Senin, 31 Oktober 2011

What Type of Food Should a Puppy Eat?

What Type of Food Should a Puppy Eat?

New pet owners should be aware of their animal's dietary needs. Puppies' diets require a broad range of nutrients, which are essential for healthy growth, as well as a constant supply of fresh water. Choosing the right food for your pet from the start will help to promote a long and healthy life. Check with your veterinarian for more information on your puppy's nutritional needs.

Solid Age-Appropriate Formula

    In general, puppies are weaned from their mother's milk and put on to solid foods when they are around four weeks old. Check with your local pet supplier for solid dog kibble that is the appropriate size for your dog's breed, and that contains the required nutrients. Puppies are constantly growing and require an increased level of protein, vitamins and minerals. Smaller breeds should stay on the solid puppy formula until approximately nine months old, and larger breeds until up to 18 months old.

Read the Label

    Ensure that your puppy's food contains a high level of nutrients, which are essential for proper growth. Puppies require different levels of nutrients than adult or senior dogs. Calcium and phosphorus are particularly important, as they promote the development of healthy teeth and bones. Dogs are also omnivores, meaning that they require a mixture of both meat and vegetables.

Frequency of Feeding

    Puppies require more frequent feeding times than adult or senior dogs and should be fed at regular intervals. Leaving food out on a continuous basis can lead to obesity. Puppies less than 12 weeks old should be fed approximately four times a day, puppies between 12 weeks and six months old should be fed three time a day and puppies and dogs over six months should be fed twice a day. Only allow your puppy to eat as much as he or she can in a 20-minute period.

Things to Avoid

    Do not feed your puppy table scraps or real bones. These items can cause indigestion, or lead to obesity and improper growth. A healthy puppy will not require supplemental feeding. No matter how tempting it may be to give your puppy a treat from the table, consider the fact that you will enjoy your pet a lot longer if you disallow anything but nutrient-enriched food at all times.

Information on Puggle Puppies

Information on Puggle Puppies

What do you get when you cross a pug and a beagle? A puggle, of course. This new breed has become very popular with dog lovers. If you are considering getting one of these adorable dogs, here's some information that can be useful to you as an owner.

Size

    The height of puggles is pretty standard, ranging between 13 to 15 inches at the shoulder. Their weight, however, spans between 15 to 30 pounds.

Considerations

    Puggles are not hypo-allergenic and shed moderately. Therefore, people with allergies may be allergic to puggles, so they should probably avoid adopting one as a pet.

Potential

    Puggles are relatively easy to train. Repetition and rewards work best when trying to train them.

Fun Fact

    When puggles become over-excited, they may begin to howl.

History

    According to the American Canine Hybrid Club, the first person to breed a Puggle was a Wisconsin breeder named Wallace Havens. A puggle has a beagle mother and a pug father.

Famous Ties

    Uma Thurman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Sylvester Stallone and Julianne Moore are some celebrities who own puggles.

How to Buy a Rottweiler Puppy

The Rottweiler is an old and historical breed that was once used as military and police dogs in their native country of Germany and has since become one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Despite some negative views about the breed, the Rottweiler can be a valuable and loving addition to a family. Here are some things to remember when buying a Rottweiler puppy.

Instructions

    1

    Research the breed. The Rottweiler is a large breed that requires a lot of space to run. They are independent and intelligent but also very protective of their owners so they are not a breed that is right for every family or owner.

    2

    Get the facts. Isolated incidents involving a small percentage of Rottweilers have unfortunately earned the whole breed a reputation as being unpredictable, violent and prone to unprovoked attacks. Keep in mind that how any dog behaves largely depends on how it is treated by its owner. Talk to breeders, trainers and veterinarians and learn the truth about the breed before making your final decision.

    3

    Find a good breeder. The Rottweiler is prone to a degenerative bone disease called hip displasia due to its large size. The odds of a Rottweiler having this disease is greatly increased if it has come from an inbred bloodline. Some studies of the breed have also shown that inbred dogs are more prone to having violent personalities. Find a reputable breeder who breeds puppies responsibly to guarantee that your Rottweiler is healthy.

    4

    Examine the puppy's legs and feet. A Rottweiler's legs should be straight and proportionate to the rest of their body. If they appear overly thin or the puppy appears bow-legged, this could be a sign of bone disease or poor nutrition.

    5

    Look at the puppy's tail. Rottweilers' tails are commonly docked or cut short to leave a small stub on their backside. While this practice does not improve the dog's health or well-being, it has become such a recognizable feature of the breed that the American Kennel Club requires Rottweilers to have docked tails to be eligible as show dogs. Docking a Rottweiler's tail too soon, however, can cause nerve damage. If you are considering purchasing a puppy whose tail has already been docked, find out when the surgery was performed and talk to a veterinarian to make sure it was done correctly and at a proper time.

    6

    Get to know the puppy's parents. You can learn a lot about the personality of the puppy you are thinking of bringing into your home by interacting with its parents and observing how they act.

Differences Between a Mastiff & a Bullmastiff

Differences Between a Mastiff & a Bullmastiff

Mastiffs and bullmastiffs have much in common, including their large size, their willingness to please and their natural tendency to form a strong bond with their handlers. These breeds also differ in traits such as breed beginnings, coat color and length and life expectancy. It is important to consider all traits of a breed before deciding to bring a dog into your home.

Breed Beginnings for Mastiffs and Bullmastiffs

    The mastiff, sometimes called the English mastiff, is a breed with a history that dates back to the time of Julius Caesar. According to the American Kennel Club, Caesar was impressed with the dogs' ability to fight in combat against the British, and he later introduced them in Rome, making them participate in bullfights and gladiator events.

    Centuries later, the English used the breed as watchdogs to keep wolves away from homesteads. The dogs' intimidating size and courageous manner made them a perfect breed for human protection. The mastiff was introduced in the United States around the 17th century, according to the Dog Breed Info website. World War II saw a drastic decline in population of the breed in Europe, and later mastiffs from the U.S. were brought to England to repopulate the region.

    In contrast, the bullmastiff's history traces back to the 1860s. Again in England, the dogs were bred as watchdogs and game hunters. They are a combination of mastiffs and bulldogs. Breeders aimed to combine the strength and size of the bulldog with the demeanor of the mastiff. According to the AKC, true bullmastiffs are 60 percent mastiff and 40 percent bulldog.

Size Difference in Mastiffs and Bullmastiffs

    Due to the bullmastiff's bulldog heritage, it is slightly shorter than the mastiff. According to the AKC, the bullmastiff breed can be anywhere from 24 to 27 inches at the shoulder. The mastiff can be anywhere from 27 to 30 inches at the shoulder, depending on the sex.

    Mastiffs are slightly heavier than bullmastiffs, weighing an average of 160 pounds compared the the bullmastiff's 110 to 130 pounds. The bullmastiff appears slightly stockier than the mastiff.

Color Differences in Mastiffs and Bull Mastiffs

    Mastiffs have medium-length coats that can be fawn, apricot or brindle. Mastiff ears should be dark in color and short when compared to the head. The breed also has dark, preferably black, muzzles or faces.

    Bullmastiffs have slightly shorter coats that can be red, fawn or brindle in color. They have medium-length ears that are dark in color. The muzzles or faces are also dark.

Other Differences Between Mastiffs and Bullmastiffs

    While both breeds respond well to training, the bullmastiff may need slightly sterner training than the mastiff due to its partly bulldog temperament. Bullmastiffs tend to slobber and drool while mastiffs don't.

    The mastiff's lifespan is 10 to 12 years, and the bullmastiff's is less than 10 years.

Minggu, 30 Oktober 2011

How to Make Homemade Puppy Food

Puppies can be introduced to solid food when they are 2 weeks old. But commercial canned food for puppies is usually full of water and preservatives. Puppies are not fussy eaters, and will eat anything--whether or not it's good for them. You can make your own to ensure that your puppy's first meals are full of nutrition. You can also continue making homemade foods to add to a kibble recommended by your vet.

Instructions

Hungry, Hungry Puppies

    1

    Remove most of the skin from a lean boneless chicken (preferably organic). You need 1 part chicken to 3 parts rice or barley for the recipe. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil on the stove. Boil the chicken until it is cooked thoroughly.

    2

    Chop a large carrot and add it to the chicken when it is about halfway through. It's OK to overcook the carrot.

    3

    Boil the rice. While it is cooking, strain the chicken and carrot. Leave them in the colander so they cool.

    4

    Place the chicken, carrot and rice in blender or food processor. Make the mixture as smooth as you can. Add milk replacer as needed, 1/4 at a time, to attain a baby-food-like consistency. (As your puppies get older, you can make this chunkier.)

    5

    Serve the food to your puppies when it is lukewarm or cool. (Expect the puppies to make a mess and step in the food.) Refrigerate the leftovers.

Teacup Yorkie Breed Characteristics

Teacup Yorkie Breed Characteristics

The teacup Yorkie breed isn't officially recognized by the American Kennel Club. However, this toy dog breed is becoming increasingly popular throughout the U.S. As is the case with other dog breeds, teacup Yorkies require proper training, and socialization with humans and other dogs.

