Rabu, 30 November 2011

How to Get Pet Insurance for a Bulldog

How to Get Pet Insurance for a Bulldog

Almost 75 percent of pet insurance claims arent for accidents like swallowing a scruffy ball. Theyre for serious illnesses such as cancer, eye or stomach operations--three things that many bulldogs are prone to suffer from. If you take into account a typical visit to the vet, the cost runs on average $30 to $100 for just the first visit. With follow-up care plus medication, the cost of health care for your bulldog can quickly add up. Insurance can save you a pretty penny, while giving you peace of mind.

Instructions

    1

    Talk with your vet to find out if he has any recommendations. Vets and their staff are likely to be able to give you reliable references, along with contact information.

    2

    Take into account the special health conditions unique to bulldogs, and shop for a policy that will cover these conditions. The unique shape of their faces and small windpipes make them more prone to respiratory and even heart problems. Their short hair makes them vulnerable to skin problems (from a few pimples to eczema), and their top-heavy bodies cause complications with their digestive systems.

    3

    Get price quotes and compare costs and benefits. The average insurance cost for a bulldog is between $25 and $50 per month, and some plans have a yearly deductible of $125. Bulldogs are usually slower to mature and quicker to age, and the costs can be a bit higher than other dogs. It also depends on their age and health when you sign up.

    4

    Search for an all-inclusive policy: preventative care, dental care, neutering or spaying, check-ups, and of course accidents and illnesses. Many offer several coverage packages allowing you to customize your bulldog's plan and add coverage for such things as cancer.

    5

    Carefully read through the exclusions. A lot of companies wont cover pre-existing conditions. It is very common for the provider to exclude coverage for problems that are considered genetic or inherent in the particular breed (skin fold dermatitis in bulldogs, for example).

    6

    Take note of waiting periods in a policy. The waiting period can be from 3 weeks to over 6 months before the policy is activated, and a lot can happen to your bulldog in 6 months.

    7

    Remember that in any policy, you have to pay the vet up-front and send an invoice to the company for reimbursement after.

Recommended Dog Foods for Rottweilers

The Rottweiler is a member of the American Kennel Club's (AKC) working group of dogs, a collection of breeds that for centuries have served people as draft animals and guard dogs. The Rottweiler is a big, powerfully built dog originally bred to herd and guard other animals and property. A high-quality diet will keep your Rottie looking and feeling great.

Characteristics

    According to the breed standard established by the AKC, an adult male Rottweiler can stand 27 inches high at the shoulder, with a deep chest that should measure a full 50 percent of the animal's height, and may weigh as much as 110 lbs. The bulging muscles, sleek, black coat and characteristic tan markings on the face, chest and feet make the Rottweiler look compact and energetic. Rotties generally are healthy animals, but common illnesses and conditions include hip displaysia, eye problems and cancer.

Dietary Needs

    This big working dog needs a diet that will provide adequate protein and fat to keep his muscle mass and coat in good shape, sufficient calcium and other minerals to protect his joints and skeletal system, and a reasonable caloric count to help him maintain a healthy weight. A dog food that includes a judicious blend of meat, vegetables, fruits and grains will fill the bill.

How Much to Feed

    In a document endorsed by the American Rottweiler Club, Dr. Tony Buffington recommends feeding Rotties between 1 and 10 years old dry food that amounts to about 1,200 calories daily, with a minimum of 60 g of protein. The label on your bag of dog food will tell you the calorie count per cup.
    The simplest way to determine how much food your dog needs is to measure the food before you feed, and keep a close eye on your dog's body condition. A body condition scoring chart, which your vet can provide and explain to you, will help you make sure your dog is getting enough food to keep her healthy and alert, without packing on excess weight.

What the Dog Food Label Tells You

    To find out whether your dog food is delivering good quality nutrition, read the label---usually it's on the back of the bag. Look at the Guaranteed Analysis to see what nutrients a serving of the food will give your pet, and in what proportions.
    According to the Pet Center, an online animal health website, minimum acceptable nutritional levels are 30 percent for protein and 18 percent for fat. Preservatives should be naturally occurring, like vitamins E and C, and it's also important that the food contains some Omega-3 fatty acids.
    The Pet Center strongly recommends a mainly meat-based diet for dogs, though not one composed only of meat.

What Are Problems to Look for When Buying a Havanese Puppy?

What Are Problems to Look for When Buying a Havanese Puppy?

Although the Dog Breed Info Center reports Havanese dogs are growing in popularity as of 2011, the Cuban breed would have gone extinct had it not been for the efforts of U.S. breeder Dorothy Goodale. During the 1970s, she placed newspaper ads and acquired 11 Havanese dogs from Cuban immigrants and successfully revived the dying breed. Since then, the Havanese breed has been recognized by the United Kennel Club and American Kennel Club, and gained fame among professional breeders and dog lovers. If you are considering adding a Havanese puppy to your family, look for common health and behavioral problems.

Reputable Breeders

    Reputable Havanese breeders willingly provide important documents such as health certificates and American Kennel Club registration papers. You should receive a written guarantee that allows you to take your new puppy to a veterinary. If the vet visit reveals any serious health issues, you are entitled to a full refund if you return the puppy. The breeder's home should be clean. Puppies living in filth are likely to suffer health problems. The breeder should allow you to handle the puppies and meet the parents. Finally, try to find references for the breeder.

Common Health Problems

    Some health problems among Havanese puppies are easily observable. Although puppies sleep a lot, they should be active and energetic when awake. Lethargy signifies serious health problems. Noses and eyes should be free of mucus, a common symptom of infections. Puppies suffering from bloody diarrhea or vomiting may have parvovirus. Unless the puppies have just eaten, the stomachs should not look bloated. Bloating is usually caused by worms.

Behavior Problems

    Havanese puppies that have been properly socialized are not fearful or timid, explains the Dog Breed Info Center. They should enjoy being handled and played with. Havanese puppies need to experience new people, places and other animals. Without this, puppies often develop aggression and improper urination as they age. When socialized, the Havanese breed is generally friendly and loyal.

Congenital Problems

    Havanese dogs are a generally healthy bred. Unfortunately, some suffer from congenial problems that cannot be diagnosed until the dog is more than a year old. These include eye disease, kneecap deformities, cardiac problems, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia and hip blood flow issues. AKC-registered Havanese breeding dogs will have had tests performed for these problems. Your breeder should verify that your puppy's parents have undergone these tests.

Rottweiler Dogs History, Temperament and Care

Rottweiler Dogs History, Temperament and Care

The Rottweiler breed is described by the American Kennel Club as a robust and powerful breed that loves to work. If you are fascinated by this dog breed and are considering owning one, you might want to inform yourself about the history, temperament and requirements of this dog.

Identification

    Rottweilers have distinct black and rust markings.
    Rottweilers have distinct black and rust markings.

    The Rottweiler breed is a molosser type of dog originating from the Tibetan Mastiff. The American Kennel Club categorizes this breed as a working dog. The prototypical Rottweiler is a medium-to-large dog with a compact body and a black coat featuring clearly defined mahogany or rust markings.

History

    The Rottweiler's ancestors were drover dogs, herding and protecting the cattle that accompanied the Romans during their invasion in Europe. The breed later nearly became extinct, with the banning of driving cattle over roads. In the early 1900s, a Rottweiler club was established and a breed standard was created.

Temperament

    Rottweilers are intelligent, highly adaptable dogs.
    Rottweilers are intelligent, highly adaptable dogs.

    The American Kennel club describes the breed as a calm, confident and courageous dog. Equipped with has a strong desire to protect the home and family, the breed may act a aloof toward strangers. Intelligent and highly adaptable, Rottweilers are eager to work and can make good all-purpose dogs.

Care

    Rottweilers require daily exercise and mental stimulation.
    Rottweilers require daily exercise and mental stimulation.

    Owners of Rottweilers must ensure their dogs are well socialized from an early age and undergo obedience training. Being a working dog, Rottweilers require daily exercise and lots of mental stimulation. Because of the characteristics of their coat, minimal grooming is required.

Characteristics & Care of the Bichon Frise

Characteristics & Care of the Bichon Frise

The bichon frise breed has been around for centuries, traced back to the 13th century as a descendant of the water spaniel, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC). Since then, the breed has been traded by sailors, been a favorite of French royal courts and has even performed as a circus dog. Today, the bichon frise is a well loved, easily recognized companion dog.

Physical Characteristics

    Physically, the bichon frise is a small breed of dog, notably "sturdy" according to the AKC. They feature a white double coat that is often referred to as puffy or cotton-like. The coat is curled with a textured outer layer and a silky under layer. Thanks to this coat, the bichon frise sheds very little --- making it an ideal breed for allergy sufferers. Also, though the coat is generally white, there may be additional coloring around the ears or on the body in shades of apricot, buff or cream.

Breed Characteristics

    Bichons are described by the AKC as a "naturally gentle, playful dog." The breed is known for having a happy temperament, making them good for families with or without children. They are social dogs who enjoy the company of other pets and humans. The bichon frise's intelligence makes it an easy to train dog that is described as competitive, obedient, making a great watchdog or even for teaching and performing tricks.

