Rabu, 29 Februari 2012

Facts About Maltese Dogs

Maltese dogs belong to the toy class of dog breeds. They make excellent companion dogs and are ideal for dog lovers that live in small spaces with limited yard access. Interesting facts about Maltese dogs include the ancient origins of the breed, its unique physical characteristics and their lovable personality.

History

    One of the lesser-known facts about Maltese dogs is that their origins date to antiquity. While it is believed Maltese dogs have been in existence for thousands of years, the first known documentation of the dog comes from a Greek vase painting dating from 500 B.C.

Size

    More commonly known facts about Maltese dogs are their small size and stature. Maltese dogs typically weigh between 6 1/2 and 9 pounds and stand between 8 and 10 inches in height.

Features

    Prized for their liveliness and devotion and affection for their masters, Maltese dogs make excellent companions. They can also serve as watchdogs, as Maltese are generally very alert and bark at unfamiliar sounds or strangers at the door.

Prevention/Solution

    Maltese dogs have long, white coats of fine, straight, silky hair. While this is their most beautiful feature, it does take considerable maintenance to keep it in top form, making daily combing and regular bathing essential.

Time Frame

    Maltese dogs have a life expectancy of 15 or more years. However, Maltese dogs are sensitive to extreme temperatures and dampness, so in order to minimize exposure to these elements, Maltese should be kept indoors much of the time.

List of Personality Traits & Dog Types

List of Personality Traits & Dog Types

Dogs are man's best friend. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes over 150 breeds of pure bred dogs, which are classed in seven different groups and one class. Although each dog is an individual, breeds placed in together in a group tend to exhibit similar personality traits. A perspective dog owner should become familiar with these different groups before choosing their new puppy.

Working Dogs

    According to the American Kennel Club, dogs which are registered in the working group were developed to perform numerous tasks including hunting, herding, rescuing and hauling. Working dog breeds were also used for guarding and droving. Working dogs have been an invaluable asset to people throughout the years and have a close association with humans. Working dogs are large and strong animals and are often domineering, independent and challenging to manage. These personality traits, together with their huge size, typically make many working breeds unsuitable as family pets. Working dogs are however intelligent and protective. Great Danes, Siberian huskies, Newfoundlands, bullmastiffs, boxers, dobermans and Anatolian shepherds are all registered as working dogs.

Toy Dogs and Non-Sporting Breeds

    The non-sporting group is made up of dog breeds which do not fit neatly into any of the other groups. Toy dogs are ideal companions for city dwellers, as they require very little space. The Pekingese, Maltese, Chihuahua, pug, Yorkshire terrier and Pomeranian are all classed as toy breeds. These dogs, which are frequently referred to as lap dogs, are normally friendly and energetic.

Hounds and Sporting dogs

    The hound group contains breeds which hunt by sight or sound, while breeds in the sporting group, such as spaniels, setters, pointers and retrievers, track and retrieve birds. Sporting breeds tend to be gentle and obedient for the most part. Most hound breeds tent to be loyal and friendly. This is particularly true of scent hounds such as the bassets and beagles, which were bred to work in a pack.

Terriers and Herding

    Dogs in the herding group, which are typically loyal and obedient, were bred to herd cattle and sheep. German shepherds and the various collie types are included in this category. Breeds in the terrier group are feisty dogs which were developed to hunt vermin. The various breeds within this group show diverse temperaments although most are excellent guardians, such as the American Staffordshire terrier, Bedlington terrier and Airedale terrier.

Senin, 27 Februari 2012

Characteristics of a Border Collie

Characteristics of a Border Collie

The border collie is a medium-sized breed of dog that can be found sporting a variety of colorations. The breed also has a long and short coat type, both shedding twice a year and requiring regular grooming. This breed was originally developed along the border between England and Scotland where it was used primarily as a herding dog.

Active

    The border collie is an extremely active dog that requires a large amount of exercise on a daily basis. K9Web recommends taking a border collie on two 45-minute walks a day to help them to burn excess energy. This is a dog that will become destructive if it does not receive adequate exercise, which could include digging up the owner's backyard and chewing furniture. The border collie is also prone to suffering from heat exhaustion in hot weather due to the breed's characteristic hyperactivity, which causes the dog to carry on exercising even when feeling tired or overheated.

Intelligent

    One of the most intelligent dog breeds, the border collie is regarded highly for its ability to reason and to think independently. The border collie is an extremely trainable dog that will learn new commands quickly. Because of the breed's high intelligence, it needs mental stimulation to feel content. Training a border collie to complete an agility course is an effective method of keeping the dog stimulated.

Hard Working

    The border collie breed was first developed for the purpose of sheep herding. Border collies are one of the most common breeds of dog that are used for sheep herding, and this is due to the breed's hard-working nature, agility, intense focus and high level of stamina. Without a job to do, the border collie can become bored easily and this can lead to the dog to exhibit neurotic and destructive behavior.

With People

    This dog can make an ideal pet with active families who are willing to provide the necessary exercise and training. However the border collie is not recommended for families with young children as its strong herding instinct can cause it to herd and nip family members. The border collie has a reputation for being affectionate with its family, although it can be distant around strangers and it is therefore important to socialize the dog thoroughly from a young age to prevent behavior problems, according to the American Kennel Club.

Wirehaired German Pointers

Wirehaired German Pointers

The German wirehaired pointer is a midsized, well-muscled dog. Its body is a little longer than it is tall. The head is broad, and the muzzle is long and straight with a long brown nose. Eyes are oval in shape and brown in color, and ears are rounded, hanging close to the head. The German wirehaired pointer has a deep, wide chest and a strong yet slender neck. The tail set is high and is typically docked to two-fifths of its natural length. The outer coat is weather-resistant, water-repellent, wiry and about 2 inches long. Beard, forehead and whisker hair is slightly longer to protect the face. Coat colors are a variation of liver and white.

History

    These dogs were bred to hunt and retrieve waterfowl as well as land game.
    These dogs were bred to hunt and retrieve waterfowl as well as land game.

    German wirehaired pointers can be traced to the late 1800s, when they originated in Germany. Breeders wanted to develop a versatile but rugged hunting dog that could work with one person or a small group of people. These people hunted on foot in varied terrain from mountainous areas to dense forests. Hunting conditions required the dogs' coat to protect them when working in heavy brush or cold water, yet require little maintenance. The goal was to create a wire-coated, medium-sized dog that would hunt for, locate and then point out upland game. The dog was required to work birds, small and large game and fearlessly go after sharper game such as a fox. Tracking and locating wounded animals was another important characteristic bred into the breed. With all its hunting instincts, the German wirehaired pointer remains a devoted companion, watchdog and pet.

Breed Standard

    The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the German wirehaired pointer as a breed in 1959. The standard calls for males to stand from 24 to 26 inches tall and the females to be slightly smaller but not less than 22 inches tall. According to the AKC, the breed's most notable characteristics are its wiry, weather-resistant coat and longer facial hair.

Coat

    Puppies can start out with a shorter coat while maintaining a wiry texture.
    Puppies can start out with a shorter coat while maintaining a wiry texture.

    The breed's most distinctive feature is the functional wiry coat. The undercoat is thick enough during cold weather to insulate and protect yet thin enough in the summer to appear nonexistent. The hair coat is longer and thicker over the shoulders and tail to protect the skin from thick, dense brush. German wirehaired pointers have long eyebrows and medium-length beard and whisker hairs. Occasionally, the darker patches of hair are shorter than the white hairs. Puppies sometimes have a shorter coat than adults while still maintaining a harsh, wiry texture.

Temperament

    Even if it is just to retrieve the newspaper, German wirehaired pointers need a
    Even if it is just to retrieve the newspaper, German wirehaired pointers need a "job."

    German wirehaired pointers are intelligent, creative and slightly independent. Typically, they are fun-loving, playful and good with children. They are generally high-drive and need activity, even if it is a game of fetch. They are very loyal and devoted dogs that crave human companionship. The dogs excel in an environment where they are allowed a warm and close relationship with their owners. They do not thrive in a kennel environment or in the backyard with little human contact. If raised with one person, they become one-person dogs. If they are raised with a family including children, they adapt to the whole family. Some bond more closely with one member of the household.

The Behavior of Cockapoos

The Behavior of Cockapoos

Cockapoo behavior is one of the best things about this hybrid breed---it is usually obedient and fun. In fact, cockapoo behavior is a reason why so many pet lovers adore this breed, made from cocker spaniels and poodles. However, just like with any dog breed, this breed's behavior may vary, as you may encounter a dog that goes against what is normal for the cockapoo, which is why research of the breeder and dog's family history is of the utmost importance. If you are on the hunt for a dog that is friendly and eager to please, this breed's behavior may be right for you.

Affectionate

    One of the keynote characteristics of cockapoo behavior is their affection towards their owners and others. It is not uncommon for a cockapoo owner to always be greeted with lots of licks. In addition, many cockapoos make their owner's laps their primary locations.

