Senin, 30 April 2012

What Cockapoos Should Not Eat

What Cockapoos Should Not Eat

The cockapoo, also called cockerpoo or cock-a-poo, is a hybrid breed. Cockapoos are part cocker spaniel and part poodle, with characteristics of both breeds. According to My Cockapoo Friends, cockapoos should be fed a premium dry dog food two to three times per day. Like all dogs, cockapoos should not eat certain foods such as chocolate, alcohol, avocados, meat or fish bones, certain nuts and certain fruits and vegetables.

Chocolate

    According to Dog Food Scoop, chocolate poisoning is the most common form of dog poisoning. Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine, a stimulant also found in cola and tea. Baking chocolate and dark chocolate have the highest levels of theobromine. However, milk chocolate and white chocolate are also dangerous to cockapoos. Initial signs of chocolate poisoning emerge within two four hours of ingestion and may include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and frequent urination. Advanced symptoms include twitching, stiffness, tremors, hyperactivity and sensitivity to noise. Without treatment, a dog could die within 12 to 36 hours. Coffee, tea and other caffeinated beverages produce similar symptoms.

Alcohol

    Alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine or liquor contain ethanol, which is poisonous to cockapoos. Early symptoms of alcohol poisoning include diminished coordination, vomiting, diarrhea, reduced breathing and slow heart rate. Severe poisoning may result in liver damage, brain damage, coma and death.

Avocado

    Avocado pits, leaves, stems and bark contain persin, which is poisonous to all animals. Persin poisoning may damage the lungs or heart. Early symptoms are breathing problems. Advanced symptoms include swelling of the abdomen and fluid accumulation in the abdomen, chest and heart. The amount of fat in avocados can also cause vomiting, abdominal discomfort and pancreatitis.

Cooked Bones

    Bones are not poisonous. However, feeding a cockapoo a bone may lead to an obstruction in the digestive system or laceration along the gastrointestinal tract. Cooked bones, chicken and especially pork bones are the most dangerous and most likely to splinter. Symptoms include abdominal sensitivity, vomiting, rectal bleeding and whimpering. Raw bones are considered to be safe. However, dogs should be supervised at all times to avoid ingestion of a jagged edge.

Nuts

    Certain nuts are dangerous to cockapoos. Macadamia nuts may damage muscle tissue, the nervous system and affect digestion. Symptoms of macadamia poisoning include tremors, weakness in the hind legs, raised temperature, fast heart rate and anxiety. Walnuts, pecans, pistachios and Brazil nuts contain small amounts of aflatoxin, which is toxic to dogs and can cause liver cells to die. That decreases liver function and can lead to gastroenteritis. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, diminished appetite and listlessness.

Additional Fruits/Vegetables

    Raisins and grapes contain an unidentified toxin that causes kidney damage in cockapoos. Onions and garlic contain disulfides and sulfoxides, which can cause damage to a cockapoo's red blood cells, resulting in anemia. Mushrooms contain toxins that affect multiple areas in the cockapoo's body. Mushroom poisoning can lead to death.

Specialized Dog Food for Skin Irritations

Many skin problems in dogs are actually caused by allergies to foods. Once the food allergy happens the dog's skin is more susceptible to other skin issues. Along with medication, a change of diet can provide significant relief from skin problems. Finding a diet that you can maintain your dog on long term can involve an elimination diet. Many limited ingredient diets are available commercially, making it easier to find the right foods for your dog to ease skin issues.

Food allergies

    Some dogs have allergies to the foods they eat just like people. The allergy to the food manifests by causing a histamine reaction, histamines alert the body something is attacking it. This reaction can make the skin and GI tract very irritated. The dog's skin can become red, swollen, itchy or even break out in pustules or sores. If the dog continues to eat this same food that he is allergic to the histamine reaction will continue leaving the dog in a constant state of reaction. This will result in a dog that has skin and GI issues as well as just not feeling very well.

Skin problems

    The histamines from the allergic reaction can affect the skin, causing it to become red, swollen, and itchy. The dog will itch his skin and traumatize it. Once the skin becomes traumatized it becomes a nice place for bacteria to set up shop, resulting in not just irritated but now infected skin. In many cases antibiotics and medicated baths can be necessary to control the infection. The cause of the itching and subsequent infection has not been addressed, however, and the cycle of itching and infection will begin again.

Immediate relief

    If food allergy is the culprit behind your dog's skin issues, you can try an elimination diet. Start by feeding a bland diet of plain rice and boiled chicken, or cottage cheese. Try different combinations of each to find something palatable. These foods are very mild on the stomach as well as nutritious, so they are generally tolerated well by sensitive tummies. Feed this to your dog and continue treating the skin with medications until the skin issues resolve.

Elimination diets

    Add food items back to the diet carefully. Try potato or peas for starch, maybe eggs or lamb for protein. Each time you introduce a new food item wait several weeks before adding another to see if symptoms reoccur. If they do go back to the food that was tolerated well. Some dogs never move past simple boiled chicken and rice. If he does well on it by maintaining his weight, no symptoms, and has a good energy level you may have found the diet of choice for your dog.

Long term

    Dogs on a limited ingredient diet should stay on the diet and not receive any table scraps that may cause a flare-up. Many limited ingredient foods are available at pet stores, making it easier to keep a dog on this type of diet long-term. It can take months for a limited ingredient to show its full effect at controlling an allergy.

How to Care for Boxer Dogs

How to Care for Boxer Dogs

Boxers are exuberant, loyal and very affectionate. These large dogs are very good with families and children, and have become popular pets due to their outgoing personalities and big hearts. Boxers are also extremely athletic, and require lots of space and a lot of exercise. To make sure that you have a long, happy relationship with your boxer, make sure you get off on the right foot with training when the dog is young.

Instructions

    1

    Provide your boxer dog with a place of its own. Buy a dog kennel big enough for the boxer to grow into and put blankets in it for the puppy to nest in. This kennel will become your puppy's "room," and help you house train the boxer.

    2

    Take your boxer dog to get his shots as scheduled, so that he's vaccinated against diseases like rabies.

    3

    Feed your puppy a high-quality puppy food. Boxers are large-breed dogs and must receive plenty of nutrition. Feed boxer puppies twice a day, in a designated spot, so that the puppy learns where it eats and learns to come to that spot when you call it.

    4

    Take the boxer for walks once an hour. The boxer needs to learn to go to the bathroom outside, and taking him out consistently will teach him to do so. When the boxer goes to the bathroom outside, reward him with praise and a treat.

    5

    Give your boxer plenty of exercise. These dogs are intense and highly energetic, and need a lot of playtime. Take the boxer to the park to play catch, chase and tug-of-war. Boxers who are not getting enough exercise can become bored and destructive.

    6

    Socialize your boxer to both people and other dogs starting at an early age. Most boxers are very social to people and dogs, but they will be friendlier and more relaxed if they are exposed to company when they are young.

    7

    Use upbeat, positive reinforcement during obedience training. Take a positive leadership role with boxers to gain their loyalty and respect.

How Long Should Newborn English Bulldogs Nurse?

How Long Should Newborn English Bulldogs Nurse?

Congratulations; It's a Puppy

    English bulldogs (sometimes called British bulldogs) are pregnant for about 63 days. Some bitches can have normal births, but many need to have Cesarean sections. The puppy's heads are very large and the mother's pelvis very narrow. If the puppies are born by Cesarean section, the mother needs to be milked of her colostrum, which carries important antibodies for the pups. There is some colostrum made commercially (see Resources below). After the first 24 hours, regular commercial puppy milk formula can be used if the mother is unable to nurse her puppies. The puppies that nurse within twelve hours of being whelped have the best chance to survive.

It's Dinnertime Already?

    Newborn English bulldog puppies need to feed every two hours for the first four or five days. It may seem like the puppies are feeding all of the time, as not all of the mother's nipples have milk in them simultaneously. If you have to bottle feed, then it's every two hours until the puppies are about six days old. Then, it's six to eight feedings for week two, and four feedings at three weeks on. The puppies should have 1cc of formula per ounce that they weigh, although they may not be hungry enough to finish their bottles.

Please, Sir, Can I Have Some More?

    Puppies start eating soft food at about one month of age, but they still need to nurse. You need to check the face wrinkles to clean them, as neither the puppies nor their mother may be able to clean them properly. Leaving food in the wrinkles can lead to sores and infection. The mother bulldog will start to wean the pups gradually between five and seven weeks of age. This is a good time to introduce hard foods, such as kibble. All nursing from the mother bulldog stops by eight weeks of age, unless your veterinarian insists otherwise for special cases.

