Selasa, 31 Januari 2012

Bloodhound Puppy Information

Bloodhound Puppy Information

The bloodhound is the face of laziness on television commercials and movies, but this image of the breed is far from reality. These energetic, loyal dogs can make excellent pets, but only for owners who know exactly what to expect from the breed.

Size

    Your bloodhound puppy will grow to approximately 23 to 27 inches in height at the shoulder, with a weight of between 80 and 110 lbs., with males being heavier.

Shedding And Drool

    Bloodhound puppies are messy dogs, as they shed significantly and also have large amounts of drool. Be prepared to clean both of these regularly.

Temperament

    Your puppy will be full of energy, bounding around your home and probably on you regularly. You must provide plenty of stimulation for your bloodhound, because these dogs will turn to chewing if they are bored.

Health Concerns

    The bloodhound breed is prone to several health conditions, including hip and elbow dysplasia, bloat, gastric torsion, ear infections and eye abnormalities. Check your puppy's bloodlines carefully for signs of any hereditary concerns.

Exercise

    Bloodhounds require significant amounts of exercise, especially when they are puppies, as they were bred as working dogs. Do not buy a bloodhound puppy if you are not prepared for daily walks.

Hunting Instinct

    The bloodhound was bred as a hunting dog and has a keen sense of smell. These dogs will track a scent steadily until they find it, so they must be carefully confined in your yard with a tall fence to keep them from wandering miles from your home.

How to Identify a Clumber Spaniel

How to Identify a Clumber Spaniel

The Clumber Spaniels wide body and short legs give it a slight roll as it moves forward. Yet the dog moves easily and freely, has good reach and drive, and will maintain a steady trot for a day of work in the field. A Clumber Spaniel is gentle, loyal and affectionate, and has an intrinsic desire to please. This is an intelligent animal and an independent thinker. It has determination and a strong sense of purpose while working. It may seem aloof to strangers, but given time, it will get used to the person and become its playful self. The Clumber Spaniel is not a hostile or aggressive breed. Here's how to recognize one.

Instructions

    1

    Observe the dog's general appearance. The Clumber Spaniel is a low but substantial dog. It has a deep chest and powerful hindquarters, coupled with massive bones and good feet. This gives it the power and endurance to make its way through dense underbrush while pursuing game.

    2

    Notice the size and proportions of the Clumber Spaniel. This breed has a rectangular shape. The height of the male at the withers is 18" to 20". Females are 17" to 19" at the withers. The dog is longer than high when measured from the withers to the base of the tail and the withers to the ground. Males weigh between 70 and 85 lbs. and females weigh between 55 and 70 lbs..

    3

    Look at the conformation of the Clumber Spaniels head. The massive head has a marked stop and heavy brow. The broad muzzle is deep and allows for the retrieval of many species of game. The large nose is square and may be colored shades of brown, including beige, rose and cherry. The flews overlap the lower jaw, adding to the square look of this breeds head. The soft eyes are amber in color and are deep set in a diamond-shaped rim or a rim with a "V" on the bottom and a curve on the top. The ears are thick and triangular in shape. They have a rounded lower edge and are attached to the skull at about eye level.

    4

    Make sure the dog has a strong, muscular neck that fits into a well-laid-back shoulder. The deep chest is wide. The well-feathered tail sits just below the line of the back and is usually carried level with the topline. It may be slightly elevated, but never down between the legs. The front legs are short and heavy in bone. The elbows should be held close to the body. The large front feet are compact and have thick padsthey work as shock absorbers. Dewclaws may or may not be removed. The heavily-muscled thighs give way to a rounded, broad rear. There should be good angulation, and the hock to the heel should be short and perpendicular to the ground. The rear feet are smaller than the front, but are compact and also have thick pads.

    5

    Feel for a dense, flat coat. It should be straight, weather-resistant and soft to the touch. The ears may be feathered with straight hair. The Clumber Spaniel has a neck frill, and his throat should not be shaved. The coat is primarily white (to help the hunter see him in the bush), and may have lemon or orange markings. The markings may be on one or both ears and the face. There may be some freckling on the muzzle. The body should have few, if any, markings.

Yorkie Pregnancy Information

Yorkie Pregnancy Information

Yorkshire Terriers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States, and many Yorkie owners have interest in breeding their dog. Pregnancy in Yorkies can be both exciting and worrisome for Yorkie owners.

Breeding Your Yorkie

    Before breeding a Yorkie, you should have proof of vaccinations and a pedigree chart. Many breeders work hard at maintaining the integrity of the breed, only breeding those dogs that meet the AKC Yorkshire Terrier Standard. Have your dog checked for diseases before breeding her, as some diseases can transfer to the puppies during pregnancy or birth.

Signs of Pregnancy

    Pregnancy in a Yorkshire Terrier lasts only about 63 days from conception, according to the York Info Center website, so a veterinarian should examine your dog as soon as you notice signs of pregnancy. First signs of pregnancy include sleepiness and sluggish behavior, quick expansion of the stomach, fast nipple growth and cleaning herself much more often than before.

Care During Pregnancy

    It is recommended that your veterinarian supervise the stages of your dog's pregnancy. Anyone who handles a pregnant Yorkie should be gentle with her. She will need a soft, quiet place to rest and will probably spend more and more time resting as labor approaches. A pregnant dog needs puppy food, both for the extra nutrition for herself as well as the growing puppies.

Toy Yorkie Information

Toy Yorkies, more formally known as Yorkshire Terriers, are small dogs originating from Yorkshire, England. According to the American Kennel Club, Yorkies are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States.

History

    In the 19th century, Yorkies were companions of the working class and were often used to catch rats in mills and mines. They were later bred to be smaller in stature and became companions of upper-class European families.

Characteristics

    According to Dog Breed Info, Yorkies stand 6 to 7 inches high and weigh an average of 7 pounds, The breed is characterized by long, silky tan and blue coats.

Temperament

    Yorkies have an adaptable, inquisitive and energetic nature. Due to a tendency to display demanding behavior if not properly trained, Yorkies are best suited for families with older children.

Diet

    Yorkies should be fed dry food to keep teeth strong, but canned food can be given occasionally.

Care

    Yorkies can live comfortably in small apartments or houses, but should be walked daily. A Yorkie's coat requires regular brushing. Due to frequent dental issues, teeth should be cleaned regularly.

Health Issues

    Digestive problems, tooth decay and bronchitis are common health issues experienced in Yorkies. Especially small Yorkies, sometimes referred to as "teacup" Yorkies, often exhibit severe health problems.

About Teacup Yorkies

About Teacup Yorkies

A common misconception is that an extremely small Yorkshire terrier (more lovingly referred to as a Yorkie) is called a teacup Yorkie. This is not an official AKC breed or classification, however; Yorkies of any size are classified only as toy (very small) terriers. Undersized Yorkies tend to have serious health risks and physical complications. Anyone who is looking to buy a Yorkie should be cautious of breeders or pet stores advertising teacup Yorkies; these are probably not reputable sellers.

Problems With Teacup Yorkies

    A healthy Yorkie puppy at 4 weeks old

    Any Yorkie with a predicted adult weight of less than 4 pounds has many risks of health complications. These tiny dogs tend to have fragile bones and health conditions such as hypoglycemia. Also, their tiny mouths do not allow for proper tooth development, resulting in early tooth loss and eating difficulties.

Breeding for Profit

    Despite these warnings, many kennels and dog breeders risk breeding unhealthy puppies because of the high price these tiny Yorkies can fetch. These breeders have been known to charge up to $10,000 for puppies that have a very high risk of serious health problems.
    The puppies are not the only ones at risk, either. The bitches, or mother dogs, are also extremely small, so pregnancy can be turbulent and dangerous. If you buy a "teacup" Yorkie, you are risking high vet bills and heartbreak over all the health issues your puppy may face.

Why Breeders Advertise Teacup Yorkies

    A healthy adult Yorkie of standard size

    Breeders like to use the term "Teacup" to attract buyers to a special product, when in fact, undersized Yorkies are less desirable and not accepted among the Yorkshire terrier breeding community. Respectable breeders will never use terminology such as "teacup Yorkies," "t-cup Yorkies," "micro mini Yorkies," "babydoll Yorkies," "teddy bear miniature Yorkies" or "pocketbook puppies."
    The only accepted small classification for Yorkies is the toy terrier classification. Adult Yorkies should weigh in at 4 to 7 pounds. There are naturally smaller Yorkies born of average adult-size dogs, and these Yorkies don't tend to have the same problems as the unnaturally bred smaller Yorkies.

Gauging Your Yorkie's Size

    To estimate how big a Yorkie will get, triple the weight of an 8-week-old puppy or double the weight of a 12-week-old puppy. An average Yorkie will weigh about 2 pounds at 12 weeks old. If you are unsure of the dog's weight, ask the seller to weigh the dog in front of you. Any breeder who refuses to do so may be unscrupulous.

