Sabtu, 31 Maret 2012

Different Kinds of Doberman Pinschers

Different Kinds of Doberman Pinschers

The Doberman pinscher is a very recognizable dog breed, with its narrow snout and long, pointed ears. This breed can have an intimidating look, but it is actually a loyal breed that makes a good family dog. There are several different types of Doberman pinschers, so select the type perfect for you, your family and your lifestyle. While most Doberman pinschers are black with red markings, they can also be blue and fawn or white.

Large or Giant Doberman

    Large or giant Doberman pinschers are also known as the warlock Doberman. While these are the largest Dobermans, they are considered a medium-large dog breed. They can reach up to 28 inches tall and up to 95 pounds. The giant Doberman pinscher was bred to satisfy people who wanted big Doberman pinschers for protection and intimidation. However, breeding such large Doberman pinschers has resulted in a variety of health issues related to their size, along with a less agile type of Doberman.

Miniature Pinscher

    Interestingly, although the miniature Doberman pinscher is thought to be a smaller version of the large Doberman, it actually is not. This dog is a separate breed and is actually a toy terrier. However, because of its striking resemblance to the Doberman pinscher, these dogs are considered a part of the Doberman family. While they are not genetically related to the larger Dobermans and their personalities are not similar, the miniature pinscher is a good option if you like the look of a Doberman, but want a small dog. These dogs are between 10 inches and 12 inches tall and weigh between 8 and 10 pounds.

European Doberman

    European, or German, Doberman pinschers were originally raised in Germany and were bred for police work, military work and as protection for families and children. Because of their purpose, Doberman pinschers are not seen as pets as much in Europe as they are in the United States. They are raised to not allow anyone outside of their family to touch them and are expected to attack when they perceive an attack. These Dobermans look like the typical Doberman most people think of and grow to about 22 inches tall to 28 inches tall and 66 pounds to 88 pounds.

American Doberman

    American Doberman pinschers look the same as European Dobermans, but they are very different. Breeders of this type of Doberman have worked to nurture personality traits like friendliness and soft temperaments and downplay typical Doberman traits, such as wariness and aggression. These dogs are also raised as pets rather than working protection dogs, so that can change their personalities as well. While American Doberman pinschers can still be fiercely protective of their families, they are not trained and bred to be so.

How to live with Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

How to live with Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are stylish and playful toy dogs that are sweet-natured, gentle and extremely loving. Their glossy coats come in four colors: Blenheim (red and white), Ruby (red), Tricolor (black, tan and white) and Black and Tan. No matter what color they are, many people think Cavaliers are adorable little dogs. As with any pet, however, it is a good idea to discover what it is like to live with a Cavalier before adopting one.

Instructions

    1

    Train your Cavalier. Cavaliers are so sweet and friendly that it is difficult to be firm with them. Unless you want to share your bed every night, train your Cavalier to sleep on a pet bed. It is not necessary to reprimand your dog; just show him strong leadership so that he does not develop undesirable habits. Once properly trained, the Cavalier is an ideal companion for adults and a terrific playmate for children.

    2

    Choose a premium dog food appropriate for your Cavalier's size, age and activity level. Cavaliers often have robust appetites. They are not shy about sharing your food, nibbling treats, or begging from strangers with their pitiful, puppy-dog look. Do not overfeed a Cavalier, as being overweight puts an unhealthy strain on its cardiovascular system, joints and connective tissues.

    3

    Select a veterinarian for regular checkups. Become familiar with the health difficulties to which Cavaliers are prone. Every breed of dog has some kind of health issue. Some are merely annoying, while others can be life threatening. Cavaliers are predisposed to mitral valve disease, hip dysplasia, cataracts and other eye diseases. Choose a veterinarian who has experience with this breed. Ask about preventative and diagnostic care for your Cavalier.

    4

    Brush your Cavalier as needed but at least once a week. While the Cavalier coat requires brushing, it does not need trimming. Cavaliers shed differently, depending on seasonal and environmental conditions. Microfiber and leather upholstery are more resistant to shedding than other fabrics. Carpets, rugs and hardwood floors should be vacuumed or swept regularly.

    5

    Join an American Kennel Club (AKC) Cavalier specialty group in your area. If you're not sure if there is a club near you, do an online search for "Cavalier King Charles Spaniels," along with your city, state or region. Getting involved socially with other Cavalier owners will give you the opportunity to learn more about the breed, hear amusing stories, talk about their behavioral and health problems, and explore other issues that affect the breed.

Positive Pitbull Facts

Positive Pitbull Facts

The pit bull terrier is officially known as the American Staffordshire terrier and is a registered breed of the American Kennel Club. The brochure of the Staffordshire Terrier Club of America explains that the often misunderstood breed loves to be around people and is a good breed for families with children. The Staffordshire Terrier Club also states that training of the Staffordshire Terrier is extremely important and should be started when the dog is at a young age for best results. This recommendation is actually true for most of the terrier breeds, which can become quite bossy and headstrong if their master does not take training seriously.

Intelligence and Loyalty

    Pit bulls are extremely intelligent. They love to please their masters and this can make them readily trainable. Obedience classes, early socialization and continued owner training can make a pit bull into a wonderful pet. The intelligence of the pit bull has made it possible for them to serve in law enforcement and drug interdiction, as therapy dogs, as search and rescue dogs and in the military.

Temperament

    In temperament tests by the American Temperament Testing Society, statistics show the American Staffordshire Terrier having an 84 percent pass rate. This temperament test pass rate is higher than the beagle and on a par with the Bassett hound. Dachsunds, Collies and chow breeds. This indicates that though there can be variations in any breed, the overall breed statistics for pit bull dog temperaments are good. A significant aspect of this study is that a large number of dogs were tested from this breed in particular.

An Owner Problem

    There are a large proportion of pit bulls in animal shelters. This, however, is likely not the fault of the dogs. Many owners purchase dogs with little thought as to their own responsibility for care, training and maintenance of a lifetime commitment. Owners need to recognize the adoption of a dog as a commitment of 12 to16 years. That commitment includes training, medical care, feeding and spending time with the dog. The American Staffordshire Terrier Club of America states in their breed brochure that the dog demands and thrives on plenty of attention. This aspect of the pit bull must be considered; this is not a dog to be adopted and then left in the back yard. Loneliness causes many breeds of dogs to become destructive chewers and diggers and breaks the dog-master bond that is crucial to effective training.

Breeder Problems

    Now that we understand that leaving a pit bull alone in the yard causes problems, consider the typical "backyard breeder." This is a person who breeds dogs to make a buck without regard to the temperament of either the producing pair or the puppies. The puppies grow up without human interaction which is just as critical for imprinting puppies as it is for imprinting foals from the moment of birth forward. Follow the recommendations of the breed brochure and choose a reputable breeder. Compare the parents and puppies of different breeders. Do not just grab the first pit bull puppy you see. Breeders who are interested in protecting and perpetuating the breed will select their breeding stock from the best in both physical attributes and temperament.

Brindle Coat Pitbull Colors

Brindle Coat Pitbull Colors

While brindling--tiger-like stripes on a base color--are common to many dog breeds, pit bulls have perhaps a greater variety of brindle colors than any other breed.

Top Brindle Colors

    Red brindle pit bulls have a base color of rust or brown. Dogs with a rust base color usually have black noses while dogs with a brown base have a red nose. The eye color of these dogs is dependent on the skin color. Blue brindles are known for their bluish-gray base color and blue or amber eyes.

Tan Brindling

    Black brindle pit bulls almost appear to be negatives of the red brindles since these dogs have tan brindling on a black base color. The mahogany brindle pit bull has a deep brown base color that is criss-crossed with light tan-colored lines.

Other Brindle Colors

    Pit bulls with a sable brindling color are rather unusual. This color has a mahogany base with a dark sable overlay. Another somewhat rare color is a chestnut brindle. This look has a dark brown base color with deep brown or black stripes.

How to Care for an American Foxhound

At about 25-inches tall, American Foxhounds somewhat resemble large beagles. These lovely dogs are friendly, kind, outgoing and courageous in the field. You can easily care for these perfect pets with these tips.

Instructions

    1

    Visit your vet regularly. Your Foxhound will need regular vaccinations and health care from your vet.

    2

    Train your Foxhound. The American Foxhound is an intelligent, independent dog that will need to learn to come, sit, stay and sometimes get down.

    3

    Exercise him regularly. Bred for hunting, Foxhounds have nearly limitless energy and need to be exercised often. A simple walk through the park will not be enough for your Foxhound; he will need to run far and fast on a regular basis.

    4

    Keep her outside. These dogs were bred to be outdoors in the field and leaving them inside can cause havoc. They need plenty of room to play and this is best provided by having a large fenced yard.

    5

    Groom your Foxhound regularly. His care should include regular brushing and bathing, cleaning his eyes, teeth, ears, feet and trimming his nails.

    6

    Control her food. You will want to keep your American Foxhound on a diet. Free access to her food may encourage her to overeat.

Good Breeds for People in Small Houses

Good Breeds for People in Small Houses

If you think the only dogs that can live comfortably in a small home or apartment are the kind that can also sleep comfortably in your lap, you might be in for a surprise. While plenty of diminutive canine breeds are perfect for modest living spaces, there are also a handful of medium and even large breeds that are just as content in a modest family home as they are in a three-story mansion.