Temperament

    Teacup Yorkies have a great deal of energy and make excellent companions. They possess a naturally inquisitive demeanor. In general, teacup Yorkies are good around other pets. If a teacup Yorkie isn't properly socialized he may become somewhat snappy toward humans and other dogs. For the most part, they display an outgoing personality, and have a great deal of loyalty for their human family. Due to their alertness, teacup Yorkies make good miniature watch dogs.

Appearance

    Teacup Yorkies are extremely small dogs. An adult teacup Yorkie weighs anywhere from 3 to 7 pounds. Though smaller in size, teacup Yorkies are muscular and fast. When properly trimmed and groomed, teacup Yorkies display a soft, silky coat. Furthermore, teacup Yorkies rarely shed, which is great news for those who have allergy concerns. Teacup Yorkie colors range from black and tan to blue and gold. The ears and tail of a teacup Yorkie should stand tall and erect.

Health Concerns

    A number of health concerns plague the teacup Yorkie breed. They may suffer from knee and joint problems, cataracts and tooth decay. Additonally, they may contract liver shunt, which is a serious liver disease. Teacup Yorkies may experience tracheal collapse at birth or later in life from events like leash straining. Smaller teacup Yorkies weighing less than 3 pounds may be born with birth defects like small kidneys.

How to Raise Pit Bull Terriers

How to Raise Pit Bull Terriers

Pit bull terriers have earned a bad rap over the years, making the news whenever a dogfighting ring is broken up. Their reputation as heartless killers is undeserved, and pit bull terriers make excellent family pets. When given something constructive to do with their energy, pit bulls display incredible drive and unbeatable loyalty to their owners. They are friendly dogs, eager to please their owners, and readily trained to do many tasks. Raising a pit bull terrier is a big responsibility, but a very rewarding one if you are prepared to meet the breed's needs.

Instructions

    1

    Housebreak your pit bull early so he won't make messes inside. Take the dog out to the same spot regularly, and praise him when he does his business. Avoid excessive punishment when he makes mistakes; instead, take the dog out as soon as possible and clean up the area with an enzymatic cleaner to eliminate the smell. Distract the dog as soon as possible if you see him starting to go inside, then take him outside instead. Younger dogs are more liable to accidents than older ones because they cannot hold it in as long.

    2

    Train your pit bull to sit. Say the word "sit" and press down on your dog's hindquarters to urge her into a seated position. When she does as you've asked, pet her and praise her eagerly so she knows you appreciate the behavior. Repeat this several times, only praising her when she actually sits down.

    3

    Train your pit bull to come and heel, as well as any other tricks or behaviors you find important. A good "drop it" command can prove invaluable, showing your dog that sometimes it is best to leave well enough alone. Techniques for training vary, but in general you should provide praise when your dog does what you want on command. Reinforcing behavior can take a long time.

    4

    Take your pit bull terrier to obedience classes, both for the professional training advice and the socialization with other dogs and situations.

    5

    Socialize your dog carefully, and from a young age. Introduce your pit bull to a variety of people and situations gradually, allowing him to meet different types of people and dogs both one-on-one in the home as well as out on the street. Introducing your pit bull to other dogs early may help curb potential aggression toward other dogs.

    6

    Exercise your pit bull regularly, for at least two hours a day. A tired dog is a happy dog, and much less likely to become destructive and chew on your furniture. Take your dog on long walks, play fetch and tug, or participate in canine sports like agility or weight-pull to keep your dog happy and healthy.

    7

    Feed your dog at least once a day, or more depending on your schedule and his dietary needs. Research good-quality dog foods that have meat as a primary ingredient, avoiding foods with artificial colors or flavors.

    8

    Keep fresh, clean water available for your dog at all times. Bring a bowl and water bottle with you on long walks to keep your dog hydrated, especially on hot days.

    9

    Take your pit bull terrier to the vet for annual checkups, and make sure you keep your dog up to date on her shots.

About White German Shepherds

About White German Shepherds

White German Shepherds are striking animals that have the same physical and temperament characteristics of their more commonly colored German Shepherd counterparts. They are loyal family pets, active sports dogs, and diligent protectors of their families and homes. Although white is not a recognized color variety in most major registries, the white German Shepherd dog has a loyal and devoted following, which keeps the breed alive and thriving in many countries.

History

    White German Shepherds were developed when European breeders added dogs with strong Shepherd characteristics to help broaden the narrow gene pool of the German Shepherd dog. The new dogs had recessive white genes that began to result in white-coated dogs during the course of breeding. Officially, the German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany does not recognize "white" German Shepherds, and most formal dog registries followed suit.

Registries


    White German Shepherds are a variety of the German Shepherd Dog. While they can be registered, they are the only color variety of GSD (German Shepherd Dog) that is disqualified from breed showing in the American Kennel Club, the German Shepherd Dog Club of Germany and most other major dog registries. Although they cannot compete in breed conformation classes, all white German Shepherds are eligible for competition in other classes, such as obedience, agility, tracking and Schutzhund (or "protection dog" competition). Because white German Shepherds are not eligible for conformation showing in official registries, owners and enthusiasts of the color variety formed their own White German Shepherd Club in order to improve their breeding programs.

    Even though the white German Shepherd originated from German Shepherd Dogs this selective breeding for color has created a new breed. It still carries all of the traits, but no longer holds the dominant brown and black color pattern, of German Shepherds.

Temperament

    Like all German Shepherds, the white variety must be fearless, yet loving and loyal, protective of their owners and homes, and very active. They excel at sports because of their athletic builds, as well as their love of sporting behaviors such as agility, obedience, herding and tracking. The White German Shepherd, like its colored relatives, makes an exceptional police dog and guard dog. Because of their very reliable temper and extreme intelligence they also make wonderful service dogs for blind and handicapped individuals.

Size

    The White German Shepherd is a large dog between 22 and 26 inches at the shoulder, and they should be longer than they are tall. The dogs will generally be muscular and strong. Their size and strength does not keep them from being excellent family pets, however, and they are often very cautious around small children to keep from knocking them over, often becoming quite protective of the children of their families.

Inherited Health Problems


    White German Shepherd Dogs carry the same tendencies for hereditary health problems as all other GSDs. They have a high tendency for hip and elbow dysplasia, von Willebrand's Disease (a dog version of hemophilia), eczema, epilepsy, keratitis (inflammation of the eye) and dwarfism.

How to Hand Feed Yorkie Pups

How to Hand Feed Yorkie Pups

One of the most recognizable of the "toy" dogs, the Yorkshire terrier was bred in the county of Yorkshire in northern England. These small but courageous animals were used to hunt for rats and other vermin, especially during the beginning of the industrial age in the 19th century. These beautiful dogs are energetic and inquisitive and make wonderful companions and watchdogs. Yorkie puppies are usually ready for adoption at eight weeks of age, at which time they have been weaned and can be fed a premium puppy food. Younger puppies must be hand-fed and gradually weaned onto solid food. Raising or adopting an orphaned Yorkie puppy requires care and attention that will reward you with a loving companion.

Instructions

    1
    Use a small baby bottle for puppy formula.
    Use a small baby bottle for puppy formula.

    Check the flow of fluid from the baby bottle. When you hold it upside down, formula should drip out, not pour out. Formula that flows too quickly may enter the puppy's lungs, which can lead to suffocation or infection. Boil the water you will mix with the formula to remove any bacteria, then cool it to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit so it will not burn the puppy's mouth or stomach. Mix the formula with the water, following directions on the recipe or package, and fill the bottle. Check that the formula drips, but does not flow, from the nipple before every feeding.

    2

    Hold the puppy gently but securely in your lap or hand and gently put the nipple into its mouth, holding the bottle upward so no air is ingested. Let the puppy drink at its own rate to allow it to breathe between sips. Increase the amount of formula gradually as the puppy grows. On average a newborn puppy requires one cc of food for every ounce of body weight. It needs to be fed every three hours until the dog reaches about four weeks of age, at which point solid food may be gradually introduced into its diet. Always consult with your veterinarian about what to offer the puppy and when to begin feeding it. Burp the puppy gently after every feeding. Refrigerate any unused formula, but do not keep it for more than three days. Consult with your veterinarian often to ensure the best oversight for the puppy's health and to confirm when to begin weaning.

    3
    Careful care and feeding of your puppy will result in a healthy, happy pet.
    Careful care and feeding of your puppy will result in a healthy, happy pet.

    Begin weaning when the puppy is about four weeks old. Introduce the puppy to the idea of eating from a bowl by offering some formula in a stainless steel dog food bowl, letting it remain available while it is still fresh. Place the bowl on the floor where you intend to always feed your pet. Mix premium puppy food or whatever first food is recommended by your vet with formula so it is soft and easy for the puppy to eat and digest. Encourage but do not force the dog to eat. Leave the food available as long as it remains fresh. You may alternatively mix the food with water, which keeps it fresh for a much longer period of time. Reduce the amount of fluid mixed with the puppy food gradually until you add no fluid at all. This should occur by the time the puppy is about eight weeks old.

