designated the Boykin spaniel its official state dog. This is a relatively new breed that was first discovered in the early 1900s and was only officially recognized as a separate breed in 2005. The Boykin spaniel is primarily used as a fowl hunting dog, and its exceptional sense of smell allows it to find, flush out and retrieve shot birds on both land and water. This is a very companionable breed that makes a happy, energetic pet as well. Here is a guide on how to identify a Boykin spaniel.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by guessing the dogs size and weight. An average Boykin spaniel is up to a foot and a half tall at the shoulder, considerably larger than its cocker spaniel cousin. The dog should be slightly longer from rear to chest than it is tall. It should weigh between 30 and 40 pounds. The tail will be a thick, docked stub, maybe two or three inches long and always sticking up. The dog should have a narrow, but deep chest that goes down to the elbows of its front legs, which should be considerably thicker boned than the rear legs.

    2

    Look at the dogs fur. A Boykin spaniel can only have dark chocolate or dark brown fur. It should be short, curly, and very glossy. Sometimes the dog will have spots of white on the chest or the toes.

    3

    Examine the dogs head. It should have a high, rounded skull and a straight muzzle that angles slightly upward at the nose. The ears are characteristic of a spaniel, long floppy, low hanging, and covered with a layer of very curly fur. The most identifying feature of a Boykin spaniel is the eye color. They should be a yellowy-amber that no other breed possesses. If the dog matches this description then its a Boykin spaniel.

How to Train Adult Great Danes Not to Scratch

How to Train Adult Great Danes Not to Scratch

Great Danes, known as the "gentle giant" of dogs, are friendly, patient and eager to please. Despite the numerous positive character traits, these dogs are large and difficult to handle. As such, undesirable behaviors should be addressed immediately in order to prevent the behavior's progression. Approach scratching issues by attacking the root of the problem and reinforce positive behavior through training. Scratching likely stems from a lack of exercise or attention.

Instructions

    1

    Remove your Great Dane from the door area immediately when it begins scratching and give little attention. Continuing this process repeatedly teaches your dog two things: scratching is unwanted behavior and no attention, either positive or negative, will be given for the behavior.

    2

    Reward your Great Dane with dog treats when good behavior is exhibited (i.e. staying away from the door or sitting by the door without scratching). Positive reinforcement is a strong dog training tool, especially for breeds that are eager to please like Great Danes. Continued positive reinforcement instructs your dog on what behavior is desired.

    3

    Walk your Great Dane daily. A lack of exercise creates pent up energy that manifests itself in negative behavior. Since Great Danes are moderately active dogs, a regular exercise routine is necessary for both physical health and good behavior.

    4

    Trim your Great Danes nails regularly. Intermittent bouts of scratching may indicate that your dog's nails are too long, a potentially painful problem. Proper trimming in conjunction with exercise and positive reinforcement should eliminate the bad behavior.

What are the Best Dog Breeds for Kids?

What are the Best Dog Breeds for Kids?

Though there are many breeds of dogs from tiny tea-cup Poodles to gargantuan Great Danes, there are only a handful of breeds that are good with kids. Whether you want a small, lazy dog or a large dog with spunk, there is a kid-friendly choice available. Besides temperament, it is important to consider the dog's size when choosing the right breed for your family. Small- to medium-sized kid-friendly breeds might be better suited to smaller children, while larger kid-friendly breeds may be a better choice for bigger kids.

Small Dogs

    Beagle pup
    Beagle pup

    Surprisingly, small dogs are not always a kid-friendly choice. What these pups lack in size they make up for in attitude. Some smaller dogs tend to be more anxious compared to their larger counterparts, making them more prone to nipping and biting. However, there are some small breeds that are perfect for kids. Beagles, Bichons Frises, Pugs, Shih Tzu, and Pomeranians are just a handful of the smaller breeds which have the personality needed to put up with tail pulling, rough play, and the occasional bite from a teething infant. Moreover, Beagles have an even temperament and actually crave human companionship. This need for human interaction explains why they are continuously ranked as one of the most popular dog breeds in the world.

    Though some terrier breeds tend to be a bit nippy, Boston, Wheaten, Staffordshire Bull, and Norfolk Terriers are even tempered and would also be a welcome addition to your child's home. For example, when the Norfolk Terrier is not chasing vermin from the barn or corralling the hamster back into its cage, he is snuggling with his family. At 9 inches, he is truly pint-sized and kid friendly.

Medium Dogs

    Collie
    Collie

    The Keeshond, Bulldog, Collie, Australian Shepherd, and Whippet are just five of the many medium-sized breeds with a temperament to fit a family with small children. These dogs are the perfect size for families with kids because they are large enough not to be stepped on by a rambunctious toddler, but not so large that they will knock over the toddler who's just learning to walk. Though Whippets are very active and need plenty of exercise, they feel right at home lounging with the family on the couch, or snuggling with your child on his/her bed. Collies are also a common kid-friendly choice. Not only are Collies renowned for their gentle nature, they are also extremely intelligent.