Smart

    According to Dog-Behavior-Training.co.uk, cockapoo dogs are very smart and therefore, easy to train. Your cockapoo may behave in such a way that you are surprised at how fast it learns its tricks and commands. In general, poodles and cocker spaniels are both fairly intelligent, therefore, this breed that is made up of both typically is, as well.

Energetic and Playful

    Your cockapoo may exhibit behavior that is quite boisterous and energetic. According to PetPlace.com, poodles are generally active, a trait that is quite likely to pass onto the cockapoo. In order to prevent destructive behavior caused by boredom in your cockapoo, take it for daily walks and provide it with ample opportunities for physical activities. Since they are usually so intelligent, cockapoos generally do well with obedience and agility trials. In addition, providing your cockapoo with exercise and activity can help to keep it a healthy weight, which is very important, as obesity is common in cocker spaniels.

Willing to Please

    According to Dog-Behavior-Training.co.uk, cockapoos tend to exhibit behavior that pleases their owners. Cockapoos generally want to obey their owners and try to make them happy by behaving well. It is rare to find a cockapoo that is downright disobedient; however, it is possible. If your cockapoo inherits undesirable traits from its parents, it can behave in unacceptable ways. Poodles can be a bit neurotic, while cockers can be quite stubborn. If the two traits are combined, it can create a cockapoo that does what it wants. However, most cockapoos will strive to obey their owners.

Good-Natured

    Cockapoos display their good-natured behavior in a number of ways. Cockapoos generally get along well with adults, children and other animals, especially if they are socialized with others when they are young, states Dog-Obedience-Training.uk.co. Cockapoos are rarely aggressive or mean, but it is always possible, as it is with any dog.

How to Put Weight on My Dog Fast

All responsible pet owners are concerned about maintaining a healthy weight for their pets. Sometimes that means putting weight on an animal that has been sick or malnourished for any reason. People who work with animal rescue organizations often come into contact with dogs who have been underfed or, because of untreated health problems, have not been able to keep weight on. But owners of a finicky or recently ill dog might also want to know how to help their best friend quickly gain weight.

Instructions

    1

    Have your dog thoroughly examined by a veterinarian. Parasites and other unresolved health problems can prevent dogs from maintaining a healthy weight no matter what they are fed. Instead of randomly adding calories to your dog's diet, work with your veterinarian to compose a plan for your pet's best overall health.

    2

    Try a homemade dietary supplement for your dog known as satin balls with your veterinarian's approval. Even the pickiest pups can't resist them and satin balls are full of quality nutrition that will help your dog build muscle and can improve the condition of his coat. Mix together the following ingredients in a large bowl:
    1 pound ground beef
    1 8 ounce package of cream cheese
    1 jar natural peanut butter
    1 small jar wheat germ
    1 dozen egg yolks
    1 cup natural, uncooked oats soaked in one cup heavy cream or cultured whole milk yogurt

    3

    Form the mixture into walnut-sized or smaller balls. Balls should be more or less bite-sized but this will vary according to the size of your dog's mouth. Store two or three days worth of treats in the refrigerator and freeze the remainder.

    4

    Feed your dog one to five thawed satin balls a day according to your veterinarian's recommendation.

What Dogs Have the Best Disposition?

What Dogs Have the Best Disposition?

There are many breeds of dogs and most are known characteristically by their personality traits. Depending on your needs, canines are sought after for various reasons. Guard dogs and hunting dogs are trained for their specific jobs. A good, old-fashioned family dog would simply need to have a pleasant disposition and enjoy human attention.

Beagles

    The beagle has a gentle disposition and loves attention.
    The beagle has a gentle disposition and loves attention.

    A well-known family dog is the beagle. They are playful, energetic canines that adore attention. Beagles tend to form protective bonds with their human companions and are great with children. Due to their hunting instincts, they require a lot of exercise. Keeping them leashed when outdoors is best due to their cunning need to sniff out mischief. Beagles can be kept indoors and do well within an apartment setting. They require regular running opportunities because of their plentiful energy. Initially bred as pack dogs, they get along well with other canines and cats. Aggression is rarely shown and the beagle will simply growl. Children are adored by this breed of dog and they make pleasant companions for older adults.

Bichon Frise

    Bichons are social, friendly and affectionate.
    Bichons are social, friendly and affectionate.

    The Bichon Frise is bred to be a companion dog that is affectionate and playful. They are a good choice for children and have a social disposition. Families with allergies can breathe easy because of the Bichon's short hair and very little shedding. This breed of canine needs to be with families and adjusts well to all lifestyles. Because of its size, the Bichon is a good choice for those residing in apartments. Exercise is a must and playtime should be scheduled daily. Bichons are obedient and easily trained to learn tricks. They respond well to positive discipline and can be utilized as service dogs to perform therapy work in nursing homes.

Cocker Spaniel

    Cocker spaniels are happy dogs that love affection.
    Cocker spaniels are happy dogs that love affection.

    The cocker spaniel is not a dominant breed of canine. They are obedient and affectionate, making good companions for people of all ages. Spaniels love to be with people and enjoy active lifestyles. They are not aggressive or territorial dogs and will normally only bark if a stranger approaches. Families and children find them friendly and enthusiastic, with a desire to meet new people. This canine enjoys visiting new places and is a sociable breed. Cocker spaniels tolerate small children appropriately and thrive on high-energy families. They blend well with other dogs and cats, even allowing them to share toys.

Information About Miniature Shar-Pei Puppies

Information About Miniature Shar-Pei Puppies

The Shar-Pei is one of the more unique dog breeds in the world for its coarse and rough coat, almond shaped eyes, and loose, wrinkled skin. Another one of the dog's distinguishing characteristics is the fleshy and round muzzle that resembles more a manatee than a dog. The miniature version of the Shar-Pei is different only in size and shares the same characteristics as the standard version.

Miniature Shar Pei

    The development of the miniature Shar-Pei is a recent development in the ancient breed. The breed carries a recessive gene that produces a dog three to six inches shorter and ten to 15 pounds lighter than the average Shar-Pei. The miniature version is a result of a deliberate effort by breeders to produce Shar-Peis with the recessive genes. A miniature Shar Pei is in appearance and temperament just like a regular size Shar-Pei.

Coat

    The Miniature Shar-Pei has a short brown, tan or black coarse and rough coat. There is also a less frequently seen bear coat Shar-Pei that has longer hair. The loose skin forms folds and wrinkles along the length of the body and is especially pronounced on the face and neck. The folds around the eyes and head are especially sensitive to moisture, which if left can allow bacteria and yeast to grow and must be cleaned daily. While the coarse hair of the coat is easy to maintain with a quick weekly brush, the folds and wrinkles require more frequent care.

Temperament

    The Miniature Shar-Pei is a very loyal companion dog that bonds easily with its owner. The dog can have a stoic appearance and is not very interested in people or dogs that it does not know. The breed's aversion to strangers makes it an option for a good guard dog. The breed is playful and active and can be very independent and stubborn. Owners must be firm while training to make sure the dog does not become dominant.

Miniature Shar Pei Puppies

    Miniature Shar-Pei puppies are active and bond quickly with a family. They should be introduced early to children and other domesticated animals to ensure that they will get along, as they can become territorial. Besides basic obedience training, the most significant issue for an owner of a Shar-Pei puppy is skin care. The puppies have to grow into their loose skin, and wrinkles need to be cleaned and monitored for moisture, yeast or bacterial infections between the folds. Shar-Pei puppies should be on a low- or no-grain diet to reduce allergies and ensure the health of their skin.

Minggu, 26 Februari 2012

How to Determine a Dog's Breed

"What breed is your dog?" is a simple question with a not so simple answer. Sometimes a dog's breed can be so muddled or obscure that even the owner doesn't know. If you want to know what breed your dog is, there is a simple process to find out. Follow these steps to become a dog breed expert.

Instructions

    1

    Look carefully at the size of the dog first to begin to eliminate specific breeds. Determine the dog's color and hair length; this characteristic will be broken into either long hair or short haired.

    2

    Determine the overall energy level of the dog whether it is playful or fairly sedentary. Observe whether the dog is friendly or aggressive to strangers. Also, notice how the dog reacts to other animals, especially other dogs. This behavior could help identify breed as well.

    3

    Figure out the dog's build. Decide if it is muscular, small, medium or very small. Then feel the coat of hair on the dog, and list if the fur is wavy, straight, silky or sparse. Write down your assessments of the dog.

    4

    Pay special attention to the color combination of your dog. Most dogs are colored with a mix of white, black, tan, brown and sometimes red. Next, study the dog's head to determine if it is round, flat or square; also pay special attention to the dog's snout and whether it is long or short.

    5

    Note whether the dog is very vocal or fairly silent. Many dog breeds have specific vocal cues. You can also look at the dog's tail as another indicator.

    6

    Write down as many observations about your dog's appearance as possible and get a book or web reference on dog breeds. Use your observations to single out breed possibilities to help determine the specific breed. Be aware that your dog could be a mixture of different breeds.