The Quality of Dog Food & Fatty Cysts in Dogs

The Quality of Dog Food & Fatty Cysts in Dogs

Dog owners who notice unusual mounds or lumps just under their dog's skin should have them checked out by a veterinarian to rule out cancer. Most subcutaneous--beneath the skin--bumps are benign lipomas, or fatty cysts. Fatty cysts result from improper fat digestion and an imbalanced metabolism, says holistic veterinarian Dr. Marty Goldstein of Smith Ridge Veterinary Center in South Salem, New York. Feeding a low- or no-carbohydrate dog food helps minimize lipomas.

Fatty Cysts or Lipomas

    Fatty cysts are fat deposits.

    "We've laden dog food with 50 to 65 percent carbohydrates, even though in nature wolves eat perhaps 1 to 3 percent grains," Goldstein says.

    Goldstein is a proponent of ancestral feeding, meaning wolves and their descendants, dogs, reach optimum health when fed high-protein, moderate-fat and low-carbohydrate diets.

Grains in Commercial Dog Food

    Grains such as corn, a primary ingredient in commercial dry dog food, prevent dogs from properly digesting food. Their digestive tracts were made to metabolize meat-based proteins, moderate amounts of fat and very few carbohydrates. Lean dogs with well-toned muscles rarely grow fatty cysts. They typically eat raw or cooked meats that keep muscles toned and provide enough energy to stay active. A meat-based diet paired with the right amount of exercise will keep fatty tumors at bay in most dogs.

Grain-free Diets

    Grain-free diets consist of whole meat ingredients, such as chicken, turkey or beef, or lamb rather than meat byproducts, and are available as dry kibble or canned food. Goldstein and veterinarian Michael Dims advocate raw feeding. Raw diets consist of animal protein--muscle tissue, lungs, livers, kidneys and spleens. The ingredient list should name the organs and species. Usually, these foods come in frozen medallions or patties. Some dog foods are cooked and sterilized of bacteria in plastic packaging. Others use preservatives.

Fresh-chilled Diets

    Fresh-chilled diets, the most expensive and convenient option, are available in refrigerated cases at natural pet food stores. The companies that make these products claim 70 percent meat and no preservatives. Due to the high cost, many pet owners opt to feed a combination of high-quality dry dog food and supplement it with one or two days a week of feeding raw turkey necks and raw meaty bones, or cooked meats combined with steamed vegetables--a high quality carbohydrate in small amounts.

Digestive Enzymes Assist Digestion

    Poor digestion seems to be the root cause of fatty cysts. Supplementing your dog's low-carbohydrate diet with digestive enzymes that contain ox bile will help emulsify fats, and can even shrink or hinder tumor growth. Some dog foods contain ingredients like bromelain to assist digestion, though the quantities are usually too small to make an appreciable difference. The key to improved health and getting the upper hand on fatty cysts seems to be feeding a no- or low-carbohydrate diet, healthy fats and high animal protein, according to The Whole Dog Journal.

Dogs That Pull Sleds

Dogs That Pull Sleds

In areas where carriages and wagons could not be used because of ice and snow, sleds pulled by dogs were used for the transportation of both humans and cargo. Sled dogs needed to be strong, enduring and resistant to cold weather, and there were many breeds used for this purpose.

Alaskan Malamute

    The Alaskan malamute is the largest sled dog used and, according to Dog Breed Info, it is descended from the Arctic wolf. Used as sled dogs for 4,000 to 5,000 years, they are strong dogs capable of hauling both light sleds for transport and heavier sleds weighed down with cargo.

Siberian Husky

    Siberian huskies are medium-sized sled dogs that are noted for their light weight and stamina. They are a preferred breed for sled races because of their speed. They originally came from Siberia, and were brought to the arctic by Russian fur traders. They were bred with the Alaskan malamute to improve their size and hauling capacity, but when other shipping methods became more popular, they were once again bred for quickness and a smaller size.

Samoyed

    Samoyeds originally come from Siberia, where they were bred by fishermen and hunters. They were a multipurpose dog, and besides drawing sleds, they were also used for guarding property and herding reindeer. According to the Organization for the Working Samoyed, they are not the fastest sled dogs, but they can perform well when given proper training and conditioning. They are notable for their pale fur, which can range from pure white to light yellow.

Alaskan Husky

    Alaskan Huskies are not recognized as a breed, but instead as a type of dog that is often used for sled racing. According to Alaskan Husky Dogs, they can be considered a hybrid dog, where a Siberian husky has been crossed with other dogs to give it speed and endurance. Some types of Alaskan Husky include the Huslia Husky and the Aurora Husky. They dominate modern sled dog races, and they tend to have more endurance the Siberian Husky while still being lighter than the Alaskan malamute.

What Is Good About Huskies?

What Is Good About Huskies?

Before you buy or rescue a dog, it's important to find out about the breed's traits to make sure it suits your needs and lifestyle. Husky is a blanket term for several sled-pulling sub-breeds, the most popular of which are the Siberian and Alaskan huskies. However, all types of husky are similar in appearance and temperament and have several good points.

Intelligence

    Huskies are intelligent dogs that can be trained to excel in obedience trials, heel work and other activities that require a highly trained dog. They're also observant and sometimes copy common behaviors of their owners. The downside of this is that they can learn to open doors and fridges, which are normally undesirable actions for a dog. Due to their intelligence, they can easily become bored of repetitive training, so short training sessions, with lots of treats, work best.

Friendliness

    If you want a dog that is good natured and friendly toward people and other dogs, a husky fits the bill. Because they were bred as pack animals, they relish in companionship, either canine or human, and see everyone as a potential new friend. Despite the inborn tendency toward friendliness, you should still make sure you properly socialize your dog. Huskies' sweet nature also means that they definitely don't make good guard dogs.

Playful

    Huskies are playful, energetic and athletic. They love to play games such as fetch and tug-of-war. These dogs love the outdoors and need lots of exercise, so this is good if you enjoy hiking, walking or just being out among nature. However, huskies do have a tendency to wander off, and have little to no homing instinct, so it's important to make sure you walk your dog on a leash.

Easy to Care For

    Many consider huskies easy to keep. They require a surprisingly small amount of food for their size and will leave part of a meal, or even completely refuse it, if they feel they don't need it. The breed also keeps itself clean and rarely gets parasites or bad odors. Their coat requires regular brushing, but they don't need clipping. They do shed their coats twice a year. However, many other breeds shed less fur but much more often.

Toy Puggles Information

Due to their small size, toy or pocket dog breeds are popular among both dog breeders and dog owners. Toy puggles, smaller versions of the puggle, a beagle-pug hybrid, are no exception. Before purchasing a toy puggle, it is a good idea to research basic toy puggle information and care tips.

Physical Characteristics

    Toy puggles differ from their larger counterparts only when it comes to size and the fact that toy puggles tend to be less wrinkled then standards. Otherwise, their physical characteristics and temperament are identical to those of standard puggles. Standard puggles weigh approximately 17-30 pounds when fully grown, while Toy Puggles weigh between 8 and 16 pounds.

    Toy Puggles look like a cross between beagles and pugs, but can have very different appearances, with some dogs resembling pugs more then beagles and vice-versa. Most puggles have the shorter, more compact bodies of pugs and the floppy ears of a beagle, and are usually cream colored, tan, or dark brown in color.

Temperament

    Toy puggles are known for their friendly, affectionate temperament, and most are easygoing, intelligent dogs that get along well with small children and are easy to train. They are also known for being full of energy and can easily become hyperactive if they are not given enough exercise.

Health Concerns

    Most purebred pugs suffer from upper respiratory problems due to their short muzzles, and puggles that inherit this trait face a greater likelihood of suffering from them as well. Toy puggles are also prone to ear infections, heat sensitivity, and eye infections.

Buying Toy Puggles

    Due to the popularity of this hybrid it may be difficult to find a toy puggle in an animal shelter or humane society, but searching there first is still an option. Otherwise, toy puggles can be purchased from breeders and from pet stores. Just make sure to research the breeder or pet store thoroughly before purchasing a dog.

Considerations

    Before bringing a new toy puggle home, make sure that you have the time, money, and space for a new pet and are prepared to deal with any health problems or behavioral issues that your new dog may have. While toy puggle puppies are adorable, purchasing an adult dog is one way to make sure that you are purchasing a dog with a documented behavioral and health history.

Sabtu, 29 Oktober 2011

Training of Aggressive Labrador Dogs

Training of Aggressive Labrador Dogs

The most popular breed of dog in the United States is the Labrador retriever, according to the American Kennel Club's 2009 rankings. Labradors are large, strong dogs that possess a formidable set of teeth. Aggressive or overly playful Labradors can do damage. Labradors enjoy pleasing people, though, so they are highly trainable. The goal of training an aggressive Labrador is to get the dog to relax when any situation becomes stressful.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the cause of the Labrador's aggression. For example, Labradors are prone to getting arthritis. If a young dog or a child jumps onto an arthritic Labrador, this will cause pain and the Labrador may snap to defend itself. Take the Labrador to a veterinarian to see if there is a medical reason for a violent outburst.