Caring for Bichon Puppies

    As with any new puppy, it is extremely important to provide a safe environment. This means removing anything that the puppy may chew on including electrical cords, throw rugs or house plants. Consider using child gates to contain the puppy in a room where he can be watched throughout the day until he adjusts to his new home and has been reasonably potty trained. The Bichon Frise Club of America also notes that bichon puppies are often guilty of eating their own feces, so preventing this by picking up feces immediately is important.

Health Conditions

    There are many health issues affecting the bichon frise breed. Some of the most common include skin issues, allergies, eye or dental diseases, bladder infections, bladder stones, liver disease, cardiac disease and metabolic diseases such as diabetes. Some bichons may also be prone to gastrointestinal problems, which can result in chronic vomiting or diarrhea. That being said, it is important for bichon frises to receive regular veterinary checkups to catch and treat any of these conditions should they occur.

Grooming

    The fur coat of the bichon frise does not shed, but rather grows continually. Therefore, regular and extensive grooming is regarded to prevent matting. The bichon frise should be bathed on a monthly basis and professional grooming is recommended. The eye area in particular requires extensive cleaning to prevent tear stains. Trimming should be done around the eyes and ears, though electric clippers may be used throughout the body.

Difference Between American & German Boxers

Difference Between American & German Boxers

Boxer dogs were introduced to the US after returning soldiers brought some home from Europe after World War II. The medium-sized dogs are now the sixth-most popular breed in America. Although some people maintain that the Boxer breed is essentially the same around the world, there are some subtle differences between the German Boxer and the American Boxer.

Size

    The main difference between an American and German Boxer dog is the size. Although they are both categorized as "medium build," there are subtle differences in size and shape. In terms of length, generally, American adult males measure between 23 to 26 inches and weigh between 30 to 32kg. Whereas German Boxer adult males are more compact and measure between 21 to 24 inches and are heavier at 31 to 33kg.

Appearance

    The American Boxer is known to be more refined and sleek than its German counterpart. The German breed is stockier and is of a more sturdy, compact square build. Both breeds are smooth coated with well-developed muscles that appear smooth under taut skin. American Boxers have a chiseled head with a narrow, blunt muzzle. Whereas the German Boxer's head is broad and in proportion to the rest of its stocky compact figure.

Temperament

    Boxers were originally developed in Germany to serve as guard dogs. However, both the American and German breeds are very energetic and playful in a domestic setting. They are naturally suspicious of strangers, which aids the function of security, but their general temperament is friendly and both breeds are commonly chosen for a companion dog function. Boxers are known to be very loyal. They are also stoical and patient with children.

Color

    The tradition color of a German Boxer is fawn or brindle, although notes of mahogany tones are the most attractive shades. American Boxers are often a darker shade of fawn, however they can vary from light tan to mahogany. The brindle variety of German Boxers tend to have a black mask, with dark or black stripes running parallel to the ribs. American Boxers also have similar markings in black or dark brown. White markings may also be present in the coat of American and German Boxers.

Yorkie Terrier Behavior

Yorkie Terrier Behavior

Yorkshire Terriers, often just called Yorkies, are popular pets due to their small size and sweet nature. Yorkies are among the smallest dog breeds and do well in apartments or small homes.

Temperament

    Yorkies are generally happy and intelligent dogs. They are friendly and love to play with their owners. Yorkies require a lot of exercise as they are extremely energetic for their small size.

Sleeping

    All dogs require a lot of sleep, but Yorkshire Terriers may sleep 13 or more hours a day. It is not uncommon for some dogs to sleep for 17 hours.

Excitability

    Yorkies are easily excitable. They can have issues with urinating when over-stimulated and often hyperventilate. These issues may be reduced with behavior modification.

Rolling in Grass

    Yorkie Terriers love to roll in the grass. This is an instinct, but excessive rolling may indicate a medical problem.

Digging

    Many Yorkies love to dig. This may cause a problem if your dog is destroying your yard or garden. Training can reduce cases of excessive digging.

Selasa, 29 November 2011

How to Identify a Pomeranian

How to Identify a Pomeranian

The Pomeranian is an extroverted and very intelligent breed. Eager to learn and with a good spirit, it is a good family dog. It can be temperamental, but if properly socialized when young, will get along with other dogs and household pets. Even though this is a small dog, the owner must be careful not to spoil this breed. The owner must let the Pomeranian know who is boss, or this little guy will own the household.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the general appearance of the Pomeranian. It is a compact dog, weighing 3 to 7 lbs. and is shorter than it is tall. Though small, the Pomeranian is medium-boned and quite sturdy.

    2

    Make sure the head is proportionate with the rest of the body. The short muzzle lends to an alert, fox-like expression. The dark, bright eyes are medium-sized and almond-shaped, set deep into the skull. The nose is black and fully pigmented.

    3

    Check that the short neck is well-set into the shoulders. This will allow a high carriage of the head. The well-angulated shoulders are moderately muscled and lead to straight legs and compact, arched feet. The rear angulates to match the front angulation. The thighs are moderate in muscle and have well-defined stifles. The rear feet are arched and compact.

    4

    Pet the double coat. The outer coat hair is straight and harsh. The undercoat is soft and dense, holding the outer coat off the Pomeranians body. The forequarters are very well-feathered. A frill is formed around the neck and front part of the shoulders. The Pomeranian can be any pattern and any color, but the common colors are black and tan, brindle and parti-colored.

What Would Cause Shaking in Yorkies?

What Would Cause Shaking in Yorkies?

For Yorkshire terrier owners, also known as Yorkies, their pooches are their whole world. Despite their Napolean complexes (a big personality in a little dog), Yorkies are playful, loyal and highly intelligent dogs. Yet they sometimes do things to scare their owners. Though the first time you see your Yorkie shaking might cause you to panic, there may be a myriad possible explanations.

History

    Yorkies are descendants of the waterside terriers that accompanied Scottish weavers in their migration from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century, reports the American Kennel Club. Despite all of the pampering that they seem to demand, Yorkies have humble beginnings as rat catchers for their working-class weavers. It was popular myth that "the dogs' fine, silky coats were the ultimate product of the looms." Eventually, Yorkies would leave the all-too-exhausting rat race for finer English society.

Cold

    Their rise to prominent English society should not come as a surprise, because Yorkies have fine features that merit a pedigree. One of the most recognizable features is their coat. Unlike other dogs, Yorkies have no undercoat; incidentally, their hair closely resembles that of humans. This missing undercoat means they are less likely to shed and won't give humans allergies. In other words, they are hypoallergenic dogs. However, this means Yorkies are often more sensitive to the cold than other dogs. They could be shaking from being cold or wet.

Emotions

    Even though Yorkies seek warmth as much as possible, there's no warmth that can compare to that of their humans. Yorkies are very needy dogs that love to be around their family. Many Yorkies have been diagnosed with separation anxiety that can result in unwavering shaking. More generally, Yorkies are sensitive dogs with a range of emotions that can cause shaking. Yorkies might shake because they are happy to see you, excited to go on a walk, jealous that you pay more attention to the cat or just scared.

Hypoglycemia

    Yorkies are also prone to a medical condition that can cause them to shake - hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia, or the fast drop of blood sugar, is most common in Yorkies from birth to 4 months. Hypoglycemia can be caused by stress, lack of nutrients and even being the runt of the litter. Apart from shaking, Yorkies will exhibit other symptoms like drowsiness, seizures or fatigue. Shaking accompanied by other unusual symptoms, such as vomiting, warrant immediate medical attention.

The Best Dry Food for Retired Greyhounds

Adopting a retired racing greyhound is a great way to save a wonderful dog while gaining a lifelong companion. Families who are planning to adopt an ex-racer frequently have a lot of questions, including what type of food to feed their new companions. Fortunately, keeping a greyhound in tip-top shape is not difficult -- or expensive.

Food considerations

    The good news is that retired racing greyhounds do not require special diets or expensive foods. In fact, greyhounds will thrive on a good dry food, and that food does not have to be expensive. Greyhound adoption organizations recommend that greyhounds be fed a diet of dry food, and not more costly canned food, once they have left the track and settled into life as a pampered pet.

    That is because the nutrient-dense soft food greyhounds eat during their racing career can be very hard on their teeth. Switching the retired greyhound to a crunchy dry food will help mitigate the damage and prevent further erosion of the tooth enamel.

Which brand is best

    Every dog owner has his or her favorite brand of food. If you already have a dog that is thriving on the dry food of your choice, chances are your new family member will do just as well. An ongoing survey of greyhound owners at Greytalk.com found that food choices were all over the board. The food choices listed on the survey ranged from the most inexpensive store brands to the most costly specialty brands. This survey began in October 2005, but new greyhound owners continue to weigh in on their favorite brands of dog food. These survey results seem to bear out the idea that retired racing greyhounds adapt quite well to their new dry food diet. Greyhound lovers who want to keep track of the ongoing survey results can check them out at http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php?showtopic=202031.

    Although no one brand had an overwhelming majority, a good number of greyhound owners reported feeding their dogs Kirkland brand food, followed closely by the specialty Canidae brand. Other popular choices among greyhound owners included Nutro, Purina ProPlan and Iams.