Large Dogs

    Boxer
    Boxer

    Boxers, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Golden and Labrador Retrievers, and Newfoundlands are the right fit for parents who want their children to have a large dog as a pet. Though some of these dogs tend to be a bit rambunctious, this trait also makes them more playful. They are also fiercely loyal and protective. In fact, Boxers have been known to chorale small children away from steep steps, and protect them from predators. If you have older children, as opposed to toddlers or pre-schoolers, then a larger breed may be right for you. It is recommended that you avoid large dog breeds if you have small children, as they may unintentionally harm them due to their size.

Conclusion

How to Identify Dog Breeds

It's helpful to be able to identify dog breeds when you're choosing a dog from a shelter and want to know something about its background. While some types of dogs are easy to recognize, some resemble other breeds. The best way to learn about different breeds is to read about them. By familiarizing yourself first with sizes and general features, then moving on to other specifics, you'll learn to recognize subtle differences between breeds.

Instructions

Ways to Identify Dog Breeds

    1

    Look at the size. The tiniest dogs fit into the toy category. These include the Chihuahua, English toy spaniel, Maltese, Papillon, Pekingese, miniature Pinscher, Pomeranian, toy poodle, pug, and Silky and Yorkshire terriers among others. The spaniel resembles its larger relatives while the Silky terrier is named for its hair. The pug and Pekingese both have shortened snouts, but the pug has shorter hair.

    2

    Look for standards typical of certain breeds. Study dog photos in books on dog breeds and in encyclopedias. Spaniels are recognizable by their large soulful eyes, shorter snouts and long wavy ears and coats. Cocker spaniels are usually blonde or black while the larger springer spaniel is white with brown patches. Setters look similar but are larger and more slender. They have long silky fur with long, narrow noses.

    3

    Watch for breeds you've seen in movies or on TV. Nearly everyone knows "101 Dalmatians," the collie Lassie with her beautiful, long orange and white coat, and the St. Bernard Beethoven with his big furry brown and white build, heavy jowls and affectionate disposition. The scruffy terrier Benji is a mixed breed. Balto and the team from "Snow Dogs" are huskies, their fur white with black or gray, and one or both eyes usually blue. Disney's "The Shaggy Dog" featured the Old English sheepdog, his eyes barely visible through his long hair. You might remember the golden retrievers in "Air Bud" and TV's handsome German shepherd Rin Tin Tin.

    4

    The dogs we think of as guard dogs typically have a sterner look. You can tell the Doberman Pinscher by its pointed ears, tall thin build, and black and reddish coat. Rottweilers are more heavy-set and are always black and brown like the dog in the "Good Dog, Carl" books. Pit bulls are recognizable by their heavy jaws, square face and thick build.

    5

    Look for specific characteristics in the easy-to-recognize hound group. Bloodhounds are famous for their droopy eyes, wrinkled faces and long ears, while beagles are known for their small stature and tri-color coats of white, black and reddish-brown. Basset hounds have the beagle coloring but are long, low, heavier dogs.

    6

    Read books for information about specific jobs some dogs perform. Black-and-white border collies are generally pictured herding sheep. With their sleek build, greyhounds make the ideal racing dog. Italian greyhounds and whippets are smaller versions. Australian shepherds, another working dog, can be identified by the mottled multi-coloring of their coats in red merle, blue merle or gray streaked with white and charcoal.

    7

    Consider the physical build of a dog. Terriers tend to be scruffy, with short wiry fur and ears that stand up or tip at the ends. Often short and sometimes stocky, terriers are known for the delight they take in digging. Scotties are black with perky ears, while West Highland terriers or Westies are their white counterparts.

Selasa, 22 Mei 2012

How to Identify a Rottweiler

How to Identify a Rottweiler

The Rottweiler is a balanced breed and its movement is very steady and sure. This is a working breed that must be kept busy, or you will have one unhappy dog on your hands. This calm breed is confident and courageous, but is aloof toward strangers. It will eventually become friendly with people it sees often, though. It makes a great guard dog, as it will protect his family and home. The Rottweiler may be aggressive to other dogs.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Rottweiler. This is a medium large, powerful breed. Do not let its medium size fool you. It may not look large, but it has a lot of strength and agility. Males are 24 to 27 inches and females are 22 to 25 inches at the withers. It has a deep chest, about 50 percent of the dog's height. It should have enough bone and muscle mass to balance the frame. Females are more feminine-looking than males, but still should not show weakness.