Terriers

    While terriers were originally bred in Great Britain to hunt and kill vermin, the American Kennel Club says these "feisty, energetic" dogs "continue to project the attitude that they're always ready for a spirited argument." Although larger breeds, such as the Airedale Terrier, are not ideal for smaller homes, smaller breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers (Yorkies), West Highland White Terriers (Westies), Scottish Terriers (Scotties) and Boston Terriers are beloved by their owners for their loyalty, intelligence and spirit. These small, energetic dogs (most Yorkies weigh less than 10 lbs. and Bostons top off around 25 lbs.) don't need much space. Most are just as content with a nap as they are with a game of fetch.

Lap Dogs

    Also referred to as "toy dogs," according to the AKC lap dogs will "always be popular" with "people without much living space" and "make terrific lap warmers on nippy nights." Considered a group rather than a specific breed, lap dogs come in all shapes but only one size: small. With their short hair, Pugs and Chihuahuas are popular lap dogs for those seeking a low maintenance companion. The equally popular Maltese and Pomeranian breeds have bigger personalities, but require daily grooming.

Medium to Large Dogs

    Just because you have a small house doesn't mean your dog must fit in your lap. With a mild temperament and a perpetually wagging tail, the AKC says that the 26 to 34 lb. English Cocker Spaniel "can live in any environment provided it receives daily exercise." Also a good fit if you can provide it with a daily jaunt, the very intelligent, human loving, 65 to 70 lb. Boxer is happy anywhere as long as it's surrounded with people.

Gentle Giants

    Even those who like their living space small and their pets mammoth have a couple of options. Though Greyhounds are the fastest breed of all dogs, these 27 inch to 30 inch tall sprinters are just as happy curled up on the couch as they are chasing squirrels. The low energy Mastiff, though a whopping 175 to 190 lbs., can also be happy in a small home as long as it receives plenty of mental stimulation, socialization and daily outdoor exercise.

Information on the Jug Dog Breed

Information on the Jug Dog Breed

The Jug dog breed is relatively new, appearing around 2003, according to Jugpuppy.com. The Jug is a hybrid dog, meaning it is a cross between two breeds; in this case, the Jack Russell terrier and the pug. While it is impossible to characterize a dog breed and fit every example of that breed into specific categories, there are some general characteristics to keep in mind when considering a jug puppy as a pet.

Appearance

    Most jug puppies have the look of a pug with Jack Russell size and shape. In other words, they have short, tan hair with dark black spots on their faces and muzzles. They tend to have short, floppy ears and curling tails. Some of these puppies, however, turn out black or have the coarser hair of a Jack Russell.

Disposition

    There is no way to predict exactly how an individual dog will behave. However, Jack Russell terriers and pugs are both friendly breeds and good with children; it is reasonable to assume a hybrid of these breeds would also be that way.

Size

    The pug and the Jack Russell are both very small dogs, approximately 10 to 15 inches tall and weighing 10 to 20 pounds, according to Dogbreedinfo.com. Therefore, a mixture of these two dogs will also yield a similar size.

Breed Recognition

    Since the jug is a hybrid or mixed-breed dog, it will never be a registered purebred on its own. This is unimportant for most pet owners who simply want a dog to be a part of their families, not for show purposes.

Care Needs

    Owners of jugs on Dogbreedinfo.com report that their pets require a lot of physical exercise, and they love to run and chase squirrels and other small animals. For this reason, a jug puppy would need to be safely kept in a yard with a fence and plenty of room and time to run or walk during the day.

Behavior Traits of a Beagle

Behavior Traits of a Beagle

Beagles are beautiful and well-built dogs that are easy to take care of. Originally bred as hunting dogs, beagles bear a lot of characteristics that help them act as a hunting companion, which is why they may exhibit odd behaviors in a domestic setting. Despite this, they are one of the most friendly and loyal of all dog breeds, making them an ideal pet for many.

Peacefulness

    Beagles are very peaceful and rarely attack other people or dogs. Beagles often have a very loud bark, which leads many to assume that they are aggressive. However, this is merely a reflection of their excitability and eagerness to interact with others. Beagles, in very rare cases, may not get along with other animals, but this is usually happens to some dogs as a result of spending their early years in isolated environments.

Independence and Dependability

    Beagles are very independent, leading them to bravely wander off without their master. They also have selective hearing, which may prevent them from returning when their master calls them. Despite their independence, some beagles feel comfortable within a routine, where things are done at the same time each day. Many times, beagles will become fidgety or uncomfortable if the normal routine of the day is broken.

Obedience

    Most beagles are extremely obedient, but some beagles may become neurotic. Typically, a beagle will only act neurotic as a result of genetic problems, which can be seen by observing the parents of the beagle. In normal beagles, a degree of stubbornness may exist at first, where beagles have to learn to follow the master's instructions. Because they have large appetites, food can be a good way to restructure behavior and discourage stubbornness.

Energy Level

    Beagles often need a large yard to exercise; because they can become extremely overweight when they don't get enough exercise. They enjoy games, such as fetch or hide and seek. The dogs are especially good for children, because they can maintain high levels of energy for long periods of time. Beagles may dig holes or howl when they become overly bored or uncomfortable.

The Best Dog Breeds for Allergies

The Best Dog Breeds for Allergies

An allergy to dogs is caused by a sensitivity to animal dander, the dead skin flakes that are present on the dog's skin and in the dog's saliva. People who are sensitive to dander will react with sneezing, runny noses and itching, but there are some dog breeds that will trigger a less extreme response or no response at all.

Poodle

    While poodles do need regular management to keep their coats in good shape, they do not shed much, and they do not produce much dander. Poodles come in three size ranges, including toy, miniature and standard, and all three are good choices for people with dog allergies.

Chinese Crested

    Chinese crested dogs only have fur on their heads, paws and tails, and their small size and their mostly naked body means that they create very little dander. The Chinese crested is an active dog and will form a strong bond to its owner.

Bedlington Terrier

    Like the poodle, the Bedlington terrier has a short, curly coat. The curly coat combined with the small size can make this dog a good choice for someone who suffers from allergies. This breed is very intelligent and requires consistent training due to its occasionally headstrong tendencies.

Airedale Terrier

    The airedale terrier, often simply referred to as the airedale, is the second largest terrier. It has a wiry coat and is a low shedder. This breed is intelligent with a reputation for stubbornness. It needs regular exercise and mental stimulation to stay healthy and happy.

Maltese Terrier

    Maltese terriers are small, pure white dogs. They have no undercoat, and they shed very little fur because of this. They need regular grooming to keep their coat free of mats and stains, and they also need their eyes cleaned to prevent tear staining.

Jumat, 30 Maret 2012

Miniature Chihuahua Health Problems

Miniature Chihuahua Health Problems

While the American Kennel Club does not recognize miniature or teacup Chihuahuas to be an official size within the breed, some are abnormally small. Small Chihuahuas are at a higher risk than larger dogs for a variety of health conditions, some of which can be life threatening.

Breeding

    Bad breeding practices, such as inbreeding, can heighten the risk of small Chihuahuas developing certain health conditions, such as patellar luxation, where the patella slips out of place, then slips back. Patellar luxation can lead to breaks, bow-leggedness and other complications with age. A properly bred Chihuahua is less likely to develop certain health complications but should still be screened regularly.

Time Frame

    Small Chihuahuas can develop certain conditions throughout their lifetime. Some conditions are apparent at birth, while others develop with age as a result of genetics or negligence. For example, the smaller the Chihuahua, the larger the risk of gum disease forming as they age. Because the teeth are overcrowded in the mouth, food particles get stuck between the teeth and rot, causing bacteria and cavities to form.

Mild Health Problems

    There are several mild health problems that very small Chihuahuas may encounter. A collapsing trachea is very common in this breed, and often develops with age. The trachea of the Chihuahua flattens and causes the dog to cough dryly and have mild breathing problems temporarily.

    Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar is also very common in small Chihuahuas. Hypoglycemia can cause the dog to act lethargic and weak, but is easily treatable.

Severe Health Problems

    There are several severe health problems that very small Chihuahuas are at risk of developing, all of which can be fatal if left untreated. Hemophilia is a blood disorder that makes it impossible for the dog's blood to clot on its own. This can be potentially deadly if the dog is ever injured.

    Hydrocephalus is a condition that causes excessive spinal fluid to build up within the Chihuahua's skull, in turn putting pressure on the brain. Hydrocephalus can lead to seizures and vision problems for the chihuahua, as well as an enlarged skull.

    A number of heart conditions are common in small Chihuahuas, including murmurs, mitral valve disease and pulmonic stenosis, all of which can be fatal if not appropriately treated.

Prevention/Solution

    The easiest way to prevent your Chihuahua from developing any mild or severe health complications is to have him carefully and fully screened by a veterinarian. A series of blood tests, scans and physical examinations can result in an early diagnosis or assess the risk the dog faces. Regular teeth cleanings and checkups also can help prevent your Chihuahua from facing health problems as he ages.

How to Feed a Dog for a Bowel Movement

How to Feed a Dog for a Bowel Movement

Dogs sometimes indulge in dietary indiscretions and can end up constipated, which is uncomfortable for your pup. Fortunately, there are types of food you can give your dog at mealtime to improve bowel movements without harsh medications. Many of these foods are high in fiber and starches that will push your dog's stool through its system. As an added bonus for your pooch, several of the options are tasty and your dog will probably gobble them up.