Other considerations

    Although the majority of retired racing greyhounds do quite well on traditional dry foods, some dogs have special digestive needs. Retired racers can sometimes be a bit nervous until they settle in to their new surroundings, and that nervousness may manifest itself in digestive problems. Dogs with sensitive stomachs may benefit from diet dog foods and food designed for senior dogs. These specialty foods are lower in fat and higher in fiber than traditional dog food formulas, making them a good choice for dogs with sensitive stomachs. Fit and Trim, Nutro Weight Control and Iams Senior are all good choices.

What Is the Lifespan of a Boxer Breed?

Boxers originated in Germany in the 19th century for fighting and hunting large game. They started gaining popularity in the United States in the 1930s due to their gentle nature and good looks.

Physical Characteristics

    Sturdily built, boxers are strong and muscular. They are medium-sized dogs, standing 21 to 25 inches at the shoulders. Their active nature means they need lots of exercise to stay healthy.

Temperament

    Boxers are intelligent and affectionate dogs that are loyal to their family. Usually very good with children, boxers are patient and fun-loving.

Common Maladies

    Boxers are susceptible to tumors, cardiomyopathy, and hip dysplasia. Any of these or other conditions can shorten a dog's life.

Average Lifespan

    On average, boxers live 8 to 12 years, but as with all pets this can vary based on specific health conditions and level of care.

Outdoors

    Boxers are not suited to living exclusively outside due to their short coat that makes them susceptible to cold weather, and due to their need to be close to people, which can cause them to escape their yard and become seriously injured or even killed by cars or other animals.

How to Identify a Central Asian Shepherd Dog

How to Identify a Central Asian Shepherd Dog

The Central Asian Shepherd Dog can be found in the areas of Russia, Iran, Afghanistan and Siberia. They are a cold weather, high altitude, working breed that has accompanied and protected the nomadic tribesmen of the steppes as well as their herds for centuries. The exact origins of this dog are unknown, but it is possible the Tibetan Mastiff is one of its ancestors. Though the dog bears a striking similarity in function and appearance to the Caucasian Ovtcharka they are not related. It is unfortunate that the breed is beginning to lose popularity in Russia over the Caucasian Ovtcharka, which has been properly domesticated for daily life for more than six decades now. Recently the breed has been shipped to the USA and, though still rare to see, is gaining favor.

Instructions

    1

    Start by judging the dogs weight and size as well as taking note of any physical features. A Central Asian Shepherd Dog can stand from 27 to 32 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 100 and 170 pounds. Do not discount larger dogs though; this breed has been known to grow far larger, though this is not the norm. The body should be noticeably longer than it is tall, with very thick bones, wide shoulders, deep chest, and a very well developed musculature. The breed is commonly found to have a docked tail, but naturally the tail is long, curved, feathery, and always held high.

    2

    Look at the dogs fur. Depending on the time of year the dog will have one of two kinds of coat. In the summer it will be roughly 1.5 inches long. This will be replaced by a 3 inch long coat in winter. Central Asian Shepherd Dogs comes in many different colors, including white, black, gray, straw, red-brown and gray-brown.

    3

    Finish by examining the dogs head and face. The ears are commonly docked but in their natural state they are long, curved at the tips, and hang down the sides of the dogs head. The eyes are dark and well recessed. The skull itself is very large and triangular in shape. The dog will have loose rolls of skin across much of the face and neck which were originally used to protect its head from extremely cold temperatures. This and one other trait is very telling. The forehead should form a flat plane all the way to the tip of the dogs nose. There is no dip defining the muzzle from the skull on this breed.

How to Care for a Rottweiler Puppy

How to Care for a Rottweiler Puppy

Rottweilers or Rotties have gained a bad reputation for viciousness that they do not deserve. But because of this public perception, many areas such as New York City public housing ban Rottweilers. Be sure to check your local laws before bringing home a Rottweiler puppy. Rottweiler puppies need to begin training and socialization as soon as possible because they grow into 155 to 130 pound dogs and are very strong. They were bred to be so large and imposing in order to herd and move cattle and then became guard dogs, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs."

Instructions

    1

    Teach the Rottweiler puppy to sit. This is the basic command that will help in more complicated commands later on in life. Puppies follow their noses. Show the Rottie its food bowl at the puppy's nose height. Raise the bowl over the puppy's head and slightly towards the back. The puppy will sit in trying to follow the bowl as you say "sit." Praise and immediately give food reward. Repeat a few times a day.

    2

    Take the Rottweiler to visit the veterinarian regularly. If the puppy's tail has been docked, check to see that the stump is not developing sores, called tail dock neuroma. Rottweilers are especially prone to catching the parvo virus, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs," so do not miss any parvo inoculations. Rottweiler puppies also bolt down food. They need to be supervised at least an hour after they eat a meal because Rottweilers are prone to a potentially deadly condition called bloat or "twisted stomach." If the puppy begins to retch but not vomit, has a swollen abdomen, drools and becomes very restless, get the puppy to a vet immediately.

    3

    Socialize your Rottie. A Rottweiler that is scared may bite, and need to attend puppy obedience classes. This will help the Rottweiler learn basic obedience skills in getting along with other dogs and strange people. While the Rottie is small, introduce the puppy to different situations such as riding in a car, listening to a vacuum cleaner run and watching children play. This gets the Rottie used to different situations.

    4

    Keep the Rottie puppy exercised. Walk the puppy with a collar and lead for at least a half hour a day or until the puppy begins panting. If the puppy pulls to the point where it is choking, use a chest harness instead. Play with the puppy in a fenced in yard so that the puppy gets to run. Keeping it exercised will keep the puppy healthy and help take away any excess energy that could discourage training sessions. A bored Rottie puppy with lots of energy could develop chewing problems.

How to Care For A Redbone Coonhound

How to Care For A Redbone Coonhound

Redbone coonhounds are a joy to own. Made famous by the book (and now movie) Where The Red Fern Grows. This breed has virtually ZERO breed specific health issues, is great with kids, highly trainable and has tons of heart that is eager to please.

One of 6 coonhound breeds, the Redbone is most commonly referred to even by owners of the other 5 coonhound breeds as the most attractive of all the coonhound types.

Caring for a Redbone Coonhound is easy but there are certain things that you should know in order to make your ownership of one more enjoyable.

Instructions

    1
    Redbone Coonhound Puppy

    First, be sure that you obtain your Redbone Coonhound from a reputable breeder who places emphasis on breeding for genetic health, superior temperaments, breed type and hunting ability.

    2
    Redbone Coonhound Puppy

    Once you have your puppy, be sure the puppy is kept up to date on vaccinations and wormings. If you purchased your puppy from a reputable breeder, your puppy will have come to you with at least one set of shots already but they will need a series of 3 at about 3-4 wks apart in order to be properly protected.

    3
    Redbone Coonhound

    From day one of your relationship with a redbone coonhound, you need to monitor their ears. No, not just in how irresistibly cute the long floppy ears are but how healthy the insides of them are. All dogs with long, floppy ears are at higher risk for ear infections due to the dark, damp conditions with limited air circulation created by it's very design. However, it's easy to keep tabs on and there are many commercially available ear cleaners available out there as well as some nice homemade recipes to make your own - just be sure to research the ingredients or get it from a reputable coonhound fancier.

    4
    Redbone  Coonhound

    Keep your redbone coonhound in a fenced in yard when not involved in some other activity such as hunting. There is an old saying for coonhounds which is "When the nose is open, the ears are shut." Being a scenthound, this saying has validity.

    5
    Redbone Coonhounds training to hunt

    Understand that a redbone coonhound is a hunting breed. Having one may cause your cat, ferret, pet bunny or other similar pets to be chased or worse. These encounters or friendships should be monitored.

Are Eggs Healthy for Dogs?

Are Eggs Healthy for Dogs?

Information on Miniature Collie Dogs

Information on Miniature Collie Dogs

The term "miniature collie" is often mistakenly used to describe the Shetland sheepdog. These dogs are often referred to as "miniature collies," "miniature Lassies" and "toy collies." Potential owners who are looking to adopt a Shetland sheepdog should do thorough research on the breed to ensure they have chosen the best breed for themselves or their family.

Identification

    Shetland sheepdogs are small dogs that are nearly identical in appearance to a collie, which is likely where the misconception about the breed name came from. The American Kennel Club (AKC) website says that the standard Sheltie size is anywhere from 13 to 16 inches in height, with a weight between 14 and 27 lbs. However, as expected, not all Shelties will fall within these guidelines. The fur of the Sheltie can range from sable, bi-black, tri-color and blue merle. Shelties with a full white coat or mostly white coat are the result of blue merle Shelties bred together, which should not be done as it results in deafness, blindness, or both.

History

    The collie and the Shetland sheepdog are both descendants of the border collie. To create the Sheltie, the border collie and a small breed of dog known as the Yakkin, were bred together. By the 1700s, the Shetland sheepdog had come into existence. Shelties were specifically bred to protect and herd sheep on the Shetland Islands. By 1909, this breed was officially recognized in England. By 1911, it was also recognized by the AKC.