    2

    Check that the head is of medium length and is quite broad between the ears. The dark brown eyes help to give the Rottweiler a noble, self-assured, alert expression. They are almond shaped and rather deep set, but not receding. The medium sized ears are triangular and set wide apart. The muzzle is broad at the base and tapers towards the nose. The nose is rather broad, but not round, and is always black.

    3

    Make sure the powerful neck is well muscled and moderately long. It should arch slightly and have tight skin. It leads to a broad, deep chest and long, well angulated shoulders. The feet are rounded and compact, leading to arched toes and thick, hard pads. The rear angulation balances the front angulation. The upper thigh is long and well muscled. The powerful lower thigh is also long and leads to a strong hock joint. The rear feet are a bit longer than the front feet, but are also compact, have well arched toes and thick, hard pads. The tail is docked close to the body. It may have one or two vertebrae. It is held just above the horizontal, giving the impression that the topline is longer than it really is.

    4

    Pet the straight, dense outer coat. The hair is medium length and lays flat against the body. The undercoat does not show through the outer coat. The coat is always black with rust or mahogany markings. The markings are located on the cheeks, over the eyes, on the muzzle (side only), the throat, forelegs, inside of the rear legs and a triangular mark on both sides of the prosternum.

Dogs That Are Good Pets for Kids

Dogs That Are Good Pets for Kids

Choosing the right dog for your family involves understanding the breed behavior and knowing the needs of your family. Some dog breeds are more suitable for households with children than others. Several dog breeds remain gentle and loving, even when being handled rough by kids.

Labrador and Golden Retrievers

    Labrador and golden retrievers rank high in pet popularity, thanks to their friendly, loving demeanors. These dogs are steadfastly loyal to their families. Retrievers are high energy, which works well with children who enjoy lots of running around outdoors. They enjoy water and easily learn to perform tricks on command. Retrievers need to be trained early in order to ensure that they are personable and obedient, otherwise your family will have an unruly ill-behaved bundle of hyperactivity that may not work well with small children. Be aware that these breeds need plenty of exercise and space to run. If your family isn't home often to care for them, seek a lower activity dog.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

    Staffordshire bull terriers may not seem like good family pets, but these terriers rarely display aggression toward humans. These dogs are overly affectionate and many act more like lap dogs than predatory creatures. Bull terriers make good watchdogs because they bark to alert people of danger present. Many people find bull terriers are trustworthy with children. These dogs work best in homes in which they are the only dog; while they don't show aggression toward humans, they are dominant with other dogs and often show dog aggression.

Newfoundland

    Newfoundlands are incredibly gentle and patient with children. In J.M. Barrie's famous novel "Peter Pan," the Darling children are watched over by their beloved Newfoundland Nana. Training Newfoundlands should be fairly simple, though the dogs may be somewhat lazy with lessons. Families looking for a larger dog to cuddle should look into owning a Newfoundland. These working class dogs enjoy swimming and have webbed paws to navigate the water better. A downside to the Newfoundland is that they have a propensity to drool, thanks to their oversized jowls.

Pug

    Many smaller dogs, such as the chihuahua or pomeranian, are too fragile for families with young children to handle. However, one small breed is hardy enough to live in homes with children. Pugs are small, stocky dogs that love to be cuddled. This breed tends to exude affection toward its family. Their trademark snorts often entertain kids. Pugs rarely show aggression toward humans, remaining even-tempered. Most pugs are highly sociable, but tend to prefer human companionship over that of other animals.

Facts About Rat Terrier Puppies

Facts About Rat Terrier Puppies

Rats terriers are a fun and loving dog that can be a wonderful addition to your family. Whether you already own one or are just looking for information, knowing the most about the breed you plan to buy or adopt can save trouble down the road. This energetic breed has three sizes, and fortunately has few health problems.

Size

    Rat terriers are available in three sizes. You might prefer larger dogs, or maybe your lease will only allow dogs up to a certain size. This is certainly a breed that allows for versatility and options. The toy rat terrier is the smallest, and will usually weigh around five pounds when fully grown. The mid-sized rat terrier will weigh a few pounds more, usually no more than about eight. The standard rat terrier is significantly larger, and can weigh up to 35 pounds.

Living Arrangements

    Though rat terriers can live in an apartment with lots of exercise, they're happier in a house with a yard. The yard, however, must be carefully secured as rat terriers are avid diggers and are adept at escaping. The best thing for them is a fence that is buried slightly, or an electric fence. Other options include a tie-out that allows the dog free range of the yard, but is too short to let it escape the fence or yard.

Other Pets

    Rat terrier puppies generally get along well with cats and other dogs. As the name implies, however, they are a dog that likes to hunt small prey. If you have any small pets such as hamsters or birds, you should make sure they're never out in the same room as your rat terrier puppy.

Barking

    Like most terriers, rat terriers have a tendency to be yappy. While some owners can successfully train this out of their dogs, you should know that when you get a rat terrier puppy that excessive barking is likely. This makes them excellent watch dogs because they will bark at the slightest foreign sound but, regularly, it can become a nuisance.