Buying a Yorkie

    Be wary of buying your Yorkie online. Online breeders don't allow you to meet the dog and ensure that it is a healthy weight and temperament. Many times, the dogs pictured on those sites are not even the dogs the breeders actually are selling.
    Always visit the breeder in person to make sure the puppies are bred in a clean, healthy environment. You wouldn't to end up with a sick puppy right away. A good breeder will interview you just as much as you interview her, and this is a good sign of a respectable, responsible breeder.
    Also be wary of ads that advertise free puppies for the cost of shipping. Often, these ads ask you to send a money order or wire transfer under the guise that they are moving and can't keep the dog. These are scam artists looking to make free money off your wire transfer.
    Buying from pet stores might mean you are supporting puppy mills that tend to breed dogs with no regard for their health or well being. For example, most separate the puppies from their mothers long before the recommended 12-week mark. The best way to buy a Yorkie is directly through the breeder, with an in-person visit to the facilities.

Which Small Dogs Are Good Family Pets?

Which Small Dogs Are Good Family Pets?

Labs and golden retrievers seem to top every best family dog list, but lets not forget about the little guys. Small dogs make wonderful family pets for those who dont have all the space a large breed requires or those who dont want their walls covered in drool and floors covered in large tufts of fur.

Beagle

    Snoopy, from the famed Peanuts comic strip, made the beagle famous, and for good reason. These small yet sturdy dogs are known for their happy-go-lucky disposition; their tails always seem to be wagging. The typical beagle stands around 14 inches tall and weighs between 20 and 25 pounds. They are the perfect size for rough and tumble play without overpowering small children. This curious, somewhat mischievous breed enjoys daily exercise and makes a wonderful buddy for adventurous, active boys and girls.

Boston Terrier

    Nicknamed the American Gentleman, the Boston terrier is an intelligent, gregarious breed, whose markings make him look like hes ready for a black tie affair. Dont let his dapper appearance fool you, however, this breed has a ton of wild energy. Highly adaptable to apartment living and eager to learn new tricks, the Boston terrier is the best of both worlds. Due to their short snout, this breed does best with moderate exercise but is always looking to romp and show off their tricks. The loyal 15- to 20-pound Boston terrier also has a short coat, which requires little more than weekly brushing, perfect for families looking to cut down on grooming time and expenses.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

    If your family is more laid back, or you have small children, consider the gentle Cavalier King Charles spaniel. These 13- to 18-pound beauties are always smiling. Known for their sweet, affectionate nature, the cavalier is trustworthy around small children and more than willing to snuggle up on the couch for movie night. You will, however, want to bring out the brush during daily snuggle sessions as the cavaliers long, silky coat requires brushing at least every other day. Though this breed loves to spend quiet time indoors, it also requires regular daily exercise to stay healthy.

Bichon Fris

    Allergy sufferers look no further; the bichon fris may be the best small, allergy-friendly, family dog on the list. This vivacious, playful breed weighs between 7 and 12 pounds and has a puffy, white coat that rarely sheds; some people say they resemble a cotton ball. Aside from not having to worry about the family sniffling and sneezing, the bichon fris is trustworthy around children, strangers and even other pets. They love to play with their new friends and require daily exercise -- the perfect companion for the whole family.

Senin, 30 Januari 2012

How to Wean Puppies From the Mother Dog

How to Wean Puppies From the Mother Dog

Weaning occurs when puppies make the natural transition from nursing from their mother to eating on their own. In the wild, dogs can nurse as long as the mother's milk holds out, usually combining this with eating solid foods. For dogs under the supervision of a human family, this process can start and end much earlier with gentle supervision. This will give the new litter independence so the puppies can become members of permanent homes at about eight weeks.

Instructions

    1

    Establish the early nutrition of the litter by providing the mother dog the same puppy food you will eventually feed the puppies, starting from the time the puppies are born. This will provide all the necessary vitamins and nutrients the puppies will need through their mother's milk and make eventual digestion of the food much easier on their tiny stomachs.

    2

    Watch the mother's behavior closely. Around three weeks after she has given birth, the mother dog will begin to spend more time away from the puppies to encourage their independence. This also saves her discomfort as their teeth develop. It is quite possible that she will lead them to dry food or bring nuggets of the food to her litter all on her own.

    3

    Guide the process along with increased gentle contact. Although this is a natural process, your hands-on approach to assisting the mother in weaning prepares the puppies for social interaction with humans. If the mother is reluctant to wean the dogs by three to four weeks of age, remove the puppies from the mother approximately three times a day to gently encourage their independence from the mother, and her independence from them.

    4

    Gradually reduce the mother's food intake to slow down milk production. You may have increased her food intake to double what she normally eats to give her the proper nourishment while she nursed her puppies, and you can begin to decrease that amount slowly from about week three. This will discourage the puppies from nursing and also keep the mother from experiencing discomfort from engorged mammary glands.

    5

    Moderate the food the puppies eat as they develop. Very young puppies are still learning the basic principles of chewing, so a gruel made of ground puppy food blended with dog milk replacement formula (found at most pet stores) is a nutritious way to introduce solids into their diet. Another option is to use baby cereal made of rice blended with goat's milk or evaporated milk. Cow's milk is harder for the new puppies to digest and should be avoided.

    6

    Feed the puppies approximately three times a day to get them used to eating solids. Do this apart from the mother to promote the puppies' independence. Be prepared for a mess, especially at the beginning. Make sure you clean the puppies after each feeding to ensure they are clean and dry, and keep them away from drafts.

    7

    Encourage but don't force feeding. Place the gruel on your finger and allow the puppies to lick it off, but don't force their faces into a bowl. Be patient if they don't take to it right away. This process not only teaches the dogs independence but also how to interact with humans. If a puppy does not respond well to weaning, you may slow the process to avoid malnourishment. You have several weeks to complete this process, which should not be rushed.

How to Make Homemade Dog Treats From Baby Food

How to Make Homemade Dog Treats From Baby Food

You can make homemade dog treats in just a few minutes, with just a few ingredients. These soft dog cookies are easy to make and dogs love them because they are fresh and have more flavor than commercial dog treats. The baby food base makes these treats very soft, so they are good for dogs that have problems chewing.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Generously grease a cookie sheet.

    2

    Measure all of the ingredients into a mixing bowl. Mix them by hand until they are well combined.

    3

    Roll the dough into small balls, about 1 inch in diameter, and place them on the greased cookie sheet. If the dough is too moist to roll, add a little more powdered milk or wheat germ. Flatten the balls slightly.

    4

    Bake the cookies in your preheated oven for 10 to 15 minutes, until they start to brown. Remove them from the oven, let them cool for a few minutes, then finish cooling them on a wire rack.
    To keep the cookies fresh, refrigerate or freeze them.

How to Decide If a Timber Wolf Dog Is Right for You

How to Decide If a Timber Wolf Dog Is Right for You

Although dogs and wolves share some ancestry, dogs have undergone thousands of years of domestication, making them different creatures. A new fad in dog breeding sprang up in the 1960s, when some breeders started breeding dogs with the American gray timber wolf. Although smart and loyal, these dogs can be dangerous in the wrong hands. If you plan to purchase a timber wolf dog, make sure that you have the adequate time and resources to manage the dog properly. Most humane societies and shelters will not take in these wolf-dog hybrids, so changing your mind after your purchase may not be an option.

Instructions

    1

    Contact your insurance company. Many insurance companies will not insure your home if you own a specific breed of dog, such as pit bulls, rottweilers or wolf-dog hybrids.

    2

    Think about your experience owning, handling and training dogs. You should only consider ownership of a wolf-dog hybrid if you have extensive, successful experience owning and handling other large dog breeds.

    3

    Base a large part of your decision on whether there are small children or other small pets in the home. U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinary medical officer Dr. Robert Willems states small children have been the target in most of the attacks on humans by wolf-dog hybrids. Wolves are predatory animals and Willems believes that children and other small animals may unwittingly give off signals to the dog that trigger their drive to attack prey.

    4

    Assess your living situation and the amount of space you have. Like most large dog breeds, wolf hybrids need space to run and by physically active. A small apartment in an urban center, for instance, would not be a good environment for one of these dogs.

    5

    Review your finances. Not only will you be taking on food and medical expenses, but you should have enough money to send the dog to a reputable, professional dog trainer. Keep in mind that despite the training, wolf-dog hybrids often exhibit unpredictable behavior due to inherited genetic differences between the dog and wolf.

    6

    Think about the amount of time you will be able to spend with the dog. Wolves are social animals and will not thrive if left alone for long periods of time, such as when you are at work. If you work full time and plan to purchase a wolf-dog hybrid, consider bringing a second dog into the home as well.

    7

    Consider your reasons for purchasing a wolf-dog hybrid. If you plan to use the dog as a security or guard dog, you will most likely be disappointed. Wolves have not become acclimated to humans as dogs have become, and tend to flee rather than fight when confronted by an adult human.