Temperament

    Shelties are loyal breeds that are ideal as companion dogs or for families. These dogs require early socialization with different people and children of ages to prevent behavioral issues later in life. Shetland sheepdogs are considered to be the sixth smartest dog in the world and are easily trained. Shelties are also good guard dogs and will sound off at any intruders or unusual noises within the home. Some Shelties may be more reserved toward strangers, but with proper socialization, they will quickly warm up to guests who are visiting their home. Unwanted traits in a Sheltie may include timidness, nervousness, excessive shyness, stubbornness or a general ill-tempered manner.

Health and Lifestyle

    Shetland sheepdogs require regular exercise and can live in any type of housing--including apartment living--as long as daily exercise is given. These dogs are a generally healthy breed, although they may suffer from certain diseases, such as collie eye anomaly, hypothyroidism or issues with displacement of the kneecap. Shelties are also known to gain weight easily if overfed. An owner can expect her Sheltie to live up to 15 years or more if properly cared for.

Grooming

    Shelties require regular grooming to prevent matting of their fur. Their long fur coat is a double coat, meaning that there is a dense undercoat accompanied by a long, protective overcoat. The undercoat sheds twice annually--once in the spring and again in the fall. However, their coat protects well against water, dirt and mud; so grooming is much easier than expected and regular bathing is minimal.

How to Find Labrador Retriever Puppies in Oklahoma

How to Find Labrador Retriever Puppies in Oklahoma

Labrador Retrievers are the most popular dog breed in the United States, the American Kennel Club reports. The dogs are gentle, family friendly, intelligent and easy to please. Originating in Canada, this sporting breed comes in the colors chocolate, yellow and black. If you are looking for a Labrador Retriever puppy in Oklahoma, you may contact either a reputable breeder or a Labrador Retriever rescue organization.

Instructions

    1

    Access the doggies.com website, which provides a free Labrador Retriever Breeders Directory search engine with listings of dog breeders by ZIP code.

    2

    Type your ZIP code in the box provided, then click on the "Fetch" button.

    3

    Write down the contact information for the Labrador Retriever breeders near your ZIP code.

    4

    Visit potential breeders and make sure that they are reputable, responsible and knowledgeable. You can filter breeders by asking for referrals from a local veterinarian. You can also consult the breeder checklist provided by the American Humane Society to make sure that the breeder meets its minimum requirements.

    5

    Contact a volunteer at Lab Rescue Oklahoma via email at president@labrescue.net. You can also visit the organization's website at www.labrescue.net. Lab Rescue Oklahoma is a not-for-profit organization that helps facilitate the rescue of Labrador Retrievers throughout Oklahoma. Their website has a catalog, including pictures, of all available dogs.

Senin, 28 November 2011

List of Homemade Foods to Feed Dogs

List of Homemade Foods to Feed Dogs

Dog owners know that between the cost of vet bills, toys and food, it is easy to spend hundreds of dollars every year on a pet. While it isn't safe to skimp on visits to the vet, making dog food at home is a great way to cut costs. Homemade dog food also can be healthier than commercial varieties.

Dog Biscuits

    It is always nice to have treats around to reward your dog, and homemade dog biscuits are less expensive than store-bought alternatives. You can make treats that your dog will love with ingredients most people already have in the pantry. Make a simple dough by combining 1 cup flour, 2 cups oatmeal, 1/2 cups wheat flour, 1/4 cup olive oil, 3 tsp. honey, 1 egg and 1 cup chicken or beef broth. Roll out the dough to 1/2-inch thickness, and then cut out the biscuits using cookie cutters. Dog-bone cookie cutters are available in most pet stores. Bake the biscuits for two hours at 300 degrees Fahrenheit, then allow the biscuits to cool until they are completely hardened. Your dog will love the taste of these biscuits, and the olive oil and egg will add sheen to its coat.

Chicken and Rice

    Just like humans, dogs benefit from a variety of different foods including meats, grains and vegetables. It is easy to make a large batch of chicken and rice to serve to your dog over the course of a few days. Simply boil chicken and vegetables of your choice until thoroughly cooked, then drain being sure to save some of the leftover broth. You can use any vegetables that your dog likes. Meanwhile, cook white rice without adding any seasoning to it. Allow everything to cool, then combine the rice, chicken, vegetables and some of the reserved broth in a bowl and serve it to your dog. To add variety to this meal, think about preparing different vegetables or using turkey instead of chicken.

Meat Cakes

    These meat cakes are versatile and are easy to make with the ingredients you have on hand. Cook about 1 1/2 cups of rice and set it aside to cool. Meanwhile, prepare the rest of your ingredients. The base of the meat cake is 6 lb. ground meat. You can use ground beef, chicken or turkey. Combine the ground meat with a variety of chopped vegetables. Use what you have on hand or your dog's favorites. Add 8 eggs, 1 1/2 cups of oats and 1/4 cup of olive oil to the meat and vegetable mixture, then combine with the cooked rice. Spoon the mixture into greased muffin tins, and then bake it for about 45 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Allow the meat cakes to cool completely before serving to your dog. Pop the leftover cakes out of the muffin tins and store them individually in plastic bags in the refrigerator or freezer.

How Do I Get a Service Dog Used to a Plane?

Service dogs are allowed on airplanes and passengers often fly with their service dogs close to them. Even if you have a service dog that has been trained by specialists, he might take some time to get used to certain things about flying. Tommy Thick, a service dog employee in Minneapolis, Minnesota, shares some hints for helping your service dog adjust.

Traveling

    Travel often with your service dog to get him used to being in a plane. A plane is an enclosed space that moves, so go with your service dog on buses, subway and in taxis to get him used to traveling in enclosed spaces.

Sitting

    Get your service dog used to being in rows of seats by going into similar situations. Take your dog to movies, plays and other places that require you to sit for long periods. Your dog already will know to sit next to you and wait for you to need anything or to get up, so you can have your dog practice taking a long flight by being in these situations with you.

Pressure

    Help your dog get used to the pressure of traveling in an airplane by taking him into situations where the pressure changes slightly. You can't mimic a plane exactly, says Tommy, but if you take your dog with you on elevators, he will learn that the different pressures in his ears are normal and will remember that experience when he gets on the plane.

Attitude

    Keep a good attitude, says Tommy. This is the most important thing when it comes to making sure that your service dog is ready to work with you on a plane. Your dog is trained to help you and he'll pick up your attitudes and feelings very quickly. As long as you have a positive attitude and let him know that everything is going just as it should go, you shouldn't have any issues with your service dog on airplanes.

How to Tell the Difference Between a Mastiff & a Bulldog

How to Tell the Difference Between a Mastiff & a Bulldog

The English bulldog is famous for its grumpy appearance and wrinkly skin, while an English mastiff stands as one of the largest dog breeds. The English Mastiff and English Bulldog share similar characteristics, such as color, a stocky appearance and facial features, but the two dogs have a lot of differences as well. A Mastiff is noticeably larger, and stands higher, whereas a bulldog is short and is closer to the ground.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the size of the dog. The most glaring physical difference between a mastiff and bulldog is their size. An adult female and male mastiff is typically between 140 to 160 pounds. Males are 31 to 34 inches tall and females are 27 to 29 inches tall. Conversely, the female bulldog generally weighs in at 40 to 45 pounds and the male weights 50 to 60 pounds.

    2

    Look at the ears. A mastiff's ears are V-shaped, while a bulldog's ears are rose shaped.

    3

    Examine the tail of the dog. A bulldog's tail is low set and small, while a mastiff's tail is high set and significantly longer.

    4

    Look at the dog's face. Although the mastiff and bulldog have similar facial features, the bulldog's jowls are larger and more pronounced with a turned-up jaw, while a mastiff has slightly smaller jowls and a lower hanging jaw.

    5

    Examine the dog's legs. A bulldog's legs are mostly bowed, with small, straight forelegs. A mastiff's legs are longer and straighter.

What Is the Difference in A Red Bloodhound & A Bluetick Hound?

What Is the Difference in A Red Bloodhound & A Bluetick Hound?

The red bloodhound is a color variation of the standard bloodhound breed, and like the bluetick coonhound is an excellent tracking and hunting dog. Both breeds are hard working animals that have been selectively bred for generations to produce desired traits. The two dogs are, however, markedly different in appearance and have differing origins. The bloodhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885; the bluetick is a more recent member being accepted in 2009.

History

    The two breeds both originate from Europe, the bloodhound being the older breed. Records of bloodhound-like dogs date back to the 3rd century A.D. Around the 12th century the dog began being selectively bred as a hunting breed in England. The bluetick descends from the French staghound, which was brought to the U.S. in the 18th century. George Washington was a noted owner of these French hounds. The French import was a slow tracker, so it was bred with local American hounds. The resulting cross-breeds were called English hounds and were either red or blue in variety. The breeders of blue dogs splintered off in the 1940s over disagreements on how the breed should progress and were renamed bluetick coonhounds. The red varieties maintained the English hound name.

Description

    The two breeds are both large, muscular dogs bred for endurance and as fast-moving trackers. The bloodhound tends to have a heavier, broader body type compared to the more slender bluetick and generally weighs 10 lbs. to 20 lbs. more on average. The bluetick's skin is tight to the body, unlike the bloodhound, which has large amounts of loose-sagging skin. The slender body type of the bluetick makes it slightly more agile than the bloodhound, which is more stout and solid.