    2

    Recognize when Labradors give warning signals. Dog behavior books with photos of dog expressions, such as "For the Love of a Dog," should be studied. Unlike many other dog breeds, Labradors have facial expressions that closely resemble a person's, according to "For the Love of a Dog." Labradors with closed mouths and a fixed stare are stressed and are warning others to stay away. Leave the dog alone when it is giving these signals.

    3

    Introduce the Labrador to clicker training, which involves using sound and food to reinforce good behavior. Labradors are highly motivated by food. Always begin clicker training indoors where there arent a lot of distractions. If the dog is highly distracted, put a chest harness and leash on the dog to keep its attention. Chest harnesses do not pull on the dog's throat, which may cause the dog to quickly become stressed.

    4

    Teach the dog to go into its bed on command using clicker training. Click and then give the Labrador a treat. Repeat until the Lab looks expectantly for a treat when you click. Gradually move the dog over to the bed and only click and treat when the dog is walking to the bed. Say "Go to bed," or another command as you do this, so the dog begins to learn the command. Keep a special chew toy by the door and give it to the dog only when it is in the bed. If the dog has problems jumping on or lunging at visitors, place the bed in a room with a door you can shut. The dog learns that it does not have to protect the house from intruders because you will do so.

    5

    Teach the Labrador to sit and look at you on command using clicker training. This is for dogs that become aggressive at the sight of other dogs. Click and treat first at home, then in the yard, and then out on a walk. Labradors can become easily distracted from other dogs or sources of aggression when good food is available.

The Best Dog Breed for Low Shedding & Smell

The Best Dog Breed for Low Shedding & Smell

An important consideration when choosing a breed of dog for your household is whether or not shedding is an issue for you, If it is, there are many breeds that do not shed their coats and have low odor. Some of these breeds have extremely short coats that are almost maintenance-free and others that do not shed, but do require professional grooming.

Dachshunds

    The dachshund's coat requires very little maintenance.
    The dachshund's coat requires very little maintenance.

    The dachshund is an appealing breed which comes in three different coats, smooth, wire, and long. They shed very little. The three coats require little attention other than an occasional bath and brushing. These dogs lick their coats keeping themselves very clean and have no dog odor which make them well suited for people with allergies. This breed comes in three sizes, standard, miniature and toy. They love to play and are devoted to their owners.

Basenji

    One of the most fastidious dog breed is the basenji. This is a good choice for an owner who is concerned with the cleanliness of their dog. They lick their coats clean, much like a cat, and have no odor. Their coat requires very little attention and they are considered to be hypoallergenic. This is not a dog, however, for all households. They are very active and love to chew. They are best with older children.

Poodles

    The poodle is an inteligent breed that doe not shed.
    The poodle is an inteligent breed that doe not shed.

    The poodle is one of the most intelligent breeds and does not shed. They have a dense woolly coat which most pet owners choose to keep clipped short to minimize trips to the groomer. They do not have an odor, but they will need frequent bathing due to the oil that builds up in their coats. The poodle is an athletic and active dog which is easily trained. The breed comes in the standard size, miniature and toy which range from 10 lbs. to 65 lbs.

Boston Terriers

    The Boston terrier's short coat require little care.
    The Boston terrier's short coat require little care.

    The Boston terrier is a small dog with a very short coat which is sheds very little. The only maintenance they require is a rubdown with a towel a few times a week and an occasional bath. Their coat is nearly odor-free. Although not a terrier as their dog implies, they are members of the non-sporting group. The Boston is a delightful breed which is comical to watch and is devoted to its family.

Low Protein Dog Treat Recipes

Low Protein Dog Treat Recipes

Dogs generally thrive on high protein diets. However, if your dog has kidney disease, your veterinarian may have prescribed a low protein diet. The proteins to avoid for kidney disease are those that come from red meat. To give your dog a healthy low protein dog treat, try these recipes that rely on vegetables and dairy for protein.

Low Protein Treat

    Combine two and a half cups of rice flour or white all-purpose bleached flour and a half of a teaspoon of garlic powder. Mix this with six tablespoons of low fat, low sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth and one cup of cooked ground-up vegetables (winter squashes, zucchini or sweet potatoes). Add enough cold water--about half of a cup--to create a ball of dough that can be rolled out to half-inch of thickness. Cut your cookies and place them on a nonstick cookie sheet. Bake them for 25 minutes at 350 degrees.

Vegetable Dog Treats

    Mix together one and a quarter cups of rice flour or white all-purpose bleached flour, one quarter cup of low fat dry milk powder and two tablespoons of nutritional yeast. In a separate bowl, mix together one quarter cup of low sodium, low fat chicken broth or vegetable broth, a quarter cup of safflower oil and a quarter cup of ground or shredded vegetables (carrots, zucchini or sweet potatoes). Combine the wet ingredients with the dry ones. Create a well in the dough and add an egg or egg substitute. Mix everything together. Roll the dough out on a floured surface to an eighth-inch of thickness. Sprinkle with garlic powder and cut the treats with a cookie cutter. Bake them on an ungreased cookie sheet at 300 degrees for 15 minutes, turn them and bake an additional 10 minutes.

Cheese and Vegetable Dog Treats

    Mix together a half of a cup of shredded low fat cheese or low fat cottage cheese, three tablespoons of vegetable oil and three teaspoons of applesauce. Add a half of a cup of cooked vegetables (zucchini, carrots or sweet potatoes) and one clove of minced garlic. Mix in one cup of rice flour or white all-purpose bleached flour. If necessary, add small amounts of low fat milk until the dough forms a ball. Knead well and chill for an hour. Roll the dough out on a floured surface to a quarter-inch of thickness. Cut the treats into shapes and bake them on an ungreased pan for 15 minutes at 375 degrees.

Small Dogs That Weigh Under 10 Pounds

Small Dogs That Weigh Under 10 Pounds

A dog weighing less than 10 pounds is quite portable -- like a little toy. That's the group name the American Kennel Club uses to refer to the majority of pint-sized pooches. There are many breeds to choose from, with different grooming and exercise requirements. Besides small size, these dogs have something else in common -- most are irresistibly cute.

Pomeranian

    Nothing compares to Pommie love.
    Nothing compares to Pommie love.

    The active, bright little Pomeranian weighs between 3 and 7 pounds at maturity, although show dogs should weigh between 4 and 6 pounds. This double-coated breed, available in various colors, makes an exceptional companion dog and isn't a bad little watch dog for his size. This outgoing small dog thinks of himself as a big guy, so you might have to protect him from his worst instincts. Poms do tend to bark a lot.

Maltese

    The Maltese is the perfect size for toting around.
    The Maltese is the perfect size for toting around.

    The adorable white Maltese hails from an ancient lineage. The AKC reports that the breed has been known for more than 2,800 years. Even back then, these were tiny canines. This friendly, feisty little dog weighs between 4 to 7 pounds in adulthood. Another fearless small dog, the Maltese loves his person and show great affection.

Yorkshire Terrier


    "My varmint hunting days are over."

    Once upon a time, the Yorkshire terrier was an English working man's dog, bred to hunt vermin; not anymore. The AKC doesn't list them in the terrier group, which does include other relatively small game dogs. Today's Yorkie is more apt to wear hair bows or jeweled collars than exterminate small rodents. These adorable black and tan terriers mature at 7 pounds and under. Their silky coats require regular brushing and trips to the groomers.

Chihuahua

    According to their breed standard, Chihuahuas max out at 6 pounds, although many are much smaller. The classic tiny dog, Chihuahuas appear in many colors with white markings permitted. They're available in short- and long-haired versions. Although some Chihuahuas appear high-strung and nervous, their ideal temperament should display traits such as self-confidence and independence.

Other Toy Breeds

    Other small breeds meeting the less than 10-pound weight criteria include the silky terrier, which shares many traits with the Yorkie. Many other breeds, such as the Chinese crested, toy poodle, papillon or miniature pinscher, often weigh 10 pounds or less but their breed standard does not include a weight limit.

How to Make Muffins for your Dog

How to Make Muffins for your Dog

My dogs are spoiled. Rotten. Here is a baked treat you may want to make for your spoiled pups. They freeze well, so you don't overfeed your pups.

Instructions

    1

    PREHEAT oven at 425 degrees.

    2

    MIX dry ingredients. In another bowl mix egg, honey and oil.
    Pour milk and carrots in dry ingredients. Then blend in your liquid ingredients.

    3

    POUR into muffin tins.
    BAKE for 15 to 20 minutes.

What Are the Differences in Size of Chihuahuas?

What Are the Differences in Size of Chihuahuas?

The chihuahua, recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1904, is classified under the AKC Toy Group. It comes originally from the Mexican state of Chihuahua where chihuahuas were first found in 1850. Chihuahuas may be descended from the Techichi dogs of the early Mexican Toltec people or from the Fennec Fox, a tiny creature with big eyes and ears. While its origins are uncertain, AKC Chihuahua breed information refers to both theories.