How to Identify a Non-Purebred Yorkie

How to Identify a Non-Purebred Yorkie

It can be tricky deciding if a Yorkshire terrier, also commonly called Yorkie, is purebred or non-purebred Yorkie mix. To decide if a dog is purebred, a careful examination of its physical characteristics has to take place. Organizations like the American Kennel Club keep lists of what each breed of dog should look like if it is a purebred.

Instructions

    1

    Check the color scheme. According to the American Kennel Club, Yorkie puppies should be born black and tan in color. The black and tan hair will intermingle until the dog matures. To show a Yorkie in a competition, they have to have a blue color that is a dark steel blue and not a silver-blue. The blue color also needs to be separate and not intermingled with fawn, bronzy or black fur. The tan hair should be darker at the roots and become lighter at the tips. No black hair should be intermingled with the tan hair, leaving a purebred Yorkie with distinct patches of color not with intertwined color schemes. If any other color scheme or calico like color scheme develops, the dog is probably a mutt.

    2

    Examine a Yorkie's head. The head should be small and flat on the top and the muzzle should be relatively short according to the American Kennel Club. The nose should be black and the eyes are considered to be medium sized. The ears should be V-shaped, erect not floppy, and not set too far apart. Also, check the teeth. If a dog has crooked, broken or just odd looking teeth, there is a chance they are an inbred dog or a mutt. If the head is round on top, the muzzle is long and other characteristics of the head do not match what was described above, it is probably a non-purebred Yorkie.

    3

    Measure and weight a Yorkie. Yorkies are a small dog and should weigh 5 to 7 pounds. They are disqualified from American Kennel Club showing events if they weigh more than 7 pounds. Their height is about 6 or 7 inches from ground to shoulder, and the height at the shoulder should be the same as the height at the rump. The body should be compact and well proportioned.

    4

    Check a Yorkie's coat. The hair on a Yorkie should be glossy, fine and silky in texture. The coat should be moderately long and the hair needs to be straight. If the hair is wavy, it is a non-purebred Yorkie. The hair on the muzzle should be very long, normally hiding the face a little bit. The hair on the head often gets so long that owners need to put a bow in it to hold it back from falling in food bowls and allowing for maximum visibility. If a Yorkie is not growing long and luxurious hair, it is probably not a purebred.

Minggu, 29 Januari 2012

How to Decide Whether to Get a Cocker Spaniel

The Cocker Spaniel was brought to the United States from Great Britain in the late nineteenth century and has become one of the most popular dog breeds in North America. There are many things you must consider, however, when deciding to get a Cocker Spaniel. Read on to learn how to decide whether to get a Cocker Spaniel.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a Cocker Spaniel if you are looking for a family pet. The Cocker Spaniel does well in a family environment, generally like children and tolerate other pets. It was originally bred as a bird dog and makes good hunting companions, but also need indoor attention.

    2

    Consider if a Cocker Spaniel's medium size fits your home. A Cocker Spaniel averages about 15 inches high and weighs between 15 and 30 pounds. It will do fine in a small house or large apartment, but need some space to run around. You need either a small yard or you will have to walk a Cocker Spaniel frequently.

    3

    Decide if you can meet grooming needs. Since their hair gets long, a Cocker Spaniel must have her hair trimmed several times a year and frequent brushing and shampooing. The Cocker Spaniel is a medium shedder. The breed also needs frequent eye and ear cleaning.

    4

    Think about the pros and cons of a Cocker Spaniel's sweet but sensitive temperament. Although their sweetness makes them good companions, they require heavy attention levels from humans and are sensitive to being left alone and to discipline. The breed disciplines well, but requires gentle, patient discipline.

    5

    Contemplate the Cocker Spaniel's average life span of 12 to 15 years. While longer than some larger breeds, many health problems make the life expectancy lower than longest-living breeds.

    6

    Take into consideration common health problems such as cataracts, glaucoma, hip dysplasia, hemophilia and chronic infections of the ears and skin.

    7

    Read the breed standard from the American Kennel Club website for an overview of what to expect from a Cocker Spaniel. From the website, choose "Breeds" and then "AKC Registered Breeds."

About West Highland White Terriers

About West Highland White Terriers

The West Highland White Terrier is a marvelous multi-purpose dog. The Westie is affectionate and loyal, as well as a fearless outdoor dog. They were originally bred to hunt small game. Agile and steadfast, the Westie also makes an excellent agility dog. Their owners are enthusiastic about the breed, and breed clubs are found wherever you find West Highland White Terriers.

History

    Hunting Westies

    The West Highland White Terrier originated in the western highlands of Scotland, thus its name. It is related to the Scottish, Skye, Cairn, and Dandie Dinmont Terriers, who share common ancestors. The Westie was bred as a white dog to avoid being accidentally shot by standing out from the hunting ground and the game.

Size

    Formal Westie

    The West Highland White Terrier, either male and female, is just under 12 inches at the shoulders. Their average weight is 20 to 22 pounds, and males tend to be slightly heavier. Their bone structure is heavy and strong for their size. The tails are about six inches long and are never docked. The characteristic Westie coat is double, with a soft, thick undercoat and a coarse, durable outer coat about two inches in length.

Features

    Intelligent Westie

    The intelligence of the Westie shows in its dark, deep set eyes. Their coat requires daily brushing but is otherwise trouble-free. The Westie is considered a non-shedding breed. Their well-padded paws are partially webbed, and their bodies are slightly longer than it they are tall. The Westie possesses the usual terrier stubborn streak and requires early training if an owner wants to remain master of the household. Give these dogs an inch, and they will take a mile.

Warning

    Westie Baby

    West Highland White Terriers possess teeth that are very large for their size. This, coupled with their heavy bone structure, can produce a problem called craniomandibular osteopathy, or "Lion Jaw." This disorder is seen in puppies under a year old and will cause the puppy severe pain. It starts before six months of age and involves abnormal bone growth in the base of the skull and jaw. If the puppy can be adequately medicated for pain until then, it will outgrow the disease at about a year old. Unfortunately, if the pain cannot be controlled, the puppy must be euthanized. In any case, a Westie who carries this genetic problem should never be bred.

Misconceptions

    Charming Westies

    Many people look at the West Highland White Terrier and see only the cute exterior and sweet and fun-loving disposition. The Westie is much more than that. They require regular exercise to be a happy, contented dog. They need mental stimulation to avoid boredom and the bad habits that originate from a lack of challenge. The Westie gives a great deal of affection to its family, but requires intelligent interaction and affection in return. If not allowed full participation, they become lonely and depressed dogs.

Sabtu, 28 Januari 2012

Good Non-Shedding Dogs for the Apartment Life

Good Non-Shedding Dogs for the Apartment Life

With a small apartment, finding the right dog breed is important. A Great Dane is obviously a bad choice because they need a lot of room. A smaller, less active dog is far better. Many of the smaller breeds are also hypoallergenic, which means that they shed little to no hair. This is beneficial for avoiding unsightly dog hair on clothes and furniture, as well as for allergy sufferers.

Miniature Schnauzer

    The miniature schnauzer is a small 10 lb. to 15 lb. dog that grows to 14 inches at the shoulder. Its size and calm personality means it is suited for an apartment as long as it is given regular walks. The coat is thick and does require regular grooming and seasonal clipping, but otherwise sheds very little.

American Hairless Terrier

    The American hairless terrier grows up to 16 inches at the shoulder and weighs between 5 lbs. and 16 lbs. They like to have a small yard, but with a 30-minute daily walk will do well in an apartment. The lack of hair means that the dog does not shed, but it does mean it is sensitive to the cold and extreme sun.

Bedlington Terrier

    The Bedlington terrier has a tightly curled coat that requires clipping every six weeks or so, but rarely sheds between clips. It is a medium-sized dog that grows to 17 inches at the shoulder and up to 23 lbs., but is slender. Given regular exercise, the breed does fine without a yard and is good for slightly larger apartments.

Bichon Frise

    The bichon frise is a small breed growing to 12 inches at the shoulder and 12 lbs. in weight. It takes up little space and is inactive indoors if well exercised with daily walks. The dog has a thickly curled coat, which can be clipped decoratively. It rarely sheds, if at all, as long as it is groomed often.

Border Terrier

    The border terrier is a 13 lb. to 16 lb. dog that grows to just over 1 foot in height at the shoulder. Daily walks will keep the dog relaxed and inactive indoors, so it is small enough to make a good apartment dog. It has a wiry tight coat, which will remain shed-free with weekly brushing.

Miniature Poodle

    Like all poodle types, the miniature has a tight curly coat, which is often clipped decoratively, and rarely sheds. They grow up to 15 inches at the shoulder, and just 17 pounds in weight, so are small enough for apartment living. They are also calm when indoors as long as they receive daily exercise. The smaller toy poodle is likewise suitable for apartment living and requires even less exercise.