Instructions

    1
    Adding pumpkin to your dog's meal helps with bowel movement.
    Adding pumpkin to your dog's meal helps with bowel movement.

    Add 2 to 3 tbsp. of pureed pumpkin to your dog's meal. Pumpkin is high in fiber, and many dogs enjoy the taste. Increased fiber adds bulk to your dog's stool, which encourages a bowel movement. Canned pumpkin can be used, just be sure it is 100-percent pure pumpkin and not pumpkin pie filling.

    2

    Add plain fiber cereal (the kind meant for humans) to your dog's meals. Dogs like the crunchy texture, and the fiber adds bulk to your dog's stool, which will result in a bowel movement.

    3

    Add cooked brown rice to your dog's meals. The starch in the rice helps bind your dog's stool together, making it easier for your pooch to have a bowel movement.

    4

    Ask your vet if you can try adding a psyllium fiber supplement such as Metamucil to your dog's meals to encourage a bowel movement.

Information on Brittany Spaniel Puppies

Information on Brittany Spaniel Puppies

Brittanys are medium-sized, leggy dogs bred both as sporting and companion dogs. The Brittany puppy makes a wonderful pet if it is given proper training and exercise. The breed was formerly called the Brittany spaniel but is now referred to as simply Brittany.

Identification

    According to the American Kennel Club, the Brittany's dense coat may be wavy or flat and either orange and white or liver and white in color. At maturity, the Brittany will reach 30 to 40 pounds and be 17-1/2 to 20-1/2 inches at the shoulder.

Socialization

    The Brittany is a loving, gentle, eager-to-please dog but it is very important that it receive firm, consistent training from puppyhood. The Dog Breed Info Center website states that Brittanys are good with children if they are introduced to them in puppyhood.

Exercise

    This breed needs lots of exercise, otherwise their pent-up energy leads them to be hyperactive. They have great stamina and should be given a long walk or jog every day.

Grooming

    Brittany puppies require little grooming besides regular brushing.

Choosing

    Mt. View Brittanys, a Brittany breeder, points out that Brittanys may be bred from both field (hunting) and show stock, so it is important to speak to the breeder about a puppy's pedigree.

How to Care for a Great Dane Puppy

How to Care for a Great Dane Puppy

Your Great Dane puppy will be an exciting addition to your family, however, you need to know how to care for it before you bring it home. Great Danes are large dogs and require a proper diet and activity level. With proper care and handling, your Great Dane puppy can be a long-standing, beloved member of your family.

Instructions

    1

    Visit your veterinarian soon after you bring your new Great Dane puppy home. The vet will give it a thorough checkup and start the puppy on a standard vaccination schedule.

    2

    Feed your puppy high quality dog food. Great Danes grow to weigh more than 100 pounds at maturity; they are prone to health issues unique to their immense size. A Great Dane's weight needs to be monitored to keep excessive pressure off its joints. An improper diet can also lead to bone and muscle problems. A diet tailored towards a dog that will grow to more than 100 pounds is best for your dog.

    3

    Exercise your Great Dane puppy on a daily basis using a leash, after allowing about two hours for the dog to digest its food prior to exercise. This will help your puppy avoid a serious condition called bloat, when a dog's stomach twists and traps air or food. Daily exercise will help maintain your Great Dane's weight and cardiovascular health.

    4

    Provide chew toys for your Great Dane puppy. Buy a variety of toys and give them to the puppy one at a time to help alleviate boredom. Puppies generally begin the teething process at about 4 months old. Keep a chew toy stockpile built up for this time in your dog's life.

    5

    Groom your Great Dane puppy often. Brush it daily with a stiff brush and trim its nails once a week. Brush its teeth occasionally to keep its mouth healthy and use a dry shampoo when needed.

How Many Calories Should My Puppy Get a Day?

How Many Calories Should My Puppy Get a Day?

    The needed calories for a puppy will depend on its age and weight.
    The needed calories for a puppy will depend on its age and weight.

Puppies Need Calories to Grow

    A puppy's growth and development is very important as it sets the stage for its overall health. As a puppy grows, its muscles and bones grow in order to support its eventual adult size. The puppy needs to have appropriate nutrition in order to be healthy and happy, which means the right number of calories with the proper balance of protein, fat, vitamins and minerals.

Too Many Calories Can Be Bad

    As with humans, too many calories can lead a puppy to become overweight, which can cause many health problems for it as an adult. Feeding your puppy the correct amount of the correct kind of food helps it stay fit while still getting the nutritional foods it needs to grow.

Bottom Line

    The exact number of calories your puppy needs to support its healthy growth and development will depend on its size and age. For an 8-week old puppy of average size (5 pounds) 375 daily calories is sufficient. Smaller dogs could need as little as 75 calories and larger as many as 1,500 calories. As your dogs gets older and larger, its calorie needs will increase. Following your vet's suggestions or those listed on your puppy food will help guide you until your dog is full grown.

How to Identify a Finnish Spitz

How to Identify a Finnish Spitz

The Finnish Spitz is a breed that is light and quick on its feet. It is an active and friendly breed that is faithful and brave, but cautious. There should be no tendency for shyness or unprovoked aggression. One of its most important characteristics is its square, well-balanced body. It is symmetrical with no exaggerated features and is covered by a red-gold coat.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of this breed. It has always been used to hunt small game and birds, so sports a pointed muzzle, dense coat and erect ears. These features also denote its northern heritage. The Finnish Spitz should show a liveliness, especially in the eyes, ears and tail.

    2

    Check the size and proportions of the breed. Males are 17 to 20 inches tall and females are 15 to 20 inches tall. The breed has a square shape. When measured from the forechest to the buttocks, that measurement is equal to the height of the measurement at the withers.

    3

    Make sure the head is clean cut and has a fox-like appearance. It is longer from the occiput to the tip of the nose than it is wide, in a ratio of 7:4. The head should not be muscular, coarse or overly long and narrow. The almond-shaped eyes are obliquely set and have moderate spacing. The outer corners should tilt upward. They should have a dark color and give off an alert expression. The ears are set high, and when the dog is alert, stand up and open to the front. They are small ears, sharply pointed and very mobile. The muzzle is narrow and leads to a black nose.

    4

    Look at the neck and body. The well-set, muscular neck is clean with no excess skin under the muzzle. It may appear shorter in males, due to their heavier ruff. The body is muscular and square. The check is deep, with a brisket that reaches to the elbow. The tail is set just below the level of the topline and forms a single curl that falls over the loin. The tip points toward the thigh. The forequarters sport bone that is strong without being heavy. Dewclaws may be removed. The feet are rounded and compact with well-arched toes. The toes are tightly bunched and the two center toes are a bit longer than the outside toes. The rear angulation is in balance with the forequarters and sports muscular thighs and moderately let down hocks. The rear dewclaws are removed. The toes are as they are in the fronttightly bunched, rounded and compact with the two center toes longer than the outside toes.

    5

    Feel the double coat. The undercoat is soft and dense with long, harsh, straight guard hairs protecting it. The guard hairs are one to two inches long. The hair on the head and legs is short. It is the longest on the plume of the tail and back of the thighs. The males have a more profuse coat on the shoulder, which gives them a ruffed appearance. The hair should not be silky or wavy. The Finnish Spitz coat is colored with varying shades of golden-red (ranges from pale honey to deep auburn). The undercoat is generally a paler color and this makes the coat have a glowing appearance. There should be very few white markings on this breed. There may be white at the tips of the toes and possibly a small spot (no wider than inch) on the chest. There may be black hairs on the lipline and sparse black hairs on the tail and back.

How to Feed a Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzers are very energetic, excellent at catching vermin, and agreeable with other household pets. Caring for a Miniature Schnauzer can be challenging at times because the breed benefits most from an all-natural, fresh-food diet high in nutrients, particularly to maintain healthy skin and coat. The key is to feed your Miniature Schnauzer the best food available, which will help prevent health problems, since there are quite a few potential problems that can affect the breed.

Instructions

    1

    Decide how you want to feed your Miniature Schnauzer. The ideal combination would be alternating between fresh, all-natural food, such as chicken and vegetables, and dog food, such as dry kibble or wet food. One meal each day should be fresh food, with the other(s) being wet food or dry kibble. You can feed your Miniature Schnauzer on a fresh-food-only diet, but this can be expensive and time-consuming.

    2

    Choose fresh, all-natural foods that you would eat. Good choices for puppies include meat with some fat content (use leaner meats as your dog grows older), such as chicken, turkey, beef or pork; grains like brown rice and oatmeal; fruit, such as melon or berries; and vegetables high in fiber and nutrients, like spinach, carrots, broccoli and beets (for the Miniature Schnauzer's coat and eyesight).

    3

    Choose dry kibble and wet food that are high in fat and nutrients for a Miniature Schnauzer puppy. The first ingredients listed should be meat, not by-products. You want the first few ingredients to be pure meat, vegetables and whole grain. Adults need less fat than puppies, and seniors even less. Look for wet or dry dog food specifically for your Miniature Schnauzer's age.

    4

    Observe the way your Miniature Schnauzer behaves to understand how his body is reacting to his diet. Miniature Schnauzers are prone to developing eye problems, diabetes, pancreatitis and bladder stones, to name a few. Symptoms of other problems include bald spots (from overeating), flaky fur (from skin problems) and fatigue. These can all be caused by a poor diet, which is why diet is so important in the breed.