What to Expect With Newborn Pugs

What to Expect With Newborn Pugs

The American Kennel Club notes the pug as one of the oldest breed of dogs, with a history dating back more than 2,000 years. Originally from Asia, the pug has gone from being a pet in ancient Buddhist monasteries to one of the more popular breeds around the world. Pugs are unique, even in the dog world, and require special care from the time they are born.

Mothers

    Most pug mothers would rather spend time with you than with their newborn pups, so they are not generally regarded as good parents, according to Sandra Morgan of WindWalker Pugs. Because of this, you will assume much of the care of the pups from the moment they are born.

Whelping

    Be prepared to do most or all of the work during the whelping, or birthing, process. Among the tasks you will likely need to perform are cutting open the delivery sacks, cutting umbilical cords and holding the mother still so her newborns can feed. For the best preparation, find a mentor who will let you watch or even assist during a newborn whelping of a pug litter. Two helpers are better than one, since newborns must be watched constantly for the first three weeks so the mother doesn't accidentally suffocate them or allow them to starve.

Newborn Care

    All newborn puppies need warmth and hydration. Watch for signs your pug pup is becoming chilled or not receiving enough milk from the mother. Accept the fact that about 10 percent of newborn pugs will have a fatal birth defect and as many as 30 percent of pups could die soon after birth. Aside from those problems out of your control, even with the best care, remember that a newborn puppy cannot urinate or defecate without stimulation from the mother. If the mother does not tend to this, the responsibility falls on you. Try rubbing a warm, wet cloth or a cotton ball soaked in baby oil on the pup's backside.

General

    The most important thing to remember during the pugs' early days is to not overfeed them. Pugs will often eat after they are full. Also, remember to clip their nails, brush them and provide any necessary vaccinations as directed by your veterinarian. And since pug puppies require exercise, provide a room rather than confining them to a crate for long periods of the day.

What Kind of Husky Stays Fluffy & Soft?

What Kind of Husky Stays Fluffy & Soft?

The husky is a breed of dog native to northern climates. These dogs are bred as working dogs, generally for pulling dog sleds. There are many similar breeds often considered to be huskies although they have different names; each of these breeds has its own distinct characteristics. While all sled dog breeds have thick, weather-proof fur, not all of them have the same texture.

What is a Husky?

    The American Kennel Club only recognizes one breed with the name of husky, the Siberian husky. There are several other breeds of dog that are very similar to the Siberian husky although they do not have the word "husky" in their name. These breeds include the Alaskan malamute, which is similar in appearance to the Siberian husky, and the Samoyed, which originates in Siberia much like the husky but has a different appearance. The Labrador husky is Canadian in origin, but is not recognized by the American Kennel Club. Another breed in this group is the Canadian Eskimo dog.

    While not all of these dog breeds contain the word "husky" in their name, they are all very similar breeds and considered to be part of the husky grouping by the general public.

General Characteristics of Husky Fur

    All northern working dogs have very thick fur to keep the dogs warm in the cold. Their coats have a double layer, one closer to the skin for insulation and one longer outer layer. Huskies are well known for the coloring of their coats and the "mask" that is formed on the face. This is most pronounced on Siberian huskies and malamutes, but also appears on Labrador huskies and Canadian Eskimo dogs. Samoyeds are different in that they are completely white; some Canadian Eskimo dogs are also white.

Texture of Husky Fur

    As a general rule, Huskies have a softer undercoat with a more wiry outer coat. This is true of all of the sled dog breeds, although there is variation in how soft the fur is to the touch. The Siberian husky and Alaskan malamute as well as the Labrador husky have shorter fur that is less fluffy and tends to lie flat. Both the Canadian Eskimo dog and the Samoyed have longer, fuller coats that feel softer and are generally fluffier.

Choosing the Softest Sled Dog

    If you are in search of a sled dog breed that will remain fluffy and soft to the touch as the puppy grows into adulthood, the Samoyed is your best bet. While the Canadian Eskimo dog also retains softer fur, the breed is diminishing in numbers and difficult to find.

    All of the sled dog breeds have much softer fur as puppies, but as they shed and grow their adult coat, the fur becomes more wiry. Many people do still find breeds such as the Siberian husky and malamute to be soft; this is a matter of personal taste.

How to Buy a Pedigree King Charles Spaniel

How to Buy a Pedigree King Charles Spaniel

It is not difficult to become enamored with the Cavalier King Charles breed. This delightfully affectionate, playful, and intelligent breed equipped with large, vivacious eyes giving an over all sweet and gentle expression is indeed difficult to resist. If you are really serious about purchasing a Cavalier King Charles puppy, your best bet is to get one from a reputable breeder so you can have a health guarantee and pedigree papers to attest your Cavalier King Charles adheres to the breed standard.

Instructions

    1

    Learn as much as you can about the Cavalier King Charles dog breed. Purchase books providing details about the breed's temperament and needs. Evaluate carefully if this breed fits your lifestyle so to ensure a happy relationship with your future purebred dog.

    2

    Locate a reputable breeder in your state. The American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club's website is a good place to start. Its breeder referral database offers contact information of potential breeders adhering to specific principles of conduct and ethical guidelines.

    3

    Contact the breeder and ask if there are any Cavalier King Charles Spaniels available. If yes, the breeder will likely arrange to meet you for an interview to ensure the breed is a good match for you and your family. This is the perfect time to also ask questions about your future pedigree companion and inquire about important information such as genetic health tests performed on the parents.

    4

    Evaluate the breeder's home to ensure he takes good care of the breeding specimens and puppies. If you are looking at a litter, the puppies should be clean, appear healthy and there should not be any overwhelming smells. Also ask to look at the dam or sire if on site.

    5

    Purchase your pedigree Cavalier King Charles dog if you are satisfied about what you see and what you have learned about the breeder. Upon selecting a form of payment, you should get a bill of sale, which confirms you have paid in full. Along with your new canine companion you should also receive proof of shots, health guarantees, test clearance certificates, and of course, pedigree registration papers.

How to Calculate How Much Dog Biscuits Cost You to Make?

How to Calculate How Much Dog Biscuits Cost You to Make?

You love your dog and your dog loves you. He can't bake you brownies to show he cares, but that doesn't have to stop you from baking him homemade treats. Dog biscuit recipes run the gamut from gourmet to basic. Calculating the cost of something homemade can be tricky; however, you may hesitate before baking certain types of dog biscuits if you knew the true total cost of your adorable creations.

Instructions

    1

    Add the total price of ingredients you bought exclusively for the dog biscuit recipe. This would include any items that you can't, or won't, use in human cooking. Write the final number down on your paper under the heading "exclusive ingredients."

    2

    Prorate the cost of ingredients from the biscuit recipe that you can use for human food, like eggs and flour. For instance, if the recipe called for two eggs, determine the cost of two eggs by considering the price of a dozen. Write the total prorated ingredients under the appropriate title and separately from the "exclusive ingredients."

    3

    Add the total cost of the categories together to find the total expense of baking dog biscuits.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of the Alaskan Husky?

What Are the Physical Characteristics of the Alaskan Husky?

Alaskan huskies have a reputation as robust working dogs. They are bred for sled racing, and demonstrate this purpose in their energy levels and physical characteristics. Unlike the Siberian husky, the Alaskan husky is typically a mix of other types of huskies, German shepherds, Inuit dogs and sometimes other dogs chosen for breeding because of their endurance, strength and speed. Alaskan huskies are best suited as pets in cooler climates and in homes with large yards suitable for plenty of exercise.

Coat Features

    The coats on an Alaskan Husky are typically short to medium in length, and can be less dense than their Siberian husky brethren. The shorter, less dense coat provides better heat dispensation, which is better conducive to sled racing. They do not need to be bathed often, because their coats tend to be self-cleaning, similar to a Siberian husky or Alaskan malamute. Their shedding season is in the spring, but because of their shorter coats tend to leave less clumps of hair in a house than other types of huskies.

Facial Features

    The Alaskan husky is a mix of dog that is bred to be well suited to cold temperatures, racing and heavy-duty work, such as pulling a sled. Because of this, the Alaskan husky is a type of dog and not a breed of dog. Thus, its facial features will strongly depend on the lineage of the dogs that were bred to create a particular litter. Alaskan huskies can have the characteristically ice blue eyes of a Siberian husky, as well as pointed ears, or even floppy ears. It can be solid in color or maintain the traditional color markings of a Siberian husky. As the essence of an Alaskan husky is to be a working dog and not a show dog, little attention has been paid by breeders to the appearance a litter of pups will display.

Health & Well Being

    Alaskan huskies are first and foremost bred for strength, endurance and speed. Because of this, they require plenty of exercise and are typically not recommended as pets. They are known to jump 6 feet high, and are thus capable of clearing many fences. They can also dig, often to escape from a pen to go hunting. Their natural disposition towards hunting can render them aggressive towards smaller animals they view as prey, including smaller dogs. Since they are not purebred dogs, Alaskan huskies are spared many of the genetic flaws and predisposition toward disease found in many purebred varieties.

Vocalization

    An inescapable characteristic of an Alaskan husky is its desire to vocalize. They will howl, especially when communicating with other dogs, including those in their own pack. Because of their tendency toward loud howling, they are not recommended as pets in an urban environment.