How to Identify a Miniature Fox Terrier

How to Identify a Miniature Fox Terrier

The Miniature Fox Terrier was developed in Australia and has bred true for generations. Though it bears some similarity with the American Toy Fox Terrier, theyre only relation is that they were both derived from the regular Fox Terrier some 200 years ago. They are referred to as the Mini Foxie in Australia, having been combined with the Manchester Terrier, English Toy Terrier, Whippet and Italian Greyhound in Australia when it was a prison colony in the early 1800s. As a result of its constant breeding the Miniature Fox Terrier lacks many of the less likable traits of the typical terrier. It barks only when it feels its home or master is endangered. Though it can be very energetic when its playtime, this breed is capable of being a very sedate lapdog as well. Like all good terriers, the Mini Foxie is great at hunting and killing vermin such as rats, lizards and mice that it might come across around the house. Unfortunately, this breed cannot discern between pet rats, lizards, mice and unwanted pests. So be careful to keep other non-canine pets away from it.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by assessing the dogs size, weight and any other prominent physical features. It should stand between nine and twelve inches high at the shoulder. The males will weigh up to 15 lbs., while the females tend to top out at 12 lbs. This is due to the greater height and muscle mass of the males. The body should be very thin and wiry, about as long as it is tall. Despite this, the dog will have a moderately deep chest reaching down to the level of the elbows. The legs should be immediately noticeable. They should be very long, thin and apparently delicate. While the front legs should be vertical when the dog is standing normally, the rear legs should be cocked backward at a diagonal. If you get the chance, look at the padding of the feet. The central pad of each foot should form a perfect oval. The tail should be short and slightly upward curved, totaling less than half the dogs height.

    2

    Look at the dogs fur. It should be skin tight and short, showing off the dogs musculature and thin build. It should be short and stubbly, coming in only three possible color variations. They can be black and white, tan and white, or black, tan and white.

    3

    Conclude by looking at the dogs head. It should be fitting to the dogs name and closely resemble the bones structure and skull of a fox. Both the skull and jaw should be very narrow and of moderate length. The line running from the tip of the nose to the top of the skull should only have a slight dent at the brow. The ears should be very prominent. They should be abnormally long, thin and tall. Typically they are held upright, but can sometimes droop at the very tip.

About Shelties

About Shelties

"Sheltie" is the common nickname for the Shetland sheepdog, one of the smallest herding dog breeds in the world. The Shetland Island's climate is harsh, cold and very windy. Animals developed on the islands have to be low to the ground and long-hared in order to survive. Now, shelties can be found in homes all over the world.

Appearance

    Shelties look like smaller versions of rough collies ("Lassie dogs"). They have the same long, thick coats and color patterns that rough collies come in, including tan and white, blue merle and white, and tri-color (tan, black and white).

History

    According to "Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds, 2nd Edition" (D. Caroline Colie, Ph.D., 2005), shelties were originally called "toonie dogs" because "toonie" was the local word for a farm. The breed developed in the 1800s and first appeared in English dog shows in 1906.

Temperament

    Shelties are notoriously vocal and do not like strangers. However, they are very intelligent, willing to please and therefore trainable. They still retain their herding instincts and may round their people up as if they were sheep.

Health

    "Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds" notes that many shelties will not tolerate the common insecticide ivermectin. "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs" (Sheldon L. Gerstenfeld, VMD, 1999) notes that shelties can be prone to deafness, eye problems, bleeding disorders and thyroid problems.

Grooming

    Shelties need to be brushed every day to keep their coats from becoming a tangled mess. Many owners like to keep the coat trimmed to make grooming easier.

What Is in Science Diet Pet Food?

Hill's Science Diet has been a top brand of pet food for decades. Science Diet dry pet foods vary slightly in formula but share most ingredients. For dogs, Hill's Science Diet has formulae for active dogs, large breeds, sensitive skin, weight control, promotion of digestive health, oral care, skin care and sensitive stomachs. A mixture of animal proteins, vegetable proteins, fiber, oil and fat are what you find in Science Diet pet food. A general understanding of how to read pet food labels will help consumers understand what is in Science Diet Pet Food.

Understanding the Food Label

    Ingredients are listed on a food label by weight. The top ingredient is the one that weighed the most, not the ingredient that is the highest percentage. Born Free USA, united with the Animal Protection Institute, points out that when chicken, for example, is listed as the top ingredient in a dry pet food, it is simply because raw chicken weighs more than the chicken and bone meal that accompanies it for the same proportion.

Top Ten Common Ingredients

    Comparing three formulae of Science Diet puppy food finds these ingredients listed in the top 10 ingredients of more than one formula:
    Soybean meal
    Pork fat or animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid)
    Dried egg product
    Flaxseed
    Dried beet pulp
    Natural flavor
    Cracked pearled barley
    Brewers rice
    Ground wheat
    Corn gluten meal
    Vegetable oil
    Dried beet pulp

Top Ten Specialized Ingredients

    Depending on the formula, other ingredients will be in the top 10 listed ingredients, such as the following:
    Lamb
    Lamb meal
    Turkey meal
    Chicken
    Chicken meal
    Brown rice
    Rice flour
    Whole grain wheat
    Powdered cellulose
    Peas
    Carrots
    Natural flavor

Other Ingredients

    Rendering meat and meat by-products to make them safe for consumption (cooking to a temperature of 270F/130C) breaks down many of the nutrients in the meat, and so vitamin and mineral supplements must be added. Comparing three formulae of Science Diet puppy food finds these other ingredients in common (in differing order):

    Cracked pearled barley, whole grain oats, apples, cranberries, fish oil, peas, carrots, soybean oil, iodized salt, broccoli, vitamins (L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), vitamin E supplement, niacin, thiamine mononitrate, vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement), choline chloride, vitamin E supplement, potassium chloride, minerals (ferrous sulfate, zinc oxide, copper sulfate, manganous oxide, calcium iodate, sodium selenite), DL-methionine, L-tryptophan, taurine, L-threonine, preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid, beta-carotene, rosemary extract and L-lysine

    Ingredients not in common between the three formulae compared include dicalcium phosphate, sodium tripolyphosphate, chicken liver flavor, iron oxide and magnesium oxide.

Warning

    Hill's Science Diet was involved in a large recall of canned pet foods in March 2007. Many brands of canned pet foods are manufactured at the same place, including Science Diet. Wheat gluten and concentrated rice protein from China had been contaminated with melamine and cyanuric acid, leading to kidney failure in dogs and cats who ate food containing these tainted ingredients. Other top brands, such as Iams and Eukanuba, were also affected by these unauthorized chemicals. The FDA received over 17,000 reports of animals sickened by these contaminants in over 100 Menu Foods pet food brands.

Jumat, 27 Januari 2012

Nutritional Supplements for Underweight Dogs

Nutritional Supplements for Underweight Dogs

Underweight dogs---those with low muscle mass and a lack of body fat---can be fed supplements to return to an optimal weight. Options for feeding to add body weight include specific food items and nutritional supplements.

Identification

    Working dogs may be underweight
    Working dogs may be underweight

    Underweight dogs have low body fat and muscle mass. Dogs that have been homeless or abandoned are often thin and undernourished. Dogs that are very athletic, like working sled dogs, and dogs with underlying medical conditions may also be underweight.

Misconceptions

    The obvious solution to treating an underweight dog may be to overfeed. Overfeeding an underweight dog can cause "refeeding syndrome," an overload of carbohydrates resulting in serious physical distress, even death.

Commercial Dog Food

    Meals for underweight dogs can be supplemented with a meat-based commercial "puppy" or "growth" formula food. Four small portions should replace the once- or twice-daily feedings. Commercial dog foods high in fats are excellent choices: Look for eggs, raw fat and fish oil to place high in the ingredient list.

Vitamin and Minerals

    Underweight dogs should be given a balanced, broad-spectrum supplement. Amino acids, especially glutamine, and omega-3 and -6 fatty-acid supplements are also beneficial.

Warning

    A dog's diet should be formulated to ensure beneficial ratios of proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and other components. Caution should be taken when adding food items specifically for weight gain so that nutrients are not provided in harmful balances.

Expert Insight

    If you have concerns about your dog's weight, consult a veterinarian. Obesity is a epidemic in pet dogs. Most dogs weigh much more than is healthy. Underweight dogs often have underlying conditions that require veterinary treatment.

Kamis, 26 Januari 2012

Things Not to Feed a Dog

Things Not to Feed a Dog

Dogs like to eat anything you give them. However, some foods and drinks should not be fed to your dog. You may think that the piece of meatloaf that you made is good for your dog because it is meat. You could be feeding your dog something that is harmful to their health because of the ingredients that you put in the meatloaf. There are many foods that can affect their health in one way or another.

Drinks

    Alcohol and coffee should not be given to your dog. Alcohol can lead to death, coma, abnormal acidity in the stomach and poor breathing. The caffeine in coffee is comparable to the caffeine in chocolate, which can cause damage to the nervous system, heart problems, diarrhea, vomiting and panting.

Meats

    Liver is not harmful to dogs in small portions, but large portions can affect bones and muscles because it is high in vitamin A, which is too much for a dog's system. Raw fish should be avoided because it can cause a vitamin B deficiency, which can lead to seizures, loss of appetite and in some cases, death. Trout and salmon have a parasite that will not affect people but can harm the dog even if it is cooked. Any meats that can contain bones can harm the dog if the bone lodges in the throat or intestines.