Size Differences

    The AKC and the Chihuahua Club of America have no differing size categories for purebred chihuahuas except that they should weigh less than six pounds. A normal, healthy chihuahua weighs between two and six pounds. The chihuahua is the world's smallest dog. It has become a trendy pet for celebrities in recent years, leading some breeders to market teacup or extra small dogs. The "teacup" chihuahua is not a recognized breed. Both organizations state that there is only one chihuahua breed.

Consumer Info

    Advertisements promoting pocket-size, miniature, mini, toy or teacup-size chihuahuas are common, but this is misleading, according to the AKC and the Chihuahua Club of America. In "The Teacup Statement," The Chihuahua Club of America cautions buyers to be aware that such marketing terms suggest greater value, but "misrepresent as rare and exceptional" the smaller pups occasionally born in any litter. They point out that extra care is often needed to keep the ultra-tiny chihuahuas healthy, as they frequently have expensive medical needs.

Health Issues

    Puppies that are very small have greater health risks, including fragile bones, weak internal organs and lack of proper dental growth because the mouth is not big enough to hold normal teeth. Blood sugar levels are hard to regulate, which can lead to seizures. It is not unusual for tinier chihuahuas to die young from heart attacks or organ failure. Reputable breeders will not breed smaller females (under two pounds) because it is too dangerous for the female.

Types

    Long-coat chihuahuas have a different appearance than smooth-coats.
    Long-coat chihuahuas have a different appearance than smooth-coats.

    The AKC recognizes two types by coat, the smooth-coat and the long-coat. The smooth-coat is familiar to American viewers, being the big-eared type seen in films and Taco Bell advertisements. The long-coat is of similar size and conformation, but the longer hair gives it a distinctive appearance. It requires a bit more brushing than the smooth-coated chihuahua, but is still easy to groom. Both types share a bright and alert nature if cared for properly.

Jumat, 28 Oktober 2011

About Min Pin Puppies

About Min Pin Puppies

Min Pins, short for Miniature Pinschers, are a mixed-breed puppy that is small in stature. Min Pins have high energy but are suitable to apartment living due to their small size and their ability to remain active indoors. They have short hair and are considered part of the American Kennel Club's Toy group. They are recognized by a variety of kennel clubs and make amiable pets.

Origins

    Though it resembles a miniature Doberman Pinscher, the two are entirely separate breeds. The Min Pin is a German dog breed, combining elements from the German Pinscher, the Dachsund and the Greyhound. According to the Dog Breed Info Center, this breed started off as a ratter; they would control the rat populations in barns for their owners.

Physical Appearance

    Min Pins are small dogs, reaching only 10 to 12 inches in height and weighing 8 to 9 lbs. The coat can be black with rust markings, chocolate with red or stag red (red with black hairs). The dog has a muscular body, pointed ears and snout and strong legs. The ears and tail are usually cropped.

Temperament

    Min Pins are generally good-natured, but they need strong leadership from human owners or they will take on a pack leader role in the household. They are very intelligent and can learn to follow orders, but they are also innately curious, which can lead to trouble if they are curious about how to escape from confinement or about the taste of your favorite shoes. They do best if given proper obedience training at a young age.

Health

    Min Pins are generally healthy, with only a slight chance of contracting a genetic eye disorder. They are hardy but also somewhat fragile; they cannot withstand roughhousing or falls from large heights. If properly cared for, a Min Pin's life expectancy is 15 years.

Care

    Min Pins need daily walks to get proper exercise. Regular playtime is also appreciated but will not substitute for a walk. Canis Major recommends basic coat care and infrequent bathing to avoid drying out the skin, as well as regular nail trimming and oral care. Min Pins are average shedders, according to the Dog Breed Info Center, and you can remove excess hair with a good rubdown with a wet cloth.

How to Choose a Teacup Schnauzer

How to Choose a Teacup Schnauzer

Teacup Schnauzers are the smallest of the miniature schnauzers. The American Kennel Club does not recognize toy and Teacup Schnauzers as breeds, so they are often registered as miniature schnauzers. Teacup Schnauzers grow to be less than seven pounds. They are hypoallergenic to people and they don't shed. Easily trainable, the intelligent Teacup Schnauzer is sociable with children and the elderly.

Instructions

    1

    Find a reputable miniature schnauzer breeder who also offers teacup schnauzers.

    2

    Make sure the breeder offers a health contract or good health guarantee that lasts at least two years, preferably five years. Health guarantees will give you options if your puppy is later diagnosed with genetic defects.

    3

    Ask the breeder if the puppies are current on vaccinations and wormings. Make sure the breeder has copies of veterinary records for the puppies.

    4

    Find out if the puppies have been registered as miniature schnauzers with the AKC.

    5

    Discuss how the breeder has started socializing the puppies. Find out if they have been introduced to people, other dogs, cats or anything else.

    6

    Select a puppy with good conformation. It is difficult to gauge what the puppy's conformation will be like when it's fully grown, but make sure every part is proportional.

    7

    Choose a puppy with a good personality. Teacup schnauzers vary tremendously in personality, and it can be difficult to evaluate personality in puppies, but make sure your puppy's energy level is not lower than the other puppies'.

Diet Food for a Chihuahua

Although Chihuahuas are very small dogs, like any other creature that is domesticated, they can become overweight if allowed to eat too much food or the wrong food, such as high-calorie treats or table scraps. Too much weight can put stress on joints and the back, and put extra strain on the heart. To have a healthy dog, take care of its weight problem.

Evaluate

    First, determine whether your Chihuahua really has a weight problem. Most weight between 5 and 8 pounds, but if the frame is very small, he may weigh less and still be healthy, or weigh more than 8 pounds if his frame is larger. You should not be able to see the ribs of a Chihuahua, but you should be able to feel them easily. There should be some indication of a "waist" on your pet. If this is not the case, there is a weight problem. Of course, this rule of thumb is more flexible if you have a puppy or old dog.

Immediate Action

    There are a number of things you can do to get an overweight Chihuahua to lose weight. First, take immediate action. Before investigating different foods or diet plans, begin immediately moderating the amount of food your Chi is eating. If he eats two cups of food a day and is overweight, cut it to 1 1/2 cups, for example. Do not allow the dog to feed continuously--once or twice a day, and then for a limited time, about 10 minutes. Do not give treats at all, except on rare occasions, or make your "treat" (if you are teaching a behavior, for example), a piece of his regular food, not something high-calorie. Do not feed your dog table scraps.

What Food to Choose

    A highly processed, grain-based diet fed to an animal designed to thrive on a meat-based, fresh food diet is very likely to produce symptoms of ill health over time. In other words, continuous exposure to excess carbohydrates results in conversion into fat. The optimum diet for a dog or a cat should closely resemble their natural diet. When choosing food for your overweight companion, check the ingredients of a variety of foods. Look first at food labeled "weight reduction" or "weight management," such as Purina Fit and Trim or Nutro MAX Weight Management. Examine the label as you would for content of any food, and make sure it is not primarily carbohydrates, which puts on weight in dogs, just as for people. If it is mostly cereal-based, your dog will not lose weight even if he eats a reasonable portion each day. Of course, also be sure it is a quality dog food that has meat as one of the primary ingredients.

Substitutions

    If you are concerned with an extreme break in routine (such as no treats) while trying to reduce weight, eliminate those that put on weight (for example, table scraps or high-calorie treats) but substitute healthy treats: a small piece of lettuce, for example. Or let your pet lick a small kong, which has just a hint of peanut butter in it. Treats do not have to come in a foil bag from the pet department to provide him with pleasure and pique his interest, and they will certainly keep him happier during the weight-loss process.

Maintenance

    Once the dog is at the desired weight, be sure you do not go back to the old routine, which probably started the problem in the first place. While you will not need to be so strict, stick to the foods and treats you had been using in the weight-loss process, although you may make some minor concessions. Just like with us, if we lose our vigilance, that weight will creep back on your pet, and not so slowly at that.

Male Vs. Female Boxer Puppies

Male Vs. Female Boxer Puppies

While both male and female boxer puppies can become excellent pets, there are significant differences between the sexes. There will be differences between a male boxer puppy and a female boxer puppy that may make one or the other more appealing for your home; understanding those differences can help you make a good choice.

Size

    There is a significant difference in size between male and female boxers when they become adults. Before adopting a boxer puppy, consider which size is more attractive to you. Males will grow to a height between 22.5 and 25 inches and weigh between 65 and 80 pounds. Female boxers will grow to a height between 21 and 23.5 inches and weigh between 50 and 65 pounds.

Affection

    The male boxer puppy tends to be more affectionate and loving than the female boxer puppy. Males are extroverted and love to interact with their owners, and they are exuberant about showing their affection. While a female boxer is no less loyal or attached to her owner, she is more reserved and subtle about showing affection.

Moodiness

    Female boxers are noted for being more temperamental than males, as well as having less-predictable moods. This does not mean that the female boxer puppy is inclined towards violence or poor behavior. It may simply mean that the female boxer may be sweet and playful one day and withdrawn and suspicious the next.

Maturity

    The male boxer puppy will keep his puppylike temperament longer than a female boxer puppy. Female boxer puppies mature more quickly than male boxer puppies, while male boxers tend to be energetic and mischievous even when they are adolescents and adults.