Small Dogs That Don't Bark Much

Small Dogs That Don't Bark Much

Small dogs have a reputation for being yappy, but not all small dog breeds are deserving of that reputation. It is unrealistic to expect dogs not to ever bark, as barking is their primary form of verbal communication. There are more than a few small-dog breeds that do not bark much.

Why Dogs Bark

    barking
    barking

    Dogs bark for several reasons. The more time spent with a dog, the closer the owner comes to understanding the reason for each bark. A dogs barking can benefit the owner and provide release for the dog. Examples of different dog barks include: territorial, alarm, greeting, attention-seeking, frustration, social, excitement or anxiety.

    Excessive dog barking is an issue and can be treated with training. Before this occurs, the owner should determine the reason for the barking. Due to neighbors, work schedules or other reasons, some people prefer a dog that barks infrequently.

The Barkless Basenji

    The Basenji is considered the only dog breed that is barkless. Though they do not bark in the traditional sense, the Basenji does howl, growl and make a distinctive yodeling vocalization. Per the American Kennel Clubs breed standards, the lack of barking is a noted breed characteristic.

    Basenjis are a small-dog breed, with full-grown adults typically growing to 15 to 17 inches and weighing 20 to 26 lb.

Other Small-Dog Breeds

    French bulldog
    French bulldog

    Other small-dog breeds with the characteristic of infrequent barking include bull terrier, French bulldog, Havanese, miniature schnauzer, Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Pekingese and pugs.

    Generally, it is just not in these breeds' nature to bark much, however unlike the Basenji they certainly do bark. Some, like the bull terrier, do not bark without good reason, and the miniature schnauzer howls rather than barks. Other than their small size and lack of barking, these breeds are different from each other. All breed characteristics should be considered before proceeding with dog ownership.

What Are the Colors of Teacup Chihuahuas?

Teacup chihuahuas are recognized for their miniature stature, and receive their name because they are small enough to fit inside of a teacup. According to the Chihuahua Club of America, however, the term teacup is a label only and there is no real difference between it and the other chihuahuas except a natural variation in size. As a result, they come in the same host of colors as all other chihuahuas despite the fact that they are on the smaller end of the scale.

Black

    Although black is a color that is found in many chihuahuas, solid full black dogs are extremely rare. Black teacups are often more than one color with either tan markings, white or a combination of colors. Black is generally one of the colors found in tricolor chihuahuas in conjunction with white and tan.

Fawn

    One of the most common colors for teacup chihuahuas, according to The Everything Chihuahua Book, is fawn, which is a reddish tan coloring. This may be solid or in combination with other colors such as fawn and white, black and fawn, blue brindled fawn, and chocolate sabled fawn.

Chocolate

    Chocolate is one of the rare, diluted colors for chihuahuas. Some breeders sell chocolate teacups at a higher price than other more common colors. Chocolate teacups are often a mixture of other colors such as tan and white, chocolate brindled fawn and chocolate blue.

Blue

    Despite the name, blue chihuahuas do not have blue fur. The are called blue because of their dull gray coloring. Blue chihuahuas may be solid or a mixture of different colors including white, fawn or chocolate. Blue is often the result of mating two chihuahuas who carry the recessive genes for this diluted color. Often blue chihuahuas will have skin and hair loss problems either as a puppy or adult.

Brindle

    Some teacups are distinguished by a brindle color pattern. This pattern involves streaks that run across the base coat and has the appearance of stripes. They are often darker in color than the basecoat and may be black, fawn or in some cases chocolate.

Merle

    Merle is a color pattern or markings that give the coat of the teacup an appearance of being dappled or speckled with other colors such as blue or red with black patches. Merles in chihuahuas are not the norm, and the gene combination that results in this pattern may cause problems with the dog's sight and hearing.

Sable

    Sable is a color effect where the base body fur is one lighter color while the tips are a darker color. This can be found in teacups with chocolate sabled fawn or black sabled fawn where the fur is fawn but with chocolate or black tips.

Sabtu, 25 Februari 2012

How to Feed Your Dog a Raw Diet

How to Feed Your Dog a Raw Diet

The raw food diet for dogs is also known as the BARF diet, which stands for Bone and Raw Foods or Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods diet. It is based on the assumption that the healthiest diet for a dog is one that mimics how a dog eats in the wild. Proponents claim that the raw diet has many health benefits, and is better than feeding commercially-prepared cooked foods with additives, fillers or grains. Beginning your dog on a raw food diet can seem like a daunting task. However, once you decide this is the route you want to go, knowledge, preparation and good food sources can make it easier.

Instructions

Pre-Made Raw Food Diet

    1

    Purchase a pre-made raw food diet for your dog. Look in the frozen section at many specialty dog food stores as well as certain holistic supermarkets. Select a pre-made formula that contains muscle meats, meaty bones and calcium rich organic ingredients, organ meats and ground raw fruits and vegetables formed in patties, rolls or nuggets.

    2

    Choose the protein that suits your dog the best. Choose your protein (formula) by addressing your pet's needs, such as allergies to certain proteins or sensitivities to foods, or if your dog likes a particular protein. Choose a manufacturer's diet formula of chicken, turkey, beef, pork, rabbit, bison, fish and others.

    3

    Transition your dog into the diet. Start slowly for finicky or sensitive dogs. Fast your dog for one day prior to starting, if you like, or incorporate small amounts of the raw meat diet into the dog's existing food.

    4

    Read the guidelines on the packaging to understand the appropriate amount of food to feed your dog, which is based on its weight. Start off with manufacturer's suggestions, and make adjustments as necessary. Watch your dog's signals to see what it prefers, either one meal or twice a day. Feed only one meal per day if it rejects the second meal.

    5

    Rotate the manufacturer's different formulas for variety, as well as your dog can tolerate them. Choose one meat for a week or two, then alternate other formulas, keeping in mind the importance of feeding a variety of proteins (formulas) to your dog.

    6

    Keep food frozen at all times. Thaw only a few days' portion of food in the refrigerator overnight. Use all thawed food before the fifth day, at the very latest. Smell the food to see if it is still okay.

    7

    Feed in a stainless steel, lead-free or ceramic bowl. Pick up any remaining food that the dog does not eat, and discard.

Homemade Diet

    8

    Research books or online for recipes to use for a homemade diet. Every dog is different and there is a learning curve to preparing meals that work best for your dog.

    9

    Purchase meat, bones, organs, oils, vegetables and supplements to use to prepare the diet. Visit a butcher shop or farm and ask for appropriate cuts of meats or organs. Select one meat for a week or two, then alternate other formulas, keeping in mind the importance of feeding a variety of proteins (formulas) to your dog.

    10

    Chop both raw meats and muscle meats. Grind raw vegetables to a pulp and mix with meats. Add supplements, such as kelp and alfalfa, cod liver oil, essential fatty acids and Vitamin C as per your chosen recipe. Include in the raw diet, eggs with shells, fruit and yogurt. Freeze or keep refrigerated for up to five days.

    11

    Feed meaty, raw bones, such as chicken necks, or knuckles bones with lots of meat as part of the diet as a major source of calcium and to keep pets' teeth clean and gums healthy. Feed daily or a few times a week, as desired.

    12

    Feed in a stainless steel, lead-free or ceramic bowl. Pick up any remaining food that the dog does not eat, and discard. Follow suggested guidelines of amount to feed at approximately 2 to 4 percent of your dog's weight, and adjust from there. Remember that every dog is different, so feed only the amount that keeps your pet at optimal weight.

How to Train Beagles as Search and Rescue Dogs

How to Train Beagles as Search and Rescue Dogs

The usual search and rescue dog is a large breed such as a German shepherd or a Labrador retriever. But beagles have better noses than most other dog breeds, except for the bloodhound. They are also smaller, which means they may be able to get into places larger dogs cannot. Beagles love food and will do just about anything to get it. Beagles have been trained to find drugs, termites and contraband. This makes the breed excellent as search and rescue dogs and as cadaver recovery dogs.

Instructions

    1

    Fit the beagle with a chest harness. This frees the head and neck to do a lot of searching on the ground. Using a standard collar and lead presses uncomfortably against the beagle's throat.

    2

    Take the beagle and a smelly piece of old clothing into a small room. Beagles can be easily distracted and doing the first training steps indoors helps keep the beagle's attention on the scent at hand. Present the old smelly piece of clothing. When the beagle sniffs it, praise and give a treat. Toss the clothing in the air. When the beagle moves toward it, praise and give a treat. Place the clothing a few steps away and then let the beagle go. Hide the clothing while the beagle watches and then let the beagle go. Praise and reward.

    3

    Train the beagle to give you a signal that he has found the desired object. This can be done once the beagle gets the idea of finding something. Watch the beagle to see how he normally responds when finding the smelly piece of clothing. Does he bark, scratch the ground or stay quiet? Quiet dogs can be trained to sit or lie down as their signal. This takes multiple sessions of pairing the act of finding the desired object with sitting down, barking or scratching the ground.