Candy

    Candy contains xilotyl and sugar, which can cause the dogs body to release too much insulin and cause kidney failure. Chocolate has caffeine, which in large amounts can cause problems with the nervous system, heart problems, vomiting and panting.

Food Additives

    Garlic, onion, salt, sugar and citrus oil extracts can be harmful to your dog. Citrus oil causing vomiting. Garlic, onions and chives can damage the red blood cells and cause anemia. Raw eggs can lower the body's ability to absorb vitamin B, which is needed for a healthy coat and skin. Salt changes the dog's electrolyte balance and sugar can cause diabetes, obesity and tooth decay. Yeast can cause discomfort and gas, but large amounts can cause the intestines and stomach to rupture.

Miscellaneous Foods

    Avocados, corn on the cob, grapes, raisins, macadamia nuts, plums, peaches and persimmons should be avoided. Kidney damage and intestinal problems can result from these foods, but some are so toxic that they can be fatal. Mushrooms can be fatal to a healthy dog. There is no way of knowing which type of mushroom the dog can eat or not eat, so avoid all.

How to Enter a Dog in an American Bully Kennel Club (ABKC) Show

The American Bully Kennel Club or ABKC is a kennel club for pit bulls, specifically pocket pits or pits that are under 17 inches tall. The ABKC sanctions events all over the United States. Most ABKC dog shows include a conformation event and a fun class event.

Instructions

    1

    Find an ABKC sanctioned event. Searching online is the best way to find out about events. You can also contact a Gottiline, Razor's Edge or Monster G Line breeder to find out about upcoming events.

    2

    Train your dog for the ring. ABKC dog shows are a little more relaxed than AKC or Westminster shows. Your dog must be friendly toward the judge and the other dogs. Aggressive dogs are banned from entering ABKC shows.

    3

    Groom your dog before the show. Your dog should have clean teeth and ears, trimmed nails and a soft shiny coat. Dirty dogs will get low scores.

    4

    Enter your dog in the class and show in which you want it to participate. You have to decide if your dog will enter the conformation show, the fun show or both. You also have to determine the proper class. These are usually based on age and gender. Pocket pits and champions have their own classes. In some cases, due to local codes, you may have to pre-register your dog.

    5

    Ice down your dog. Rubbing ice on its back, neck and head will make the coat shiny and help to cool the dog off so it won't pant as much in the ring. If you do this every time you show your dog, eventually, your dog will use this as a signal that it is about to enter the show ring.

How to Adopt a Teacup Poodle

How to Adopt a Teacup Poodle

Teacup Poodles, also known as Toy Poodles, are the smallest of the Poodle breed. Small enough to fit in a teacup, these Poodles are only 6 to 9 lbs. when fully grown. Quite easy to train, Teacup Poodles are intelligent, loyal and playful. It's important that you socialize and train these dogs properly. If you don't, they can become high-strung, demanding and painfully shy. With proper care, Teacup Poodles make excellent pets for both individuals and families.

Instructions

    1

    Find Teacup Poodle breeders in your area. Whereas some pet stores get their puppies from puppy mills, breeders are interested in quality and healthfulness rather than merely quantity. You should be able to view photos of the latest litters online, and you can then travel to meet the puppies in person.

    2

    Contact Poodle rescue foundations. Teacup Poodles tend to be in high demand as they are a designer breed. As a result, they generally are adopted quickly. You are more likely to find adult Teacup Poodles via rescue organizations rather than puppies. Such organizations as Adopt a Poodle and Coastal Poodle Rescue allow you to view available dogs via their websites (see Resources below).

    3

    Play with the Teacup Poodles prior to choosing one. Oftentimes, one may appeal to you more in person than it did in photos. Allow time for the dogs to familiarize themselves with you. Don't be put off by a timid or shy Teacup Poodle. With diligent training, even the shyest one will come out of his shell and become more social.

    4

    Inquire about the dog's health. Common ailments that affect Teacup Poodles include runny eyes, digestive disorders, skin diseases, ear infections and heart conditions. Make sure the dog has all necessary vaccinations, including rabies and worm immunizations.

    5

    Acquire needed dog supplies prior to bringing your new Teacup Poodle home. A sturdy collar, leash, and food and water dishes are necessary, as are a dog brush, comb and shampoo.

    6

    Feed your Teacup Poodle the same food she was eating at the breeder or shelter. If you wish to change the type of dog food, make it a gradual switch. Start by mixing a bit of the new food in with the old. Slowly change the proportions until you have completely switched her over to the new dog food. A sudden switch is tough on Teacup Poodles' delicate digestive systems.

    7

    Exercise your pup daily. Despite their small size, Teacup Poodles are very active. They require daily walks and playtime. If you neglect to exercise your Teacup Poodle, he is likely to become destructive in your home.

    8

    Brush your Teacup Poodle weekly to ensure her hair is free of tangles. Wash your pup every three to four weeks to keep her skin healthy and fur clean. It's also wise to have her clipped every 6 to 12 weeks, to keep hair at a manageable length.

How to Find a Stud Male Dog for Breeding

How to Find a Stud Male Dog for Breeding

If you own a purebred dog, you will likely want to continue the dog's line by breeding her to a stud dog of the same breed. While finding a stud male dog for popular breeds such as German shepherds and golden retrievers is easier than finding one for a rare breed, it is important to understand not only how to search but the politics involved in obtaining stud services.

Instructions

    1

    Take your female dog to the veterinarian for a general exam. Make sure your dog is completely healthy before contacting a breeder for mating.

    2

    Look in publications such as The American Kennel Club for breeders offering stud services. Search on the internet for local kennels that breed dogs of the same breed as yours. Look in local newspapers for stud services as well.

    3

    Call the breeders that interest you and discuss their terms for stud service. You may even simply call the breeder where you bought your dog. Each breeder's terms will differ so call a few to compare and to find out if they have a dog with the qualities you are looking for.

    4

    Take your dog to the breeder when she is in heat. Finalize terms with the breeder, whether it be a fee or pick of the litter or both, before breeding your dog.

The History of Working Dogs

The History of Working Dogs

The American Kennel Club's Working Group division of dogs recognizes 26 breeds. Some of the world's largest breeds are in this group, including the Great Dane, Saint Bernard, Mastiff and Newfoundland. These powerful animals were originally bred to labor under harsh conditions, working in a variety of roles such as shepherds, guard dogs, sled-pulling dogs or rescue dogs. Because of their size and temperament, these dogs are generally not ideal for first-time dog owners.

Shepherding and Farm Dogs

    Some of the oldest dog breeds were originally bred by nomadic shepherd tribes to herd and guard livestock. They are often a similar color to the livestock so they can blend in with the herd. These dogs include the Anatolian Shepherd of Turkey, the Great Pyrenees from Central Asia, the Komondor of Hungary, the Kuvasz originally of Tibet and the Rottweiler, whose origins date back to ancient Rome, though the modern breed was developed in Germany,

    Other breeds were developed for general farm labor. Their jobs included cart-pulling, herding, guarding livestock and other farm goods, and in some cases, catching rats and other farm pests. These breeds include the Giant and standard varieties of Schnauzers from Germany, the German Pinscher, the Bernese Mountain Dog and the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog.

Guard and War Dogs

    Often ferocious in appearance but highly intelligent and trainable, certain dog breeds were developed to guard people and property and have, on occasion, worked as soldier dogs. The Doberman Pinscher of Germany is widely recognized as a guard dog. The Bull Mastiff originated in England, where it was used to protect game estates from poachers. The Black Russian Terrier was developed after World War II to serve the Soviet Union through a variety of tasks, including guard dog. The Mastiff and Neapolitan Mastiff breeds served in the army of the Roman Empire.

Hunting Dogs

    Not to be confused with sporting dogs, hunting dogs were not bred to merely help the hunter find game. They played an active role in accosting the game or holding it at bay until the hunter arrived. Several large breeds hunted boars, including the Great Dane. The Dogue de Bordeaux hunted bears as well as boars, and the Boxer of Germany hunted wild boar and bison. A Japanese hunting dog, the Akita, was first introduced to the U.S. in 1937 by Helen Keller.

Sled Dogs

    Sled dogs are stocky, hardy breeds built to withstand arctic climates and hard working conditions. Historically, these dogs transported people and goods across the frozen tundras of Siberia, Alaska and northern Canada. The Siberian Husky is one of the most widely-recognized sled dogs and often competes in dogsled races. Similar in appearance, the Alaskan Malamute was developed by Innuit tribes. The Samoyed of Siberia is considered a sled dog but was also once used in herding reindeer.

Other Jobs

    The Newfoundland originated on the coast and performed fishing labor, such as pulling nets and carting timber. The Portuguese Water Dogs, another coastal breed, performed tasks such as diving for fish and guarding the fishing boats. The Saint Bernard traditionally rescued lost travelers and avalanche victims in the Swiss and Italian Alps.