Children

    Rat terriers, like many small dogs, are not recommended in a house with small children.The rough handling that even the most well-intentioned child may provide can often lead these sometimes skittish, high-strung dogs to nip or otherwise show their impatience. Rat terriers, including puppies, also can be food and toy aggressive.

Pit Bull Diet Tips

Pit Bull Diet Tips

The dogs many people commonly think of as pit bulls are actually one of three breeds: the American pit bull terrier, the American Staffordshire terrier, and the Staffordshire bull terrier. These breeds are prone to joint problems, so feeding them properly is important to avoid the dogs becoming overweight and stressing their joints.

Avoid Free Feeding

    In free feeding, the owner leaves the dog food out in the bowl all day long and lets the dog decide when and how much he wants to eat. Free feeding is an unhealthy approach for pit bulls, because they may eat after exercise, which they should not do Some pit bulls may overeat if the food is readily available all the time. Instead, set small amounts of food out at the same times every day to make sure your dog is getting the right amount of healthy food.

Provide a Variety of Foods

    The best food for pit bulls offers a variety in terms of ingredients and textures while still supplying all the dog's nutritional needs. Don't limit your pit bull to a diet of just dry dog food or even just canned dog food. Too much canned food can harm your pit bull's teeth and lead to irritable bowels. As you add different types of food to your pit bull's diet, deep the veggie to meat ratio about 15 percent to 85 percent, and don't forget to include organ meats.

Feed Your Pit Bull Raw Meat

    Introduce a raw meat diet gradually to your pit bull. Begin with the raw meat as a treat, and slowly increase the amounts until he is eating primarily raw meat as the staple portion of his diet. Raw food improves pit bulls' digestive systems and leads to healthier coats, teeth, and skin. Avoid raw pork and raw salmon, however, as both can contain parasites that can damage your dog's digestive system. Choose inexpensive meats such as chicken backs and turkey necks, or find a co-op where you can buy raw meat in bulk. Raw eggs will help your pit bull's coat shine.

Add Raw Vegetables to Your Pit Bull's Diet

    Add some vegetables to your dog's diet for variety and nutrition. Mix together vegetables of different colors, using veggies like kale, Brussels sprouts and Swiss chard for green vegetables, and yellow peppers, yellow squash and yams for yellow vegetables. Vegetables need to be pured before pit bulls can digest them. You'll save time if you pure a lot of veggies all at once and freeze them in meal-sized portions.

Feed on a Regular Schedule

    Make sure your dog's feeding routine matches well with your own daily routine, so feeding him will be easy for you. Give him a cup of healthy food two to four times a day. If he doesn't eat, remove the food to get him used to the idea that he will now be eating on a regular schedule. Place the food before him again at his next regularly scheduled feeding time until he becomes accustomed to the schedule. Feed puppies more often, because they burn a lot of energy as they grow. A quarter of a cup of food six times a day should keep a pit bull puppy healthy.

Minimize Treats

    It's easy to think of doggie treats as something separate from your pit bull's regular diet, but calories from treats add up the same way your dog's full meals do. Minimize treats to one a day or less, and deduct a little from your pit bull's regular food allowance whenever you give him a treat. Meat treats like dried liver are great for pit bulls.

Gestation for a Schnauzer

Gestation for a Schnauzer

The American Kennel Club (AKC) currently recognizes three sizes of schnauzers: miniature, standard and giant. Despite the varying sizes, gestation length is the same for every breed of dog, including the schnauzer. Understanding the progress of gestation for the schnauzer is an important factor for breeding.

About Schnauzers

    The average gestation period for the schnauzer is approximately 63 days, or 9 weeks. Though gestation length is the same for each size of schnauzer, the age at which a schnauzer reaches sexual maturity will vary. A miniature schnauzer matures the earliest at 6 to 12 months of age, while a standard may take 10 to 16 months, followed by the giant schnauzer, which can take up to 24 months to become sexually mature.

Initial Signs of Pregnancy -- Weeks 1 to 3

    In a pregnant schnauzer, one of the first signs noted by the owner will be an increase in appetite. This increase in appetite will also lead to weight gain. Aside from this, the owner may notice that the nipples of the dog have become larger. Some schnauzers may have a personality change in which she becomes more cuddly or loving during her first few weeks of pregnancy. However, these signs do not guarantee pregnancy, as they can occur with a false pregnancy.

Weeks 4 to 6

    As gestation progresses, the breasts on the female schnauzer will begin to fill out. During this time, the owner may also note some vaginal discharge that is clear in color. The stomach will begin to swell as she and her unborn puppies continue to grow. By the end of the sixth week, her nipples will be darker in color and will thicken.