    4

    Make a human friend hide in a room while the beagle is outside. Have the friend call the beagle and see if the beagle finds the friend. Praise and reward. Then progress to having the friend hide in another place but this time remain silent. When the beagle finds the friend, both you and the friend praise and reward. Try these exercises outside where there are more distractions for the beagle.

    5

    Take Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) search and rescue (SAR), American Rescue Dog Association or National Association of Search and Rescue classes. If your beagle has progressed to Step 4, then the dog has what it takes to get certification. You will also get to train over many different terrains and situations with lots of support and encouragement. Often only certified dogs will be allowed to go on a search and rescue mission and not just any dog and handler, according to the book "Dog Heroes of September 11."

    6

    Keep on repeating these lessons in a variety of indoor and outdoor situations as long as the beagle is healthy and willing to work.

About Dachshunds

About Dachshunds

"A dachshund is a half-dog high and a dog-and-a-half long"

H.L. Mencken

Commonly referred to as hot dogs, sausage dogs or wiener dogs, dachshunds have been among the most popular breeds in the United States since the 1950s. Long and low, stubby-legged and barrel-chested, they are instantly recognizable.

Function

    Dachshunds were originally bred in Germany, over 300 years ago, to hunt badgers, pursue them into their narrow burrows and kill them. ("Dachs" is the German word for badger.) The dachshund's short legs and tubular torso make it ideally suited to this activity. These stouthearted hunters have also been used to catch rabbits, foxes and even wild boars. The dachshund is classified as a hound but exhibits characteristics of tenacious terriers.

Features

    Image courtesy of Peter Griffin and Public Domain Pictures

    As with any breed, temperament and personality varies from dachshund to dachshund. In general, the breed is playful and loyal with family but might be standoffish with outsiders. They can be stubborn and resist training - including house training. They have a hearty bark that is disproportionately loud relative to their size. They are also known to be good competitors in Earthdog Trials and scent-tracking events. In Earthdog Trials, dogs are timed as they pursue prey through a series of man-made, underground tunnels. Scent-tracking events are the competitive form of canine search and rescue, showing off the dog's natural ability to recognize and follow a human scent.

Size

    The dachshund comes in three varieties: short-haired (also known as "smooth"), long-haired and wire-haired. Each variety features two sizes: standard (14 to 18 inches, 11 pounds or greater) and miniature (up to 14 inches, up to 11 pounds). Coat color can vary widely, from solid black to cream to multi-colored brindle or dappled. Today's dachshunds are smaller than the original breed---the original breed weighed between 30 and 40 pounds.

History

    Image courtesy of Public Domain Clipart

    Introduced in America in the late 19th century, dachshunds steadily gained popularity over the next few decades. During the first World War, however, dachshunds fell out of favor because of their German connections. Some dachshund owners were called unpatriotic. The American Kennel Club temporarily re-christened the breed "Badger Dog" to downplay its origin. After the war, the breed slowly began to reestablish itself. And by World War II, dachshunds were so entrenched in American society that they escaped the prejudices suffered by their predecessors.
    Today, dachshunds are popular with urbanites and apartment dwellers in the United States. The dog's small size and modest exercise requirements make it a good choice for the city. In 2007, dachshunds were ranked seventh in popularity among all breeds.

Considerations

    Due to its elongated shape, the dachshund is prone to spinal disc problems (Dachshund paralysis). Dachshunds have a tendency to be lazy and become overweight. The extra weight is especially dangerous for this breed because it puts more stress on an already vulnerable spine. For the same reason, dachshunds should be discouraged from jumping---for example, jumping off furniture. Some veterinarians suggest that dachshunds avoid climbing stairs too. Others feel that a slow, careful climb is good exercise for the dog. For the sake of their spines, they should never be exposed to rough play or handling. The dachshund should be picked up carefully, supporting both the front and back ends.

Yorkie Terrier's History

The Yorkshire Terrier has a colorful history, from its humble beginnings in Scotland to its days as a working class breed and finally to its official recognition by the American and European Kennel Clubs. After recognition, the Yorkshire terrier quickly became popular as a companion pet, forever cementing the role of this delightful breed in history.

History

    Yorkshire Terriers, despite the breed's name, originated in Scotland during the 1800s. The dogs became popular and better known when many Scottish immigrants came to Yorkshire England to find work in clothing mills. The Yorkshire terrier was originally classified as a working class breed, its main purpose to catch the rats that often plagued the mills.

Time Frame

    During the early 1800s, Yorkshire Terriers were popular, although possibly not of the purest bred lines, originally being a mix between the Paisley and Skye Terrier breeds. In the 1860s, a prize-winning Yorkshire Terrier named Huddersfield Ben set the standard for the breed to be recognized as seen today. The Yorkie was introduced to America in 1872 and registered with the American Kennel Club in 1878, where it was one of the first twenty-five breeds registered. These dogs were very popular during the Victorian era, although their popularity dipped during the 1940s. In 2008, the American Kennel Club listed the Yorkie as the second most popular dog breed in America.

Identification

    There are several differences in the dogs of today compared to those of traditional Yorkshire Terriers. Originally bred from rough haired terrier breeds, the Yorkies of today may have had Maltese traits bred into the bloodline to produce the long silky hair that is a standard for the breed. It is difficult to determine which breeds were used when creating the Yorkie breed since many breeders, interested in simply breeding the best possible mousers and rat catchers, did not keep accurate records. In addition, traditional Yorkshire terriers also weighed roughly thirty pounds. According to regulations set forth by the AKC, Yorkshire terriers should weigh no more than seven pounds. In traditional Yorkshire Terrier history, the dog's tail would have been docked, but in more recent European dog shows, un-docked tails are being accepted.

Considerations

    Unfortuanetly for the breed, many genetic illnesses have been passed through bloodlines. Some common ailments are collapsed tracheas, slipped kneecaps, called Patella Luxation, and a tendency to develop inflamed pancreas from foods too high in fat. While most of these can be treated by veterianarians, treatments can displace the joy of owning such a delightful breed.

Yorkies in History

    There have been many famous Yorkshire terriers in addition to Huddersfield Ben. CH Blairesville Royal Seal helped further the breed's popularity by winning more than thirty competitions and placing Reserve Best in Show an impressive sixteen times. Also in the winning circle is Champion Ozmillion Mystification, who was the first Yorkshire terrier to win 1997 Best in Show at Crufts, the largest annual dog show. Others, such as Smoky, a World War Two hero and Pasha, who lived in the White House during Nixon's term, added to the breed's notoriety.

A List of Which Raw Vegetables Are Good for Your Dog

A List of Which Raw Vegetables Are Good for Your Dog

Raw vegetables are an important source of vitamins, minerals, fiber, enzymes, antioxidants and fatty acids for humans and dogs. Many dog owners report their pets require fewer visits to a veterinarian after they add raw vegetables to their diets. This suggests that raw vegetables boost the animals' immune systems. Some experts believe that fresh, raw vegetables should make up about 15 percent of a canine's diet.

Green Leafy Vegetables

    Green leafy vegetables such as raw spinach, celery, bok choy, broccoli, kale, mustard greens and endive are all good to feed a dog, according to Dr. Ian Billinghurst, a veterinarian and founder of the Biologically Appropriate Raw Feeding Diet, or BARF. Herbs such as parsley are also beneficial.

Root and Fruit-Type Vegetables

    Vegetables such as raw carrots, zucchini, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, sugar beets, green beans, parsnips, turnips, tomatoes and red and green peppers are also valuable sources of nutrients for dogs. Cayenne pepper is believed to prevent cancer in dogs.

Benefits of Raw Vegetables

    Dogs have been eating green plants in the wild even before they befriended man. Vegetables contain vital nutrients, such as proteins, vitamins and fatty acids. They are also a good source of fiber, which can aid digestion of meat and other heavy foods. In addition, vegetables contain antioxidants and phytochemicals, which help reduce the risk of chronic diseases in dogs as they age.

Vegetables to Avoid

    Vegetables you should never feed your dog include garlic and onion. Both contain significant amounts of thiosulphate, which is toxic to dogs and tend to decrease the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Also, it's best to avoid corn as it has been extensively genetically modified, and many animals are sensitive to it.

Other Considerations/Warnings

    While vegetables should be given to your dog raw, it's best to completely crush or puree them beforehand to make them more easily digestible. You can also use a juicer to mix the vegetable pulp in with the dog's food. It is also fine to grate raw vegetables such as carrots and zucchini.

    Be sure to wash all vegetables thoroughly to remove any chemical residue before feeding to your pet.

    Do not peel vegetables before feeding them to your dog. Vegetable skin is where most of the nutrients are contained.

Jumat, 24 Februari 2012

How to Make Dehydrated Beef Dog Treats

How to Make Dehydrated Beef Dog Treats

Training a dog requires a reward of some sorts, whether it be lavish praise or an edible reinforcer. And even if your pet follows commands well, it's nice to reward their good behavior with a treat. Pet owners can visit any retail store and purchase dog snacks, but these products can be full of preservatives. Make your own dehydrated beef snacks to provide your pet with a healthier alternative. Use a commercial dehydrator or your oven to cook the meat slowly and then store in an air-tight container.