Minggu, 29 April 2012

How to Identify a Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog

How to Identify a Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog

The Louisiana Catahoula Leopard dog is, as the name suggests, a native breed of Louisiana as well as the state dog. Its exact origins are unknown, though it is believed to be the result of crossbreeding between native American dogs and the Nordic Wolfhound some 3 to 5 hundred years ago. The breed is very rare and makes a decent watchdog. The Catahoula is named after a parish in Northeastern Louisiana and excels in rounding up wild and feral boars and hogs in swampy march conditions. This is an extremely dangerous function and must be performed in concert with several other dogs to have a hope of success. A boar that knows it is being hunted has a nasty habit of turning and attacking those who would hunt it. Such an animal is quite capable of killing the dogs as well as goring the hunter in a matter of minutes. To avoid this the dogs must instinctively work as a team to harry the animal until it can be restrained.

Instructions

    1

    First examine the dogs body, paying attention to its dimensions and weight. It should stand roughly 2 feet high at the shoulder and weigh about 60 pounds. Some males can weigh significantly more due to an increase in muscle mass upon maturing, reaching almost 95 pounds, but this is very uncommon. In any case the dog will always look well-proportioned, not gaining or losing weight easily. It should be long-bodied, not quite one and a half times long as it is tall. The tail should be short and thin, long enough to reach to the hocks, but is always held up or over the back. The legs should be thick and sturdy. The body should be athletic and tubular, with a wide chest to provide room for a good sized pair of lungs.

    2

    Look at the dogs head. It should be very unprepossessing, and people often get the impression that its just a little too small for the size of the body. This is mainly due to the very thick and long neck upon which the skull sits. The skull should be short, wide and flat along the top of the head. Ears should be small and triangular, hanging low and well to the rear. The nose should be slightly upturned at the end of a muzzle that is of equal length to the skull.

    3

    Finish by looking at the dogs fur. It should have a single coat of short, water-resistant hair over tight skin. The dogs coloring is partly what contributes to its name. Often the dog will have a mixof black, gray, red and tan fur that would serve well to break up its outline in the marshy backwoods of Louisiana. The breed also occasionally displays an interesting recessive trait. A Catahoula with a light grey or tan coat will have spotting almost identical to that of the leopard. Its theorized that this was the result of natural selection in that it is particularly effective camouflage in low-light, overcast conditions. If the dog matches this description then its a Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog.

What Is the Difference Between a Collie & a Sheltie?

What Is the Difference Between a Collie & a Sheltie?

At first glance, collies and Shetland sheepdogs or "shelties" seem very similar to each other. But they're two distinct breeds with many differences. Though the sheltie looks like a collie in miniature, the breed requires more activity to meet its high energy than the more laid-back collie. Collies descend from Scotland and were bred to keep sheep herds together; the sheltie, however, was raised in the 1800s on the Shetland Islands off the coast of Scotland and kept on farmland to prevent sheep from wandering into crops to graze. Both breeds share lineage with the border collie.

Height Differences

    Shetland sheepdogs require more exercise than collies.
    Shetland sheepdogs require more exercise than collies.

    Shelties stand at about 14 inches, weighing between 15 and 25 lbs. Collies weigh in between 60 and 75 lbs and stand nearly 26 inches at the shoulder. Even though advertisements might announce the birth of a "toy collie" litter, "toy collies" or "miniature collies" don't exist.

Temperaments

    The calm temperament of the collie can be mistaken for aloofness, while a sheltie's outgoing, friendly nature makes this breed appear clownish once it gets to know someone. Both breeds tend to be shy around strangers, but the collie is much more reserved than a sheltie.

Exercise Requirements

    Even though the sheltie's size might lead you to think it would make a great apartment dog compared with the larger collie, the opposite is true: Shelties need an active lifestyle to thrive, requiring several walks and play times daily, while collies prefer the couch and perhaps one long walk a day.

Coat Colors and Textures

    Although the sheltie's coat is similar to the rough-coated collie, its markings and colorings exceed to two basic collie coats. Shelties come in two coat colors, even though the American Kennel Club labels their marking as "tricolor." Black and brown with varying degrees of sable, blue merle and black make the sheltie's coat dramatic in different light. A collie's abundant coat is predominantly sable (reddish brown) and white, rough (long-haired) or smooth (short-haired). The rough-coated collie can have blue merle and white, but never black as seen in shelties.

Family Dogs

    Both breeds make excellent family dogs. Collies, the more docile of the breeds, make more sense for a less-active urban family, while the sheltie needs an outlet for its energy and needs a yard. Shelties exceed at agility competition and training. If small children are in the home, be sure to exercise your sheltie often. Problems with herding the children or nipping at their heels can develop if a sheltie is bored, mainly because it is under-exercised.

How to Identify a Manchester Terrier

How to Identify a Manchester Terrier

The Manchester Terrier displays its true terrier temperament--it is cunning and eager to learn. It is also quite loyal to its family, and thrives on attention. This breed would do well with classes such as obedience and agility classes and trials. Without obedience training, the Manchester Terrier may become overly alpha, so in addition to obedience classes, it should be socialized when young, especially with younger children and other animals. If it becomes bored, it will destroy your belongings, so it should either be crated if you are not home for long periods of time--or make sure it has plenty of keep busy toys and other things to do.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Manchester Terrier. The rich mahogany markings help give this breed an elegant look to its compact, muscular body, at the same time expressing power and agility. The standard and toy Manchester Terriers are the same, with the exception of the size of the dog and how the ears look.

    2

    Check the size of the toys and standards. The toy varieties do not exceed 12 pounds. The standard Manchester Terrier weighs over 12 pounds and up to 22 pounds. Both toys and standards are a bit longer than they are tall. The height is measured from the ground to the top of the shoulders and the length is measured from the highest point of the shoulders to the rearmost part of the upper thigh.

    3

    Make sure the Manchester Terriers expression is astute and alert. The long, narrow head is just about flat and looks like a dull wedge in both the frontal and profile views. The nose is black in both the toy and standard terriers. The black eyes are close together and do not protrude or sink into the skull. The ears for the standard may or may not be cropped, but should stand up. The toys ears should not be cropped, and it should stand erect.

    4

    Look at the body of the Manchester Terrier. The graceful neck becomes larger as it arches into the shoulders. The narrow chest is quite deep. The compact front feet are arched, with the two middle toes a bit longer than the other toes, protected by thick pads and black toenails. The muscular rear thighs (upper and lower) are equal in length. The rear feet are cat-like and protected by thick pads and black nails. The medium length tail should not reach past the hock joint, and should taper to a point, carried in an upward curve, but not curved over the back.

    5

    Pet the smooth coat. It is short and should feel dense and tight. It should be a glossy jet black with rich tan markings, including over the eyes and a small spot on each cheek. There is tan under the neck, on the muzzle and in the inside of the ears. This breed has no white coloring or markings and should be no other color other than black and tan.

About Toy Chihuahuas

About Toy Chihuahuas

Toy chihuahuas are affectionate dogs that make good companions. Because of their small size, chihuahuas are popular with the elderly and apartment dwellers. It is the smallest dog breed in the world and the oldest in America. While they are often referred to as teacup or toy chihuahuas, these terms are not for official breeds but merely descriptions.

The History of Toy Chihuahuas

    Chihuahuas are native to Mexico and they named for the Chihuahua state in that country. They are thought to have originated in the Techichi breed, which is a similar short stocky dog. They were once valued by the pre-Columbian Indians and prized by the Mexican upper class. Toy chihuahuas were brought to Europe in at the end of the 1800s. They were registered with the American Kennel Club in 1904. According to the Chihuahua Information website, this small pet is the 12th most popular breed in the United States.

Appearance

    As one of the smallest dog breeds, toy chihuahuas are usually around 6 to 9 inches tall and weigh about 2 to 6 pounds. The body of this dog is very muscular and longer than the tail. The head is round and the dog has a short, pointed muzzle. Toy chihuahuas are known for their large ears and big round eyes. They have short hair and come in many colors such as black, white and many shades of brown. When they are born there are typically about four puppies in each litter and they often live for about 14 to 18 years.

Behavior

    While chihuahuas are one of the most loyal dog breeds, they can be difficult if not trained properly. Often a toy chihuahua will become attached to only one or two children and become difficult around other people. Because of this they are generally not good with children. They socialize well with other chihuahuas but not with dogs of different breeds.

Chihuahua Care

    Dog owners need to take special care with toy chihuahuas. To prevent discipline problems they need to be walked regularly and disciplined carefully. If they are babied they can become snappish and spoiled. The toy chihuahua does not need a lot of grooming. Brush the dog and clip the nails as needed. Bathe it about once a month. Chihuahuas do not like chilly weather and are vulnerable to colds. Also take care not to let them jump from high places, as toy chihuahuas often have joint problems.

How to Decide Whether to Get a German Shepherd

The German Shepherd is a high profile breed of dog, which you see often serving as a guide dog for a blind person or accompanying a police officer. A German Shepherd is an excellent choice for these roles because it is highly trainable. It makes a fine pet too, even if you do not have a medical or physical need. Read on to learn how to decide whether to get a German Shepard.

Instructions

    1

    Consider a German Shepherd if you need a guard dog or simply enjoy the company of a large dog. It is important to remember, however, if not properly trained, a German Shepherd can be mean to you and your family. A well-trained German Shepherd gets along well with children and other pets, but there is risk in getting a German Shepherd if you are unsure whether it had proper training.