Sociability

    Both male and female boxer puppies do better with dogs of the opposite sex, but male dogs tend to do better with other dogs in general than female boxers. Female boxers may have problems living with other female dogs. However, male boxers are more prone to battles for dominance than female boxers, especially as they are growing up.

Kamis, 27 Oktober 2011

Top 10 Dog Breeds by Sense of Smell

Top 10 Dog Breeds by Sense of Smell

Questions to Ask Alapaha Bulldog Breeders

Questions to Ask Alapaha Bulldog Breeders

Originating from English bulldog stock, the Alapaha bulldog has been traced to one originating American breeder from Georgia. Prior to 1979, and the formation of the Alapaha Blue-Blood Bulldog Association (ABBA), this southern born bulldog breed had become almost extinct. Because of this breed's precarious ancestry, the ABBA registry and club members are strict and meticulous when it comes the breeding practices of this dog.

Breeders

    The dog breeding business has come under scrutiny for unethical and inhumane practices. Alapaha bulldog breeders are now closely monitored, not only by the ABBA, but also by organizations like the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Humane Society of the United States.

    When considering the purchase of a new puppy, choosing the right breeder is the greatest consideration. Always insist on seeing where the dogs are housed and meeting the parents of your new puppy. Any reputable breeder will not hesitate to open their facilities for your inspection.

Initial Inspection

    There are two common types of dog breeders -- those who have an on-site dog breeding business that requires permits, certification and licensing, and private homeowners who simply have a female dog with a litter of puppies they want to sell.

    Which ever type breeder you choose, be investigative. Observation can tell you a lot about a breeder and the care they take with their dogs. Look to see if the facility is clean and well maintained. Is the temperature set for the maximum comfort of the dogs? Is the dogs' living area carefully secured and all potential dangers removed? Make certain the dogs are clean and playful and have a healthy appearance. The dogs should have a designated area to run free and play. A reputable dog breeder will always have fresh water available, as well as a comfortable area for the dogs to rest and sleep.

Questions for the Breeder

    It is best to make a written list of questions prior to visiting a dog breeding establishment. Once on site, the environment can be exciting, chaotic and confusing, which may hinder your ability to remember the questions you want to ask.

    If the Alapaha bulldog puppies are said to be purebred, ask to see the ABBA registration papers for both parents. By the time they are put up for sale, the young dogs should have been examined and treated by a veterinarian, so ask to see the veterinary report.

Additional Inquiries

    Besides documented information, there are probing questions a dog breeder should be willing to answer. For instance, ask for references. Conscientious and ethical breeders keep records of previous sales and often ask buyers if they can use them as references. Question the breeder for information on how much experience they have breeding dogs. Inquire about specifics pertaining to the Alapaha bulldog breed. Find out if these dogs are suitable family pets. Do they make good watchdogs and are they easy to train? An ethical breeder will attempt to ensure their dogs are a good fit for your lifestyle and that you can provide a suitable home.

Purchase Guarantee

    Ask the breeder what type of guarantee they offer. New puppies should come with a health guarantee, current vaccinations and de-worming schedule. No breeder can promise that a puppy will not have future health problems, but a health guarantee should cover any genetic related diseases. It is important to take your new Alapaha bulldog puppy, with his records, to your own veterinarian immediately after you bring him home.

The History of the Irish Staffordshire Bull Terrier

The History of the Irish Staffordshire Bull Terrier

The Irish Staffordshire Bull Terrier has a rowdy and multi-cultural past. Starting as a dog-fighting breed in Ireland and England, this breed is a mix between the bull dog and the terrier. The breed has continued to develop since its inception in the 19th century. As of 2010, the breed is registered in both the UK's Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club. While no longer a fighting dog, the breed is instead a household pet known for its fearlessness, its love of chewing things, and its ability to get along with older children in family homes.

Dog Fighting

    From the 13th century, dogs had been used for bull-baiting, a kind of public entertainment. Bulldog breeds fought with a bull with spectating gamblers hollering for their dog to win. To create fresh entertainment and competition, dog breeders started creating new breeds. Breeders crossed bulldogs for their strength, tenacity and almost reckless fearlessness and terriers for their quick moves and agile body types.

James Hinks

    According to CanineChronicle.com, Irishman James Hinks (1829-1878) was the first Bull Terrier breeder and became rich from the trade. A poor man from Mullingar, Ireland, Hinks got into dog fighting which won him money and a chance to move up in status. To create a new fierce kind of breed, Hinks brought the bull dog and the Staffordshire terrier together to create a competitive, intelligent and loyal breed.

First Staffordshire Terriers

    After the mastiff-like bull dogs and quick terriers became a well established "bull and terrier" breed, breeders continued developing the breed for fighting in Staffordshire, England. When Great Britain enacted animal welfare laws that banned bulls and bear-baiting fights, crowds gathered to watch and gamble on dog-to-dog combat instead. The Irish Staffordshire terrier was the top fighting dog.

Irish Staffordshire Bull Terrier Registration

    When England went to register the Staffordshire terrier in the Kennel Club in the 1950s there was a bit of a problem. There were two types of Staffordshire breed--an English one and a more Irish one with slight differences in shape, size and behavior. The Kennel club sent the Staffordshire dogs to Ireland to keep the dog thoroughbred as an Irish breeding strain.

    In the 1980s, Irish breeders brought the breed back to England to differentiate it from the UK's Kennel Club called plain Staffordshires. They added "Irish" to the breed's name to separate the two breeds for good.

Staffordshires Vs Irish Staffordshires

    Irish breeders developed a taller, leaner and more agile dog than the Kennel Club's Staffordshire dog. When Irish and English lawmakers officially banned the dog-fighting sport, few people were interested in buying or breeding the bull terrier. However, a refreshed interest in the dog revived in the 1980s when the dog was bought as a pet in the UK and in the U.S.

How Much Do I Feed My Beagle Puppy?

How Much Do I Feed My Beagle Puppy?

Beagles are among the smallest dogs included in the hunting group. Beagles are energetic and joyous; as working dogs, they hunt deer and rabbits. The litter size in beagles is between two and 14 puppies, with the average of seven. Ideally, beagle puppies should spend their first four weeks alongside their mother, who provides the necessary warmth, protection and food. After the first four weeks, you need to start feeding it.

Beagle Puppy Food

    If the beagle puppy is with its mother, you don't need to give it any food for the first four weeks, because the mother provides all the puppy needs. An orphaned beagle needs a dog milk replacement for the first four weeks. Talk to your veterinarian to recommend a suitable substitute. Cow's milk is not suitable for feeding beagle puppies, because the puppy's digestive tract may not react well to it. Starting from week four, you may introduce solid food in the puppy's diet. Gradually decrease the amount of milk replacer until you eliminate it completely. By the time it is eight weeks old, the puppy should eat solely puppy food. Don't feed regular dog food to a puppy, because puppies should have twice the energy intake of adults. Puppy food is rich in protein, containing between 25 and 30 percent protein. The food for adult beagles should contain only up to 23 percent protein, according to Columbia-Willamette Beagle Club.

How Much Do I Feed My Puppy?

    If the puppy gets dog milk during its first weeks, you don't need to feed it. If it is no longer with its mother, weigh your dog; feed it an amount of milk replacement that is equal to one-quarter of its weight. Modify the amount as your puppy grows. After the transition to solid puppy food, your beagle should eat a cup or a cup and a half of food. Spread out this amount over 24 hours.

Feeding Frequency

    Feed the beagle puppy every two hours during the first four weeks of its life. Gradually reduce the feeding frequency to six and four times a day. By the time the puppy is three months old, it should eat only twice per day. You can keep feeding your beagle twice a day for life. Don't give your beagle table scraps and avoid free-feeding it, because beagles like to eat and your dog may become obese.

Monitor Puppy Weight

    Monitoring the puppy's weight in the initial four weeks is important. If fed correctly, it should gain approximately 10 to 15 percent of its weight at birth every day. During the first weeks, beagle puppies may double their weight. Orphaned puppies that don't get enough food and don't develop may die.

How to Feed a Dog Ice Cubes

How to Feed a Dog Ice Cubes

Dogs react to ice cubes in much the same way as people. Some love munching them as a snack and some have no interest in them at all. If your dog enjoys the occasional ice cube snack, you can double its enjoyment by making ice cube treats. These can help keep your dog cool and reward it for good behavior.

Instructions

    1

    Pour chicken or beef broth into an ice cube tray. Keep this tray separate from your everyday trays.

    2

    Put the tray in the freezer and leave it for a few hours, allowing the broth to harden into ice.

    3

    Call your dog to the kitchen and run it through some of its best tricks.

    4

    Toss a broth cube into your dog's food bowl and let it crunch it up.

Rabu, 26 Oktober 2011

How to Identify Dog Footprints

How to Identify Dog Footprints

Dog footprints actually include several different types of animals. Along with domestic dogs, the tracks you're seeing could also be from a red fox, gray fox, wolf or coyote. All of these animals have very similar tracks. You might think it would be difficult to mix up a dog footprint with a cat footprint, considering the differences in sizes. But remember that dog tracks include foxes, which can be quite small, and cat tracks include bobcats, lynx and mountain lions, which can be quite large.