Coat and Color

    The red bloodhound, as the name suggests, has a dark, reddish-colored coat. It is medium-length and dense to afford protection from undergrowth. The bluetick's coat is a dark blue base color with pale ticking or mottling all over. It also has a medium-length, coarse protective coat, but it tends to appear smoother than the bloodhound's.

Temperament

    The two breeds both exhibit a hard-working temperament and need to be kept active to avoid them becoming bored and problematic. The bloodhound has a slightly more amiable character, so if it is raised right and has a defined dominance structure it can be a family pet. The bluetick tends to be more geared to working and using its tracking instincts.

Minggu, 27 November 2011

About Dalmatian Dogs

About Dalmatian Dogs

Many people think of Dalmatians as the cute little spotted dogs from the Disney movies, but this dog breed has a rich history as a service animal, having been used to clear the way for horses and coaches of centuries ago, as guard dogs protecting the coach owner's property and even as carriers of messages and emergency supplies during WW II.

The Firehouse Dog

    Dalmatians were named for the Croatian city of Dalmatia and were first brought to Great Britain in the 18th century. They were bred by the first U.S. president, George Washington, and have a history in Colonial America, but it is unknown when they were brought over. They eventually became known as an unofficial firehouse mascot when they were used to chase rats out of firehouses and guide and calm horses on the way to fires. Some modern-day firehouses still keep them as pets.

Physical Characteristics

    The tell-tale black spots make adult Dalmatians easy to spot, but Dalmatian puppies are actually born with a purely white coat. They are short-haired dogs, but they do shed, so daily brushing may be necessary. They have long necks and thin, floppy ears that rest by the side of their heads. A full-grown male Dalmatian is anywhere from 50 to 65 pounds and 22 to 24 inches in height, while the female is 45 to 55 pounds and 19 to 22 inches long. They are considered mid-sized dogs and are muscular and strong.

Dalmatian Deafness

    Many Dalmatians actually cannot hear, with around 30 percent of them being completely deaf. Many Dalmatian owners report teaching their dogs sign language and training them that way. They are also prone to bladder stones, but for the most part are healthy dogs and live to be 14 years old, with some living to be 17 or 18.

Personality

    Dalmatians live up to the dog credo of man's best friend. They love human companionship, are always ready to for a walk or to play, and even suffer from separation anxiety when away from their owner. However, they can be aggressive toward other dog breeds and may not be the best choice if you have other pets in the house or are away from home often.

How to Take Good Care of a Chihuahua

How to Take Good Care of a Chihuahua

The chihuahua is a tiny but fearless dog with the tenacity of a terrier and the heart of a lion. These dogs, which originated in Mexico, seemingly have no concept of their compact size and are very protective of their owners. Chihuahuas tend to bond with one person in a family, and although they can be good with children, their size can make them easier to injure by accident. Chihuahuas don't require extensive care or exercise, and only the long coated version must be groomed. These are great dogs for people living alone or in apartments.

Instructions

    1

    Bring your chihuahua to the vet for regular checkups and vaccinations. Speak with your vet about flea preventative medications. Chihuahuas tend to develop allergies more than many other breeds, and fleas are a major cause of allergic reactions.

    2

    Talk to your vet about foods and frequency of feeding. If your chihuahua is a puppy, feed him several small meals throughout the day. Chihuahuas are prone to hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar. Always have a source of emergency sugar available in case of a hypoglycemic reaction. Oral glucose paste, available at your local pharmacy, can be used in case of a low sugar emergency.

    3

    Bathe and groom your chihuahua about once a month. Use conditioner after shampoo, to prevent dry skin. Be sure to use a hypoallergenic shampoo and conditioner and check for any signs of allergic reaction or skin irritation. Keep your chihuahuas ears clean and dry using canine ear cleaner and cotton balls. Check your dog's ears for redness or irritation, which can indicate allergies. Speak to your vet about maintaining your chihuahua's allergies and keeping your dog comfortable.

    4

    Brush your chihuahua's teeth regularly. Use a canine toothpaste and either a finger brush or dog toothbrush, available at your local pet supply store. Dental disease in dogs can lead to heart disease, and small breeds such as the chihuahua are more prone to tooth problems. Preventative dental care is always the best way to keep your dog healthy but there are also options for care if your chihuahua already has signs of periodontal disease. Talk to your vet about options for keeping your chihuahua's teeth healthy.

Sabtu, 26 November 2011

Facts on Golden Retrievers

Facts on Golden Retrievers

The Golden Retriever originated from the Scottish Highlands in the 1800s. The breed was developed from a mixture of varieties of retriever, spaniel and bloodhound. This is a versatile dog with many natural abilities. These include hunting and retrieving game, agility classes, obedience competitions and narcotics detection. Retrievers have also been trained successfully as seeing eye dogs for the blind and as helpers for the disabled. They also love water and swimming.

Appearance

    Robust, medium-sized dogs, Golden Retrievers have a distinctive appearance. However they can sometimes be confused with Golden Labradors due to their fairly similar looks. Golden Retrievers stand at around 23- to 25-inches tall at the shoulder, and weigh between 65 and 75 lbs. Females are generally slightly smaller than this. They have a water-repellent medium-length double coat of smooth hair, which can be either wavy or straight. It is usually a golden color, but can range from light cream to deep amber.

Temperament

    The temperament of this breed is one of the reasons they are such popular family dogs. Golden Retrievers are lovable, patient and affectionate dogs which are great with children. They are also very intelligent and eager to please, meaning they are easily trained and obedient. These dogs are friendly towards everyone they meet including other dogs, as they have little or no guarding instinct. They benefit from a strong and confident owner who will ensure they remain dominant and pack leader in the dog's eyes. Their hunting and retrieving instincts mean they like to play and fetch balls or other toys.

Health

    Purebred Golden Retrievers are prone to a number of genetic issues, including hip and elbow dysplasia, heart conditions and eye problems. Research has shown cancer to be the most common cause of death for this breed. They can also suffer quite badly from skin allergies which may need veterinary care. Golden Retrievers gain weight easily, so they must not be overfed.

More Facts

    Although this breed is very active and energetic, it can adapt to most living arrangements including apartments, providing it gets daily exercise. If the owner likes to run or cycle, the ideal thing would be to allow the dog to jog alongside, as this kind of brisk exercise is perfect for them. If a Golden Retriever is not kept occupied, both mentally and physically, it will easily become bored, and possibly destructive and hyperactive. The life expectancy of this breed is around 10 to 12 years.

How to Feed High-Protein Dog Food to Giant Breeds

Large dog breeds are susceptible to complications that are different than those experienced by other breeds. One prevalent problem in large dogs is hip dysplasia, which is caused by the rapid growth of the puppy. When feeding a large-breed dog, keep this in mind so you don't further his condition. Dogs do not need carbohydrates; they need protein to ensure a nutritional diet. Large dogs especially need a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet.

Instructions

    1

    Avoid feeding foods that are high in carbohydrates. Dog food makers use carbohydrates as a binding agent, but they do not add any nutritional value to the food; instead, they only add calories. For large-breed dogs, the higher calories create a weight issue that can add to hip and bone issues.

    2

    Increase the protein levels in the food. Dogs cannot have too much protein. Add to the protein in the food by combining it with eggs, meat and yogurt. Freeze chicken livers and give these as a treat instead of offering store-bought treats with little to no nutritional value.

    3

    Limit calcium in a dog's diet. Calcium is not shown to help with nutritional needs for dogs, and the calories would be better used by providing protein. Calcium has also been linked to various bone diseases in large-breed dogs.

    4

    Vary the protein. Varying the protein forms, such as beef and chicken, helps ensure that the dog's needs are being met. Variety also keeps the dog from getting bored with a food and not wanting to eat at all. When introducing varied foods, keep track of what you are offering in case any allergies occur.

How to Raise a Wolf-Husky Dog Breed

How to Raise a Wolf-Husky Dog Breed

A wolf husky is a type of wolf dog, or wolf hybrid, that is born when a wolf mates with a husky, most commonly a Siberian or Alaskan husky. Like all types of wolf dog, the wolf husky requires intense training and tireless supervision, and therefore is not the ideal pet for everyone. If you nevertheless decide to bring one of these canines into your home, you will need to exercise patience and authority, and raise the dog as its pack leader.

Instructions

    1

    Begin training your wolf husky as early as possible. Wolf hybrids require exhaustive obedience training, as you must constantly establish yourself as the pack leader. Use a firm and commanding voice to give instructions and use positive reinforcement, such as treats for good behavior. Wold hybrids respond enthusiastically to positive reinforcement but may become highly aggressive if you exhibit negative reinforcement.

    2

    Exercise your dog every day. Exercise should include at least one long walk or jog as well as additional time spent outdoors. The Siberian husky and the wolf both require constant activity and room to roam. Therefore, do not take lightly your animal's need for exercise. If you allow it to remain cooped up, it may become restless and destructive.

    3

    Watch your dog closely when in the presence of strangers and individuals outside your immediate family. As wolves are fierce pack animals, your wolf dog may show intense loyalty to your immediate family while behaving skittishly around strangers. Do not allow your wolf husky to interact with other people and animals without supervision. If you have a child, carefully monitor all interactions between the dog and the child as well.