    2

    Decide whether you can accommodate a German Shepherd standing 22 to 26 inches tall and weighing 75 to 85 pounds. If you plan to let the dog spend frequent time inside you need a medium or large house with space for the dog to move around. The breed gets some of its exercise in the house and on walks, but ideally needs a large yard.

    3

    Choose a German Shepherd for a low-maintenance dog. The breed sheds heavily during the summer and requires brushing, but needs only infrequent bathing and does not require trimming.

    4

    Learn about the personality of a German Shepherd. The German Shepherd gets along well with their families and needs to spend time with them but are usually weary of strangers and do not make friends quickly. The breed needs far more mental stimulation than most breeds. Significant time must be given to a German Shepherd to train it to perform obedience tasks, tricks or play demanding games in order to keep it stimulated and happy.

    5

    Take into consideration common health problems such as elbow and hip dysplasia and skin problems. The life expectancy of a German Shepherd is around 10 to 14 years, however, is in line with or longer than most large breeds.

    6

    Get better acquainted with the needs of a German Shepherd by visiting the German Shepherds website.

Information on Mini Shar-Peis

Information on Mini Shar-Peis

The Chinese shar-pei is a dog known for its very loose skin, which creates wrinkles that are predominant on the head, neck and withers. The miniature Chinese shar-pei is no exception. It has been bred as a downsized version of the standard shar-pei using a recessive gene that is carried in their DNA. While the standard shar-pei weighs between 45 and 60 lbs., the miniature shar-pei weighs between 25 and 40 lbs.

General Appearance

    Like the standard shar-pei, the miniature shar-pei is broad and compact. The most notable and recognizable feature of the shar-pei is the abundant wrinkling around the head and body. The coat of the miniature shar-pei is a distinctive feature of the breed. It can be short, harsh and bristly. It stands straight on the body, but lays flat on the limbs. The miniature shar-pei comes in many different colors, but only solid colors and sable are acceptable when showing the dog. The shar-pei has a black pigmented mouth, similar to that of a Chow Chow.

Temperment

    The miniature shar-pei is known for being alert, playful, confident, adaptable, affectionate, easily trained and relatively clean and quiet. It is very loyal and bonds quickly with its family. Miniature shar-peis can be somewhat standoffish with strangers, but show great devotion to their family, according to the American Kennel Club. Because it is such a strong-willed dog, the miniature shar-pei needs a strong, confident owner. It is a confident dog and needs a firm, but gentle, and consistently authoritative figure or it will attempt to dominate its owner, says the Dog Breed Info Center website.

Daily Care and Grooming

    Miniature shar-peis have a considerable need for exercise and should be walked daily. Shar-peis are sensitive to heat, and proper care should be taken when exercising the dog during the warmer months. Limit the walks to early or later in the day when the sun is not at its peak, and provide the dog with a steady supply of water. The miniature shar-pei, if given plenty of exercise, will be peaceful indoors. A miniature shar-pei can live up to 10 years.

    Daily brushing should be a part of your routine. Since this breed does not have an undercoat, its shedding is limited and will only shed a little year-round. Keeping the dog bathed about once a week will remove dead hair and keep its skin and coat healthy.

Origin

    The miniature shar-pei has been developed using recessive genes in the DNA of standard shar-peis. Some breeders hope that this gene will become dominant through selective breeding, says the Dog Breed Info Center website. The Chinese shar-pei was used in China as a multipurpose dog. It was used as a guard dog and in catching vermin, herding and tracking. The Chinese believed that the scowl and the black pigmented mouth would scare off evil spirits, according to the American Kennel Club.

How to Identify a Welsh Springer Spaniel

How to Identify a Welsh Springer Spaniel

The Welsh Springer Spaniel has high rear drive, giving it smooth action and allowing it to move quite fast. It is an active breed that is very loyal and affectionate with its family. It can be aloof to strangers, and should be socialized at an early age. This spaniel makes a good family dog and a good hunter.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Welsh Springer Spaniel. It is a muscular breed with substance, but not enough to make it coarse. A compact breed, it is not leggy and is built for endurance. Males are 18 to 19 inches at the shoulders and females are 17 to 18 inches at the shoulders. The length of the body is slightly longer than the height measurement, but in some dogs it may be the same as the height, giving the Welsh Springer Spaniel a rectangular shape.

    2

    Make sure the head is balanced and in proportion with the rest of the dog. It is not a coarse head, and while somewhat wide, should not be too wide, nor should it be too thin to be considered racy. The oval eyes are medium to dark brown and have a soft expression. They are medium sized and are not prominent, but should also not be sunken. The ears hang close to the side of the face and are lightly feathered. They have some length, but should not be long enough to reach the nose when extended forward. The nose may be black or brown.

    3

    Check that neck and body are proportionate. The long neck arches into the long, well-angulated shoulders. The muscular chest is somewhat deep and well-developed. The front legs are well boned, but should not be coarse. The front feet are cat-like and have well arched toes protected by thick pads. The muscular rear has enough bone to support it, but is not coarse. The rear feet are also cat-like and have well arched toes that are protected by thick pads. The tail is usually docked and is carried a bit up when the Welsh Springer Spaniel is excited.

    4

    Pet the soft coat. It is straight and flat and should never be wiry. It is weatherproof. There is moderate feathering on the backside of the forelegs, the chest, the underside of the body and the hind legs (just above the hocks). The coat is a rich red and white. While this is the only color combination in this breed, it can be displayed on the dog in any color.

Sabtu, 28 April 2012

Hypoallergenic Canine Diet

Hypoallergenic Canine Diet

Canine food allergies result in skin problems, digestive problems and even respiratory problems. If your dog suffers from food allergies, your veterinarian may recommend a hypoallergenic diet as a method of treatment.

Function

    Hypoallergenic diets are specially formulated to remove specific food allergens from your dog's food in order to eliminate food allergies.

Types

    Hypollergenic diets can be purchased commercially or homemade. Commercial diets are available in canned and kibble forms, in pet stores or from your veterinarian. Homemade food can be made using ingredients from the grocery store.

Effects

    When being fed a hypoallergenic diet, your dog's symptoms normally clear within one to 10 weeks. Symptoms should not reappear as long as the hypoallergenic diet is fed.

Benefits

    Hypoallergenic diets are highly digestible. Some commercially available hypoallergenic diets guarantee your money back if your dog does not like or will not eat the food.

Warning

    It is important not to deviate from your dog's recommended hypoallergenic diet to prevent reoccurances of food allergies. If you dog's condition does not improve or grows worse, contact your veterinarian for further treatment.

What Is a Bull Mastiff?

What Is a Bull Mastiff?

A Bull Mastiff is a type of dog that is known for its power. The breed is a mix between a Mastiff and a Bulldog and was first brought about in England in the 1900s. The Bull Mastiff was found to possess all the qualities needed to cope with poachers that were causing major problems on many of the game reserves. Other dog breeds would simply alarm the poachers and cause them to flee when the goal was to capture them to prevent further poaching. The Bull Mastiff could silently stalk, knock down and hold down a poacher until the authorities arrived.

Companionship

    The Bull Mastiff can be a great companion to anyone wanting his dog to possess that quality. Mastiffs are very loyal and will do what they can to provide protection to their owner. This is because the Bull Mastiff has a natural instinct of being on guard. If you leave to go somewhere, your Bull Mastiff will certainly want to join you on your trip. Bull Mastiffs hold pleasing their owners high on their list of priorities. Give them plenty of attention, as leaving them to their own devices could cause them to have behavioral issues.

Appearance

    A Bull Mastiff is not for someone seeking a dog that doesn't get very big. Male Mastiffs have been known to weigh over 125 lbs. Female Mastiffs are slightly smaller than males, but have still weighed in at more than 115 lbs. Both male and female Bull Mastiffs can have a shoulder height of 25 inches, which is tall compared to many other types of dogs. Bull Mastiffs have large heads and muscular bodies with fur that is water resistant.

Aggression

    Because of a Bull Mastiff's size and strength, any signs of aggression shown by it must be taken seriously. The two main things that stir up aggression in Bull Mastiffs are male dogs and people they're not familiar with. Bull Mastiffs need an owner that can handle them and that won't be pushed around. Although Mastiffs are surprisingly good with kids, small children should not own a fully grown Bull Mastiff. A simple surge of excitement in a Bull Mastiff could cause it to accidentally knock over and harm a young child.

Issues

    One thing that many people take an issue with when it comes to Bull Mastiffs is the fact that they slobber. Bull Mastiffs will likely slobber on you and everyone in your household and there is little you can do to prevent this. Keep a slobber rag handy to dry off with after a slobber attack. Another issue with Bull Mastiffs is that they are not easily trained. Many other types of dogs will learn commands quicker than a Bull Mastiff will. Because of this, much patience is required to train it.