    5

    Feed a Miniature Schnauzer accordingly. Puppies need three meals a day for maximum nutrition. Feed the puppy with a 1/4 cup of kibble moistened with water, or wet food. For lunch and dinner, prepare an all-natural meal of a few ounces. As the Miniature Schnauzer grows, feed the dog two times a day with a 1/2 cup of dog food in the morning and an all-natural meal of a few ounces in the evening.

Kamis, 29 Maret 2012

How to Make a Tiny Cake for a Dog

How to Make a Tiny Cake for a Dog

If the pooch in your life is having a birthday, show your pup how special it is by baking a tiny birthday cake, made especially for the canine palette. There are many foods that are bad for dogs including sugar, chocolate, mushrooms, onions and raisins. Bake your best friend a treat it will enjoy and that's good for him too. Each new birthday is worth seven to a dog, so make them count and spoil your dog on its birthday.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit and grease cupcake pan. Fry the bacon until crisp. Set aside to cool.

    2

    Sift together the baking powder and flour. In a separate bowl, beat the butter, eggs and oil until smooth. Stir in the carob and baby food. The carob powder adds a chocolate taste to your doggie cupcakes.

    3

    Slowly add the dry ingredients to your butter mixture. Mix well. pour the batter into the pan and bake for 60 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean when stuck into the center of a cupcake.

    4

    Allow the cupcakes to cool. Use a spatula to frost the cupcakes with the yogurt. Crumble the bacon onto the top and serve your dog a tiny birthday cupcake. Top each cake with a dog treat. Share the other cupcakes with your pooch's canine friends.

About the Teacup Maltese as a Pet

About the Teacup Maltese as a Pet

The maltese is a toy dog recognized by the American Kennel Club. These feisty, playful and affectionate dogs form a close bond with their owner. However, due to their small size, they are fragile animals. "Teacup" Maltese are not an actual breed; this is a name applied by some breeders to sell the runt of the litter or one that they have specifically bred to be smaller than normal (less than four pounds as an adult).

Considerations

    The Maltese needs socialization; they can become destructive if left alone for long periods of time. Though the Maltese has a social and friendly manner, small children often aren't aware of how to handle a small dog properly and need supervision. Toy breeds in particular are more fragile, and thus the Maltese can easily be harmed or even killed in the home. Also, they typically need only short walks plus playtime in the home or backyard to satisfy their exercise requirements; they can become exhausted easily if taken on an extended walk.

Breeder

    When choosing a Maltese from a breeder, request to see the dam and sire, as well as the littermates. If the breeder offers this or is open to your request, the family looks healthy, and they can provide a pedigree of the line, then you have selected a good breeder. If a breeder offers a "Teacup" Maltese, be aware that this is a runt of the litter or a dog that is deliberately bred to be smaller than normal; they often come with a multitude of health issues due to underdeveloped organs and bones. Lastly, most puppies for sale through the Internet come from puppy mills.

Home Care

    Maltese dogs need enough attention to provide them with enough socialization to be friendly with strangers and other dogs. Maltese experts agree that the Maltese is difficult to housebreak and many recommend crate training.

    Feeding crunchy high-quality dog food can help keep their teeth clean, while feeding table scraps or "people food" may make Maltese dogs more picky eaters. They love to be lap dogs, but overindulging them may lead to excessive shyness and distrust around other people and dogs.

Grooming

    Teacup or standard-size, the Maltese's soft white coat naturally grows long, often down to the floor. They do not have an undercoat and do not shed very much, so the breed is often the choice for people with allergies or who simply don't want to deal with pet hair. Brushing the coat daily will keep the coat mat-free. Many owners, typically those who decide not to show their Maltese, prefer to have a groomer clip the coat short which gives them a "puppy look" even as adults. They tend to get stains at the inside corners of their eyes on the hair that grows there, so consistent gentle wiping of the area will alleviate the stains. Lastly, as in any other breed, regularly clip the nails and brush the teeth.

Teacup Maltese Issues

    If you have a Teacup Maltese, be very careful with your dog since the bones are more fragile; prevent broken bones by setting up ramps to keep your Maltese from jumping off of furniture. Avoid excessive exercise since playing too vigorously could lead to broken bones as well. Undernourishment is common in Teacup dogs when they are first brought home; signs include lethargy, dullness, weakness and shallow breathing. See your veterinarian regularly to evaluate any conditions associated with underdeveloped organs.

Difference Between Purebreds & Designer Dogs

Difference Between Purebreds & Designer Dogs

If you are a dog lover, you have probably noticed that some canines are referred to as designer dogs, and wondered what this impressive-sounding term means. Designer dogs, or hybrids, are the offspring of two different purebred dogs. While adorable and charming, designer dogs are not the same as purebreds. Purebred canines are the result of generations of breeding within one specific breed group. There are several important differences between designer and purebred dogs.

Pure vs. Designer Bloodlines

    Purebred dogs are bred to maintain the integrity of the breed. This includes breeding for specific looks, characteristics and behavior traits. For example, German shepherds are known for their erect ears, strong bodies and loyal temperaments. A reputable breeder will not breed a German shepherd that does not measure up to these characteristics because it will not produce offspring that will maintain the breed standard. Because designer dogs are basically mixed breed dogs, their bloodlines are not pure. For example, yorkipoos are combinations of the Yorkshire terrier and poodle. Mixing two different breeds can result in health issues and behavioral problems among offspring. Though designer dogs often make great pets and have attractive appearances, their mixed bloodlines can result in uncertainties within the breed combinations.

Health Differences

    When purebred dogs are bred by reputable breeders with goals of keeping their breed pure, they do not allow dogs with health problems to reproduce. For example, if a Maltese has heart disease, that particular dog will not be allowed to reproduce. By keeping him from reproducing, the breeder will prevent the heart ailment from perpetuating in new generations of pups. Designer dogs are often bred from mixed breeds with questionable bloodlines. This is because they are more commonly bred for their looks and not to maintain breed integrity. Therefore, designer dogs may have health issues that are common to both parents' breed types, which may make them susceptible to more illnesses than purebred dogs.

Genetic Issues

    Though designer dogs are often more prone to certain illnesses than purebreds, they may sometimes have fewer genetic issues because their gene pools are more diverse. Some breeders of purebred dogs are not particular about breeding practices, and sometimes allow inbreeding. This practice has weakened the bloodlines of some breeds, resulting in reoccurring problems such as hyperactivity or fear issues. Though designer dogs often suffer from genetic issues, those with the most diversity in their bloodlines generally tend to have fewer genetic problems.

Loveable Looks

    Looks are the most noticeable differences between purebreds and designer breed dogs. Purebred dogs have specific traits that are easily noticed. For example, almost everyone can recognize an English bulldog or a Labrador retriever. In contrast, it may be hard to determine the type of breeds that a mixed breed designer dog has in her bloodline. For example, a puggle is a pug mixed with a beagle, though it may be hard to tell simply by looking at one. Though designer dogs may have indistinguishable appearances, most dog lovers agree that they are still adorable members of the canine family.

How to Identify a Papillon

How to Identify a Papillon

The Papillon is a happy breed that is very friendly and alert. This is a hardy little dog that thinks its a big dog in a little body. In addition, it is an easy-to-train breed and very intelligent. The following steps will help you to identify a Papillon.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Papillon. It has a fine bone structure to go with the little body. It is 8 to 11 inches at the shoulders. The body is a bit longer than high, giving this breed a rectangular look.

    2

    Check that the head is small and of medium length. The dark eyes are round and have an alert expression. They should not bulge. The muzzle is thinner than the head and tapers to a small black nose. The round eyes are medium sized and are quite alert. They do not bulge. The ears may stand straight up or they may be dropped. The tips are rounded and the ears are set toward the back of the head.

    3

    Make sure the medium length neck sits on angulated, well-developed shoulders. The chest is somewhat deep, fronting a tucked up belly. The front feet are thin and hare-like. The rear legs are thin and, like the rest of the body, fine-boned. The rear feet are also hare-like. While the dewclaws may be left on the front, the rear dewclaws should be removed. The tail sports a long plume and may hang to either side of the dog.

    4

    Pet the long, silky coat. It is a single, straight coat and lies flat on the back and sides of the body, but has a lavish frill on the chest. The ears, backs of the forelegs and the hind legs are covered with extra hair. The color is always parti-color or white with patches of any color. The head should have a white blaze.

The Bo-Shih Dog Breed Information

The Bo-Shih Dog Breed Information

The type of dog known as a "Bo-Shih" or "Boshih" is not a mutt, but a hybrid. The Bo-Shih is a deliberately bred cross of a purebred Boston Terrier and a purebred Shih-tzu. Like cockapoos (cocker spaniel-poodle mix) and schnoodles (schnauzer-poodle mix), the Bo-Shih is what is usually called a "designer dog."

Physical Features

    The Bo-Shih will have some characteristics of both parents, but because there are two distinct and disparate gene pools, the resulting puppies may take after one parent more than the other, depending upon the dominant genes of each parent.

    In general, a Bo-Shih has medium to long fur which is often tri-colored. Often, a Bo-Shih will have a face like a Boston Terrier but with long, wiry fur that beards the muzzle and gives the face a shaggy appearance. These Bo-Shihs also have shaggier coats overall, though the fur is usually soft rather than coarse.