    4

    Feed your wolf husky approximately two to two-and-a-half cups of a meat-based dog food every day. As the average wolf husky should reach 40 to 60 pounds, it will need at least two cups of food, preferably spread over two meals, with ample protein and calcium. Puppies under six months of age require twice as much food spread over three meals, to account for the energy, metabolism and growth.

    5

    Comb your dog's coat daily. Although different hybrid dogs take on different dominant characteristics, your Wolf Husky should have a thick coat. Since the husky sheds its coat heavily twice a year, you will need to maintain the fur with daily brushing. Use a firm wire brush for best results.

Facts About French Bulldogs

Facts About French Bulldogs

The French Bulldog was originally called a "Toy Bulldog" in the 19th century when a smaller version of the English bulldog was created. They eventually became more popular in France than in England, where they gained their current name, which stuck even when the breed went on to become an English show dog. They eventually made their way to the U.S., and in 1898, they were recognized by the American Kennel Club as a non-sporting dog.

Physical Characteristics

    The French Bulldog is a strong and stocky animal with a square head and pointed ears that stand erect on the head. Their coat is short and smooth and can be a variety of colors, including fawn and white, with spots that look black but are actually brindle. They grow to only be about 12 inches tall, with the smaller class of French Bulldog weighing around 22 pounds, and the larger class topping out at 28 pounds.

Playful Personality

    These lovable little dogs get along well with both people and other animals, including dogs. They are usually very happy and enthusiastic about life, without being loud. French Bulldogs are an affectionate breed, but also need solid training. Owners may find that training is a challenge, however, as these dogs become easily bored by repetition.

Health

    The French Bulldog is often has spinal disorders, as well as heart defects and eye problems. They also are prone to respiratory problems and larger "Frenchies" can easily become overheated and do better in cooler temperatures. The heads of puppies are so large that they often have to be delivered by Cesarean section. A daily walk of around 15 minutes keeps them healthy, but they are not typically outdoor dogs. The life expectancy for this breed is about 10-12 years.

Grooming and Lifestyle

    The short coat of the French Bulldog does not need much more than regular brushing, but they do shed, so beware. They do not need a yard to run around in and can be just as happy in an apartment as in a house, as long as they have the human companionship they crave.

How to Tell a Blue Pomeranian From a Black Pomeranian

How to Tell a Blue Pomeranian From a Black Pomeranian

Pomeranians are sweet, lively small dogs with big personalities and hearts to match. They also have lovable teddy-bear faces and long, thick double coats. Pom coats come in an impressive rainbow of colors, from black, brown and white to red, orange, sable, lavender and blue. Both blue and black Poms have silky, uniformly dark coats, and they can both have dark eyes and dark noses. In many ways, a blue Pom is nearly indistinguishable from a black Pom, but there are subtle differences that separate these similar yet distinctive colors.

Instructions

    1

    Check for uniform color. If you find patches of white, cream or other colors, your Pomeranian is not a true black or blue and may be classified as parti-colored.

    2

    Fan your fingers through your Pomeranian's coat, checking the color of the entire hair shaft. Sable-colored Poms often look black, but in reality their coats are brown or gray with black tips. This color classification is distinct from black or blue.

    3

    Check your Pom's nose. If the coat is uniformly dull black and the nose is blue or has some blue coloring, your dog is a blue Pomeranian. Black Poms have black noses.

How Do Pit Bull Puppies Get Big Muscles?

How Do Pit Bull Puppies Get Big Muscles?

Pit bull dogs have a reputation as big, aggressive, scary dogs, but nothing could be further from the truth. When properly cared for and trained, pit bull puppies are loyal and steadfast companions with gentle demeanors. Nothing about their appearance betrays their softer side: pit bulls are muscular and compact, but it doesn't happen overnight. Pit bull puppies gain muscle and size as they grow.

Genetics

    According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) "Complete Guide to Dogs," fully grown adult pit bulls weigh in between 50 and 70 pounds, most of it muscle. As a general rule, males weigh more than females and are more muscular. Since pit bulls are naturally muscular as defined by genetics, it doesn't take much for a pit bull puppy to get big muscles. For the most part, muscle growth happens on its own.

Diet and Exercise

    As with humans, muscle in pit bulls is built via exercise. Newborn puppies never fully rest, even while asleep. Muscles are constantly twitching and legs are moving. This is called active sleep and helps newborns build muscle tone and quality. Young pups play and run as a means of exploring the world and finding their skills and talents. Adult dogs exercise out of instinct to hunt or in search of a breeding partner. Dog owners should encourage exercise to help maintain a proper weight and stave off boredom that can lead to destructive behaviors. Running, agility exercises, pulling, packing and other active exercises help pit bull puppies gain muscle. A nutritionally complete diet is essential to a pit bull's well being and health. Protein is sometimes called the building block of muscle. The canine diet is naturally high in protein, ensuring enough available nutrients to build a fair amount of muscle.

Anabolic Steroids

    Dogs used for illegal fighting are sometimes injected with anabolic steroids to increase muscle growth. Anabolic steroids belong to a class of drugs called corticosteroids and mimic the effects of the hormone testosterone. Steroid use speeds up the process in which protein is converted into muscle. Steroid use is accompanied by an increase in aggressive behaviors and overproduction of the hormone cortisol, which in turn leads to fat gain and changes in body shape and condition. Because of the dangers these steroids pose to the dogs and potentially to those who come in contact with them, the use of anabolic steroids in pit bull dogs to increase muscle mass is highly unethical and inhumane. It is also illegal in some areas.

Considerations

    Pit bull dogs vary in shape and size just as humans do. Some dogs are naturally more muscular than others. Speak to a licensed veterinary professional if you feel your pit bull puppy is developing slowly or are concerned about its muscle mass. A nutritionally sound diet and plenty of exercise are the safest and most effective ways to encourage healthy muscle growth in your pit bull puppy. Although exercise is beneficial to your pit bull puppy, avoid strenuous training or exercise regimens for the first year and a half of life. During this time the puppy is still growing and any available energy should go towards growth. Engaging in strenuous exercise routines while a pit bull is still a puppy can lead to long-term issues including but not limited to malformation and chronic energy deficiency.

How to Raise Wolf Hybrids

How to Raise Wolf Hybrids

The term "wolf hybrid" is used to describe any animal that is part domestic dog and part wolf. The wolf blood may constitute over half of the animal's genetic makeup and brings with it some serious considerations. Wolves are larger and more aggressive than domestic dogs and are only suitable for homes that have adequate room and safety. To raise wolf hybrids, keep some guidelines in mind to keep the situation as safe as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Ensure that you have adequate room for wolf hybrids before you adopt them. Genetically, these animals require more space than domestic dogs. Ideally, they should be raised in large yards with several acres of space for exercising.

    2

    Take hybrid wolf puppies from their mother at 3 weeks of age before they gain the pack mentality or get too attached to the idea of the pack into which they were born.

    3

    Build a strong relationship with wolf hybrids immediately. These animals maintain playful attitudes until they're about 18 months old. During that time, you build your authority and gain their respect for the future. Spend as much time as you can with the wolf hybrid puppies so that they grow to know and trust you.

    4

    Train your wolf hybrid puppies as you would train domestic puppies, with some changes. Use a crate for house training, treats for rewards and mild punishment for discipline. Wolf hybrids are naturally smarter than domestic dogs and may learn more quickly. Conversely, they may challenge their owners and can become aggressive with harsh punishment.

Jumat, 25 November 2011

Characteristics of Fox Terriers

Characteristics of Fox Terriers

Although the fox terrier is now a relatively rare breed, reports DogTime, its history dates back to 17th century England. Originally bred to enter foxes' dens to flush the quarry out during fox hunts, the dogs possess a toughness and agility that have become their trademarks. Fox terriers have garnered more Best-in-Show awards at Westminster Kennel Club shows than any other breed, continues DogTime. The breed is divided into two groups, smooth fox terriers and wire fox terriers (referring to the texture of their coats).

Physical Characteristics

    Fox terriers love to eat and can easily become overweight, but the breed standard holds that mature males weigh about 17 to 19 lbs., with females at 15 to 17 lbs. Like other terriers, they have a lifespan of up to 15 years. According to the American Kennel Club, both types of fox terriers have predominately white coats with black and tan markings. As with other mostly white dogs, deafness is a common defect. Though they are generally hardy, eye problems like cataracts and lens luxation sometimes afflict the breed.

Temperament

    Friendly and playful, fox terriers make good family pets. At the same time, the alertness rooted in their hunting past contributes to their skills as a guardian of the home. One of their major assets, superior intelligence, can lead to willfulness and easy boredom. These dogs require daily exercise, as well as toys and puzzles for mental stimulation, advises DogTime. Today, their hunting days are virtually over, except in the hunt country of the eastern United States, where fox terriers occasionally still perform their traditional role. The vestige of this breeding is seen in pet terriers prone to dig in the yard.

Smooth Fox Terriers

    In 1875, these sleek and elegant dogs became the first of the fox terrier group to be recognized by England's Kennel Club. White smooth fox terriers were sought by hunt clubs because they were less likely to be mistaken for a fox. Among the group's greatest contributions has been its genetic part in the establishment of many other terrier breeds, including Jack Russell Terriers (also known as Parson Russells), toy fox terriers and rat terriers. The American Kennel Club cites its easy-to-maintain coat as the main advantage over wire-haired varieties. In the 1920s, the popularity of smooth fox terriers soared when RCA chose one, Nipper, for its head-cocking logo.