The Top Ten Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs

The Top Ten Most Dangerous Foods for Dogs

Many of the foods that people enjoy on a daily basis are not safe for their pets to eat. Dogs can develop severe health problems and even die from eating the wrong types of food. Before you feed your dog scraps from the table, ensure that you don't feed it something that could cause it harm. While several things may not be good for your dog, these ten items top the list of foods dangerous for your dog.

Chocolate

    Most pet owners know not to give their dogs any form of chocolate, because chocolate can cause a dog to have diarrhea, seizures or an abnormal heartbeat. Chocolate is toxic to dogs and is fatal if consumed in mass quantities.

Macadamia Nuts

    It takes as little as six macadamia nuts to make your dog sick, as these nuts are poisonous to dogs. Macadamia nuts eave your dog weak, overheated and paralyzed in its hind legs.

Fruit Pits and Seeds

    Unlike humans, dogs do not know that pits and seeds are not for eating. Fruits like peaches and plums have pits that contain deadly levels of cyanide, while persimmon seeds can block your dog's intestinal track.

Raw Eggs, Meat and Fish

    Raw eggs may infect your dog with Salmonella or E.coli and cause it to lose its coat over time. Raw meats and fish contain deadly bacteria as well as potential parasites.

Caffeine

    Beverages like tea, coffee and energy drinks that contain caffeine can cause bleeding, heart palpitations and rapid breathing if ingested by your dog. A large enough dose is fatal and smaller dogs are more susceptible.

Grapes and Raisins

    It takes a small amount of grapes or raisins to cause your dog to become ill or depressed. Grapes and raisins also cause kidney failure in dogs.

Onions and Garlic

    Whether fresh or in a powder, onions and garlic causes your dog's red blood count to lower, which leads to anemia. A small amount is okay, but continually feeding onions or garlic to your dog over time can cause poisoning.

Alcohol

    Dogs suffer the same negative effects from alcohol as people including vomiting, difficulty with movement and liver failure. A dog may go into a coma or die from drinking alcohol.

Avocado

    Avocados contain a fungicide called persin, which is toxic to dogs in large quantities. Persin is found in all parts of the avocado plant, so block your dog's access to avocado plants if you grow them in your garden.

Table Scraps and Junk Food

    The food people eat is not safe for dogs because it contains large amounts of sugar, salt and other substances that are unhealthy for a dog. Table scraps often contain the inedible parts of meat, such as bones and fat, which are dangerous for dogs to eat.

Jumat, 27 April 2012

The Best List of Natural Dog Foods

The Best List of Natural Dog Foods

Dog lovers have become increasingly concerned with providing a natural diet for their canine companions. It is a misconception that dogs are carnivores and prefer meat above other food groups. According to Texas A&M University, canines are omnivorous (eat plants and animals) and eat meat when the opportunity presents itself or when no other food source is available. When choosing the best natural dog food for your canine, look for dog foods that contain both natural meats and vegetables.

AvoDerm Natural

    AvoDerm Natural dog food promotes a healthy skin and coat in dogs.
    AvoDerm Natural dog food promotes a healthy skin and coat in dogs.

    The AvoDerm Natural line of dog foods is best for dogs with skin and coat disorders. The use of avocado in the food is good for the health of a dog's skin and coat, because the fruit is high in vitamins A, C and E as well as essential fatty acids. Reports about avocado being toxic for dogs have circulated the Internet; however, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) states that avocados cause only gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea. In addition, some consumer reviews advise that dogs that eat avocados pass gas more frequently. AvoDerm Natural dog foods come in different varieties, such as chicken, lamb and vegetarian, that meet the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) standards. AvoDerm Natural dog food is available online and at national pet food stores such as PetSmart, Petco and Animal World Network.

Grandma Lucy's

    Grandma Lucy's Artisan dog foods contain USDA grade meats.
    Grandma Lucy's Artisan dog foods contain USDA grade meats.

    Grandma Lucy's Artisan dog food varieties use U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grade lamb, venison (deer), chicken, pork or bison. This natural dog food is one of the best because it also mixes fruits and vegetables with meat to provide a nutritionally balanced dog food. To comply with the standards set by the AAFCO, Grandma Lucy's Artisan dog foods incorporate the recommended amounts of vitamins and minerals in each variety of food. Grandma Lucy's Artisan dog foods can be purchased directly from the company's Web site or at national pet food retailers such as Petco and PetSmart.

Artemis Maximal Dog

    Artemis Maximal meets AAFCO nutritional standards to provide your dog a balanced diet.
    Artemis Maximal meets AAFCO nutritional standards to provide your dog a balanced diet.

    Artemis Maximal Dog is a grainless natural dog food that contains a good amount of meat and quality ingredients, according to Dog Food Analysis.com. The other quality ingredients in Artemis Maximal include dry skim milk, various vegetables, probiotics (considered good bacteria that aid in digestion), vitamins and minerals. All ingredients in Artemis Maximal Dog meet AAFCO standards. Unlike AvoDerm and Granny Lucy's, Artemis Maximal is not sold at major pet food stores but it is sold online at sites such as Animal World Network and Adam's Horse and Pet Supply.

Siberian Husky AKC Colors

Siberian Husky AKC Colors

The Siberian Husky, originally bred as a sled dog, have a high level of endurance. The Siberian Husky is a well mannered dog that likes people. The coat of the Siberian Husky is thick and coarse as they were orginally bred to be in cold climates. The Husky's coat can be solid in color, two-colored, or even tri-colored.

Solid Colors

    Several solid colors have American Kennel Club recognization. The AKC recognizes solid white, tan, brown and black huskies as being within breed standards.

Two-Color Huskies

    Several combinations of colors are recognized by the AKC as being within the breed standards. Standard colors include black and white, gray and white, and red and white. Sable and white is also an AKC recognized color combination. Sable fur is reddish at the root and ends in a dark brown or black tip. The undercoat of a sable colored dog is red, copper or brown. Agouti and white huskies are sometimes called "wild colored" with the white being more cream like. Agouti fur is black at the tip and root with a lighter, yellowish color in between. Other two-colored Huskies that the AKC acknowledges include the brown and white, copper and white, gray and black, tan and black and tan and white.

Tri-Colored Huskies

    Tri-colored Huskies can meet AKC standards in certain combinations. Black, gray and white Huskies are within the AKC standards as are black, tan and white. Brown, black and white is also an AKC recognized color combination.

Markings

    Huskies can come with various markings on the face and body. Three types of markings are recognized by the American Kennel Club. A husky with Black Points has black ears and noses. A Husky with pinto markings has an excess of white.The white typically is over the shoulders and front legs, and the rest of the body can be any other recognized color. A piebald Husky has over 30 percent white fur and then color in spots or patches on the body.

How to Feed Sick Newborn Puppies

How to Feed Sick Newborn Puppies

Newborn puppies become sick for many reasons. The first and best recourse of action with a sick puppy is to seek the medical help of a veterinarian. The most accurate way to determine the health of a newborn puppy is to weigh the baby daily using a gram scale. If a puppy loses weight or ceases to gain weight then there is something wrong and the puppy may be showing early signs of sickness. At this point the newborn puppy needs to be fed by hand so the exact milk intake can be determined.

Instructions

    1

    Weigh the puppy twice a day to determine daily weight gain when hand feeding or when the puppy's health is in question. A puppy should gain between 10 to 20 grams per day, depending upon the breed. Record the weight gain or loss twice a day in a chart book.

    2

    Maintain the room temperature at 85 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter for the newborn sick puppy. Newborn puppies will be unable to digest their milk if the temperature dips to below 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Many people keep the whelping room hot with the thermostat, utilize hot-water bottles or use a heating pad set to low to keep puppies warm. Never lay a puppy directly onto a heating pad. Place a blanket over the heating pad or fill a plastic sandwich bag with uncooked rice to lay upon the heating pad and nestle the puppy on top of.

    3

    Buy a baby bottle for puppies or for human babies. Small-breed dogs will need a newborn-puppy bottle for a small-breed puppy but a large-breed newborn puppy can easily use a human-baby bottle.

    4

    Check the hole in the end of the bottle to make sure it is large enough that when the bottle is turned upside down and gently squeezed the thick, newborn-puppy-milk re-placer will easily drip from the nipple. If the bottle must be forcibly depressed before the milk will drip out then enlarge the hole using a heated sewing needle pressed into the hole several times.

    5

    Mix formula according to the directions on the milk substitute label or follow your veterinarian's advice. Warm the formula to 101 degrees Fahrenheit. Check the temperature using a thermometer. Feed the puppy as much as it will readily consume every two to three hours all day and night. Newborn sick puppies must be nursed around the clock. If a feeding is missed then the puppy may die.

    6

    Pat the puppies back gently until it burps after every bottle. Newborn puppies must be burped after every meal just like human babies or they will suffer from a stomach ache.

    7

    Wipe away any formual that has dribbled onto the puppy's face, paws or fur. Keep the puppy clean by wiping with a warm wash cloth.