Instructions

Using a Dehydrator

    1

    Cut the meat to 1/4-inch thick, 1-inch wide and 2-3 inches long. You can purchase beef that's already cubed to reduce your preparation time. Even if you've found the leanest cuts of beef, take care to trim off any fat, so that each piece is as lean as possible.

    2

    Spray each tier of the dehydrator with cooking spray.

    3

    Lay the meat on each tier in a single layer. Allow enough space between each piece so they don't overlap.

    4

    Cover or close the machine's door. Set the dehydrator to medium or 120 degrees.

    5

    Check the meat throughout the eight hours required for proper dehydrating. When cooked thoroughly, the meat will appear dry and have a dark brown color while still remaining pliable. Throughout the cooking time, rearrange and rotate the trays, so that bottom tiers are nearer to the top and vice versa. This allows for all the pieces of meat to cook evenly.

    6

    Remove any pieces of meat that are done cooking and place them on a flat surface to cool. Continue to check the meat, remove cooked pieces and rearrange and rotate trays every two hours until the pieces are ready.

Using a Conventional Oven

    7

    Preheat the oven to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray a cookie sheet with cooking spray.

    8

    Cut the meat to 1/4-inch thick, 1-inch wide and 2-3 inches long. You can purchase beef that's already cubed to reduce your preparation time. Even if you have found the leanest cuts of beef, take care to trim off any fat, so that each piece is as lean as possible.

    9

    Place the pieces of meat on the cookie sheet in a single layer. Allow enough space between each piece so they don't overlap.

    10

    Place the cookie sheet on the middle shelf of the oven. Prop the door open 2-3 inches so that air can circulate and remove any excess moisture.

    11

    Check the meat in six hours. When cooked thoroughly, the meat will appear dry and have a dark brown color while still remaining pliable. Remove any pieces of meat that are done cooking and place them on a flat surface to cool. Continue to check the remaining meat every hour until they are finished cooking.

The Best Guardian Dogs

The Best Guardian Dogs

One of the oldest roles of the domesticated dog is that of guardian to its family. Most breeds of dog will bark or bring attention to someone strange close to the family home. Certain breeds are more protective and have, in fact, been bred to serve as an active guard against attack or intruders.

German Shepherd

    The German shepherd is used commonly in the police force.
    The German shepherd is used commonly in the police force.

    German Shepherds are medium-sized dogs with light to dark brown coats. They are a loyal and brave breed making them ideal for jobs in the military and in police forces. Alert and energetic, the German shepherd is naturally protective of its owners and will often fearlessly defend property or family members. They are an intelligent breed, making them easy to train, and they bond well with children. The breed will often bond most with just one family member and is suspicious of strangers.

Doberman Pinscher

    The Doberman pinscher is a breed designed to protect.
    The Doberman pinscher is a breed designed to protect.

    The Doberman pinscher is a breed bred to be a protector. Often black, with brown coloring in areas, they have a slender, powerful build and a fierce reputation as guard dogs. They are intelligent and loyal, making strong bonds with their owners or handlers. With a fearless temperament, they will defend property and family members with their lives. They should be well-socialized to prevent overly aggressive behavior. In a loving home, the Doberman can become a loving member of the family.

Akita Inu

    Akita inus can be very willful and hard to train.
    Akita inus can be very willful and hard to train.

    Highly prized in Japan as a guard dog, the akita inu is a brave, willful breed that is very protective of its owners. They can be hard to train, requiring a firm hand; they must be taught their role in the household. The inu can become aggressive if it feels it is the top dog. This medium-sized dog has thick fur which can vary in color; the breed has a distinctive curling of the tail.

Bullmastiff

    The bullmastiff is imposing, but can very gentle with children.
    The bullmastiff is imposing, but can very gentle with children.

    The bullmastiff is a very large breed and is physically imposing to look at. They are heavily-built dogs with powerful jaws that tend to slobber. They are very loyal and affectionate to owners or handlers and make good guard dogs thanks to sheer imposing size and fierce protective instinct. They are not the most intelligent breed, so they can be slow to train. Good with children, they only bark when they sense the need to.

How to Identify a Tibetan Mastiff

The Tibetan Mastiff has a light-footed, but powerful and balanced gait. It is a very intelligent breed that is also independent and strong-willed. It is protective of its family and aloof with strangers, so it makes a good watchdog. Though aloof, it is not shy. This breed has been used as a guard dog for ages.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Tibetan Mastiff. Males are a minimum of 26 inches at the shoulders. Females are a minimum of 24 inches at the shoulders. It is a slightly rectangular-looking dog, as the withers-to-rear measurement is slightly longer than the withers-to-ground measurement. Males and females can weigh between 140 to 170 pounds.

    2

    Make sure the heavy head is broad and strong. It should give a noble, intelligent expression. The medium-sized eyes may be any shade of brown and they are very expressive. They are set deeply into the skull and are set far apart. They are almond-shaped and slant just a bit. The medium sized-ears are v-shaped, sit high on the head and drop forward. The Tibetan Mastiff does raise its ears when it is alert. The muzzle is wide and square, ending in a black nose that is fully pigmented. If the dog's coat is blue-gray or a combination of blue, gray and tan, the nose will be a dark gray color. If the dog's coat is brown, the nose will be a dark brown color.

    3

    Check that the well-muscled neck arches moderately into moderately angled shoulders. The chest is deep and moderately wide. The legs have substantial muscle and bone, leading to large, strong cat-like feet. The rear is very muscular. The rear feet may sport single or double dewclaws. The well-feathered tail is moderately long, but does not hang below the hock joint. It curls over the back or to the side of the back when the Tibetan Mastiff is in motion.

    4

    The Tibetan Mastiff sports a double coat. The outer hair is coarse and covers a heavy, but soft undercoat. The undercoat sheds out and is not quite as heavy in the summer months. The hair is straight and should never be curled or wavy. The neck and shoulders have an especially heavy coat-more so in males. The coat may be black, blue/gray, brown and may have tan markings. Some dogs may have white on the chest and feet.

About Canine Raw Food Diets

About Canine Raw Food Diets

Many dog owners choose canine raw food diets for various reasons, including purported health benefits and to save money. Canine raw food diets closely resemble those of dogs living in the wild. And raw diet proponents say that because dogs' digestive systems are identical to their wild ancestors, the raw diet provides optimal health.

Features

    The canine raw food diet includes a range of raw meaty bones, whole carcasses, raw eggs in their shells and organ meat. Food items include chicken, beef, pork and whole fish. Canine raw food diets include no commercial dog food or grains. Grains are prevalent in commercial foods, but according to Raw Learning, grains are the most common allergens in dog foods, and dogs cannot digest grains. Some pre-packaged raw foods exist but aren't recommended, according to Raw Learning.

Positives

    The benefits of raw diets are numerous, says Raw Learning. Dogs smell better, their teeth are cleaner, and owners save money. (The raw diet can be less expensive than commercial food, and vet bills are lower because of better health.) Owners who have switched their dogs to raw food diets have noticed various positive outcomes, according to Raw Learning. These include more energy in their dogs, fewer allergies, less arthritis and fewer issues with weight management.

Questions

    People considering raw canine diets have many questions. For example, they wonder whether it is harmful for their dogs to eat bones or whether the bacteria in raw food can harm their pets. Raw Learning says these issues are not cause for concern. Puppies and adults can eat the same foods on the raw diet, unlike commercial foods, which come in a wide variety for different ages of dogs.

Varying Opinions

    There are mixed opinions about the raw canine diet. Dogs are carnivores and do not need fruits or vegetables, according to Raw Learning. Other raw diet proponents believe that dogs can eat these foods. According to Dog Channel, some veterinarians do not advocate the raw canine diet, in part because of issues such as bacterial ingestion.

Sources and Prices

    Dog owners can buy food for the raw canine diet at a few places, including the local butcher or food processor. According to Raw Learning, food items that are considered waste, such as chicken necks, are foods that fit well with the raw canine diet. Plus, prices can be quite low.

Kamis, 23 Februari 2012

How to Raise a German Shepherd pup

How to Raise a German Shepherd pup

German Shepherds are naturally protective, intelligent creatures that are used as police dogs, therapy dogs and bomb detection dogs. They can also be raised to be a family dog with proper training and care. Families interested in getting a German Shepherd as a pet should do a lot of research on the breed so that they know what they are getting into. Sadly, many of these dogs end up abandoned due to a lack of knowledge by their owners.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase your new pup from a German Shepherd breeder. Search for breeders in your area online or in local newspapers. Ask your German Shepherd breeder questions about prior socialization and the temperament of the puppies that he offers.

    2

    Socialize your German Shepherd puppy by having your family hold and pet it. Also, take your new puppy with you when you go out to expose him to different social experiences. According to DogObedienceAdvice.com, "A lack of socialization is the primary reason that German Shepherds become aggressive."