    Because a Boston Terrier has short hair that requires very little grooming, and the Shih-Tzu has a long, flowing coat that needs regular brushing, it is virtually impossible to predict what kind of coat the offspring will have. Normally, however, the Bo-Shih's coat is longer than the Boston Terrier's.

    The Bo-Shih has a short, usually "pushed in" snout. The height of the adult Bo-Shih varies greatly, from 12 inches to about 16 inches. The ears often, but not always, stand up straight.

Personality

    The Bo-Shih may have personality traits of either parent, or a combination of both parents' temperament and manner.

    Buyers and adopters can familiarize themselves with the basic characters of the foundation breeds to get an idea of what they may expect from their dog. Much of the animal's character will be formed by its owner's interaction.

    Boston Terriers--which were at one time hybrids themselves--are smart, active and, like all terriers, sometimes stubborn. They are affectionate and loyal. They require exercise and stimulation, such as complicated toys or perhaps agility training.

    Shih-tzus are generally happy little dogs who carry themselves proudly. They were bred by the Chinese to be house pets, and are quite content fulfilling that role.

The Heterosis Effect

    The Heterosis Effect is a theory promoted by hybrid dog breeders and aficionados which says crossing two purebred dogs of different breeds will result in a new breed that enjoys better health.

    This effect is thought to bring to the fore the strongest health characteristics of each dog, resulting in a dog that is less prone to genetic disease and genetic defects and thus more robust and healthy.

Buying or Adopting a Puppy

    While there are often Bo-Shih's in rescue and in animal control shelters, they are usually not listed as such, but rather as Boston Terrier mixes or Shih-Tzu mixes. Because of this, it is usually easier to search pet adoption websites for one breed or the other, and watch for listings that give the secondary breed, for example "Boston Terrier/Shih-tzu mix."

    If buying a puppy, research the breeder carefully to be sure only the finest stock from both breeds have been mated to produce the puppy you are interested in. Puppies at major pet stores come from uncertain origins, including puppy mills, and may harbor latent health issues or be born of parents that are not purebred.

    Check the lineage of the parents and meet both sire and dam. A reputable breeder will be happy to introduce you. Because there are so many variables possible in buying a hybrid puppy, it is up to the potential owner to evaluate the puppies and try to predict which one will mature into an adult that has the coat, color and personality desired.

Breed Registration

    While the Bo-Shih is not recognized as a breed by the AKC (American Kennel Club), a Bo-Shih can be registered with the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC) and the International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR).

    Both organizations provide a certified registration that includes pedigrees. IDCR states it provides services throughout North America and in many other countries.
    Registering the dog helps owners track their dog's lineage and may be crucial if the owner plans to breed and sell the dogs.

What Is the Difference Between a Whippet & a Greyhound?

What Is the Difference Between a Whippet & a Greyhound?

The first obvious difference between the whippet and greyhound dog breeds is their size. The whippet looks like a miniature version of a greyhound. However, the greyhound's aristocratic history stretching back to ancient Egypt and the whippet's background among the hardscrabble, working-class British show these dogs have more differences than just appearance.

Greyhound History

    Greyhounds have been raced for hundreds of years.
    Greyhounds have been raced for hundreds of years.

    The greyhound's history extends back to ancient times. The earliest evidence of the dog is carvings on Egyptian tombs from around 2751 B.C., says the American Kennel Club. The dogs are depicted hunting goats and deer. The Romans were the first to describe greyhounds in writing. For many centuries, the dogs were considered high-class animals and only royal families owned and bred them. Greyhounds were trained to hunt foxes, deer and rabbits. The first greyhounds were brought to America by Spaniards in the 1500s, and shown as early as 1877 in major dog shows.

Whippet History

    The English Kennel Club did not recognize the whippet breed until 1891, even though the breed had been developed for hundreds of years. The whippet was created by combining genetic traits of Italian greyhounds, greyhounds and a terrier-type dog, according to the AKC. It was called "the poor man's racehorse" and was usually owned by working-class people. The breed came to America with English mill owners. For a long time, Massachusetts was the home of whippet dog racing.

Size

    The main difference between whippets and greyhounds is their size. The American Kennel Club reports the ideal height is 19 to 22 inches for male whippets and 18 to 21 inches for female whippets. This is measured from the ground to the highest point of the dog's withers. The ideal weight is 25 to 45 lbs. Greyhounds are larger, with males weighing 65 to 70 lbs. and females at 60 to 65 lbs. They measure from 27 to 30 inches tall.

Speed

    Greyhounds are the second-fastest land mammals in the world and are faster than whippets. The top speed for the greyhound is almost 39 mph. The whippet can reach speeds of 35 mph. Both breeds of dogs have been used in racing competitions for centuries. The Romans and Egyptians raced greyhounds for sport and competed in prey-chasing exercises called coursing. Racing the dog with artificial lures started in 1876 in England, but it did not catch on until the early 1900s in America. "Rag races" with whippets became a major English pastime in the 1800s among the working-class citizens.

Largest Breed of Dog Recognized by the American Kennel Society

Largest Breed of Dog Recognized by the American Kennel Society

Domestic dogs are a diverse group of creatures, coming in countless colors and shapes. But when it comes to pure size, mastiffs stand out from the rest of the pack. The mastiff breed is the biggest one acknowledged by the American Kennel Club. "Old English mastiff" is an oft-used moniker for this breed. Although mastiffs are the largest dogs, they're not the tallest. That distinction goes to Irish wolfhounds.

Height

    Mastiffs are English natives who have extensive histories as watchdogs. Hunting was also a big part of their pasts. Female mastiffs are usually around 27.5 inches at their shoulders. Male mastiffs are generally about 30 inches tall.

Weight

    Weight is where mastiffs reign. Mastiffs of both sexes usually weigh between 175 and 190 pounds, pretty similar to the range for men. Because mastiffs are so large, they tend to thrive in suburban or rural settings where they can move around. Chihuahuas usually weigh less than 6 pounds, a huge difference within the same species.

Biggest Dogs on Earth

    Mastiffs are frequently on lists as the globe's biggest canines. A Massachusetts-based mastiff named Hercules was tagged as the world's heaviest pooch in June 2001. Not only did the immense cutie weigh in at 282 pounds, his neck was 38 inches around.

Tallest Dogs = Irish Wolfhounds

    Irish wolfhounds are known as the American Kennel Club's tallest dogs. Males can often grow to at least 32 high at the shoulders. Females can be 30 inches or taller. Males generally weigh 120 pounds or more, while females can weigh 105 pounds or more. Despite their intimidatingly size, Irish wolfhounds tend to have pleasant and friendly dispositions. Because these guys are so tall, ample space in their living environments is a must.

How to Make Homemade Dog Food for Boxers

How to Make Homemade Dog Food for Boxers

Boxers are gentle giants. They are perfect for any family because they are so loving and giving. Giving your boxer the best nutrition and food you can provide will ensure not only a happy boxer, but a long and happy life. Boxers are known for their sensitive stomachs, so a little planning and know-how is needed before venturing out to make homemade dog food for this breed. After going through these simple steps, you will be the head chef of boxer food.

Instructions

    1

    Place a 20-quart stock pot on medium heat.

    2

    Cook rice or oatmeal according to package instructions.

    3

    While your grain is cooking, prepare your meat. Using a frying pan works just fine.

    4

    After the grain has been completed, put in vegetables and stock of your choice and return to low heat.

    5

    Add the meat once it has thoroughly cooked.

    6

    Divided the mixture into plastic tubs with lids and store in the refrigerator.

    7

    Use a 2-cup measuring cup to portion the serving for your dogs.

    8

    Microwave the meal for 1 to 2 minutes.

    9

    Add 2 to 3 pieces of broken up bread and serve.

How to Predict the Size of Toy Poodle Puppies

How to Predict the Size of Toy Poodle Puppies

Toy poodles are a very popular pet due to their small size, remarkable intelligence and loyal personalities. Toy poodles vary greatly in color and size, ranging from 5 to 9 lbs. and 7 to 10 inches tall. Toy poodles are often bred with other toy breeds to create combinations such as Yorkiepoos and Cockapoos. Whether your puppy is purebred or mixed between two toy breeds, it is possible to estimate her adult size fairly accurately.

Instructions

    1

    Find out the height and weight of the mother and father of your puppy. For purebred dogs or mixed toy breeds, your puppy should grow to be somewhere between the size of his parents. Male puppies will be closer to their father's size, and female puppies will be closer to their mother's size.

    2

    Research the size averages of your puppy's breed or breeds. Compare your puppy to litter mates or other puppies of a similar age. The comparative size of its paws and head give a good indication of its adult size. Puppies with larger heads and paws will be larger adults.

    3

    Estimate adult size based on your puppys current age, height, and weight. At 2 1/2 months old, a puppy is about 25 percent of its adult weight. At four months, it is around 50 percent of its adult weight, and at six months, it is about 75 percent of its adult size. Your puppy will generally be at its adult height and weight around 11 to 12 months of age.

Rabu, 28 Maret 2012

How to Care for a Lhasa Apso

Lhasa Apsos are thought to bring good luck to their owners. They are originally from Tibet and were bred by nobles and holy men. They are intelligent, affectionate dogs. Due to their long double-coats, they can also be high maintenance.