    8

    Stimulate the newborn puppy to urinate and defecate after feeding by rubbing its anal area with a warm wash cloth. Gently stroke until the puppy urinates and defecates. Wipe up the waste with the warm wash cloth. Puppies cannot eliminate naturally for the first two weeks of life without performing this function that imitates the mother dog's licking action.

    9

    Discard all unused formula promptly. Wash the baby bottle thoroughly between each use.

Characteristics of a Wheaten Terrier

Characteristics of a Wheaten Terrier

The wheaten terrier is a breed of dog characterized as an athletic, medium-size dog. The wheaten terrier was labeled for its wheaten color in hues of golden beige and cream and given originally to differentiate the specific breed from the red-coated Irish terrier and the Kerry blue terrier. Although considered a generally healthy, people-oriented dog the wheaten terrier is not a for every family and there certain things they need to make good pets.

Temperament

    Wheaten terriers are energetic and loyal dogs who are usually good with children. With its sturdy frame, the dog is seldom injured by child falls or play and is tolerant of ear and tail pulling. The Your Purebred Puppy website claims the wheaten terrier acts as if it were a puppy for its entire life and may get overexcited and greet people at the door by barking, jumping and running through the house.

Wheaten Coat

    The wheaten terrier has a very soft, cream to brown-colored coat that is wavy in design. Because wheatens do not have an undercoat, shedding is limited and is nonexistent in some cases when combed daily; brushing makes the coat too fluffy and uncharacteristic of the breed. Those with allergies often seek wheaten terriers as loyal companions because of this trait. The coat keeps growing and must be clipped by an experienced dog owner or a professional groomer.

Activity

    Wheaten terriers require regular exercise. It is a very active breed and can thrive in any living environment if the dog is active which may require many walks per day, play time in the yard or time at the dog park. A wheaten terriers must be leashed on walks or it may run from its owner. The breed requires early and consistent training.

Physical Characteristics

    The wheaten terrier is a medium sized dog with V shaped ears that lay down on its rectangular-shaped skull. The breed has a strong athletic build with a straight back line. The face of the wheaten contains a black nose, a scissor bite, black lips and almond-shaped brown or auburn-colored eyes that are wide-set on its face. Wheaten puppies are born a darker color and may take up to two years to finally reach the wheaten color.

Kamis, 26 April 2012

The Best Dog Foods for a German Shorthair Pointer

The Best Dog Foods for a German Shorthair Pointer

A German shorthaired pointer is known for its hunting ability. Nutrition is the cornerstone of an active, healthy dog, and it has a profound impact on a German shorthaired pointer's performance in the field, according to veterinarian Chris Pinney. While some dog owners like the idea of making their pet's food from scratch, high-quality commercial-brand dog foods are a better choice since they are nutritionally complete and balanced.

Puppies

    From birth to 14 months, feed your German shorthaired pointer top-grade commercial puppy formula to ensure proper growth. Many companies that specialize in formulating dog foods have precisely blended ingredients to provide optimal amounts of calories, protein, calcium, phosphorous and vitamins. The first year of your German shorthaired pointer's life sets the stage for its health and happiness in later years. Generally, supplementation is not necessary if you're feeding your puppy a high-quality food. Follow the package directions to determine the daily ration, and feed half of it in the morning and half in the evening. Allow your puppy to eat all it wishes for 20 minutes, and then remove the food from its reach until the next meal. Your puppy will quickly learn the good habit of eating on schedule. Refrain from feeding it table scraps and treats between meals to avoid upsetting the nutritional balance, but let it chew on a nylon bone to satisfy a puppy's craving to chew. Replenish fresh, filtered water daily, and wash the bowl at least once a week.

Adult Dogs

    After 14 months, switch your pointer to an adult maintenance formula in the same brand for the smoothest transition. Some companies make a single formula for all stages of life, but they're usually targeted for puppies and are too rich for adult dogs. Continue to feed two smaller meals per day rather than one large one, since German shorthair pointers are prone to bloating, which can be a dangerous medical condition. To help ensure the best life possible for your dog, be zealous about keeping its weight at a healthy level, but don't underfeed it, either. The standard for small males is 55 pounds, while large ones can weigh up to 70 pounds. The standard for females is 45 to 60 pounds, depending on body type. More than 10 percent over that weight is considered obese.

Hunting Season

    During field training or if you go hunting with your German shorthaired pointer, it will need 35 to 40 percent more calories. Choose a nutritionally dense food that is higher in fat than your dog's regular food. Feed 25 percent of the daily ration two hours before training or hunting, and the rest of it an hour afterward. Never feed an hour or less before rigorous activity because of the tendency to bloat. Once hunting season is over, switch back to the dog's regular feeding routine.

Treats

    Reserve treats for training sessions. Some German shorthaired pointers enjoy avocados, and you can offer a couple of bite-sized pieces occasionally between meals if you choose. The breed generally doesn't need dietary variety to satisfy its cravings, and they can become finicky eaters and learn to crave treats if they're frequently given things other than their regular diet. Do not feed it bones -- ever, according to Pinney. Not only can they shatter, splinter or become lodged in the throat and gastrointestinal tract, but they create nutritional imbalances because of the many minerals in bone. Flavored nylon chew bones are fine, however. Even large chunks of them are easily digested by the pointer's digestive system. The feeding of bones is disputed among animal experts. Some believe it is vital; others believe it is dangerous.

Senior Dogs

    Switch to a senior formula when your dog reaches 7 years old to provide the highest nutrition possible while keeping weight at an optimal level. These formulas usually include more fiber and less fat and the balance often helps slow the progression of disease. Your dog's ability to taste and smell may diminish as it ages, so increasing the taste of the formula may be necessary. Warming canned food might help, as will stirring in a bit of water with dry food or adding flavor enhancers recommended by your veterinarian.

Medium Size Dogs That Do Not Shed

Medium Size Dogs That Do Not Shed

Any dog with hair will shed, and medium-sized dogs (16 to 22 inches high) can have more hair to worry about than smaller ones. However, there are dog breeds that shed minscule amounts, making them particularly indoor-friendly pets. These breeds are characterized as "low shedding." Special coat characteristics of low-shedding breeds reduce an owner's clean-up requirements, particularly when the dogs are kept regularly groomed.

Shedding and Grooming

    Grooming is an important factor in determining how healthy a dog's coat is and how much shedding will occur. Dog breeds range from low grooming needs, which must be remembered occasionally, to high grooming needs, which reoccur on a daily basis. Beyond leaving behind less hair, some low-shedding dogs may also be better for allergy-ridden owners when groomed properly. Shedding likelihood and grooming needs together give a picture of how much maintenance a particular pet will be.

Low Shedding, Low Grooming Needs

    Some dog breeds are low shedding because they possess less hair. These breeds also have very low grooming needs. The Xoloitzcuintli breed is also known as the Mexican hairless dog due to its notable variety without fur. The Basenji is a short-haired hound with high energy that seldom barks. Whippets are fast-running hounds with a short, easy-to-care-for coat and high exercise needs.

Low Shedding, Medium Grooming Needs

    Low-shedding breeds with more hair have a variety of fur types. The wiry coats of standard schnauzers and Irish terriers require daily brushing and at least a yearly professional trim. The tousled fur of the Tibetan terrier must be brushed daily to avoid tangles. The hard and dense coats of the Airedale terrier, Welsh terrier and Black Russian terrier require weekly to monthly attention. Kerry blue terriers and soft-coated wheaten terriers have softer coats that do not shed when brushed and trimmed regularly.

Low Shedding, High Grooming Needs

    Long, thick and curly or wiry coats on other dog breeds require extra attention to grooming despite characteristic low shedding. The Portuguese water dog's curly or wavy coat needs daily brushing and regular monthly trims. The dense fur of the standard poodle will mat together if not brushed daily and clipped weekly. The fur of the puli grows into long cords that hardly shed but require extensive daily upkeep for appearance.

How Are Chihuahua's With People That Have Allergies?

How Are Chihuahua's With People That Have Allergies?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, Fifteen percent to 30 percent of people with allergies have allergic reactions to cats and dogs and people with dog allergies may be allergic to all dogs or to only some breeds. Allergic reactions can become dangerous and life threatening, so choosing the best breed if you have pet allergies can be crucial. Chihuahuas may not be the best choice for allergy sufferers.

History

    The Chihuahua dog got its breed name from the Mexican state of Chihuahua where the dog originated. The little dog was used in religious ceremonies and mostly belonged to the upper class. In the late '90s the Chihuahua achieved fame from a series of Taco Bell commercials.

Breed

    The Chihuahua has a small body, large ears and eyes, and can have either a short or long coat. Both the short-haired and the long-haired Chihuahua do not require much grooming. They do not shed, or shed very little which has led some to believe that the Chihuahua is hypoallergenic. This is not the case, however, as the Mayo Clinic points out while the absence of shed fur may reduce exposure to dog allergens, a person allergic to dogs would still be allergic to nonshedding breeds.