Wire Fox Terriers

    A decade after Nipper's appearance, Nick and Nora Charles' dog Asta in "The Thin Man" movie series brought recognition to wire fox terriers. These dogs are thought to have a different lineage than their smooth counterparts. They are likely descended from rough-coated black and tan terriers from Wales or the Derbyshire and Durham regions of England. Since their coats kept them less vulnerable to injury, wires were favored when hunting in rough terrain. Their main advantage over smooths, according to the American Kennel Club, is their minimal shedding.

How to Care for a Toy Poodle

How to Care for a Toy Poodle

Toy poodles may be small in size, weighing in at under ten pounds, but they have personalities just as big (some say even bigger) than their standard-sized cousins. They are well adapted to life in small apartments, but just because they don't take up much space, they still need quite a lot of time and care. The good news, though, is that they will reward all of your effort with a great deal of doggie devotion and a lot of love, licks and laughs.

Instructions

    1

    Keep your toy poodle healthy. You will need to schedule regular trips to the vet for her, once or twice a year, so she can receive the proper vaccinations as well as being examined by the vet. In addition to these isits, you will also need to keep an eye on her general health and well being at home, so you can seek medical advice if she shows signs of developing any problems.

    2

    Feed your toy poodle a healthy, well-balanced diet. You may either purchase a commercial diet or make your own pet food following one of many recipes available in doggie cookbooks or online. Your breeder or vet many be able to supply you with such recipes upon request. With a toy poodle puppy it is suggested that you offer about 1/3 cup of food three times a day at morning, noon, and night. With an adult toy you may eliminate the noon feeding, or you may leave food out all day for him to nibble on as "free feeding."

    3

    Groom your toy poodle regularly. Many toy poodle owners schedule regular trips to a professional dog groomer every 4 to 6 weeks; others prefer to do the grooming themselves. If you wish to groom your toy poodle on your own, you will need to purchase small electric clippers as well as a brush and comb. Even if you prefer that your dog be groomed by a professional you'll need to do a little maintenance brushing and combing of your own so that your dog does not turn into a matted mess.

    4

    Make sure your toy poodle gets plenty of exercise. Even if you live in an apartment and you have house trained your toy poodle to use "wee wee pads" or a litter box, you should still try to take her out for regular walks and she may even enjoy the occasional off-leash romp in a dog park or other protected area, although it is best if you take her to a designated area for small pets only or at least keep a very close eye on her so she is not injured by a larger dog.

    5

    Treat your toy poodle gently, always taking care for his small size. If you play with him roughly, or allow other pets or people to do so, this could be very harmful to him. Remember, this little dog is less than 1/20th (or 5 percent) of the size of many full grown adult humans.

Teacup Yorkie Terrier Information

Teacup Yorkie Terrier Information

Cute and cuddly are not the only words that could be used to describe these miniature canines. Teacup Yorkie Terriers are feisty, assertive and fearless by nature. They are after all descendants of the terrier breed. Despite their adventurous attitude, they are easily trained and follow basic directions with the greatest of ease. These pocket-sized dynamos are faithful companions and once a bond is formed, it is a permanent one. Best of all they do it all with their special brand of majestic flair.

The Name Game

    The Yorkshire terrier breed is famous for its many aliases. Cutesy names such as "Teacup" or "Baby doll face" terrier are just a few and are often utilized to help prospective owners find the size of the dog they want to purchase. The majority of Teacup Yorkie terriers tip the scale at roughly 3 to 7 pounds. Unfortunately, a smaller dog is at greater risk of not recovering from an illness than one that weighs more. The Elvis Yorkshire terrier website warns that "Teacup Yorkie" is a deceiving term often used to sell low quality breeds to the general public. Good temperament and health aren't top priorities to breeders only concerned about making money. On the other hand, there are breeders using the exact same term to sell quality Teacup Yorkie terriers. So, before making the decision to care for these little guys, do some research to make sure the establishment you plan to purchase them from is of good reputation.

Natural origins

    Bred for the sole purpose of eradicating the rat population in coal mines, the Yorkshire terrier breed or Teacup Yorkie terrier hails from England. According to the "Complete guide to responsible dog ownership" Web site, breeds such as the Skye terrier, Waterside terrier, Maltese, Paisley terrier, Clydesdale terrier, Welsh terrier and The Old English Black and Tan were used to breed Yorkshire terriers.

Appearances

    Appearances can be deceiving when it comes to this spirited breed. The "Complete guide to responsible dog ownership" describes Teacup Yorkie terriers as well balanced, athletic, muscular, and swift on their feet." Although the Yorkie's natural exuberance is compacted into a tiny bundle, their confidence is always front and center. Teacup Yorkie terriers parade around with their heads erect as their "intelligent" eyes dart to and fro. The quality that appeals to most is the Yorkie's luminous black and tan coat which ultimately transform into a dazzling "flowing steely blue". Additionally, Teacup Yorkie terriers shed little to no hair, making it the perfect breed for allergy sufferers.

Behavior

    The quality of training you provide for your Teacup Yorkie terrier is a determining factor in its temperament. In other words, you reap what you sow. Generally, Yorkies are sociable creatures but are very protective of their adoptive families. These little fellows can be quite territorial and use their unusually loud barks if they feel threatened in any way.

Health

    Teacup Yorkie terriers are typically healthy, although they do fall prey to certain illnesses. Many Yorkies are born with a condition known as tracheal collapse, a progressive damage of the tracheal area. The condition may also be due to the dog exerting himself on its leash. Hypoglycemia, tooth decay and cataracts are also common but one of the most considerable threats to your dog's health is often overlooked. Accidents within the home leave Teacup Yorkie terriers with multiple broken bones and may even prove to be fatal. If you're a proud owner of these darling creatures, tread carefully around your home. Also remember that Teacup Yorkie terriers fare far better around older children because the risks of accidents are significantly reduced.

How Can I Get My Mini Pinscher to Gain Weight?

How Can I Get My Mini Pinscher to Gain Weight?

The Miniature Pinscher is an energetic little dog that easily burns off more than it consumes. Though some of these little dogs have thyroid disorders which cause them to gain excess weight, some of the miniature pinschers are very active and on the thin side. There are steps that you can take to help your dog gain some weight in a healthy way.

Instructions

    1

    Call your veterinarian first before changing your dog's diet. It is necessary to be sure that there are no medical issues responsible for your miniature pinscher's lack of weight gain.

    2

    Discuss a special diet with your veterinarian. There are prescription diets available on the market and through your doctors' office that can help your dog to gain healthy weight.

    3

    Increase the amount of food you give your miniature pinscher currently if you choose not to go with a prescription diet. Adding extra calories to your dogs' current food will help in a weight gain, especially if you have a very active dog.

    4

    Experiment between dry food and wet food, or a combination of both to make it more tasty and appealing. Dry food has more carbohydrate filler which stimulates weight gain and the wet food smells more appetizing. Combining the two can get your dog to eat more.

    5

    Supplement your dog's diet with a good multivitamin. These supplements not only provide necessary nutrients your dog may be lacking in a diet, they also can stimulate a dog's appetite.

    6

    Provide your miniature pinscher with extra treats that have nutritional value and are loaded with extra fiber and proteins. Consider dental treats as well which not only help in the weight gain of your miniature pincher but also affords your dog with a healthy mouth.

Top 10 Most Popular Dog Breeds

Top 10 Most Popular Dog Breeds

Every year, the American Kennel Club posts its dog registration statistics. This list shows how 164 AKC registered breeds are rated in order of popularity. The top 10 breeds may vary in the standings by areas of the country. The bulldog is a favorite in California, South Florida prefers the German shepherd, and in Providence, Rhode Island, the Labrador retriever does not even factor into the top five. These are, however, the top 10 breeds in order of popularity in 2009.

Labrador Retrievers

    Labrador retrievers have been rated No. 1 for 19 years in a row. AKC spokesperson Lisa Peterson attributes this widely held acceptance to their loyal and gentle nature. These dogs are friendly, lovable, smart and great with kids. They are easily trained and make excellent sporting companions.

German Shepherds

    The German shepherd is ranked the second most popular breed in the nation for the first time in more than three decades. Their increased popularity may be due to enhanced security efforts taking place in the United States and overseas. These very intelligent, beautiful dogs are loyal family pets, ideal companions and dependable K-9 partners when needed.

Yorkshire Terriers

    Yorkshire terriers are the smallest of the terrier breeds. Highly energetic, very protective and loyal to their families, these little dogs do not always get along well with strangers. They do, however, love to be close to their owners.

Golden Retrievers

    A golden retriever is extremely kind and gentle by nature and loves playing with people and their toys. These beautiful dogs are very affectionate, have excellent temperaments and are easily trained.

Beagles

    Beagles are often used by homeland security personnel because of their strong scenting ability. They have assertive hunter attitudes, but are also kind, gentle and love their families. Their loud barking and howling also make them great watchdogs.