Instructions

    1

    Give your Lhasa Apso a lot of time and attention. She can become depressed.

    2

    Brush your Lhasa Apso daily to remove tangles and matted hair. Shampoo their coat often.

    3

    Take your Lhasa Apso to the vet for regular checkups. This breed of dog is prone to ear infections, eye problems, and skin disorders. Kidney disease is also prominent in the Lhasa Apso.

    4

    Train your Lhasa Apso she requires a clear understanding of the master/dog relationship. Requires firm and consistent commands. They are a take charge type of dog and do respond well to praise.

    5

    Crate train your Lhasa Apso. They can become very arrogant and destructive if left alone. They must be taught obedience from the beginning.

    6

    Walk your pet daily. This is the perfect animal for apartment or condominium living. Lhasa Apso needs minimal exercise.

Facts on Blue-Nosed Pit Bull Puppies

Facts on Blue-Nosed Pit Bull Puppies

Finding factual information about blue-nosed pit bull puppies can be a real challenge. There are many traits that are either inflated or simply replaced by myths. Some people believe they are dangerous dogs based on stories they have heard. Others claim they are a rare breed and try to profit from their uncommon coloring. Having all the facts will help you make an informed opinion about blue-nosed pit bull puppies.

Blue Nose

    The blue nose coloring is an oddity. Strange coloring for any dog can be attractive and sought after. However, it is important to know that this is not a rarity that raises the monetary value of the dog. This is simply a trait that shows up in all types of pit bulls.

Aggression

    The pit bull breed has tendencies toward animal aggression, and the blue nose is no exception. It is possible for them to be at peace with other animals if the right environment is provided, but it's important to monitor them closely. Pit bulls are not naturally aggressive toward people and therefore do not make good guard dogs without proper training. This dog does not have extra bite pressure or a different way to use their teeth for extra damage as some myths say. There is also no evidence of the brain swelling and causing them to go crazy. This myth started with doberman pinschers and has now been applied to pit bulls, but holds no truth.

Ability

    Pit bulls are performance dogs. They are the professional athletes of the dog world. They can perform tasks well and are very muscular. A 6-foot fence is recommended because of their jumping ability. They are also very strong; take blue-nosed pit bull puppies through obedience training, as there is a possibility of being over powered if they see something they want.

Precautions

    Because of their strength and aggressive tendencies towards other animals, it is important to have the right environment if you are bringing a pit bull into your home. Other pets may cause fights that could end in tragedy. Even though the dog is not prone to aggression towards people, young children may inadvertently do something that the dog does not like and provoke a dangerous reaction. However, as long as proper precautions are taken, having a blue nosed pit bull puppy in your home can be a wonderful experience.

How to Properly Take Care of a Beagle Dog Breed

The beagle dog breed is a popular canine that lots of people are fond of. They are relatively small, friendly and cute looking. Who can say no to that little face and those big eyes? However, it is important for a owner to know more about the beagle dog breed and the proper ways to take care of one. This article talks about beagles' characteristics and what you should do as a owner to properly care for them.

Instructions

    1

    The beagle dog breed is a hound which means they use their noses a lot to catch the scent and help hunters get to their pray. They are typically three colors, white, tan and black. They are also very friendly to everyone and make lots of friendly easily.

    2

    To properly care for the beagle dog breed, you must know that this is a dog that follows its nose and sometimes that can get it into big trouble. You must always have the dog on a leash because it might run away from you because of a scent that it caught.

    3

    The beagle's coat is very easy to groom so you should have no problems there. As a responsible owner, you will have to keep an eye on the beagle's nails because it might grow long and dig into his flesh. Only bath the dog when necessary.

    4

    One of the biggest problems with the beagle dog breed is that it can escape from your yard. It is a scent hound and is easily distracted by smell. If this dog is left in your yard for a while unsupervised, it might catch a scent somewhere and run away from you. Because of its nose, it can get into some serious trouble. This breed is popular for those that conduct experiment on dogs. Make sure you monitor this dog's play in the backyard preferably have it on the leash at all times.

    5

    Choose dog food that helps the dog maintain healthy weight. The beagle dog breed is prone to weight gain and loves treats. You should monitor how much your dog is eating and provide sufficient exercises to keep it in the best shape possible.

How to Rescue a Pit Bull

How to Rescue a Pit Bull

Pit Bulls are easily the most misunderstood and mistreated breed of dog. They have a reputation for being vicious, yet are no more prone to viciousness than any other breed. Only difference is: they are stronger than most breeds.

In spite of their unfair reputation, dog experts find that pit bulls are one of the most loyal, people-friendly and children-friendly breeds, as well as tend to score higher on temperament tests than most breeds. In fact, if you talk to people in cat and dog households, you often find out the dog is a pit bull, since they tend to get along well with cats.

Yet tragically, because of their undeserved reputation and the fact that many are turned in by irresponsible owners, shelters are filled with pit bulls that would make loving family pets--but due to their sheer numbers--are never given the chance.

This is why it's so important for people to consider pit bulls when wanting to add a dog to their family. If you are one of those wonderful people--here are some ways to go about it.

Instructions

    1

    Do some online research and educate yourself about pit bulls. A good place to start is a pit bull rescue group's website. These websites normally have information about the breed based on their experience with placing a variety of pit bulls in compatible homes.

    2

    Check your local animal shelter if you decide you are ready to adopt a pit bull. Chances are your local shelter will have a few to choose from. If you have a hard time entering an animal shelter (which many people do), most shelters list their available dogs online along with pictures and descriptions. In many cities, animal shelters will hold offsite mobile adoptions at places like pet supply stores and parks for people who would rather not visit the shelter (chances are you will find a pit bull or two or three). Shelters always do temperament testing before they adopt out an animal.

    3

    If you can't find a pit bull from the shelter, check with a local pit bull rescue group. If you don't have one in your immediate area, chances are there will be one not too far away; just search pit bull rescue along with your city or state. Pit bull rescue groups do behavior testing and will make sure a specific dog you have in mind is right for your family, home and lifestyle. They will also come out and do a "home check" to ensure that your home is right for the dog and vice versa. And rest assured, adopting a pit bull from a rescue is making room for them to save another pit bull from a shelter's "death row."

    4

    If you are more specific in the pit bull you are looking for, PetFinder.com is a great place to look. This website lists thousands of dogs up for adoption at shelters and rescue groups throughout the United States. You would just need to choose pit bull as the breed of dog and enter your zip code to search. You can also search by age group including "Baby," "Young," "Adult" and "Senior," as well as by gender if you like.

    5

    Once you have a pit bull in mind, ask a lot of questions. Start with the basics such as whether the dog is people-friendly (most dogs that are up for adoption are), likes children, is dog and cat friendly and what they know of the dog's background. Some are taken in as strays, but often times, dogs (especially pit bulls) are turned in to the shelter by their owners who may not be the most responsible. Many pit bulls are bought to breed, and some to fight, and when they are done serving their purpose, are given up. Also, people often buy pit bull puppies to be "cool" or seem "tough" and when the novelty wears off, they no longer want to keep them. For this reason, there are plenty of younger pit bulls available for adoption that are a year or two old. Also, be sure to find out if the pit bull may have been abused in the past, and keep in mind, most dogs that have been abused come around with just some love and patience, or perhaps need to work with an animal behaviorist or trainer that is experienced with the breed. Consider if you are in a situation to offer this.

How to Rescue a Shih-Tzu

If you have always wanted a shih-tzu and are considering buying one from a breeder, try to rescue one instead. Best known for their small, stocky frames, long, shaggy coats and lively personalities, these dogs can make excellent pets. But this breed is not for everyone. Some shih-tzus suffer from severe separation anxiety and even display aggressive behaviors. If you have a loving home and adequate time to devote to training your shih-tzu, adopt an orphan in need.

Instructions

    1

    Locate shih-tzu rescue organizations. There are several national organizations devoted to the rescue of shih-tzus. These include Shih Tzu and Furbaby Rescue and Adopt a Pet. Contact them online to search for a shih-tzu in your area (See Resources). Talk to your local Humane Society about shih-tzu rescue organizations near you and they will connect you.

    2

    Complete the adoption application. Most shih-tzu rescue organizations require you to fill out an extensive questionnaire. Be ready to answer questions about your home, family, financial situation, other pets, your past experience with dogs and your reasons for rescuing a shih-tzu. Have a list of personal references, as well as the names of your vets and dog groomers readily available. Attend a face-to-face screening interview if the rescue organization requires it.

    3

    Pay the rescue fee. Many shih-tzu rescue organizations ask that you cover the costs that your dog incurred while at the rescue organization. This typically includes the cost of food, relevant care supplies, medical expenses and micro-chipping. Provide an additional donation of money, supplies or food if you wish to support the continued work of the shih-tzu rescue organization.

    4

    Prepare for the arrival of your shih-tzu. You're likely rescuing an adult dog but you are not familiar with your dog's history. Puppy-proof your home to ensure that it's a safe environment for your dog. Move all poisonous plants, cleaning products, medicines and insecticides out of your pet's reach. Check your fence to make sure that it is completely secure. Unplug any electrical cords that your dog might chew. Find more information about puppy-proofing your home, go online to Health Guidance (See Resources).