Asthma

    According to the Mayo Clinic website, A pet allergen can prompt inflammation in air passages and prolonged exposure can cause the ongoing (chronic) inflammation associated with asthma. The animal protein, or dander, kicks the immune system into high gear. In the nasal passages and lungs, it creates an inflammatory response.

Allergy

    The typical allergen produced by pets is their dander, a protein found either in an animal's skin cells, saliva or urine, according to the Mayo Clinic website. The dander does not come from the hair as some believe, but it can collect on the fur along with other airborne allergens. Some breeds create less dander than others. Per the American Kennel Club, the Chihuahua is not on their list of dog breeds recommended for people with allergies.

As a Pet

    Guard dogs can come in small packages. The Chihuahua is fiercely loyal, intelligent and protective. They are popular among the elderly, apartment and city dwellers. Chihuahuas have a big heart and a big ego, are a bit temperamental and live a long life. Though no dog is truly hypoallergenic, the best way to find out if you are allergic to Chihuahuas is to spend some time with one.

How to Make Homemade Dog Food With Crushed Egg Shells

How to Make Homemade Dog Food With Crushed Egg Shells

Feeding your dog a raw or homemade diet is a good idea if you are concerned about chemicals, lack of nutrients, or your dog has special caloric needs. Working dogs in particular often cannot have their needs met through commercial foods. However, it can be difficult to ensure your dog gets the vitamins and minerals he needs. To offset this, add powdered egg shell to your dog's food. This will ensure he gets the calcium he needs to build and maintain strong, healthy bones.

Instructions

    1

    Determine your dog's needs. Speak with your vet concerning your dog's caloric requirements and any health issues, such as allergies or sensitivities.

    2

    Assemble your ingredients. Lay them out to ensure you have everything you need.

    3

    Cook the meat, pasta, and veggies thoroughly. Slightly overcook the veggies to make them easier for your dog to digest.

    4

    Weigh out the necessary amount of food for your dog. Most dogs eat one to three percent of their body weight in food a day.

    5

    Crack the eggs. Put the yolk and egg whites in a separate container to use while cooking or to add as a supplement to your dog's food.

    6

    Boil the egg shells and membranes to ensure any chemicals are removed from the shell. Check to make sure they're clean and lay them out to air dry.

    7

    Pulverize the shells into a fine powder using the back of a spoon and a bowl. Store the powder in a baby food jar or similar container. Sprinkle a teaspoon over your dog's food with a bit of water and serve to your dog.

Rabu, 25 April 2012

How to Make a Doggy Cake

How to Make a Doggy Cake

It has been said that dogs are man's best friend. A dog birthday is a fun way to celebrate your pooch's life. You can make a birthday cake for your best friend even if you have never cooked. This no-bake recipe for a doggy cake uses pre-made commercial dog food that has been formed into a cake shape. Then you can top it with your choice of "icing" such as cheese or yogurt. Your best friend will thank you for this treat.

Instructions

    1

    Press three of the cans of dog food into the round cake pan. This will be the middle of the paw for the print. Turn the pan over to unmold the cake onto the serving platter.

    2

    Place four cupcake liners into four tins of the cupcake pan.

    3

    Divide the remaining can of dog food into four even portions and press each portion into the four cupcake liners.

    4
    Paw Print

    Pick up the cupcake liners and turn each one upside down on the serving platter, arranging them above the center circle to create a dog paw print shape. See image.

    5

    Spread yogurt or cottage cheese over the "cake" with a spatula or sprinkle the top with the shredded cheese. Top with candles and serve.

About Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Dogs

About Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Dogs

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is a dog breed that is native to Ireland. The moderately-sized breed shares heritage with both the Irish Terrier and the Kerry Blue Terrier. The earliest function of the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier was to work on farms, hunting rats, herding livestock or guarding from outsiders.

Appearance

    The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier has a square and athletic body, with long and sturdy legs. The typical height range for the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is between 17 and 20 inches, with the female dogs being slightly shorter than the male dogs. The weight range runs from 30 to 45 lbs, and again, female Wheatens weight slightly less. The breed has a single coat that has a thick, silky and wavy texture. At birth, Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers are generally deep apricot in color. With age, the coat turns light brownish (wheaten). Up close, some Wheatens may have black, white or red hairs, as well.

Maintenance

    For the most part, the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is a low maintenance dog in terms of grooming. However, daily combing and brushing is necessary to keep up the appearance, comfort and cleanliness of the animal. Without sufficient brushing, matting and tangling can occur. To prevent a frizzy appearance, it can help to groom with a metal-toothed comb. The breed is non-shedding. It is also important to routinely clean the breed's ear and eye area.

Temperament

    The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is noteworthy for its gentle, smart and friendly demeanor. With adequate and early socialization, the breed interacts well both with other types of dogs and pets (including cats), as well as with young children. The people-loving breed has a confident, energetic, playful, loyal, curious, courageous and protective temperament, and does not bark very often.

Health

    Like the majority of other terrier breeds, the Wheaten usually enjoys good health. In general, the breed is expected to live from 12 to 15 years of age. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, however, may experience some health issues including allergies to fleas, protein-wasting diseases (immune disorders), progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and hip dysplasia.

Exercise

    The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier has a lively spirit, so once-daily exercise is necessary. To keep a Wheaten in optimal shape and health, it can help to take the dog outdoors for brisk, roughly hour-long walks every day. The breed has an athletic nature, and enjoy activities such as hiking.

Training

    The breed can display willful and stubborn tendencies, and so calls for a dominant and firm trainer. For Wheaten owners, it is crucial to start obedience training from very early in the puppy stages. The Wheaten can be very sensitive and can become nervous with training techniques that are particularly tough. To train a Wheaten well, it can be effective to be calm and patient. A lot of praise and rewards can also be helpful for Wheaten training.

How to Make Brownies for Dogs

Pamper your best buddy with a special treat and make him some homemade doggy brownies. They're made of ingredients that are healthy for your canine pal, and contain no sugar. And your dog won't mind that they contain meat instead of chocolate.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and oil a baking pan or cookie sheet.

    2

    Place the livers in a blender or food processor and puree them until the consistency is smooth.

    3

    Crack the eggs into a small bowl and whisk them lightly.

    4

    Transfer the pureed livers to a large mixing bowl and add the eggs, corn meal, garlic, parsley flakes and wheat germ. Stir the mixture with a wooden spoon until the ingredients blend together well.

    5

    Stir in the whole wheat flour a little at a time until the brownie mixture is very thick.

    6

    Spread the brownie mixture in an oiled baking pan and bake it for about 20 to 30 minutes, until it's very dry. Allow the brownies to cool, and then cut them into small squares.

    7

    Put the brownies in a sealed container or resealable plastic bag and store them in the refrigerator or freezer.

Difference Between Labradoodles & Goldendoodles

Difference Between Labradoodles & Goldendoodles

While purebred dogs are still in high demand, special hybrids are also popular. Two in particular are the Labradoodle and the Goldendoodle.

Labradoodle


    A Labradoodle is the result of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle that have been bred together. Labradoodles feature the coloring of a Labrador Retriever and the slightly curled fur of a Poodle.

Goldendoodle


    A Goldendoodle is a cross of two popular breeds of dog -- a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. Goldendoodles are cream or gold in color, with shaggy fur and long, overlapping ears.

Origin of Labradoodles and Goldendoodles

    Labradoodles were first created in Australia, and Goldendoodles originated, probably by accidental breeding, in North America and Australia. Both breeds are now popular all over the world.

The Benefits of Combining Dog Breeds

    Dog breeds are often combined to create a dog that is personable, intelligent, easy to train and easy to maintain. Labradoodles and Goldendoodles combine desirable canine qualities, and present them in a type of dog that is appealing to many people.

Carefully Mixed Breeds

    Labradoodles and Goldendoodles are carefully bred and raised by professional breeders. Plenty of attention is paid to the genes that are being mixed, and special care is given to the resulting puppies.

Selasa, 24 April 2012

How to Care for a Bernese Mountain Dog

The big and lovable Bernese mountain dog is loyal and attentive to its family and needs to be a part of all activities. This dog is a quick learner, but is slow to mature. Expect to have a full-grown puppy for a couple of years.

Instructions

    1

    Vaccinate your Bernese mountain dog when you first get him and make sure he gets yearly booster vaccinations to maintain immunity to diseases. Also worm your adult dog every three months and consult your veterinarian about flea-control products.

    2

    Feed your Bernese mountain dog high-grade dog food. The first ingredient should be meat if you want a quality product. Crude protein should be no less than 30 percent and crude fat no less than 20 percent. Also, the fiber content should be 4 percent or less.

    3

    Remember that the Bernese mountain dog needs to spend much of its waking hours with the family and does not do well when left alone in the back yard.

    4

    Train your Bernese mountain dog when it is a puppy. Because of his large size, you'll want to teach your pet basic obedience and household manners very early. These dogs are quick learners and eager to please.