Instructions

    1

    Check the footprints for claw marks. Dog footprints will typically include claw marks above each pad, while other animals' tracks typically won't.

    2

    Look closely at the shape of the heel pad (the largest, bottom-most pad) of the footprint. There will be four imprints above the heel pad, which represent the toes. The bottom of the heel pad will curve upward in the middle. This is because that part of the pad is located higher on a dog and therefore doesn't leave an imprint. Also, the top of the heel pad will show one bump, not two as in other animals.

    3

    Examine the toe imprints. If you're looking at a dog footprint, the top two middle toe imprints will most likely be side-by-side, or nearly so. The outer two toe imprints will be almost triangular in shape.

How Much Dry Food Should an 80-Pound Lab Eat?

How Much Dry Food Should an 80-Pound Lab Eat?

    Health, age and activity level all affect a dog's nutrient needs.
    Health, age and activity level all affect a dog's nutrient needs.

Basic Guidelines

    The consensus among dog experts is that an adult, 80-pound dog should be fed between five and eight cups of dry food a day. If you're feeding your Labrador a combination of dry and wet/canned food, the dry food can be reduced to 2.5 to 5.25 cups along with two cans of food.

It's Not Just a Number

    Health, age and activity level, along with breed and weight, are factors that should be taken into account when determining how much to feed a dog. In particular, pregnancy, nursing and increased physical activity will increase the Lab's nutrient needs.

Bottom Line

    The exact amount of food a particular dog will need in a day is difficult to pinpoint exactly, so use five to eight cups of dry food a day as a general rule of thumb and adjust accordingly. Also, be sure to always have clean, fresh water available for the Lab.

How to Know Dog Breeds

There are about 540 recognized dog breeds in the world. One hundred forty of them are recognized by the American Kennel Club, while another 100 or so are listed under "miscellaneous breeds" and "Foundation Stock Services." The rest are breeds of various crosses and hybrids around the world bred for specific traits and purposes. By learning the basics, it's possible to recognize most breeds by sight. Read on to learn how to know dog breeds.

Instructions

    1

    Start learning about dog breeds by looking up information on familiar dogs. Look into the histories and origins of the dogs owned by friends and family.

    2

    Review the different classifications of dog breeds. Get familiar with the kinds of dogs included in sporting, hound, working, toy, terrier, non-sporting, herding and miscellaneous classes. Learn the purpose of each class or group.

    3

    Study each classification and particular breeds. Take the time to read a little about each breed, its special features, temperament and characteristics.

    4

    Notice that the sporting group requires lots of regular exercise; the hound group enjoys hunting and tracking activities; terriers exhibit strong wills and the toy group, by virtue of its size, minimizes care and costs.

    5

    Find the category familiar dogs fit. Think about the particular traits of specific breeds, like retrieving, tracking, guarding and companionship, and determine its group.

    6

    Visit the website of the American Kennel Club (AKC) and review each class of dog. Study the pictures of the various breeds. Note the commonalities and differences. See the Resources section for a link.

    7

    Research "designer dog" hybrids not recognized by the AKC. Read about the efforts to combine the best features of two breeds into one new breed.

Selasa, 25 Oktober 2011

How to Locate a Rhodesian Ridgeback

Finding a the right Rhodesian Ridgeback can be a challenging experience. Although Ridgebacks have grown in popularity over the last ten years, they are still not as common as some breeds. Still, with a little legwork, you should be able to find a Ridgeback that perfectly fits in to your family.

Instructions

    1

    First, do your research. Rhodesian Ridgebacks are not a breed for everyone. They can be stubborn, dominant, and destructive, when not given enough attention or trained properly. Make sure a large, active dog like a Ridgeback fits your lifestyle before taking the plunge.

    2

    Decide if you want to locate a puppy or an adult. Puppies are usually easiest to acquire from breeders, and adults from rescue organizations.

    3

    Check out your local shelters. Purebred Rhodesian Ridgebacks can and do sometimes pop up in shelters, as well as a variety of Ridgeback mixes. Make sure you are well acquainted with the Ridgeback's appearance before going to the shelter, since some Ridgebacks do not have the hallmark ridge and can be more difficult to identify. Also, shelters are not always reliable at identifying Rigebacks correctly.

    4

    Get online. The Rhodesian Ridgeback Club of the United States (RRCUS) has links on their website to breeders in every state. Typically, these breeders are ethical and health test their breeding stock. Also, the RRCUS website has links to national Ridgeback rescue organizations, if you are interested in rescuing a homeless Ridgeback.

    5

    Make some calls. Once you've found your area breeders or rescue organizations, start calling them on the phone. Be prepared to be wait-listed for puppies by breeders. Sometimes, it can take well over a year. Also, most breeders will want to meet you prior to selling you a puppy. Both breeders and rescue organizations will want you to fill out questionnaires, and rescue organizations will do a home check as well, to make sure you and your home are properly equipped to add a Ridgeback to your life.

    6

    Look up Rhodesian Ridgeback clubs in your area. Sometimes, reputable breeders will not be members of the national Ridgeback club, but will belong to the local club.

Characteristics of Rat Terrier Dogs

Rat terriers are a domesticated American breed of dogs that are friendly pets and useful hunting companions. The lineage of the rat terrier traces back to the 19th-century English feist, a small hunting dog that was a cross between the smooth fox terrier and the Manchester terrier. In the 1890s, Americans imported the feist to the United States and bred the feist with smooth fox terriers and other dogs, such as the beagle and the Italian greyhound, to form different colored rat terriers. Today, Rat Terriers have specific characteristics that distinguish them from other dog breeds.

Appearance

    The Rat Terrier Club of America (RTCA) has specific breed standards for rat terriers. The RTCA recognizes two different sizes: miniature and standard. A mMiniature rat terrier stands between 10 and 13 inches in height, while standard rat terriers stand between 13 and 19 inches in height. Rat terriers can weigh anywhere between 10 and 25 pounds. Their coats are short, naturally smooth and dense. The dogs can have bi-colored coats of white with black or white with tan colors. They can also have tri-colored coats of white with black and tan or rust colors. Rat terriers may also come in shades of chocolate, lemon, red, orange or blue.

Living with Rat Terriers

    Rat Terriers are obedient and loyal to their owners. Due to their small size, they do not take up much space in a house. The dogs are clean and well-mannered. They do need exercise and fresh air, and three or more long walks a week can help the dogs expend energy. Rat terriers enjoy the presence of people, so if you live in the city and desire owning a dog, a rat terrier is a possible option. Rat terriers also enjoy playing with children and young kids. Historically, people have used the dogs to corner squirrels, hunt vermin and rid an area of mice and rats. Today, rat terriers continue to make useful hunting companions.

Diet

    Puppy rat terriers drink their mother's milk for the first six weeks of life. Breeders may begin introducing small amounts of solid food during the third or fourth weeks. A puppy should begin eating solely puppy food about seven to eight weeks after it is born. Veterinarians can recommend high-quality foods for the puppy to eat. When a rat terrier is four months old, you should switch the dog to an adult diet. A veterinarian or dietary specialist can recommend which type of maintenance foods would best suit a particular dog. Dogs who are fed good-quality dry food do not need supplements of vegetables or meats. Make sure your dog always has access to fresh water.

Health

    Rat terriers are basically healthy dogs, and their average lifespan ranges from 12 to 18 years. The dogs can survive in various climates, ranging from extreme cold to very hot environments. They can also be either indoor or outdoor pets. When you receive your rat terrier from a reputable breeder, make sure to obtain all of the animal's medical records. You should also obtain a health guarantee, which states that you can return a puppy that has any serious health problems. Adult rat terriers should have annual visits to the veterinarian.

Senin, 24 Oktober 2011

Foods My Yorkie Can Eat

Foods My Yorkie Can Eat

Everbody wants to know that they are feeding their dog the right kinds of food, especially because a bad diet could cause severe health problems for them in the future. To make sure that your dog will lead a happy, healthy life, it is important to know foods that are good for your Yorkie and foods that are bad for your Yorkie. Appropriate foods for your Yorkie include manufactured dog food and homemade dog food, and it is also important that they are getting their daily vitamins and minerals. Yorkies can be especially sensitive to fat because of their small stomachs, so you should watch their fat intake as well.

Manufactured Dog Food

    Experts go back and forth on the issue of manufactured dog food. Some say that homemade food is the best choice for your Yorkshire terrier because of all the fillers and processed ingredients found in the manufactured dog food. Other experts say that manufactured dog food is best because it has just the right percentages of all the food groups and vitamins and minerals that your dog should be eating on a daily basis. However, both diets are accepted by dog nutritionists. Perhaps the correct choice would depend on the owner's personal beliefs, preferences and free time. One thing experts do agree is that dry dog food is preferred over wet food because it is better for their teeth.