Weeks 7 to 9

    By the seventh week, it will very clear that the schnauzer is pregnant. Some schnauzers may experience hair loss on the stomach. Entering into the eighth week of pregnancy, milk production will begin and squeezing will release milk from the nipples. In week 9, nesting behaviors will be evident as the schnauzer prepares to give birth.

History of the Shih Tzu Dog

History of the Shih Tzu Dog

According to the American Kennel Club, the exact origin of the Shih Tzu is not known. Dogs resembling the Shih Tzu are found in historic art objects from as early as 624 A.D. Other legends claim the small dogs were bred to be "under table dogs" as early as 1,000 years before the time of Christ. Regardless, the Shih Tzu has a long and interesting history.

Meaning

    The Chinese translation of Shih Tzu is lion, according to the American Kennel Club. The lion was an important animal in the Buddhist beliefs. Other names given the dog breed include the "chrysanthemum-faced dog," because the hair around the face grows in many directions.

Early History

    The history of the Shih Tzu prior to the 1600s is mostly speculation. Legend has it that small dogs given as gifts from royalty in Tibet to royalty in China. These dogs were most likely crossed with other small dogs from Tibet and other countries known to China. Early records indicate small dogs, possibly Shih Tzu, were given by Chinese royalty to leaders in countries such as Turkey and Greece as early as 624 A.D., according to the website imperialshihtzu.com.

Modern Shih Tzu

    According to the American Kennel Club, the Dowager Empress Cixi operated a kennel raising Shih Tzu as well as pugs and Pekingese. After her death in 1908, breeding ceased and the breed nearly ended during the communist revolution. In 1930, only seven female and seven male dogs remained. From these animals, breeding resumed in China and England.

English Shih Tzu

    Originally considered part of the Lhasa apso breed, the Kennel Club of England later ruled the Shih Tzu was a separate breed. The Shih Tzu Club of England was formed in 1935. The breed spread from England to other European countries and Australia before World War II.

Shih Tzu in America

    American soldiers returning from Europe after World War II brought the dogs back to the United States. The breed became part of the American Kennel Club in 1969 and is classified as part of the Toy Group.

Senin, 21 Mei 2012

Chihuahua Puppies Information

Getting a new Chihuahua puppy is an experience that you will treasure forever. There are several different things that you should know about Chihuahua puppies so that you can help your puppy make the best transition and be the happiest possible. Understanding your new puppy's wants and needs can help you give him everything that is required for a good start.

Weaning Information

    Chihuahua puppies are usually weaned right around eight weeks of age. A good breeder will probably allow the puppies to spend another week or two with the mother. Even after the mother stops feeding the puppies, with Chihuahuas, there is still a certain amount of behavioral things that the mother teaches the pups. If your puppy is younger than eight weeks old, it is usually important to give him a few feedings a day of puppy milk.

Importance of Supplies

    There are several different supplies that you need with Chihuahua puppies. First of all, before they are about 12 weeks old, expect to use a little bit of puppy milk to supplement their diet. You will also need a puppy food that is especially made for smaller breed puppies. The pieces of food should be small enough to fit into your dog's mouth. Often regular puppy food isn't small enough for Chihuahua puppies, so you might need to open up a bag to see how small the pieces are. You'll also need a food and water dish, a puppy bed, and toys and chews for your puppy. Don't forget to get a small collar and leash that is appropriate for a very small dog.

Behavioral Information

    Chihuahua puppies need to have socialization right away from the time they are brought into your family. They will generally be very nice and loving dogs, but if they aren't exposed to a lot of people, especially children, when they are a few months old, you might find that they have a tendency to bite. Keep them well socialized. Also, play with them often because Chihuahua puppies have much more energy than adults, and more energy than many other breeds of puppies.

Play Information

    There are several ways to play with your Chihuahua puppies. Use a small toy to toss and have them run after. Give them squeaky toys to chew on. You can also play with them by petting them and getting them very excited. Chihuahua puppies need several hours of play per day.

Sleeping Information

    Chihuahua puppies are often known for being big babies about sleeping alone. You might find that you need to keep your Chihuahua with you when you get him. Having a bed or kennel in your own room at night might help him feel safer and happier in his new environment.

Information About the Yorkie-Poo Breed

Yorkie-poos, or Yorkipoos, are a "designer" dog breed that crosses a Yorkshire Terrier (Yorkie) with a toy poodle, one of the many popular poodle crosses being bred today. (Some people may breed Yorkies to miniature poodles, but this is not as popular.)This breed is not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Standards

    Most Yorkie-poos are between three to 15 lbs. and seven to 12 inches tall at the shoulder. They live for about 12 to 15 years. They are usually built like a toy breed, but cannot be considered a toy breed because they are not recognized by the AKC, since the toy group is a division of dog breeds as decided by the AKC. Yorkie-poos can, however, by registered with the American Canine Hybrid Club, and is one of the association's top breeds in popularity.