    5

    Know how to care for your shih-tzu. Talk to your vet about how to prevent common problems in the breed including, skin allergies, respiratory issues, spinal injuries and obesity. Shih-tzus also have extensive grooming needs. Consult with your groomer about how to properly care for your dog's coat. Locate more information about how to care for your shih-tzu online at Your Purebred Puppy (See Resources).

The Differences Between Golden Lab & Golden Retriever Dogs

The Differences Between Golden Lab & Golden Retriever Dogs

While a yellow Labrador retriever might be referred to as a golden lab, it shouldn't be confused with a golden retriever. Although both kinds of dogs have a similar heritage and temperament, golden labs and golden retrievers belong to different breeds and have striking physical differences.

Yellow Labrador Retriever Physical Description

    Labrador retrievers are faithful and eager to please.
    Labrador retrievers are faithful and eager to please.

    Yellow, or golden, is one of the several colorings of Labrador retrievers. According to the American Kennel Club, Labrador retrievers vary in shade from yellow to black to chocolate, which is brown. Considered a medium-sized dog, a Labrador retriever of any color sports a uniformly short coat, broad head and a tapered tail that is very thick at its base.

Golden Retriever Physical Description

    Golden retrievers are intelligent and energetic.
    Golden retrievers are intelligent and energetic.

    As its name indicates, a golden retriever may be any number of shades of yellow. No other colors are specific to this dog breed. A golden retriever is similar in size to a Labrador retriever, but its coat is much longer, thicker and water-repellent. Its head is broad like a Labrador retriever's head, but its muzzle is longer and narrower than that of a Labrador retriever. Like the Labrador, the golden retriever has a tail with a thick base, but its tail is less tapered than the Labrador's tail. Because of the golden retriever's longer coat, it has a feathery appearance.

Yellow Labrador Retriever Background and Personality

    Labrador retrievers, including yellow labs, were bred to help Newfoundland fishermen retrieve their fishing nets. Throughout the ages, they have earned a reputation as "people-pleasers," commonly serving as guide dogs for people with disabilities. Their gentle nature and friendly disposition make them popular pets for families.

Golden Retriever Background and Personality

    Golden retrievers were bred to assist hunters in the challenging conditions of the Scottish Highlands, resulting in their lean muscular build and warm, heavy coat. Because their ancestors were experts at navigating rocky terrain, it's no surprise that they require daily exercise to maintain health and happiness. Their predictable behavior and high level of energy make them ideal companions for active individuals and families.

How to Treat a Dog Separation Anxiety Problem in a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Dog Separation Anxiety can be painful for the dog and the owner. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are also not just any dog. Bred to be lap dogs and companions, as opposed to hunters and workers, these dogs need contact with people and animals. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels can develop dog separation anxiety that needs to be attended to in a manner consistent with their sweet dispositions.

Instructions

    1

    Give your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel the attention he or she requires. cavaliers are bred to be lap dog companions - indoor dogs that are with people or other dogs. Cavaliers make excellent pets in houses where people are home and can spend time with them. A cavalier is not a good choice to be the only dog in a home where it is left alone all day.

    2

    Establish a routine with your dog. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are not unlike children. They feel safe with routines. Cavaliers do not require a great deal of exercise in the form of walks, but they do require lots of play and love. Establish a routine of eating, playing and nap times so your dog will feel safe.

    3

    Train your dog in basic canine obedience so that they can be in and around your house, friends and family without being a nuisance with annoying habits. You and your dog will be happier and your dog will be less likely to develop or continue with separation anxiety.

    4

    When you do need to leave your Cavalier home alone, establish a quick routine for good-byes. If you are anxious, your empathic dog will be anxious also. Leave the dog with a treat or toy and the radio playing.

    5

    Consider investing in a puppy pen. Cavaliers are relatively small and puppy pens are larger than crates. Puppy pens can be 2.5-4 feet square with a covered roof and pan at the bottom. This will allow your dog space to move around (even as an adult) as well as feel safe in your absence.

    6

    If you are able, find play dates for your Cavalier, consider doggie day care, or even getting another dog- especially if you find yourself leaving your little heart warmer alone for hours at a time. Unlike other breeds, these companion dogs may have separation anxiety for the very traits they were chosen for- their desire for contact.

Information on Maltese X Shih-Tzu Puppies

Information on Maltese X Shih-Tzu Puppies

Shih Tzu Maltese, also called Bichon Maltese, is a hybrid dog that is becoming popular because of its sweet temperament and convenient size. As non-shedding dogs, they are considered to be hypoallergenic. As long-haired hybrids, though, these dogs come with a list of required grooming and care responsibilities.

Shih Tzu Maltese--The Facts

    A Shih Tzu Maltese is produced when a Shih Tzu is crossed with a Maltese. Dogs are often crossed in this way to develop new breeds with the desired characteristics of the parent breeds. Shih Tzu Maltese is not yet "set" as a breed, meaning that the only guaranteed way to produce one is to breed a Shih Tzu with a Maltese. This can result in a wide range of physical characteristics and personalities, as opposed to a set breed type.

Appearance

    A Shih Tzu Maltese has long, flowing hair that may be brown, black or tan with white. Some are pure white. As puppies they weigh between 3 and 4 lbs.; they grow to weigh 8 to 15 lbs. as adults. Even as young dogs they have the characteristic appearance: solid bodies with flat faces, wide eyes and floppy ears.

Personality

    A Shih Tzu Maltese is characterized by a bright, intelligent personality. They are loving and well-mannered, with a playful streak that makes them popular with the young and the old. These dogs get along well with other dogs are are clever and willing during training. Shih Tzu Maltese are typical of most breeds in that puppies present with this personality relatively early, and are friendly and outgoing from an early age. Their intelligence makes them easy to train, though training is always best if started very early in a dog's life.

Grooming

    Shih Tzu Maltese dogs do not shed as much as their parents, and are ideal for people who have allergies. Their long, silky hair does require regular grooming, though, including bathing and brushing. This keeps their coats clean and tangle-free. Owners should start grooming their Shih Tzu Maltese early to get them used to the idea of being bathed and brushed. Teaching a puppy early leads to a lifetime of easier grooming.

Considerations

    Buying a hybrid dog can be risky. Since these dogs are not registered by the American Kennel Club, there are no restrictions on breeding. A buyer is never guaranteed that a Shih Tzu Maltese puppy comes from healthy, purebred stock, or that it is evenly split between the two breeds. Purchasers should only buy hybrid breeds from trustworthy kennels with good breeding records.

Labrador Puppy Nutrition

Labrador Puppy Nutrition

With many choices out on the market, deciding what to feed your new Labrador puppy might not be easy. Along with synchronizing your Labrador's food to its life stages, such as puppy or adult, there are more facts to base your food choice on. Labradors have special requirements for nutrition. They are very active and have a specific chemical makeup.

Feeding after Weaning

    If your Labrador puppy has already begun eating solid food, keep feeding your puppy that same food. If a switch in food is needed, introduce the new food slowly by mixing it with the old food until the switch is complete.
    Puppies need to eat more frequently than adult dogs. Feed your Labrador puppy dry food to help develop teeth and gums. In addition, dry food helps fight plaque. From one to six months of age, feed your puppy three times throughout the day. From six to twelve months, feed your puppy twice a day. For dogs one year of age and older, one meal a day is sufficient.
    An adult Lab may eat 1.5 to 2 lbs. of food a day. For a puppy, feed it enough to keep hunger satisfied but not enough to make the puppy sick. Follow the food label directions for how much to feed.

Nutrients

    Puppies are at an accelerated growth stage and need more nutrients than an adult dog. The amount of minerals, protein, fat, carbohydrates and water-soluble and water fat-soluble vitamins are the ingredients required for energy and muscle growth. These nutrients also provide nourishment and help to transport oxygen through the bloodstream.

Non-digestible Foods

    Non-digestible foods include carrots, asparagus, green peppers and other raw vegetables, as well as peanut shells and other fillers. These food should be avoided, as they are non-digestible and block nutrients from being absorbed.

Reading the labels

    Eggs, meat or fish should be the first or second ingredients on the label. According to Tripp Wood, Labrador breeder and owner of labpups.com, economy dog food usually provides more filler and less protein rich ingredients. Fillers are cheap products that are mixed in with nutrient-filled foods to decrease the overall cost of the food and should be avoided.
    If corn is the first ingredient listed, move on. Corn is a filler food. Lamb is another ingredient to avoid. It has a scent that is not desirable to Labs. These foods have additives such as flavors and sugars to mask the scent. Avoid any sort of fillers, such as peanut shells. They are non-digestible
    Chicken meal or beet pulp are two good ingredients. Chicken is also good for treats.

Water

    Water is essential for any puppy to survive. Healthy puppies are able to regulate their water intake as long as a fresh supply is always available to them.

Selasa, 27 Maret 2012

About Spaniels

About Spaniels

Twelve breeds of spaniels exist, with lineage tracing to at least the 12th century. Typically thought of as hunting dogs, spaniels make great pets for energetic people who can devote adequate time and attention to them. Each breed is known for specific skills, variations in appearance and even different personality traits. However, many traits remain similar across the spaniel family.

Breeds

    The American Kennel Club recognizes 12 official breeds of spaniels, many of which are common and others you may never have heard of. One of the most common is the Cocker Spaniel, while the American Water Spaniel and Field Spaniel rate among the rarest. Other breeds include the Boykin Spaniel, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Clumber Spaniel, English Cocker Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, English Toy Spaniel, Irish Water Spaniel, Tibetan Spaniel and the Welsh Springer Spaniel.