Homemade Dog Food

    If you decide on homemade dog food, it is important to make sure you incorporate sufficient protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and fats into their diet. Protein should make up about one-fourth to nearly one-half of their diet. Acceptable foods that your Yorkie can eat within this food group would include boiled chicken, liver, kidneys, organs, fish, lean hamburger, bison and venison. Carbohydrates should make up about half of your Yorkie's diet. Acceptable carbohydrates include brown and white rice, pasta and potatoes. Your Yorkie should be eating a small percentage of fruits and vegetables such as apples, green beans, beets, sweet peas and carrots. Fats can be found in the meats that you give your dog, but should be only 5 percent of their diet. Alternatively, you could add wheat germ oil to their meals or give them avocados, which would also make for a shiny coat.

Minerals and Vitamins

    Yorkshire terriers typically are found to have more troubles with their teeth than other breeds. Teeth problems with your Yorkie can be caused by their diet. Make sure they are getting the recommended levels of vitamins A and D and calcium. It is also not recommended to feed them wet food as this aids in tartar buildup. Vitamin A will help build strong gums and teeth and fight infections. Vitamin D helps regulate the calcium. Minerals that your Yorkie should be getting are sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, copper and iodine. These vitamins and minerals are already present in the manufactured dog food and in certain human food. If you are only feeding your dog homemade food you will want to make sure you are incorporating these into their diets. You could also opt for supplements.

Foods Not to Eat

    Foods that your Yorkshire terrier should not be eating include the following: chocolate, grapes, raisins, sugar-free candy or gum, macadamia nuts, dairy, walnuts, onions, garlic, bread dough with yeast, raw eggs, cat food, cooked beans, salt, corn and nutmeg. These types of foods can make your Yorkie sick, and some can possibly lead to fatal kidney failure or a rapid drop in blood sugar.

Gifts for Black Pug Dogs

Gifts for Black Pug Dogs

The pug is an ancient breed of dog that originated in China.They are comical-looking dogs with large heads, short snouts and large, round eyes. Pug owners are devoted to their chosen breed and enjoy the attention their dogs earn from friends, family and strangers. Include the pug in your gift giving and both the owner and the dog will be delighted.

Bed

    Pugs love their beds.
    Pugs love their beds.

    Pugs play hard and sleep hard. They love cozy beds where they can curl up and recharge for another round of play. A perfect gift from a pug's point of view is a soft bed. You can find beds shaped like doughnuts or as the conventional rectangle. Choose a color that complements the black pug. Lime green, pink or purple are good choices. An exciting detail would be to embroider a silhouette of a black pug on the corner or the front of the bed with the dog's name. Fabric paint and a brush would be another option.

Clothes

    A personalized black pug jacket or a T-shirt can be practical and fun.
    A personalized black pug jacket or a T-shirt can be practical and fun.

    Clothing for dogs is growing in popularity. A winter jacket is a good choice if the pug lives in a cold climate. Jackets come in a variety of fabrics and styles. Choose a plain color that you know the owner enjoys or match the color of the dog's collar and leash. Colors that look well on a black pug include aqua, pink, lime green and yellow. Paint a silhouette of a black pug on the back of the jacket with fabric paint and an artist's brush. Add some rhinestones to look like a collar for a little bling. If the pug lives in a warm climate, a T-shirt is a fun gift to give. Print a message on the back of the shirt: "Black Pugs Rule."

Toys

    Black pugs are playful and enjoy their toys. They can never have too many. Finding a commercial toy that is specific to a black pug is difficult, but it is easy to make one. Transfer a photo of a black pug onto a square of off-white, heavy fabric. Cut out around the image and sew it securely into a little pillow. Stuff with cellophane so it "crinkles" when the dog bites into it. An alternative to the photo image is to applique a black sillhouette of a pug onto the fabric.

Gift Baskets

    A black pug will appreciate soothing oatmeal shampoo.
    A black pug will appreciate soothing oatmeal shampoo.

    Black pugs can be have skin issues. Arrange a gift basket filled with oatmeal-based shampoo and conditioner. Oatmeal is soothing to irritated skin. A well-stocked pet store will carry this product line. Include a soft brush. Add a microfiber towel to dry the pug quickly and make the dog more comfortable after its baths in the cold months. Include a few small toys and wrap the basket in cellophane. Secure the the wrapping with a florist's bow.

Best Dog Breeds for Older Households

Older dog owners are best suited to low-energy dog breeds, and also breeds that are small. Smaller dogs, or lap dogs, are easier to handle than larger breeds, making them easier to walk and care for. Since puppies tend to be high energy and require a lot of time to train, many older dog lovers prefer to rescue an older dog. There are a number of dog breeds that would do well in an older household.

Bichon Frise

    In addition to being relatively low-energy dogs, bichon frises are known to be lap dogs. These little white dogs love human companionship and would do well with retired people who spend much of their time at home. A fully grown Bichon weighs between 7 and 12 pounds. Bichons do need daily walks, but will remain fairly inactive indoors. They like to go everywhere with their family and hate to be left at home. Bichon frises need to be groomed frequently to prevent matting of their fur.

Pomeranian

    The Pomeranian is a small dog, whose average adult weight is between 3 and 7 pounds. The Pomeranian is a smart, loyal breed that is eager to please. Pomeranians take well to positive reinforcement training, and need to be given boundaries in order to become well-rounded, balanced dogs. A Pomeranian is a good breed of dog for older active adults, as they have a fair amount of energy. They need daily walks as well as play time to take care of their exercise needs. The Pomeranian has a long double coat which requires frequent brushing to prevent tangling.

Dachshund

    Dachschunds come in a choice of short-haired, wire-haired or long-haired. The short-haired dachshund's coat is easy to maintain, but the wire- and long-haired dachshunds require regular grooming to keep their coats healthy. Dachshunds also come in two sizesstandard and miniature. Standard dachshunds weigh approximately 20 pounds at their adult weight. Miniature dachshunds weigh approximately 11 pounds when they are fully grown. While younger dachschunds do have a great deal of energy, they are not active indoors. Daily walks will be sufficient exercise for this breed. Dachshunds are more prone to separation anxiety than other dogs, so they are a good dog for the retired adult who is home the majority of the time. The dachshund should be confined if left alone to avoid damage to the house.

Pug

    Pugs are happy, playful dogs with fun personalities. The pug is a breed that appreciates creature comforts and will happily nap during the day. While pugs need a daily walk for exercise, they should not be let outside in extreme hot or cold weather as their short noses can lead to breathing problems. Pugs do not need daily brushing, however their wrinkles will need to be wiped daily. A fully grown pug weighs between 13 and 20 pounds.

Yorkshire Terrier

    Yorkshire terriers are small dogs whose average weight is 7 pounds. Their size makes them a suitable choice for older adult households. Yorkshire terriers are loyal and energetic, and need daily walks. They can be wary of strangers, and their bark can make them a good guard dog. Their wariness can lead to aggression if allowed, so training should be implemented to avoid this.

The History of Golden Retrievers

The History of Golden Retrievers

Recognized for its grace, sweet disposition and intelligence, the golden retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds. The loyal breed is a valued family companion in many homes, and the medium-sized animal is a favorite breed for search and rescue dogs. The history of this breed is rich and filled with rumors about its true origin.

Scottish Origin

    The exact origin of golden retrievers is a mystery. Several breeds played a role in the creation of the golden retriever, such as bloodhounds, the tweed water spaniel, Labrador retrievers, Irish setter, St John's Water dog and Newfoundland dogs. In the 1800s, there was an increasing demand for hunting dogs in Britain. According to the Scottish aristocrat Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, the dog's origin can be traced back to when he bred a now extinct tweed water spaniel with a dark colored retriever. The first flat-coated retriever puppies were born and he continued breeding until a lovely light-colored dog was produced.

Circus Dogs

    In the 1950s, Lord Tweedmouth's breeding records were released to the public and they tell a different story. Dogs were bought from a circus for breeding purposes and this led to the wavy coat and light color. The puppies were crossed with several different breeds, such as St. John's water dog, the Irish setter and Newfoundland. Lord Tweedmouth was breeding dogs that would catch his game, but also be a good companion and friendly in large groups of people or animals. It is also possible that Lord Tweedmouth bought a golden retriever from a cobbler in Brighton, England. The dog, Nous, was born in 1864, and was the only yellow dog from a black litter.

Registration

    Flat coats - golden were first accepted for registration by Kennel Club of England in 1903. In 1911, they were recognized as a breed. The name was officially changed to golden retriever in 1920 as they were previously called retrievers - golden and yellow. The name golden retriever has been attributed to Lord Harcourt, who had a collection of dogs from the original matings at his estate at Nuneham Park, Oxford, England. He exhibited the breed at the Kennel Club Show in 1908, where they were described as yellow flat-coated retrievers.

Introduction to North America

    Golden retrievers came to North America in the 1890s, but were not shown in dog shows until the 1920s. Archie Majoribanks, a relative to Lord Tweedmouth, brought a dog, Lady, to North America and it was registered in 1924. However, the breed was not recognized until 1932. The first golden retrievers were used primarily in hunting. The first dogs were gold to dark gold to a copper gold. The lighter colors that are common today developed over time when the breed became popular in the show ring.