    3

    Secure a spot in your home that is designated for your German Shepherd puppy. According to Vonletta.com, "For a healthy state of mind and some sense of security, every (German Shepherd) needs to have a place where it can go and not be bothered, the place that is theirs." Allow your puppy to go to his special place when he needs to rest. Do not force him out of his spot. Instead, let the pup come out when he needs to.

    4

    Enroll your puppy in an obedience class in your area. You can find classes by looking in the phone book or asking pet shops about popular obedience trainers. This will teach your German Shepherd pup to obey rules and commands. This can also provide stimulation and socialization for your new puppy.

    5

    Brush your new German Shepherd to get rid of stray hairs that fall out. Your pet will shed a lot during the year so proper grooming is necessary to maintain his appearance.

    6

    Interact with your new puppy to provide him with opportunities to exercise. "German Shepherds need to exercise or they become aggressive," states DogObedienceAdvice.com. Have your German Shepherd run alongside you as you bike ride or go for a jog. Play interactive games like throwing a ball and having your pup chase it.

Homemade Balanced Diet for Dogs

Homemade Balanced Diet for Dogs

One sure way of knowing what's in your dog's food is to make it yourself. According to Richard H. Pitcairn, DVM, Ph.D; a homemade, balanced diet for dogs can be made using a variety of foods and some added supplements. The amount of food to give a dog depends on the animal's weight, metabolism, temperament and breed. Meal sizes should also be adjusted based on the dog's appetite, daily exercise habits and the climate he lives in.

Instructions

    1

    Consider the kind of meat to include in your dog's diet. Meat provides needed protein. The Merck Veterinary Manual says healthy adult dogs need about two grams of digestible, quality protein per kilogram of body weight per day. Choose from beef, chicken, lamb and fish. Rinse canned fish with water to remove excess salt. Vary the type of meats for optimum nutritional benefits. Include muscle and some organ meat. Avoid feeding too much liver, as it's exceptionally high in Vitamin A.

    2

    Include eggs and dairy products, like yogurt and cheese, in meals a few times each week.

    3

    Use cooked grains such as brown rice, white rice and rolled oats in every meal. Whole wheat bread is also a convenient way to provide grains. Martin Goldstein, DVM, suggests a dog's meal should contain 25 percent meat, 50 percent grain and 25 percent vegetables.

    4

    Provide vitamins and minerals in the form of cooked legumes and vegetables in most meals. Cook or grate vegetables before serving, to increase digestibility. Use spinach, peas, carrots, sweet potatoes, chick peas and black beans.

    5

    Add beneficial fats to your dog's diet, especially linoleic acid which dogs require. Linoleic acid is an omega-6, essential fatty acid found in corn and other vegetable oils. Additionally, a-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, can enhance canine health. Docosahexaenoic acid, another omega-3 fatty acid, promotes normal development and growth in puppies.

    6

    Supply calcium in your dog's diet with raw bones, bone meal powder or powdered egg shells. Wash and dry the egg shells and bake them in a 300 degree Fahrenheit oven for 10 minutes before pulverizing them. A dog's diet must provide slightly more calcium than phosphorus (a mineral found in meat, fish and dairy products). A ratio of 1.2 to 1.4 parts calcium, to 1 part phosphorus is ideal; but 1 to 2 parts calcium to 1 part phosphorus is acceptable).

    7

    Read the book "Dr. Pitcairn's New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats" for guidance on preparing balanced, homemade dog meals. Also read Chapter 3, "It All Starts With Food," in "The Nature of Animal Healing."

Kinds of Pekingese

Kinds of Pekingese

The Pekingese is a breed of dog indigenous to China. According to the Pekingese Club of America, the origin of the Pekingese possibly dates to 200 B.C.; however, the dog in its present form is believed to have evolved around the 8th century. This small dog was once considered a sacred, royal dog exclusive to China. Pekingese were introduced to the western world after British soldiers invaded and pillaged the Beijing -- formerly called Peking -- imperial palace in 1860. Today, the Pekingese is a popular pet in homes throughout the world.

Kinds

    The Pekingese is also called "little lion dog," "Peke," "sun dog" and the "imperial dog of China." While experts recognize only one breed of Pekingese, there are many varieties of Pekingese, all determined by their physical appearance. The Pekingese occurs in smaller versions, also called "teacup toys" or "sleeve" dogs, with sizes that begin at 6 inches at the shoulder and a weight of six pounds. Larger versions of the dog grow to 9 inches in shoulder height and can weigh up to 14 pounds. All true Pekingese are stocky, have bowed legs and a short undercoat of fur with a longer topcoat. The dogs are bred in a wide range of colors; however, for breeding and show purposes, the American Kennel Club categorizes different kinds of Pekingese according to standard or alternate colors and markings. All color and marking classifications are identified by codes.

Standard Colors and Markings

    The American Kennel Club's standard Pekingese color categories include: biscuit -- 006; black -- 007; black and tan -- 018; cream -- 076; fawn -- 082; fawn sable -- 038; gray -- 100; gray -- sable S 339; red -- 140; red sable -- 155; and white -199. The AKC's standard Pekingese marking categories include black mask -- 004; parti-color -- 038 and white markings -- 014.

Alternate Colors and Markings

    The AKC's alternate Pekingese color categories include fawn brindle -- 088; light red -- 340 and red brindle -- 148. AKC alternate Pekingese marking categories include black face -- 058; black face, white markings -- 059; black mask, white markings -- 005; black muzzle -- 056 and black muzzle, white markings -- 057.

Personality and Care

    According to the Purina Pet Library, Pekingese are intelligent, bold, independent and dignified. While they are affectionate family pets, the American Kennel Club says that Pekingese tend to prefer adult company. Because Pekingese are generally sedentary, they adapt well to apartment life. The Pekingeses naturally long hair and short muzzle make them relatively intolerant of humid, hot temperatures. Weekly brushing is required to prevent their long, thick double coats from matting.

What Are the Differences Between CKC & AKC Registered Dogs?

What Are the Differences Between CKC & AKC Registered Dogs?

Continental Kennel Club (CKC) and American Kennel Club (AKC) are bodies that govern the registration of dogs in order to maintain breed standards and track the pedigree of an animal. Registered dogs are eligible to compete in show events. The AKC was founded in 1884, whereas the CKC was introduced in 1991 as an alternative for registering dogs.

Eligibilty

    CKC and AKC have different eligibility requirements for their registries. AKC requires the pedigree of a dog to be confirmed before the dog is accepted for registration. The pedigree of a dog is like a family tree; it provides proof that the dog is from a purebred line for a number of generations. In contrast, a dog can be registered with the CKC without proof of pedigree by providing three photos (from the front, left and right) and two witness signatures.

Recognized Breeds

    The CKC recognizes all AKC-registrable breeds but also accepts purebred breeds not recognized by the AKC. For example, the dingo, or Australian native dog, is recognized by the CKC but not the AKC. In addition, the CKC recognizes all of the breeds that are in the interim stage in the AKC, also known as miscellaneous class breeds. Breeds in this class, such as the rat terrier, would not be eligible to compete in AKC but would be eligible to compete in CKC events.

Mixed-Breed Dogs

    A mixed-breed dog may qualify for registry with the CKC.
    A mixed-breed dog may qualify for registry with the CKC.

    The AKC only registers mixed-breed dogs for eligibility in rally, agility and obedience trials. These animals must be spayed or neutered and are therefore not meant for breeding. The CKC differs in that mixed-breed dogs can be registered and bred to produce litters eligible for registration. For example, Labradoodles, cock-a-poos and schnoodles are all CKC-registrable breeds. In effect, as long as the parent dogs are CKC registered, a litter produced by any breeding combination is eligible for registration with the CKC.

Breed Standards

    Both CKC- and AKC-registered dogs may not meet all the breed standards set out by the club to which they belong. This is because eligibility for registration in both the CKC and AKC is subject to parentage, such that a puppy may not meet the breed standard but will be granted registration because of its pedigree. That being said, the standards of the AKC are more rigorous than the CKC, and therefore a dog that has won an AKC show has been held to a higher standard than a dog that has won a CKC show.

Questions About German Shepherd Dogs

Questions About German Shepherd Dogs

German shepherd dogs fill many roles. They are companions and working dogs. According to the American Kennel Club, the German shepherd is the world's leading police, guard and military canine, and by AKC registration statistics, one of the most popular breeds in the United States. The German shepherd dog is also called the Alsatian. The name of the breed was officially changed in Britain during World War II.

History

    The first registered German Shepherd dog was named Horand von Grafrath and was registered by Captain Max von Stephanitz in 1889. Horand von Grafrath was yellow and gray, medium sized and was working at herding sheep. Von Stephanitz founded the German Shepherd Dog Club the next year and the German Shepherd Dog Club of America was founded in 1915. The German shepherd dog is listed in the herding group by the AKC and was first recognized by the AKC in 1908.