Temperament

    Yorkie-poos are friendly, energetic and people-oriented dogs. They are very trainable, but can be stubborn, though this is usually overcome by patience and consistency in training. They make good family dogs, but may not tolerate very small children. They are just as willing to run around and play as they are to snuggle up on the couch. They also make good watchdogs despite being so small.

Coat

    Since they are a mixed breed, a Yorkie-poo's coat may have characteristics of either a poodle or a Yorkie. The coat may even be a combination of the two, such as curly hair on the head and wavy or straight hair on the body. Colors can be any of the colors that are bred into poodles and Yorkies. A Yorkie-poo needs to be brushed often to prevent mats in the coat. Trimming at the groomer's depends on the type of the coat the Yorkie-poo has. Tear stains by the eyes can become a problem.

Best Environment

    Though Yorkie-poos are active dogs, they do as well in an apartment as they do in a house with a yard. They are good at exercising themselves indoors and fit very well into a small space. Because of the Yorkie-poo's energetic nature, however, the breed still requires walks, and Yorkie-poos enjoy time at a dog park or other places where they are allowed to run off-leash.

Health Problems

    Some people may think that Yorkie-poos should be healthier than either poodles or Yorkies because of the wider genetic pool, but being a mixed breed does not mean better health. Yorkie-poos can inherit problems from either their Yorkie or poodle heritage, especially problems common to all toy breeds. Examples of possible diseases are luxated patellas (where the patella slides off the knee), hypothroidism (thyroid does not produce enough hormones), hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), mitral valve disease (where the valve between the atrium and left ventricle heart chambers does not close properly) and urolithiasis (stones in the urinary tract). Do not let your Yorkie-poo gain too much weight, as this may cause or exacerbate problems.

Minggu, 20 Mei 2012

The Best Herding Dogs

The Best Herding Dogs

Herding dogs were bred to herd sheep and cattle, making them very intelligent and loyal and therefore suitable family pets. The Herding Group of canines is the newest AKC classification, created in 1983. All the animals in this group herd, but they have very different ways of doing so. According to the American Kennel Club 2005, the top 10 most popular herding dog breeds in the United States were the German shepherd, border collie, collie, Australian shepherd, Shetland sheepdog, old English sheepdog, Pembroke Welsh corgi, Australian cattle dog, Cardigan Welsh corgi and Bouvier des Flandres.

Shetland Sheepdog

    Shelties are extremely obedient and easy to train.
    Shelties are extremely obedient and easy to train.

    The Shetland sheepdog is also known as a Sheltie. This is a small breed that is very intelligent, loyal, sweet mannered and agile. Shelties are easy to train and love to please their owners. They usually get along well with children, but some are overly sensitive and high-strung and may be a poor choice for a family with small children. They make excellent watch dogs and keep a keen eye on anyone who is unfamiliar.

Australian Shepherd

    The Australian shepherd is a working sheep or cattle dog. They are loyal and attentive, but they also require plenty of attention and exercise to keep them out of trouble. They are very easy to train due to their high intelligence and make excellent family pets. They excel at fetching games and pick them up very rapidly. They also make excellent guard dogs for the family. They do require an experienced owner who has plenty of time for the breed.

Collie

    Collies are very obedient and make excellent family pets.
    Collies are very obedient and make excellent family pets.

    The collie is an extremely intelligent and friendly animal. There are two types of collies, the smooth-coated and the rough-coated. The smooth-coated sheds less and is more active than the rough-coated. Collies make loyal companions and rely on lots of social interaction to prevent them from becoming noisy or bored. Collies do wonderfully with children and are very trainable. They also make excellent guard dogs.

Border Collie

    Border collies are strong-eyed herders that use their stare to herd sheep.
    Border collies are strong-eyed herders that use their stare to herd sheep.

    The border collie is by far the smartest of all dog breeds. They are known for their high activity level and their great strength and speed. They need plenty of space to run and need a yard. They are very easy to train due to their intelligence. Border collies are meant to be herding livestock on a farm, so if you do not intend them for this purpose you will need to provide them with plenty of exercise and stimulation. A lack of social interaction and activity will cause the dog to become hyperactive and possibly destructive.

Rice Starch Allergies

Rice Starch Allergies

About 10 percent of allergies in dogs are attributed to food, according to peteducation.com. Dogs generally react to an allergen by itching and scratching their skin, but other signs may be present, too. Although the most common food allergens in dogs are dairy products, proteins, corn and wheat, among others, rice and other starch allergies are rare in dogs.