    5

    Be aware that Bernese mountain dogs take more time to mature than most breeds. Be patient and gentle in your training. This breed does not respond well to harsh training methods, as it can be sensitive.

    6

    Socialize your Bernese mountain dog when it is young to be with other people. This breed can by shy or reserved with strangers if it has not had proper socialization.

    7

    Exercise your Bernese mountain dog daily. This dog is happy to walk and does require intense running.

    8

    Brush your dog's coat every day, if possible. They are heavy shedders, shedding once or twice a year, but do not require frequent bathing because their coats rid themselves of much of the dirt they collect. Trim your dog's nails every two to three weeks.

    9

    Know that the Bernese mountain dog is prone to certain health conditions such as hip and elbow dysplasia (a malformation of the joints), cancer and bloat.

    10

    Expect an adult male Bernese mountain dog to grow to 24 to 28 inches and weigh between 85 and 110 pounds. Females will grow to 23 to 27 inches and weigh between 80 and 105 pounds.

    11

    Be prepared to enjoy 10 and 12 years with your dog, as this is the Bernese mountain dog's average life expectancy.

Things to Know About Bloodhounds

Things to Know About Bloodhounds

Strong, sturdy and saggy, bloodhounds are the oldest breed of scent-hound around, dating back more than 1,000 years. They're best known for their scent-trailing ability, which is used by law enforcement and search-and-rescue teams to locate fleeing criminals and lost children. For the right owner, bloodhounds also make gentle, affectionate pets.

Physical Characteristics

    Bloodhounds have heavy, loose folds of skin around the face and neck.
    Bloodhounds have heavy, loose folds of skin around the face and neck.

    Bloodhounds are massive, powerful dogs. They weigh about 100 pounds and are heavily muscled. They have strong backs that enable them to hold their heads low to the ground for hours while tracking. The eyes are deep set and diamond-shaped due to the heavy upper lips that pull down and partially invert the lower eyelids. The coat can be black and tan, red or liver colored.

Scent Trailing

    Bloodhound tracking results are admissible in every U.S. court system.
    Bloodhound tracking results are admissible in every U.S. court system.

    Bloodhounds are built for scent work. A bloodhound can follow a scent that is 100 hours old for 100 miles. They have long, low ears that drag on the ground and excessive, loose folds of skin around the head and neck. These features stir up scent particles from the ground and trap them near the dog's face. The dog's large black nose with open nostrils acts as a potent scent-particle vacuum, inhaling microscopic pieces of skin and hair shed by the person being trailed.

Care

    Bloodhounds require one to two hours of exercise per day to stay healthy and prevent behavior problems due to boredom and excess energy. Daily training is required if the dog will be doing scent work. Bloodhounds have short, smooth coats that are easy to groom. Bloodhounds are prone to bloat, a life-threatening condition that causes the stomach to twist and fill with gas. If not treated immediately, the dog will suffocate and die. Feeding twice per day and limiting exercise after meals helps prevent bloat. Bloodhounds are also prone to ear infections and hip dysplasia.

Bloodhounds as Pets

    Bloodhounds make wonderful pets for the right owner. Bloodhounds are gentle but stubborn dogs that require strong leadership. They're difficult to obedience train and are very distracted by scent. Once a bloodhound is on a scent trail, it's difficult to call it off. These dogs tend to drag their owners along on walks, following wherever their noses lead them. They also drool, howl and snore. According to the Dog Breed Info Center website, bloodhounds are suited to apartment-living because they tend to be inactive indoors; however, they need a yard and should be exercised often.

Information About the Labrador Puppy

According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), Labradors are one of the most popular breeds of dog in the United States. They are an intelligent breed and are often used as service and police dogs but are also family oriented and make faithful companions.

Types and Colors

    There are two different types of Labradors: English-bred ("blockier" and thicker) and American-bred (taller and thinner). Both types come in three colors: black, yellow and chocolate.

Temperament

    Labrador puppies have an even temperament--a blend of patience, love and loyalty--and enjoy being part of families.

Training

    Lab puppies are intelligent and easy to train. According to the Dog Owner's Guide, they are strong (almost full-grown at six or seven months) so it is important to train them by voice command and on leash while they are young. Labs are also known to be rambunctious and destructive if not kept active. Gentle guidance works well with Labs.

Socializing

    According to the Dog Breed Info Center, it is important to socialize your Lab as a puppy, otherwise it may become reserved with strangers and other dogs.

Diet

    According to the Dog Owner's Guide, Lab puppies should be fed large-breed puppy or adult dog food to ease joint problems that may occur if the puppy grows too quickly (always check with your vet to make sure your puppy is on the correct diet). Labs are prone to hip dysplasia, a painful condition that can cause lameness and limping. It's also important to purchase a Lab puppy from a breeder who knows the genetics and conditions of the parents.

Homemade Dog Treats With Apple Sauce & Oatmeal

Homemade Dog Treats With Apple Sauce & Oatmeal

If you like to give your dog treats often or if you typically use treats for training your dog, it is best to make the treats yourself. Making dog treats gives you peace of mind knowing exactly what ingredients are in what you are feeding to your dog. Homemade dog treats with applesauce and oatmeal are healthy treats that most dogs love. You can make these treats in any shape or size you want. A small size is best to use for training while a larger sized treat is good to give your dog as a daily indulgence.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

    2

    Grease a cookie sheet with non-stick cooking spray or use a non-stick cookie sheet.

    3

    Combine 1 cup instant oats, 4 oz. unsweetened applesauce, 1/4 cup dry milk and 1 egg into a bowl and mix well.

    4

    Drop the cookie mixture using a teaspoon to create quarter-sized drops. If you want bigger cookies, use a tablespoon instead.

    5

    Bake in the oven for 15 minutes.

    6

    Allow cookies to cool before feeding them to your dog.

Senin, 23 April 2012

How to Feed a Ridgeback

How to Feed a Ridgeback

The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a purebred dog that's well known for agility and speed. Originallly from the country of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), Ridgebacks were often used to assist big-game hunters in their chase of large animals, often including lions. Today, Ridgebacks are more commonly known as being excellent guard dogs who are very affectionate and wonderful family pets. Feeding your Ridgeback appropriately is essential to the dog's growth, endurance and overall health.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase dog food and bowl. Ridgebacks are large dogs who need specific food geared toward providing them with adequate ingredients and nutrients. Look for dog food that contains high quality protein and other beneficial ingredients, such as the essential amino acids they need to thrive. Make sure the food also includes whole grains, such as brown rice, barley or oats and a combination of complex carbohydrates. You'll also need to purchase a durable, sturdy bowl large enough to accommodate several cups of food.

    2

    Measure the appropriate amount of large breed dog food. Use either a one- or two-cup measuring cup and according to your dog's age and size, fill with dry food. Most Rhodesian Ridgeback puppies eat anywhere from five to seven cups of dry food a day, spread out into three to four separate meals. For adult Ridgebacks, reduce the amount of food served daily to approximately three and a half to five cups per day, split between two separate servings. For your individual Ridgeback speak with your veterinarian.

    3

    Train your Ridgeback to sit before every meal. Call him by his name to the designated feeding area. Holding the bowl of food in your hands, ask him to sit, using a calm, yet assertive voice. Once he sits, bend and place the bowl of food in front of him. Repeat this method before every meal. This training technique helps you to assert your position as the leader of your Ridgeback and teaches submissiveness. It also shows him that he needs to work in order to obtain his food. When done everyday with kindness and consistency, your Ridegeback will learn to respect you as the leader, and will also know that he will not be fed until he obeys the sit command. This training will also help you to establish a safe and controlled environment for your dog.

How to Determine Dog Breed by Brindle Coloring

How to Determine Dog Breed by Brindle Coloring

Brindle dogs have black stripes running across their body in the same direction as the ribs. Technically brindle is a marking pattern, but for ease of use most people refer to it as a color. Many breeds display a brindle coat, so determining the breed of a brindle dog depends on other factors.

Instructions

    1

    Visit the American Kennel Club (AKC) website and search for brindle. You will get a list of various dog breeds that include the brindle color in the breed standard.

    2

    Check the dogs size. Is it a small, medium or large breed? Brindle dogs come in all sizes and this will help you narrow your choices by eliminating breeds that are a different size.

    3

    Look at the dogs coat and determine whether it is a short-haired or long-haired breed. Again, this will help you eliminate some breeds.

    4

    Evaluate the head structure. Some breeds that carry brindle, such as the boxer, have distinctive heads. Note whether the ears are floppy or upright and the length of the tail.

    5

    Compare the above factors to the AKC standards to narrow down your list of possible breeds. Most standards are laid out so that there are specific sections on size, coat, head and body, so you can quickly review the relevant traits.

    6

    Visit the website of the parent club for each breed (there is a link on the breed standard page) and view the photos of the breed. If they dont have many photos, follow their links to a regional club or a local breeders website. Compare these photos to the dog youre evaluating.