Modern Jobs for Working Dogs

    Modern technology has eliminated the need for working dogs in some roles, but they are still widely used in farming and as guard dogs. Working dogs also serve in police and military forces as well as in rescue and emergency organizations such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Information on a Border Collie and Jack Russell Mix

Information on a Border Collie and Jack Russell Mix

Border collie/Jack Russel terrier mixes are common enough to have a nickname: "Border Jack." These dogs are a mix of two intelligent, fairly intense breeds. They can be complicated and challenging, but are affectionate and playful pets for people who understand how to handle dogs.

Border Collie

    Border collies are herding dogs that hail from Scotland. Border collies are medium sized, with long black or brown and white coats. They are known as clever, intense dogs that take well to training. The AKC website refers to border collie breed as "the workaholic of the dog world."

Jack Russell Terriers

    Jack Russells are small terriers that were originally bred in England to hunt and kill rats and mice. They are cheerful, smart and dedicated to their owners, but can also be stubborn and opinionated. These little dogs excel at working disciplines.

Border Jack Features

    Border jacks are small dogs that stand taller than Jack Russells but shorter than border collies. they resemble terriers physically, with black and white colorations that follow both Jack Russell and border collie patterns. They are dense and very sturdy.

Border Jack Personality

    Border jacks are born of two breeds that need regular exercise and stimulation. These dogs are extremely active, with bright, clever personalities that mimic their terrier and collie parents. They are bred for performance and used for agility training and competition because of their intelligence and high activity levels.

Considerations

    Border jacks require a lot of time and are not good dogs for new dog owners. These dogs are bred specifically for performance disciplines and must be handled with that drive in mind.

    An owner who buys a hybrid dog takes a risk in that the breed is not set, which means that there is no breed standard or AKC control over breedings. There are no guarantees in regard to a dog's lineage, health or character.

Information on Cocker Spaniel Dogs

Information on Cocker Spaniel Dogs

Cocker spaniels are a breed of dog, either American- or English-bred. They make ideal live-in companion dogs. Descended from hunting ancestors, cocker spaniels are sporty and intelligent as well as cuddly, loyal, gentle and sensitive. For a person interested in this breed of dog, plenty of information is available.

Appearance

    Cocker spaniels are small, sturdy dogs that have well-balanced frames, silky coats, can weigh 20-30 pounds and generally reach 12 to 16 inches tall. Their heads have square jaws, wide muzzles and large upper lips that cover their lower jaws. Cocker spaniels have long, feathered ears, dark, almond-shaped eyes, brown or black noses, and long necks with short backs and deep chests. Their coats come in a variety of colors, including dark red, light cream, black, and black with tan spots.

History

    Cocker spaniels are direct descendants of spaniels, one of the first breeds of dogs thought to have originated in Spain. Originally bred as sporting dogs, the ancestors of modern-day cocker spaniels were extremely useful in flushing game out of dense brush and hunting woodcocks for their English owners. The middle of the 19th century brought about a smaller breed of cocker spaniels, developed by American breeders as household pets. Today, the American breed of cocker spaniel is a popular choice for a pet.

Advantages

    Cocker spaniels are popular for several reasons. They are typically a happy breed, love people, and are extremely devoted to their owners. Cocker spaniels are also playful and fun to be around. As one of the smaller breeds, cocker spaniels typically require less exercise, are easier to transport and are ideal for smaller living quarters. With breeders and shelters all over the United States, cocker spaniels are also widely available to prospective owners.

Health Problems

    Unfortunately, some health problems are commonly associated with the cocker spaniel breed. These dogs are prone to development of several eye conditions, such as glaucoma, cataracts, a prolapsed gland of the third eyelid, eye infections and distichia, which is an eye irritation caused by a misplaced hair growing toward the eye. Cocker spaniels are also prone to various skin problems, ear infections, autoimmune diseases and submissive or excited urination.

How to Use Peanut Butter to Coax a Sick Dog to Eat

Most dogs find the taste, smell and texture of peanut butter irresistible. For this reason, many pet owners fill their dog's toys with peanut butter and many manufacturers make dog toys with a peanut butter scent. If your dog loves peanut butter as much as most dog do, you can use it to help him eat when he otherwise wouldn't. A lost appetite may simply be the result of an upset stomach; but it could also indicate a more serious health condition. Make sure he gets medical attention.

Instructions

    1

    Boil white rice until soft. White rice is soothing to the dog's stomach, easy to eat and helps with many digestive problems.

    2

    Drain the water from the rice.

    3

    Mix in 1 tablespoon of peanut butter for each cup of rice. Do this while the rice is still hot to help melt the peanut butter and coat all the grains.

    4

    Place rice in a sealed container and keep it in the refrigerator until it reaches a cool temperature.

    5

    Place the bowl in front of your dog. If the smell of the peanut butter is not enough to convince him to eat, place a small amount of rice and peanut butter mixture in your hand, let him smell it, then hold it near his mouth. If he still won't eat it, try to mix in more peanut butter.

How to Make Homemade Vegetarian Dog Food

Homemade vegetarian dog food can be made with everyday ingredients that are both satisfying and nourishing to most dogs. Choosing to make dog food eliminates the concern of unknown ingredients in commercially prepared dog food, as well as the fear of commercially prepared dog food recalls. Additionally, pets with food allergies can benefit physically and emotionally from a diet of homemade vegetarian dog food. The removal of known allergens, prevents dogs with food allergies from suffering with potentially life threatening reactions.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

    2

    Spray a baking dish with cooking spray.

    3

    Combine all ingredients except water.

    4

    Blend the mixture by hand until it is thoroughly combined. If mixture is too dry, add water.

    5

    Press it into a baking dish and place it in preheated oven.

    6

    Bake the dog food for approximately 20 to 30 minutes.

    7

    Remove it from the oven and allow it to cool.

How to Find My Dog's Family Tree

How to Find My Dog's Family Tree

Your mixed breed dog may look part shepherd and part collie, or nearly all Labrador, but its DNA holds the secret to its true ancestry. Knowing your dog's genetics can help you train, exercise and feed more effectively for the animal's dominant behaviors and characteristics. Several companies offer genetic testing to determine primary and secondary breed information for your dog, and when the testing is complete, you receive a report in the mail.

Instructions

    1

    Find a canine DNA testing company online. An Internet search of "dog DNA testing" produces more than a half dozen results. Review company information to understand the scope of testing offered. In general, scientists are able to identify more than 300 DNA markers that determine specific breeds. Comparison shop based on testing information provided online.

    2

    Request and pay for a test kit from the company you choose. Test prices average $80. Wait several days for the kit to arrive in the mail. It will contain all the necessary pieces for you to obtain a DNA sample at home.

    3

    Collect a DNA sample from the inside of your dog's cheek using the special swab that comes with the test kit. This is a painless process that involves opening your dog's mouth, inserting the swab and scraping a few cells from the cheek. Package the sample and return to the company as instructed.

    4

    Wait several weeks. Testing times can vary among companies, but typically you should have your results within a month's time. You'll receive a report stating the known breeds found in your dog's DNA. In cases where breeds are difficult to determine, you will receive a list of breeds that can be eliminated by looking at your dog's DNA.

    5

    Consider the results carefully. You may be surprised if your German shepherd-looking dog carries genes for a Shar Pei or beagle. Physical appearance may have little to do with actual genetic makeup of your dog, but the test results should give you a better understanding of temperament and breed needs as you train and live with your pet.

    6

    Discuss the test results with your veterinarian, especially if the results reveal breed information that you and your vet would not have expected. Your vet will know if the genetic information means your dog is predisposed to different diseases or cannot take certain medications.

    7

    Review the results with trainers. A dog's looks might lead a trainer in one direction, but genetic testing could reveal temperament traits that require a different and more effective training approach than was expected.

English Bulldog Vs. Bullmastiff

English Bulldog Vs. Bullmastiff

The bullmastiff and the English bulldog are two English breeds of dogs. Both official breeds of the American Kennel Club, these two dog types are linked by breeding. There are similarities and differences in the two breeds, making a fascinating comparison.

Origin

    The English bulldog has been bred and has been a staple in English society dating back to the early 16th century. The bullmastiff has only been around since 1860, making the bulldog roughly a 300-year-older breed.

What is a Bullmastiff?

    Breeding a mastiff with an English bulldog developed the bullmastiff. The bullmastiff originally served the purpose of catching poachers on large game reserves. The bullmastiff is taller than the English bulldog and less ferocious by nature. A 60/40 ratio of mastiff and English bulldog is the ideal genetic make up of a bullmastiff.

Health Issues

    The lifespan of a bullmastiff and an English bulldog is between eight and 12 years. They are prone to similar medical conditions: Osteosarcoma and lymphoma are two of the most common cancers in these breeds. Endocarditis is reported in both breeds. Allergies and ear infections are common among English bulldogs and the bullmastiff breed.