Appearance

    The male German shepherd dog averages 24 to 26 inches in height and 80 to 90 lbs. in weight. The female averages 22 to 24 inches in height and 70 to 80 lbs. in weight. The coat is medium in length. German shepherds' coloring can be sable, black and tan, bi-color or solid black. The black and tan coloring is the most common. Coloring can also be blue, liver or white, but those colors are considered a fault by breed standards.

Personality

    According to the AKC, the German shepherd dog is often a good choice for families. The AKC states that German shepherds are fun-loving and good with children. They are loyal and take guarding their homes and families as a serious responsibility. In general, German shepherds do not show affection until they have established a relationship with a new person. Once they do establish that relationship they have an unwavering loyalty.

Health

    German shepherd dogs are prone to some hereditary conditions. These include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, blood disorders, digestive problems, bloat, dwarfism, epilepsy and inflammation of the cornea. German shepherds require daily exercise and can become bored without some training activity to occupy their intelligence. German shepherds shed throughout the year and need to be brushed daily, but bathing requirements are infrequent. The life expectancy of a German shepherd is about 13 years.

Occupations

    The German shepherd is one of the most popular working breeds. Responsibilities given to German shepherds include herding, police work, assisting disabled people, search and rescue, tracking and guarding. Many drug and bomb detection dogs are German shepherds. Buddy, a German shepherd, was--in 1928--the first canine to be trained as a Seeing Eye dog.

How do I Keep a Shih Tzu Puppy From Crying in His Cage?

How do I Keep a Shih Tzu Puppy From Crying in His Cage?

Shih Tzu puppies are very active, playful and small in stature. Due to their small size and big personality, Shih Tzu's require more play time and potty breaks than other dog breeds. According to the Dumb Friends League, puppies under six months of age shouldn't stay in a crate for more than three or four hours at a time as they can't control their bladders and bowels for long periods of time. Learning what triggers or causes your puppy's crying is key in stopping your Shih Tzu puppy from crying in its cage.

Instructions

    1

    Put your Shih Tzu puppy on a strict potty and playtime schedule. If your puppy isn't getting regular potty and playtime breaks, crying will ensue as a result. Place a collar and leash on your puppy and take it out of the cage every three to four hours for restroom and play breaks. According to the American Shih Tzu Club, you should never reward the dog by letting it out when it barks or cries, but instead wait until it is quiet.

    2

    Place the puppy's cage in an area where you're regularly present. Shih Tzu puppies are very sociable dogs and need regular human interaction or they'll become depressed and lonely and cry as a result.

    3

    Place a towel over the puppy's cage. The towel will enclose the cage and make it more cozy and safe.

    4

    Ignore the puppy's crying. The Dumb Friends League recommends not giving in to your puppy's crying as you'll end up teaching your dog to whine loud and long to get what it wants.

    5

    Take your Shih Tzu puppy to a veterinarian to be examined. If your puppy is still crying in it's cage, it may be suffering from a serious injury or illness.

How to Feed a Staffordshire Bull

How to Feed a Staffordshire Bull

It is straightforward and easy to go to the store and buy a bag of regular grain-based dog food. However, you could be feeding your Staffordshire Bull Terrier something a lot more nutritious and beneficial. According to Dr. Billinghurst's Biologically Appropriate Raw Food diet, a diet rich in appropriate raw foods provides more protein, vitamins and minerals than does the regular dog diet. By feeding your terrier this nutrient-rich diet, you are ensuring he will remain in good health for a long time.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your dog a diet of 60 percent raw meaty bones, 25 percent ground meat and offal, and 15 percent ground vegetables and fruit. Raw meaty bones include chicken necks and wings, whole chicken carcasses, turkey wings and necks, beef neck, pork feet, as well as duck, rabbit and quail.

    2

    Feed your dog by chopping the meat and serving it to him in a dish. Don't forget to give him plenty of water as well.

    3

    Feed the dog fruits and vegetables. If your dog has never eaten fruits or vegetables before, it is important to start slowly. Add small amounts to your dog's food every day, until he is eating the proper amount for his weight.

    4

    Mix the fruits and vegetables in a blender, with some natural yogurt if your dog needs help digesting, and a few eggs. You can use romaine, small amounts of parsley, carrots, pumpkin, spinach, tomatoes and broccoli. Include oranges, apples, mangoes, kiwi and cantaloupe. Serve in a bowl to your dog.

    5

    Feed your dog ground meat. This includes beef, chicken, turkey and fresh fish, as well as beef heart, kidney, liver and brains. Mix the meats together in a blender, but don't grind too finely. Serve in a dish.

Rabu, 22 Februari 2012

Dogs That Are Quiet

Dogs That Are Quiet

Excessive barking from a dog cannot only be annoying to the owner, but also to neighbors. Some dogs are prone to be noisy, but others are naturally quiet and reserve their barks for when they are actually needed. Training is also vital in curbing a tendency to bark; well-behaved dogs are less likely to bark unnecessarily.

Alaskan Malamute

    The Alaskan Malamute is one of the quieter dog breeds although it will sometimes howl. Strong training will help to curb any howling to make the dog quieter and only vocalize when needed. It is a large breed with a wolf-like appearance that exhibits strong loyalty and affection to its owners.

Black Russian Terrier

    The Black Russian Terrier is a natural guard dog, but even so rarely raises the alarm unless it is necessary. When it does bark, it is loud due mostly to the dog's large size so it works as a deterrent to potential intruders. It is a large, shaggy-haired breed with a black coat and a playful personality.

Borzoi

    The Borzoi, like all sight hounds, tends to be quiet as the nature of their hunting style requires silence. The dog rarely barks unless totally necessary. It is a tall, slender breed with a thick, long-haired coat. It has a strong hunting instinct, so it is not good around other smaller pets and is generally bad off the leash in public.

Glen of Imaal Terrier

    The Glen of Imaal Terrier does not use its voice unless it senses danger. Socializing the breed is therefore vital so that it does not see danger where there is none. It is a medium-sized, sturdy terrier with strong hunting instincts and is not good around smaller animals. It is otherwise gentle with its family and a devoted pet.

Mastiff

    If the Mastiff barks you will know about it, but it is a rare occurrence. The dog's pure size announces its presence so it rarely bothers to bark unless it is warranted. It is a gentle giant who loves its owners and will protect them staunchly, without being overly aggressive. A mastiff is most likely to corner an intruder and hold them until someone comes.

Greyhound

    The greyhound is a tall slender breed that is a sight hound, so it seldom barks, if at all. It can be a problem around smaller pets such as cats which, if improperly raised, the dog may attack. Dogs bred and trained for racing are most likely to kill small animals, while conformation show dogs are calmer and less likely to hunt.

What Dogs Were Bred to Get a Rottweiler?

What Dogs Were Bred to Get a Rottweiler?

Rottweilers are considered part of the worker category of dog breeds, with family members including the sheepdog and mastiff. The name Rottweiler comes from the name of the German town Rottweil, which is known as one of the first places Rottweilers lived. These German Rottweilers were thought to have originated from Roman drover dogs, but the exact dogs bred to create Rottweilers are not known.

Origins

    When the Romans invaded Europe, they brought Italian Mastiff dogs, from which present day Rottweilers may have descended. Rottweilers served as herders, guard dogs, messengers and aided in police work. Rottweilers fell out of popularity in the 1800s, becoming nearly extinct. They began gaining popularity again in the early 1900s because a few breeders aimed to revive the breed. Modern day Rottweilers are noted for their ability to track, herd, guard, perform search and rescue, and guide the blind.

Personality

    Often feared due to reputation and size, Rottweilers do not always live up to the negative stereotypes. While some breeders do produce Rottweilers with aggression, many Rottweilers can be friendly companions. Intelligence, confidence and fearlessness are common characteristics of Rottweilers, and therefore they can be trained effectively. Alert and protective, Rottweilers can also serve as diligent guard dogs, but they can be skeptical of strangers and overprotective at times.

Care

    Rottweilers require significant attention and effort from owners. They need to get ample amounts of exercise, both physically and mentally. Options for exercise include long walks, jogs or intensive games of fetch. It is also wise to take Rottweilers to obedience classes and reinforce the training at home. Rottweilers should spend most of their time indoors with their owners to bond properly. Grooming is minimal; they only need occasional brushing to maintain their coats.

Health Issues

    Some health issues known to plague Rottweilers include canine hip dysplasia; elbow dysplasia; sub-aortic stenosis, which is a heart irregularity; osteosarcoma, which is a type of bone affliction; and gastric torsion, which affects the stomach. Other less-common but also possible health concerns for Rottweilers include OCD and epilepsy. Recommended tests for Rottweilers consist of hip, elbow, heart, blood and eye exams. The average lifespan of Rottweilers is eight to 11 years.

Appearance

    Thought to owe some of their origins to Mastiffs, Rottweilers have dense, short coats in black and rust coloring. Rottweilers' bodies are muscular and strong, their average weight ranges from 85 to 115 pounds for females and 95 to 130 pounds for males. The average height of a female Rottweiler is 22 to 25 inches; males range from 24 to 27 inches in height. The Rottweiler's body is compact and powerful, with a broad chest and muscular neck.