Signs and Symptoms

    Dogs that are allergic to rice and other starches generally experience three or more bowel movements a day compared with dogs with no known allergies that have just 1.5 on average per day, states peteducation.com. Like other food allergies, consuming rice and starch may cause a dog to profusely itch his face, legs and ears, among other parts of his body. He may also have chronic ear infections, hair loss and skin irritations on his body. Reoccurring ear infections attributed to the presence of yeast in the ear canal and skin problems that don't respond to steroid treatment in younger dogs are telltale signs they have a food allergy.

Rice and Starch Allergy Diagnosis

    An allergy to rice and other starches is generally diagnosed with a food trial. A food trial involves replacing the dog's typical food with a protein and carbohydrate diet--or a diet consisting of foods not normally fed to the dog--for a period of 12 weeks. During this time, the dog consumes no medicines or treats and his behavior is monitored for signs of allergies. The process continues and the diet changes until the food triggering the reaction is determined. The dog generally shows signs of whether or not he's allergic to a particular type of food by Day 21 of the food trial. Although some food allergies may be diagnosed with a blood test, a food trial provides a more accurate confirmation of the allergen.

Rice and Starch Free Diet

    In certain cases, a dog might respond to steroids and antihistamines that block the allergic reaction in the dog when exposed to starch, so he can continue eating the same diet. However, the best remedy is to simply remove rice and starch from the dog's diet after it's confirmed he's allergic to starch products.

Supplements

    Since it's important a dog has a well-balanced diet, including vitamins and nutrients obtained from rice and potatoes, dog owners may want to provide their dog a diet supplement.

Commercial Diets and Alternatives

    Most commercial dog food brands--the kind available in the grocery store--contain rice, potatoes and other starches such as corn meal, which can aggravate your dog's allergies. It's therefore recommended to seek out a natural food brand available in most specialty pet stores. Another alternative is to feed your dog a homemade diet comprised of all protein, vegetables and fruits, selecting from dog-friendly foods you would eat, such as chicken, broccoli, carrots and apples.

Warning

    Dogs allergic to rice and other starches also could be allergic to wheat, soy and gluten, which are more common dog allergens. In addition, a dog's allergies change over time.

    Some dogs may become allergic to an increasing number of foods over time, while others simply "grow out of the allergy," and it goes away. It may be necessary to conduct food trials on the dog periodically over the dog's lifetime to detect these changes.

How to Select a Basset Hound

The basset hound was originally bred for hunting small game such as rabbits. The breed's long ears and wrinkly skin were developed to stir up and hold a scent while tracking.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a basset hound if you want a friendly, loyal, calm companion. They are not aggressive watchdogs.

    2

    Try a basset if you're looking for a good family dog. They are very tolerant and gentle with children.

    3

    Realize that basset hounds slobber much more than other breeds. The No. 1 reason people give up their bassets is because they drool too much.

    4

    Adopt a basset with confidence if you have other pets; they get along well with everyone.

    5

    Make no mistake, this dog may be short, but he is a large ' and sturdy ' pet. Adult males weigh between 55 and 75 pounds and stand less than 15 inches at the shoulder. The female is usually about 10 pounds lighter and an inch shorter than the male.

    6

    Expect to pay between $200 and $500 for a good-quality dog.

    7

    Consider adopting a basset hound from a rescue group. Many are already housebroken and finished with the chewing stage. There is usually nothing wrong with the dog; most often, the owners didn't research the breed and later discovered that they were incompatible.

    8

    Remember that bassets tend to be somewhat stubborn, which means that you must be consistent and patient while training them.

How Can I Get My Pit Bull Registered?

How Can I Get My Pit Bull Registered?

If you have a purebred Pit Bull that is currently unregistered, you can apply for a certificate of registration with one of several dog breed associations, including the American Dog Breed Association, the United Kennel Club and the American Pit Bull Registry. Each association has its own particular requirements, which the Pit Bull must adhere to in order to be registered. Obtaining a certificate of registration will give your dog a purebred status, which will increase the value of the dog and any puppies that result from breeding the dog with other purebred Pit Bulls.

Instructions

    1

    Request a document that includes the information of your dog's family history before you purchase an alleged purebred Pit Bull to ensure that it is in fact a pure bred. You will need to prove that your Pit Bull has three generations of purebred Pit Bulls in its family history on both its mother's and father's side.

    2

    Evaluate your dog to determine which dog breed association you should register with. Check that your Pit Bull has a large head with a broad skull and round eyes, a thick, well-muscled neck, and a stocky, well-muscled frame with straight legs and a deep chest. Your Pit Bull must also have a short-haired coat. Check your Pit Bull's coat for any areas of merle coloration, as the American Pit Bull Registry will not accept a Pit Bull with this coloring. Check your Pit Bull's eyes, as the United Kennel Club will not register a Pit Bull with blue eyes. Both the United Kennel Club and the American Dog Breed Association will not register a Pit Bull with a docked tail, although all three dog associations will accept a Pit Bull with cropped ears. Your dog will be disqualified if it is blind, deaf, shy, aggressive or spayed neutered.