    7

    Contact a member of the parent club for the breed the dog most closely resembles if youre still not sure. Parent club members have been involved with dogs for many years and will be able to tell you whether the dog looks like their breed, a mixed breed or another breed entirely.

How to Estimate the Adult Size of a Jack Russell Puppy

How to Estimate the Adult Size of a Jack Russell Puppy

Many new dog owners have the same question: How big will my dog grow to be? This is an important question to consider when choosing a dog, as many people have limitations on space. The Jack Russell Terrier, known for its faithful companionship, high intelligence and boundless energy, makes a great companion. Determining the adult size of your Jack Russell is relatively simple.

Instructions

    1

    Check the official size listing of the breed. The Jack Russell is a well-established breed and known to grow to a height of 10-15 inches and a weight of 14-18 lbs. If your dog conforms to the standards of the breed, he should fit somewhere within these limits.

    2

    Consult with your breeder or the organization through which you purchased your terrier. They may be able to provide information on the size of your dog's parents and grandparents. This will be a great indicator of your dog's future growth.

    3

    Check with your veterinarian. A well-trained vet can usually give you a good idea of how large or small your dog will be. If you are concerned whether or not your Jack Russell is a true pure-bred, your vet can examine him and predict future growth.

Minggu, 22 April 2012

Dog Breeds for Homes With Children

Dog Breeds for Homes With Children

Many dog breeds are compatible with children. When choosing a pet, do so based on your child's personality and the available time and energy the whole family has for the dog's care and training. Select your family companion based on your ability to keep the dog for the rest of its life. Some breeds may be with you long after your children are grown.

Small Dogs

    The fun-loving pug is short-nosed and has an easy-care coat.
    The fun-loving pug is short-nosed and has an easy-care coat.

    Small dogs have life spans generally longer than those of their medium- or large-sized canine cousins. When looking for a family pet, choose a small breed based on the breed's physical ability and overall temperament.

    Of the smallest breeds, pugs are sturdy and playful family pets. The beagle is another option but should not be considered unless your property is securely fenced. They are a small hound and often follow their nose to trouble if allowed to do so.

Medium Dogs

    Miniature poodle coats come in a variety of solid colors.
    Miniature poodle coats come in a variety of solid colors.

    Of the medium-sized dogs, the Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever is an active, easily trained sporting dog that makes a wonderful companion for the active family.

    If you'd prefer a breed with hypo-allergenic qualities, look no further than the miniature poodle. This is the medium version of the three poodle sizes. Miniature poodles are a loyal, active intelligent breed but need monthly clipping and grooming to keep the coat free of mats.

Large and Giant Breeds

    While they are large, Great Danes are considered gentle giants.
    While they are large, Great Danes are considered gentle giants.

    Large and giant breeds have the shortest life spans of dog breeds. The larger the dog, the shorter their life span. If a large or giant breed is to your liking, ask a reputable breeder for proof that the dog's ancestors were rated for good hips, eyes and hearts.

    Of the large breeds, well-bred Labrador and golden retrievers make wonderful family pets. For homes with room and the love of giant breeds, look no further than the Great Dane or mastiff as excellent family companions.

Other Considerations

    Consider each breed based on breed traits and individual personality.
    Consider each breed based on breed traits and individual personality.

    When choosing a family dog, there are a few issues to keep in mind. Some breeds are not suitable for families with allergies while others may not be suitable for your residence or geographical area.

    Choose a dog with the future in mind and is well suited not only for your children, but your ability to offer fenced running space, necessary grooming, professional training and veterinary care.

    Work with a reputable breeder, shelter or rescue group that will match a specific dog of the breed of interest to your family's needs.

At What Age Do Puppies Eat Solid Food?

At What Age Do Puppies Eat Solid Food?

A puppy can be fed a limited amount of solid food when it is three to four weeks old. Up until this point it receives the nutrients and antibodies it requires for healthy growth from its mother's milk. Puppies who start to eat solid foods before being weaned from the mother will find it easier to adjust to solid food feeding patterns when homed.

Solid food

    In most circumstances, puppies are ready to be weaned from their mothers at the age of six weeks old. By this time they may already have started to eat solid food from their mother's dish. Once introduced to the appropriate solid food for their age group, puppies should be fed three times a day at regular intervals. Mix three parts food with one part water in order to moisten dry food to make it easier for the puppy to digest. Alternatively try puppy milk, but be careful not to use too much milk as this can work as a laxative. Time the scheduled feeds and remove and discard any uneaten food after one hour.

Nursing puppies

    Do not attempt to feed a nursing puppy solid food before it is three to four weeks old. A healthy puppy should put on the equivalent of its birth weight each week during the nursing period. If a puppy appears to be struggling to feed, place the pup close to the mother's nipples when it is time to feed. If the puppy continues to show poor growth seek advice from a veterinarian.

Older puppies

    Around the age of four to five months, reduce the pup's feeding schedule to twice a day and then to once a day when it reaches the age of eight months. It is vital that the dog has access to fresh, clean water at all times to avoid complications arising from dehydration. A well-bred dog will be used to consistent eating habits and feeding a puppy at established times in the same place every day is a recommended housetraining tool. The amount of food a puppy requires on a daily basis is determined by its size, breed and level of activity.

Considerations

    Never feed a puppy with scraps of food from the table. Its digestive system is not built to cope with human food and it may encourage fussy eating habits. A puppy does not require additional meats, vitamins or minerals on top of a balanced and nutritious brand-name dog food diet. At age three to six months, a teething puppy may experience a temporary loss of appetite. Do not allow it to refuse food for longer than three days without consulting a veterinarian.

Charities That Provide Free Dog Food in Denver, Colorado

Economic hardship not only affects people, but pets as well. Food banks exist for people who need assistance with groceries, and certain organizations also recognize the growing need for animal food. In the Denver area, there are organizations that offer free dog food for your four-legged friends. Each organization may have its own set of requirements to qualify for services.

PAWS Colorado

    PAWS Colorado offers free food and help with veterinary services to clients in need. A list of qualifications on the PAWS website will help you determine if you qualify for assistance. PAWS Colorado also coordinates several fundraisers each year to help offset the cost of the services the group provides.

    PAWS Colorado

    P.O. Box 22531

    Denver, CO 80222

    303-693-1587

    pawscolorado.org

Food Bank of the Rockies

    Food Bank of the Rockies serves all of Colorado through various locations around the state. Classified as a food bank for people, the organization also offers help with pet food and other non-food items. You must ask for assistance with specific items during the hours of operation of your local food bank. The website lists locations and hours of operation.

    Food Bank of the Rockies

    10700 E. 45th Ave.

    Denver, CO 80239

    303-371-9250

    foodbankrockies.org

Max Fund

    Started in 1988 because of a dog named Max, Max Fund provides pet supplies and veterinary services to low-income families, seniors and those with disabilities. The Max Fund offers pet food and other services to any person in need. You must call to request information about qualifying for the services.

    MaxFund

    1025 Galapago St.

    Denver, CO 80204

    303-595-4917

    maxfund.org

How to Feed a Dog Raw Food

With commercial pet food recalls and questions about the best nutrition for dogs, many people are choosing to feed their dogs a raw diet. The staple of the raw diet in its various forms is raw meat from various animals. Proponents argue that the diet is closer to what wolves eat in the wild and thus, more species appropriate for dogs.

Instructions

    1

    Research the various raw diets that individuals use for their dogs. The two most common methods used are the BARF (or Bones and Raw Food) and a whole prey model. Typically, BARF diets include raw meat, vegetables and supplements. The whole prey model concentrates on feeding raw meat, bones and organs from different animal sources, but does not include grains or other carbohydrates.

    2

    Decide on the method that you are most comfortable with. The debate between the models can be as strong as the debate between kibble and raw in some cases. You'll need to decide for yourself, or through discussions with other raw feeders, about what you feel is the best method.

    3

    Locate food sources. You can find pre-packaged raw food at some pet supply retailers, which follow the BARF method in most cases. For raw meat, you can typically find various sources in local grocery stores, meat buying groups and butcher shops. You may also be able to grow or raise your own food for your dogs.

    4

    Incorporate meats from different animals in order to provide better nutrition and interest for your dog. Beef, pork, chicken and turkey are often available without too much searching. You can also incorporate wild game, fish and other animals. Organ meat, particularly liver, is an important food source as well. The whole prey model often uses about 10 percent organ food, including at least 5 percent liver.

    5

    Make the switch with your dog. Many people recommend that when you begin feeding raw that you stick to only raw food as the digestion time can be shorter than for kibble. Some dogs can eat kibble and raw with no apparent problems, however.

    6

    Go slow with the food variety and gradually introduce new meats. You may want to stick with one protein source for several weeks before slowly introducing new ones. This will help your dog adjust and help avoid stomach upset which can also happen when individuals switch from one variety of kibble to another.

    7

    Monitor your dog in the immediate and long term so that you can adjust the diet as necessary. If your dog gulps the food down, you might try larger pieces. You can also adjust the amount fed if your dog appears to be gaining or losing too much weight.