Size and Temperament

    The English bulldog is a medium-sized dog ranging from 50 lbs. to 55 lbs. It is short legged and compact. The bullmastiff is a large dog weighing up to 100 lbs. Long limbed and streamlined, the bullmastiff is faster in a sprint. Bulldogs can be very strong hunters and if not trained properly, due to its muscularity and strong jaw, it can be dangerous. However, modern-day bulldogs are bred to be more docile and gentle; some grow so attached to family and home that they will not stray from the property without human companions. Bullmastiffs are independent and prefer to make their own decisions; however, with proper socializing and training, the bullmastiff can be an obedient, courageous companion. Do not leave a bullmastiff alone with small children; because they are large, they can knock down a child accidentally or engage in aggressive play.

How to Care for a West Highland White Terrier

A West Highland White Terrier is known for loyalty and an abundance of energy. Some Westies are good lap dogs, while others prefer independence or a quiet corner. Easy to train and highly intelligent, a Westie can make a great pet. If you're looking for a dog that will shed minimally, a West Highland White Terrier is the one for you.

Instructions

    1

    Get to know your West Highland White Terrier by spending quality time each day with it. A little attention goes a long way, and the Westie will reward you with loyalty.

    2

    Train your West Highland White Terrier with a new trick every few weeks. Westies are quick to master tricks with some repetition. Consistency is the key to learning new tricks. Once the West Highland White Terrier masters one trick, move on to another.

    3

    Contact your vet to determine if your dog has allergies. West Highland White Terriers can be allergic to certain foods. One sign of allergies is constant sneezing and scratching.

    4

    Maintain a West Highland Terrier's coat by daily brushing and monthly bathing. Begin this routine when your West Highland Terrier is a puppy. Use a shampoo for sensitive skin. Trim the coat every two months.

    5

    Maintain the health of the West Highland White Terrier by brushing its teeth twice a week using a fingertip brush or doggy toothbrush. Purchase toothpaste made for dogs.

    6

    Spay or neuter your West Highland White Terrier unless you plan to breed it.

Pros & Cons of Beagle Puppies

Pros & Cons of Beagle Puppies

The beagle is a small to medium-sized dog that has a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years. Beagles have different colors: some are tricolored (having two colors plus white) like those in chocolate or lilac, others are blue or red tick in color or are tan and white, lemon and white or red and white (called a patch beagle). Those that are merle are not purebred beagles.

Beagle Facts

    Beagles originally came from Great Britain. They are hound-type dogs with a good sense of smell. This type of dog are house pets and hunting dogs. It uses a distinct howl, a characteristic bark, when hunting. It is a stubborn breed to train. A full-size beagle will have a height ranging between 13 and 16 inches and can weigh between 20 to 25 lbs. depending on gender.

Beagle Puppies

    Beagles puppies need more attention than other dog breeds because they are curious, full of energy and like to play. They need house training, obedience training, potty training and crate training. Pet owners can keep a beagle pup indoors, but it needs to be brought outdoors often to exercise, move and play around because they are an energetic breed. As beagle puppies mature, they begin to develop weak legs and a crooked back and are prone to a range of illnesses.

Pros of Beagle Puppies

    Beagles can fetch and return items like balls and plush toys. They are an intelligent breed, and when trained as a pup, can be disciplined. Puppies are capable of learning and understanding pet owners' commands if trained early or taken to some obedience classes. They are also good with children and other dogs, as well as cats if acquainted early. Beagle puppies show affection toward pet owners. They are playful, easy to keep clean and groom. It is a clean breed that only needs an occasional bath and brushing once in a while.

Cons of Beagle Puppies

    They love to dig and chew on things, so pet owners need to distract the dog by buying chew toys and bones for the puppy or risk having their own personal items chewed and buried. Training a beagle puppy is difficult because is has short attention spans. As a result, pet owners must repeat dog commands and demands more than a few times before it will end up as an obedient dog. Also, beagles howl very loud, and as pups they may learn early on this type of bark that is characteristic to their hunting abilities.

Rabu, 25 Januari 2012

How to Train a Toy Pom

How to Train a Toy Pom

Pomeranians are animated, high-energy dogs that require lots of attention from their owners. Toy poms are especially susceptible to fear-based aggression and separation anxiety. The best time to train Pomeranians is while they are puppies, before they have had a chance to develop fearful dispositions and destructive habits. It's never too late to train a dog, though, and a few changes to your toy Pom's routine can make a huge difference in its behavior.

Instructions

    1

    Socialize your dog as a puppy to people and other animals. Reinforce positive interactions by clicking your clicker, praising your dog and giving your dog a treat. Encourage other people, especially strangers, to give your dog treats. Avoid aggressive or hyperactive dogs during the first months of your puppy's life, providing your Pomeranian with access to lots of friendly dogs, including large breeds, instead.

    2

    Avoid rewarding bad behavior. Dog owners frequently inadvertently encourage hyper and fearful behavior in toy Poms. A dog who is chewing up furniture, for example, should not get any attention for doing so. Similarly, dogs who react aggressively toward people or other dogs should not be picked up, played with or comforted while displaying aggression. Instead, ignore your dog's behavior or place it in a crate until it has calmed down.

    3

    Teach your dog to walk on a leash. Because Pomeranians have so much energy, they may be inclined toward leash-pulling and hyperactivity during walks. Take a bag of treats with you, giving your dog a treat every time it walks near you. This encourages your dog to stay nearby instead of pulling on the leash. If your dog pulls, stop walking until the pulling stops.

    4

    Start house-training your dog the day you bring it home. Remember each accident increases the likelihood of future accidents, so allow your dog outside frequently, and if you have to be away from home for extended hours, hire a dog walker. Put your dog in a crate during the day until it is housebroken. If you catch your dog having an accident, immediately take it outside. When your dog goes to the bathroom outside, give it a treat and click your training clicker.

Information About Newborn Teacup Chihuahua Puppies

Information About Newborn Teacup Chihuahua Puppies

The tiny Chihuahua has become a popular pet, and sometimes, the smaller, the better. There is no official breed of Chihuahua called the "Teacup" Chihuahua. Because Teacups are just smaller-than-average Chihuahuas, the characteristics of newborns are essentially the same for both types of dog. However, Teacups often suffer additional health problems due to their small size.

Birth

    Because Chihuahuas are so small, they usually only have one to three pups per litter. At birth, each pup will weigh between 2 and 5 oz. Teacups will weigh as much as their standard siblings at this point, so there's no way to tell a Teacup from a standard Chihuahua. (A Chihuahua is considered a Teacup if it weighs less than 2.5 lbs. as an adult. Chihuahuas typically reach an adult weight between 2 and 5 lbs.)

    A mother's care is critical in the first weeks of a puppy's life. The mother provides essential nutrition, warmth and care. Therefore, a Teacup pup should not leave its mother until it is at least 8 weeks of age.

Temperament

    Teacup Chihuahuas, like others of the same breed, are sweet and social. Chihuahuas have gotten a reputation for being short-tempered, but breeders are quick to point out that they are just fiercely loyal and protective. Newborns are easy to train, quick to learn and eager to please. They love being around people and other dogs, but owners should take precautions because they can be hurt easily. According to V.I.P. Chihuahua, "Chihuahua dogs are very loving around kids. However, it's not recommended leaving the dog alone with a child under the age of 6 unless they're supervised."

Health

    Teacup Chihuahuas have special health considerations due to their small size. Newborns often suffer from hypoglycemia (sometimes called "puppy diabetes"). Other health issues can be joint displacement, seizures and reactions to vaccinations. The Chihuahua Club of America notes that, while not a medical problem, most of these small dogs are born with a molera, a soft spot on top of the head. As the puppy's skull grows, it will cover the soft spot. Healthy pups will have clear eyes at birth and no signs of limping or imbalance.

Socialization

    As stated earlier, Chihuahuas are social animals and love being around people and other animals, particularly other Chihuahuas. According to Next Day Pets, "the Chihuahua can be difficult to train, but with patience, love and consistency do well." It is important to start the socialization process around 5 to 6 weeks of age, so the pups learn not to fear humans. Drs. Foster & Smith Inc. advises owners to remember that your pup "is still a baby and must be handled with care, but you should start to introduce the pup to noises, grooming procedures, new people and pets."

Safety

    Newborn Teacup Chihuahuas present special safety concerns. Because they are so small, they are easily lost or injured. Before you bring home a newborn Chihuahua, be sure to puppy-proof the house just as you would for an infant. Chocolate, cleaners, baits, other animals, washers, dryers and windows present safety hazards for these tiny pups. Since they are so small, they also often have trouble keeping warm. A mother dog usually provides adequate warmth for her pups, but if the mother is not available, a heat lamp may be required.

Coats and Colors of German Shepherd Dogs

Coats and Colors of German Shepherd Dogs

The German shepherd dog is a registered breed with the American Kennel Club (AKC). The dogs are known for their intelligence, loyalty, courage and natural aptitude for training. They are routinely used by the police, security organizations and the military. The AKC has established standards for the most desirable type of coat and color for the purpose of show competitions. The length and colors of the coats of German shepherds can vary and should not be a factor when judging the worth of a particular dog as a companion or for professional use.