Personality

    Most spaniel breeds are high-energy, friendly, intelligent and hard-working. They enjoy being around "their" people and delight in being involved in family activities. The large majority of spaniel dogs require exercise at least once a day, despite being relatively small. Spaniels are easy to train when young and are trustworthy around children. Some breeds--such as the Tibetan Spaniel and Field Spaniel--may be aloof with strangers, although they warm up quickly.

Occupation

    Most spaniels make great hunting dogs because of their small size, speed, eagerness to please and perseverance. They can find, flush and retrieve animals and birds from both land and water. Some spaniels--particularly the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel--may also be used as therapy dogs, thanks to their loving nature.

Coat Care

    Spaniel coats come in many different colors, depending on breed and even sometimes within a breed. However, most spaniels have long layers of fur that require brushing at least once a week and that may need periodic trimming. Coat care is extremely important with spaniels because of the tendency for the fur to mat. Some breeds--such as the Cavalier King Charles--require only brushing, not trimming. The Irish Water Spaniel has tight ringlets for the majority of its coat, and is considered suitable for allergy sufferers.

Location

    Due to their physical nature, most spaniels are most comfortable in the country. However, several of the smaller, less-active breeds of spaniels can make good apartment or city dogs. These include the English Toy Spaniel and the Tibetan Spaniel. These animals will still need exercise, but it will be less frequent. Each breed can be as happy hanging out with family as engaging in physical sport such as hunting.

Information on the Spaniel Dog Breed

Information on the Spaniel Dog Breed

There are many types of spaniels, from the cocker spaniel to springer spaniel. Despite the differences in their appearances, all dogs belonging to the spaniel category share a common ancestry and a set of characteristics that make them ideal pets for many kinds of people and situations.

Descent

    Although the origin of this dog breed is still debated today, some people believe that it came from Rome, where spaniels were used to hunt. The old Italian verb "spaniere" means "to get out of a trap or net," notes the Dog Owner's Guide's website. This may be a reference to the spaniels' hunting style of crouching and then springing on prey. However, many of the types of spaniels common today were developed in England. Today, the spaniel breed includes the American and English cocker spaniels, the Field and Sussex spaniel, the English and Welsh springer, the Clumber, the Irish and American water spaniels, and the Boykin spaniel.

Function

    All spaniels were bred for two main tasks: to hunt and to serve as family companions. Many people who own spaniels say that these dogs live for their families. When hunting, spaniels are used to flush game from hiding. After a hunter shoots down the quarry, the spaniels retrieve it. They stay relatively close to their owners during hunts, so that their owners can follow on foot. Additionally, they were bred to get into thick brush to retrieve quarry.

Physical Traits

    Spaniels can range from small- to medium-sized. There are also some toy-sized versions of the breed that are used solely for companionship. Generally, these dogs have medium to long coats of fur that come in many colors and color combinations. Main distinguishing features of all spaniels are their long, floppy ears.

Character

    People who own spaniels often say that this breed of dog has a real enthusiasm for life. Their tails are always wagging and they are always ready to put a smile on their families' faces. This makes them an ideal pet for families, including those with small children. They are highly intelligent dogs and full of energy, but at the same time are gentle and sociable.

Needs

    Like any other sporting breed of dog, spaniels need a moderate amount of daily exercise. This breed has a long life span, compared to other similarly sized breeds. However, spaniels can be prone to eye problems, including blindness, so owners need to pay attention to any vision problems that may develop. Additionally, because spaniels have long, floppy ears, dirt and bacteria can easily accumulate in the ear, leading to infection. Frequent cleaning can prevent this.

Beagle Eye Disorders

Beagle Eye Disorders

According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), beagles are generally a very healthy breed, but they do tend to have problems with their eyes. Eight eye disorders are categorized as "prevalent" in beagles by the AKC.

Eyelash Disorders

    Distichiasis and ectopic cilia (aberrantcilia) are two disorders dealing with improper growth of the eyelashes. These conditions develop at birth or within the first year of a puppy's life and will cause irritation, but no vision loss.

Central Progressive Retinal Atrophy (CPRA)

    CPRA refers to a disorder in which the rods and cones gradually become less effective. Over time a dog affected with this disorder will lose its central vision, but peripheral vision is not lost.

Glaucoma

    Just like in humans, canine glaucoma causes excessive pressure on the eyeball and requires treatment. Without treatment it is very painful and can cause total blindness.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

    PRA will gradually cause total blindness in an affected dog due to loss of retina function over time.

Other Minor Conditions

    Dry eye, cherry eye, and imperforate lacrimal punctum (epiphoral) are minor conditions prevalent in beagles dealing with the tear ducts and production of tears. These are treatable and cause discomfort, but no loss of vision.

Yorkiepoo Information

Yorkiepoo Information

The yorkiepoo is a type of designer dog, a term referring to a mixed-breed pup that has been bred for certain characteristics. Designer dogs have a two-breed lineage, one of which is often a poodle. The poodle is a popular choice primarily because of its hypoallergenic properties their coats are less irritating to people with dog-hair allergies. The yorkiepoo is a mix of a Yorkshire terrier and a miniature or toy poodle. When selecting a hybrid dog, remember that the dog will exhibit a combination of the characteristics of the two breeds from which it originates.

Yorkshire Terrier

    Yorkies are small dogs that dont require a lot of exercise. They do prefer regular interaction with their human companions, however. The breed began as a type of working dog used to catch rats in the clothing mills of Yorkshire, England (whence the name). However, their long silky coats and charming demeanor soon attracted the attention of members of the upper classes, and they became companion dogs. Yorkshire terriers are members of the toy group. Theyve been an American Kennel Club-recognized breed since 1885.

Poodle

    The poodle is widely recognized as one of the most intelligent dog breeds. They were originally bred to be water retrievers. In fact, the classic poodle haircut is designed to help the dogs move more freely when performing this work, while leaving extra fur in places where they need warmth to protect their vital organs. Poodles come in small, medium and large toy, miniature and standard.

Classifications of Yorkiepoos

    The yorkiepoo will exhibit characteristics that are a combination of the Yorkshire terrier and the poodle. Which of these two breeds dominates depends on what classification of yorkiepoo you purchase. An F1 classification of yorkiepoo is exactly half poodle and half Yorkie. The F1B can either mean that the dog is 25% poodle and 75% Yorkshire terrier, meaning an F1 cross was mated with a Yorkie, or that its 25% terrier and 75% poodle, meaning an F1 has been bred with a poodle.

Yorkiepoos by Other Names

    The poodle-Yorkie cross is known by a few other handles. The American Canine Hybrid Club and the Designer Dogs Kennel Club both use the hyphenated yorkie-poo. But the International Designer Canine Registry goes with one word: yorkipoo. The Designer Dog Breed Registry uses a slightly more formal first-name, last-name title: Yorkie Poo.

How to Select a Great Dane

While Great Danes can look intimidating because of their large size, they're extremely friendly and sensitive dogs. The Great Dane comes from Germany and was bred to hunt wild boar. Today the Great Dane is primarily a companion dog. Avoid choosing this breed unless you're prepared to spend a lot of time with your pet. Great Danes love to be around people and if left alone too long can quickly get into trouble.

Instructions

    1

    Consider a Great Dane if you're looking for a loyal watchdog. Size alone should prove intimidating to strangers.

    2

    Choose a Great Dane if you have children or other pets. These dogs get along well with both. However, if you have a male Great Dane, understand that he may not get along with other male dogs.

    3

    Realize that owning a Great Dane is a big commitment. Because of their large size, they require early obedience training so they don't become a threat to themselves or people.

    4

    Know that you'll spend a lot more money on food than with other breeds. Great Danes eat 3 to 6 cups of food twice a day - most dogs eat half that.

    5

    Be sure the Great Dane you choose shows no signs of aggression. Overall, he should be regal and alert in appearance, with well-formed muscles and straight front legs. The head should be finely chiseled and the neck should be long and muscular. The Great Dane's coat should be shiny.

    6

    Note that Great Danes come in six distinct colors: black, blue, brindle (yellow-gold and brindled with black cross stripes and a black mask), fawn (yellow-gold with a black mask), mantle (mostly black with white chest/neck; can have a white blaze down the nose), and harlequin (white with black patches throughout the body).

    7

    Understand the health problems related to Great Danes. They're prone to hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint), hypothyroidism (a condition that causes the body to slow down), Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder), heart disease, tumors and bloat.

    8

    Look at potential breeders very carefully. Be sure to ask if they're members of breed clubs, specialty clubs or obedience clubs. Affiliation with a club means you can check references to make sure you're not dealing with a puppy mill (a place where puppies are constantly bred for financial gain without consideration of the integrity of the breed).

    9

    Understand that you'll pay between $300 and $1,500 for a purebred Great Dane.

    10

    Note that it's OK to have a Great Dane in an apartment, despite the dog's large size. This breed will remain fairly inactive indoors.

    11

    Consider adopting a Great Dane from a pet rescue organization. However, be sure to carefully screen rescued dogs for personality. An aggressive Great Dane can cause damage because of his size.

    12

    Keep in mind that these great dogs usually have a relatively short life span of around five to six years, so appreciate every minute with them.