    3

    Contact the dog breed association that you have chosen to register with. Provide the required documentation that proves that your dog has a family history of purebred dogs. Fill out the required application form, and ask the breeder from which you purchased your Pit Bull to sign it to prove that the family history is legitimate. Send the application to the specified address, along with some photographs of your Pit Bull. The association will contact you to inform you of whether your dog is eligible for registry.

How to Adopt a Female Rottweiler Into a Multi-Dog Home

How to Adopt a Female Rottweiler Into a Multi-Dog Home

Rottweilers can be good dogs to have in multi-dog homes because they usually get along well with other canines. However, when bringing them into a home where other animals are already established, it is important to take the time to plan ahead and introduce the dogs carefully. Dogs in your home will follow a pecking order depending on their age and personality, and a new dog -- especially a female one -- will have to find its place within that pecking order. This can take hours, days or even weeks to truly establish.

Instructions

    1

    Learn as much as you can about the female Rottweiler you are adopting. Before you decide to bring it home, spend time getting to know its personality. Take it for walks, see how it interacts with people and other animals, and ask as many questions as you can think of about its background and current attitude from the rescue organization or foster family it is living with. If it has been fighting with other dogs or hides from strange animals, or even acts aggressively in new situations, you should know about them before you take it home and problems occur.

    2

    Keep all of the dogs on a leash when first introducing them. As dogs need to establish themselves in a pecking order, there may be some growling, barking or even nipping at one another during the initial introductory phase. But this should not end in all-out fighting. By keeping the dogs on leashes, you can keep some control over how physical the situation gets. Watch closely, and if either the new dog or the old dogs become too aggressive toward one another, pull them apart until they have calmed down enough to try introducing them again.

    3

    Provide every dog with its own food dish and toys. Rottweilers and other breeds can be territorial of their possessions, and forcing them to share when they have just met can lead to fighting. You can also separate them out by several feet or even into separate rooms when feeding them so they don't crowd one another and cause issues.

    4

    Keep the dogs separated when home alone. For at least the first few weeks or until you are sure that the new dog and the old dogs are getting along, do not leave them together when there is no one around to monitor them. Put the new dog in a crate or kennel so that it can see the other dogs and interact with them, but not get into physical fights with them.

    5

    Provide equal attention to all of the dogs each day. Dogs can become jealous if they see their owner giving more attention to another dog. Don't focus solely on the new dog just because it is new. If you play with one dog for 15 minutes, make sure to give equal play time to the other dogs as soon after as possible so none of them feel left out.

Information on Morkie Puppies

A Morkie is a cross between a Yorkshire terrier and a Maltese. As the website giveadogabone.net points out, this hybrid union results in the puppy's inheritance of the parents' best, or healthiest, characteristics. According to the website designerpuppyinfo.com, a litter of Morkies can range from two to six pups. If you exercise the proper care for them from puppyhood, they can live to be 14 to 16 years old.

Personality

    The Morkie is a social animal. It particularly loves its master, and craves attention from him, This type of dog loves the cuddling touch of its proprietor. However, from the time it learns as a puppy to bark, the Morkie will do so upon seeing a stranger. Once the dog notices that its owner is friendly toward the person it doesn't yet know, it will also warm up to the stranger. Morkies also relish the chance to be around children.

Size

    The Morkie is a miniature dog. According to giveadogabone.net, an average Morkie grows to be 6 to 9 inches tall. However, dog breeders Steve and Teri Campbell report that some members of this breed have grown to be 15 inches tall, and to weigh between 5 and 16 lbs.

Training

    Training this type of dog must begin early. The Morkie can be difficult to potty train due to its stubbornness. Despite the challenging nature of such training, it must be consistent, yet gentle, for it to be effective. As with any other dog, treats and verbal encouragement, such as simply saying, "Good job" when it behaves in an appropriate manner is helpful. A Morkie does not respond well to harsh discipline.

Cleanliness

    Morkies are non- to low-shedding animals. However, according to puppiesanddogs.com, keeping the hair short and well-shampooed is a best practice with this particular breed to avoid debris buildup in the fur. The website also recommends a gently medicated shampoo to kill fleas. Also, brush your Morkie's hair daily.

    The hair is not the only area of concern when it comes to Morkies. Brush your dog's teeth frequently -- at least two times a week -- beginning when it is a puppy. Otherwise, the animal is likely to lose its teeth at a young age.

Other Care Tips and Precautions

    As the Morkie bores easily, give the animal a toy to occupy itself. According to designerpuppiesinfo.com, if you don't, the dog becomes destructive and chews on objects it sees lying around. In addition, Morkies relish going on long walks outdoors. A 20-minute walk can help burn some calories, and some excess energy as well.