Coat

    This breed sheds often and needs daily grooming.
    This breed sheds often and needs daily grooming.

    According to AKC standards, the German shepherd dog should have a double coat of medium length. The outer coat should be dense, short and harsh and should lie close to its body. The AKC accepts a slightly wavy outer coat with wiry texture. The hair around the dog's neck, rear forelegs and hind legs should be longer than the hair on its head, legs and paws. If the dog has an outer coat that is too curly, wooly, silky or soft, it is considered faulty by the American Kennel Club's standards.

Colors

    This breed's coat varies in color but the most common shades are black and tan, sable, which is a dark gray, and solid black. Other colors include black and cream, black and red, as well as black and silver. Blue, liver and white are additional colors found in German shepherds' coats. Most colors are permissible according to the AKC standards. However, rich strong colors are preferred. The club considers coats faulty if they are blue or liver-colored. It is also a fault if the color looks washed-out. German shepherd dogs with white coats are automatically disqualified by the AKC.

White-Coated German Shepherd Dogs

    The pure white German shepherd dog has been recognized as a separate breed by some dog organizations. The Fdration Cynologique Internationale, based in Belgium, recognized it as a "Berger Blanc Swiss," or "white Swiss shepherd." It was referred to as "Swiss" because it was first recognized as a separate breed in Switzerland. The White Swiss Shepherd Dog Club of Australia also recognizes the white-coated German shepherd as a separate breed. The American White Shepherd Association has established its own standards for the dog. The ideal color for this breed's hair is pure white. Very pale cream to biscuit tan colors are acceptable but not preferred. Both short and long coats are equally acceptable. To the general observer, this new breed looks exactly like the German shepherd dog except for its hair color.

Considerations

    German shepherds are loyal companions.
    German shepherds are loyal companions.

    A German shepherd's coat sheds small amounts of hair daily and more heavily in season. It should be brushed daily to keep it in optimum condition. A well-trained German shepherd can be kept in an apartment; however, it requires some strenuous exercise daily, such as playing with a Frisbee, as well as the usual walks. This confident, intelligent breed serves well as both a companion and a watch dog.

DNA Ancestry Test for Dogs

DNA Ancestry Test for Dogs

Mixed-breed dogs are very popular, especially with families who are looking to rescue a shelter dog rather than patronize a breeder. Since there is often no way of telling what exact breeds of dog make up a standard mutt, this can cause further mystery when diagnosing health issues, dealing with training and temperament and even predicting lifespan. Today, dog owners can rejoice in the development of a DNA ancestry test for dogs, which allows you to determine your pooch's breed once and for all.

Definition

    When you hear the term "DNA test," your mind may venture to television crime shows, where DNA samples quickly and easily solve a crime. Canine DNA analysis is much different--often taking weeks for the result and going through an all-encompassing process of quality assurance and controlled environment.

    Once a lab receives your dog's DNA, it will then go through different laboratory processes to give you a clear and accurate analysis. Then, it will compare the analysis to over 100 major dog breeds, attempting to match your dog to a specific heritage.

    The test itself is simple and straightforward, able to be performed at home and not requiring any blood sample or vet visit.

How It Works

    The DNA is tested from your dog's cheek cells, which share genetic information with other bodily components such as blood. With your kit, you will receive a cheek swab that is designed to collect this DNA. It is painless for your pet, and all you have to do is swap and mail the sample into the lab designated on your DNA package.

Determining Heritage

    Your pet's sample arrives at a laboratory and is opened and logged into a system with an individual file for your dog. It is then isolated and DNA is extracted from the swap. A process is then performed to ramp up the concentration of the DNA, effectively making copies to create enough material to test with.

    The DNA is then run through lab equipment, which singles out key locations in the DNA that can point to a specific dog breed. These markers are then compared against pure breed dog markers to determine and finalize the breeds found within your dog's genetic structure.

Cost

    DNA ancestry testing can be a fun gift for the dog lover in your life, and is affordable at around $100. Many companies now produce this popular kit, so be sure to shop around for the best price. Most kits can be ordered online, and some labs, like the Canine Heritage XL test, include free shipping with a kit.

Why Test?

    Many people are happy with their mixed breed dogs remaining a genetic mystery. However, others desire to learn all they can about their four-legged best friend, and DNA testing can help them feel closer to the dog's roots and history.

    Testing can also be helpful in both diagnosing and preventing health problems, as well as helping you isolate behavior issues that can strain your family life. Knowing your dog's background can allow you to care for it as fully as possible, while also maintaining a tranquil living environment for the humans in the house too.

Are Pork Bones Safe for Dogs?

Are Pork Bones Safe for Dogs?

A large pork bone with meat and cartilage on it will make a dog's day, but one with marrow is even better. Dogs chew bones to get the marrow. If you put a bone and some marrow in two bowls, most dogs will chose the latter.

Rib Bones Are Dangerous For Dogs

    Rib bones are a choking hazard for dogs.
    Rib bones are a choking hazard for dogs.

    Rib bones are a choking hazard, and they can also get stuck transversely between the teeth, causing much distress, as a dog can't insert a paw deep inside its mouth to remove it. Also, when broken, these bones yield sharp edges, which can endanger the digestive tract.

Temperament and Size Matter

    Some dogs are relaxed about bones.
    Some dogs are relaxed about bones.

    Some dogs are relaxed around large bones, and if a bone is too hard, they will pass. But a stubborn temperament may go at it with the risk of teeth-breaking and choking. Of course, a tiny dog, given a large pork bone, can only nibble at it.

Are Bones Good Sources of Calcium?

    Bones are often contaminated with lead and arsenic.
    Bones are often contaminated with lead and arsenic.

    Richard H. Pitcairn, a natural nutrition authority for dogs and cats, author of "New Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats," says that all cattle and pork bones can be sources of toxic minerals, such as lead and arsenic Also, bones are too high in phosphorus to counterbalance the high content of this mineral in meat and grains.

Facts About Inbred Pitbulls

Facts About Inbred Pitbulls

Inbreeding -- the practice of breeding closely related family members to each other -- is a method that has been practiced for centuries as it is thought to concentrate the best genetics of the family line into each litter of puppies. It isn't without consequences, however, and has recently become more and more frowned upon, which is especially the case with pit bulls, a dog that human irresponsibility has given a persistently bad reputation.

Why It's Done

    When breeding any type of dog, there are several terms that are often thrown around. Inbreeding is the practice of breeding very closely related dogs in an attempt to bring out the best qualities in the offspring, which means encouraging mating pairs that are brother and sister or parents to children. Line breeding is another type of inbreeding, in which dogs with a common relative are bred -- such as grandparents to their grandchildren or nieces and nephews to their aunts and uncles.

    When breeding pit bulls, these are dogs that are often bred with a very specific ideal in mind. The desirable -- and most expensive -- pit bulls are those that are heavily muscled, strong and athletic. Dogs are also bred for colors; blue pit bulls are a genetic rarity but a popular color, and some breeders will breed blue siblings to get more blue puppies.

Health Problems

    While some breeders decide to get their puppies by practices of inbreeding to enhance the desirable traits in the dog, this also has the chance of magnifying health issues as well. As a breed, pit bulls are very susceptible to developing a condition known as hip displasia. This degenerative disease begins to manifest itself when the dog is as young as four months and results in extreme pain, lameness, weakness and arthritis. An inherited disease, breeding pit bulls with siblings can increase the chances that the offspring will inherit the genetic makeup and bone structure that will result in this debilitating disease. Similarly, other genetic conditions that the pit bull is susceptible to can be magnified by inbreeding, including the development of hereditary cataracts, skin conditions, heart disease and allergies.

Mental Stability

    A mental element is also inherent to the dangers of inbreeding pit bulls. Healthy, well-adjusted and well-bred pit bulls are known for being eager to please and devoted to their owners and families as well as being friendly but protective of their families if they are aware something is wrong. Dogs that have been inbred show few of these traits, and mental illness is common in puppies with closely related parents. These inbred dogs are difficult to train and are potentially dangerous; unfortunately these traits often come out after they have been purchased from a breeder and taken home. A genetic defect that results in mental illness also has the tendency to skip a few generations, so if a puppy with the condition is bred, it may become much more severe several generations later.

Consequences

    After years of being raised as a fighting dog and after countless news stories vilifying the pit bull, they have earned the designation of being one of the most feared of the bully breeds. In many areas, owning a pit bull is illegal because of this image that has been created by years of irresponsible breeding and ownership. Breed specific laws are created to manage a perceived threat that comes from a particular breed of dog, and often these include pit bulls. Inbreeding dogs can create puppies that are destined for a lifetime of pain, and dogs that are in pain are more likely to snap or bite. The breeding of unstable dogs also does nothing but result in more incidents and increased fear of a breed that, when bred correctly, can be a loving family pet.