Boxers

    Boxers are energetic, fun-loving, good with children, extremely loyal and low maintenance. However, because they can be very headstrong, they should have obedience training when they are young. These loyal and affectionate dogs love to be outdoors.

Bulldogs

    Bulldogs are unwavering and dignified, with lovable mellow dispositions. They form strong bonds with children, while being gentle and protective. These calm and composed dogs also have a strong sense of dedication to their families.

Dachshunds

    A dachshund loves to have fun and play. These dogs may be small, but they are very protective of their families. Originally bred to hunt badgers, they are fearless and have been known to nip at strangers and others dogs.

Poodles

    The poodle is a loyal and extremely intelligent dog. This popular breed is an excellent companion, easy to train and adapts to almost any type of residence. This an ideal companion for someone who does not have a lot of living space, as well as for someone with more spacious accommodations.

Shih Tzu

    The Shih Tzu breed is smart, obedient and loves to play. They are very energetic dogs that love to be around their people.

St. Bernards & Dry Mouth

St. Bernards & Dry Mouth

The first Saint Bernard was bred by a Christian monk named Bernard de Menthon, who lived during the 11th century. He established a haven for travelers in the St. Bernard Pass between Italy and Switzerland. The St. Bernard dogs were used as guardians for the monks, as their draft animals and also as rescue dogs in the brutal Alpine storms. Through the years, St. Bernard breeders have developed certain standards for the breed. Dry mouth in St. Bernards is a variance on the breed standard although not forbidden in shows.

St. Bernard Standard

    According to the American Kennel Club, the St. Bernard's "flews of the upper jaw are strongly developed, not sharply cut, but turning in a beautiful curve into the lower edge and slightly overhanging. The flews of the lower jaw must not be deeply pendant. The teeth should be sound and strong and should meet in either a scissors or an even bite; the scissors bite being preferable. The undershot bite, although sometimes found with good specimens, is not desirable. The overshot bite is a fault. A black roof to the mouth is desirable." The difference in the shape of the pendant determines if the St. Bernard will have dry mouth.

Deep Pendant

    Many St. Bernard dogs have a deep pendant, which is the pocket that their lower jaw forms. This pendant, or pocket, is the catch basin for the dog's saliva. When the pendant is too deep, the saliva gathers and overflows from the dog's mouth, forming large strands of drool hanging from either side of the dog's mouth. A deep pendant is not desired in the St. Bernard standard, but since 1955, a slight pendant is adhered to.

No Pendant

    When a St. Bernard has no pendant in their lower jaw, the dog is known as a dry mouth St. Bernard. In this case, when the dog salivates it is easier to swallow and the drool does not gather in a lower lip pocket. Although the American Kennel Club states that a St. Bernard should have a slight pendant, they do not fault a St. Bernard for having dry mouth. In fact, from 1888 until 1955 the AKC St. Bernard Standard specified that the lower lip of the St. Bernard "should not be pendant."

Slight Pendant

    The slight pendant in a St. Bernard is the AKC standard. The dog's saliva does gather in the pendant but not to the extent of a deep pocket. The St. Bernard is still able to swallow the saliva without having too much heavy drooling. A St. Bernard has a much more regal and powerful appearance when thick strands of saliva are not hanging from the jowls.

Breeding Consequences

    When the American Kennel Club made the change in the St. Bernard Standard from no pendant to slight pendant, breeders were less vigilant in keeping the standard pure. As a result, many St. Bernard dogs have deep pendants and drooling problems.
    The deep pendant also causes the dog to drink more water because the loss of saliva makes the dog continually thirsty.

Dry-Mouth Preferable

    Most St. Bernard owners prefer dry-mouth dogs. The care and maintenance for a dry-mouth St. Bernard is much easier than one with a deep pendant. Drooling St. Bernards require constant cleaning, especially on the chest and forelegs. The thick drool adheres to the fur on the front of the chest, causing clumps and matting.
    Another consequence is the mess the drool causes in the home or car. The puddles of saliva need to be mopped up or wiped with paper towels on a regular basis. The odor from the hanging saliva also has an offensive fishy smell. Many times, people with other dogs get annoyed when a drooling St. Bernard slobbers on their dog or shakes and sprays saliva on everyone around them.

Kamis, 24 November 2011

How to Find a Hypoallergenic Dog (Buy or Adopt Hypo Allergenic Dogs!)

How to Find a Hypoallergenic Dog (Buy or Adopt Hypo Allergenic Dogs!)

While there really is no such thing as a completely hypo allergenic dog, there are breeds that allergy sufferers do well with. To save money and time, here's what you should consider before purchasing or adopting any dog.

Instructions

    1

    When looking for hypo allergenic breeds, look to the American Kennel Club for recommendations. The American Kennel Club (AKC) will have helpful detailed descriptions about many breeds. The AKC recommends the following breeds for allergy sufferers: Bedlington Terrier, Bichon Frise, Chinese Crested, Irish Water Spaniel, Kerry Blue Terrier, Maltese, Poodles (Toy, Miniature or Standard), Portuguese Water Dog, Schnauzer (Miniature, Standard or Giant), Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, Xoloitzcuintli

    2

    The Chinese Crested and the Xoloitzcuintli (or Mexican Hairless) are two hairless dogs. While they are not completely hypo allergenic they sure do come close. Remember, they still produce saliva which is highly allergic.

    3

    Mix breeds such as the Cockapoo and the Labradoodle may work well with some allergy sufferers. Since they are a mixed breed, there is no way to tell if they are more or less like the mother or father. This means you have a very good chance of getting a dog that you will be very allergic to. Both Cocker Spaniels and Labrador Retrievers are highly allergic animals.

    4

    Before taking home any dog or puppy. Be sure to play with the dog for a good length of time to determine if you are sensitive or allergic to the animal. It would be heart breaking to have to return any puppy or adult dog.

    5

    If you are allergic to dogs and you decide to bring one home, be sure to follow a few simple rules.
    *Keep the dog in a room without carpeting.
    *Do not allow the dog to sleep in the bed.
    *Keep furniture covered with slip covers and train the dog not to sit on the furniture.
    *Bathe the dog frequently. Do not have the allergic person bathe the dog.

The Best Dogs for Single Women

The Best Dogs for Single Women

A single woman has certain needs she must consider when choosing a dog. Because you will be taking care of the dog yourself, you will want a more self-reliant breed. You may also want a breed that offers protection and dependability as well as companionship and fun.

German Shepherd

    These dogs are loyal protectors that are easily trained. German shepherds are very smart dogs that take pleasure in making sure their owners are happy and safe.

Pit Bull Terrier

    Despite a difficult reputation, pit bull terriers are known as affectionate companion dogs. Strong and smart, they are easy to train and good protectors.

Golden Retriever

    One of the most popular dog breeds in the United States, golden retrievers are also great for single women because of their easy and friendly temperaments and their eager-to-please attitudes.

Bolognese

    These small, fluffy dogs do not need a lot of space or exericse. They are friendly, sweet, easy to train and though they may be reserved around strangers, they tend to warm up quickly.

Greyhound

    Despite being fast dogs used for racing, greyhounds do not usually display that much energy. They enjoy short bursts of exercise, but are also quiet animals that enjoy keeping to themselves in small spaces. Also, their short coats require very little grooming.

Bulldog

    These short, squat dogs are great for apartment life. They do not need a lot of space or much exercise--in fact, their short muzzle makes hard workouts dangerous for them. Bulldogs are sweet, loyal and very affectionate.

Tips and Advice on Training a Bulldog Puppy

Tips and Advice on Training a Bulldog Puppy

Bulldogs (also known as English bulldogs or Churchill dogs) originated in England in the early 1800s, and were bred in order to fight bulls. When bull baiting was outlawed, bulldogs became pets. By the early 1900s, they were even bred with shorter legs and a pushed-in face in order to make them more appealing.

Face

    Sadly, the cute face of a bulldog comes with a price: the puppy and adult dog cannot clean its own face. It is vital that bulldog puppies get used to having their face wrinkles wiped clean as soon as possible before they are big enough to struggle. This should be done gently and with a reward of food or a toy. Also, because of the way bulldog faces are constructed, they will be prone to snoring. They also will have problems getting enough air on hot, humid days, and should not be allowed to exert themselves too much on such days.

Feeding

    Bulldogs average 45 lbs., but they love food and can put on weight rapidly, even as puppies. Too much extra fat can damage growing bones, strain the heart, make breathing more difficult and predispose the puppy to developing diabetes as an adult. Be sure to get everyone in the family involved in keeping the bulldog puppy on a diet and not letting it overindulge. Bulldogs are excellent scavengers and will tear into garbage in order to get food, so be sure to keep garbage locked up. Keep all harmful chemicals out of reach, too. Their love of food means that food can be a great incentive to help train bulldog puppies.

Protection

    English bulldogs do not make good guard dogs. The puppies are especially vulnerable to being stolen. Never leave a bulldog puppy unattended in a car or a yard, and never tie the puppy out in front of a store. Never let a bulldog puppy meet other dogs without your supervision and with the other dog leashed. Some dogs have never seen a bulldog and will not recognize that this is another dog, so they will attack. Bulldogs--even as puppies--will defend themselves with a powerful bite.