Jumat, 30 September 2011

How to Identify a German Wirehaired Pointer

How to Identify a German Wirehaired Pointer

The German Wirehaired Pointer has a reliable temperament, but may be aloof at times. Nonetheless, it should not be unfriendly with strangers. The loyal companion is affectionate and eager to please. It is a well-muscled breed that is balanced in size, making a determined, intelligent and energetic hunter.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the size and proportion of the dog. The male German Wirehaired Pointer is 24" to 26" tall measured at the withers; the female is a bit smaller, but should not be shorter than 22" at the withers. The body is a bit longer than high. In order to be versatile and have agility and endurance in the field, the German Wirehaired Pointer should not be over- or undersized.

    2

    Make sure the head has the correct conformation. It is moderately long. The brown eyes are medium in size and oval-shaped. The rounded ears should not be overly broad and should hang close to the head. The muzzle is quite long, ending in a dark brown nose that has wide-open nostrils. The nose should be completely pigmented and should not be spotted or flesh-colored.

    3

    Check that the neck is of medium length and does not have a dewlap. The skin should be tight to the body. The chest is deep and has well-sprung ribs leading back to a tuck-up under the short back. The tail is high-set and should be carried up when the dog is alert. The tail is docked 2/5 of its length in this breed. The front leg bones are more flat than round, and while strong, should not be heavy or coarse. The dewclaws are removed. The round feet are webbed and have high arches and close toes leading to thick, hard pads. The muscular thighs are strong, and their angles balance out the forequarters. The dewclaws are removed. The feet are the same as the front feet.

    4

    Feel the wiry coat. This is the German Wirehaired Pointers distinctive feature. The weather-resistant coat repels water to some extent. This breed also has a dense undercoat that helps to insulate against the cold. In the summer, the undercoat thins out so much that you may not be able to tell it exists. The outer coat should be wiry, harsh and lie flat on the body. It is not more than 1" to 2" in length. The coat is usually liver-and-white-spotted, but may be liver roan, solid liver or liver-and-white-spotted with some ticking and roaning. The head is usually liver, and may have a white blaze. There should be no black in the coat.

Ten Reasons to Love a Pit Bull

Ten Reasons to Love a Pit Bull

They may be tagged as aggressive fighters by the media, but pit bulls are quite the opposite. Pit bulls were once called the "nanny dog" for their natural propensity to love and care for humans, particularly children. Pit bull is a category of dog that includes the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire terrier and Staffordshire Bull Terrier breeds. Pit bulls exhibit a number of positive traits, making them an ideal pet for responsible dog lovers. If you are looking for an endearing and lively companion, a pit bull is sure to provide you with years of adoration and playfulness.

Eager to Please

    Pit bull terriers are eager to please their owners with appropriate behavior and following commands. They enjoy being rewarded with treats and positive reinforcement, and respond to structure.

Loving

    Pit bulls exhibit an inherent love for humans and are particularly affectionate toward children and owners. Pits love to lick and give kisses and relish belly-rubs.

Cuddle Buddies

    Pit bulls enjoy cuddling in close proximity to people and act like lap dogs, lying or sitting on owners without recognizing their size and weight. Pits are at ease in their owners' care and can be lulled to sleep within moments.

Energetic

    Pit bull terriers have an inherent joy for life. They are full of energy and enjoy daily activities such as long walks, running, fetching and tugging toys. This breed makes an excellent companion for outdoor enthusiasts.

Friendly

    Pit bulls are outgoing dogs who get excited to greet new people and owners, particularly at the door. They enjoy being petted and acknowledged, even by strangers, and tend to become fast friends with people.

Loyal

    Pit bulls are loyal to their owners, standing or sitting near their sides and following owner cues. Their loyalty includes a protective quality that gives them a heightened awareness, when around other dogs, of conflict that may pose a threat to their owners.

Intelligent

    Pit bulls are smart and determined. They are quick to learn and train. For this reason, pit bulls are often trained as search and rescue, narcotics detection, therapy and educational dogs.

Confident

    Pit bulls exude confidence in exploring their surroundings, playing and meeting new people. They are self-assured and do not typically show shy or withdrawn behavior. Their confident nature means they do not back down from challenges, which owners should be aware of when introducing pits to other dogs.

Easy to Groom

    Pit bulls have short and shiny hair that requires occasional brushing with a bristle brush. These dogs only need baths when necessary, and their coats air-dry quickly.

Healthy

    Pit bulls are typically healthy dogs, with strong, agile bodies and healthy organs. Annual examinations are recommended for pit bulls, as with all breeds. Pit bulls may show symptoms of environmental allergies or hip dysplasia during elderly years.

Common Health Problems in Pug Dogs

Common Health Problems in Pug Dogs

Pugs are dogs known for their short face and small stature. They are excellent apartment dogs as they do not require much exercise, but before adopting a pug, you should become aware of some of the health problems they may experience.

Pug Dog Encephalitis

    Pug dog encephalitis was once a disease that was thought to affect only pugs. It is an inflammatory condition of the brain, and it can affect dogs of either sex. It manifests itself in the form of seizures in pug dogs that are older than 5 years old or younger than 1 year old.

Dry Eye Syndrome

    Dry Eye syndrome is also known as Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca. This condition is caused by the low levels of tear production in the eyes of the pug. It is a very common serious eye problem among pugs and, if left untreated, it can lead to blindness.

Hip Dysplasia

    Hip dysplasia is a malformation that causes the the bones of hip to sit together poorly. While it is most common in larger dogs, it can often be found in pugs as well. This hereditary disease causes stiffness in the rear legs, and as it worsens, it can result in pain and a loss of mobility. Hip dysplasia can be diagnosed when a pug is as young as 2 months old.

Tracheal Collapse

    Tracheal collapse refers to the pug's windpipe being overly narrow as a result of the softening of the cartilage rings in the throat. This problem is common to pugs and other toy breeds. A tracheal collapse can be indicated by a persistent cough, gagging and loud breathing.

Stenotic Nares

    Stenotic nares describes a condition in which a pug's narrow nostril openings strain its breathing and its ability to receive oxygen. This inherited problem results in reduced airflow, but the problem can be corrected by surgery.

Portosystemic Shunt

    A portosystemic shunt, or PSS, is a problem in which an abnormal vein causes blood to bypass the liver. Because of this, the blood is not filtered, and in turn, it will cause neurological diseases. PSS is more likely to occur in female pugs than in male pugs.

Types of Yorkie Breeds

Types of Yorkie Breeds

Yorkshire terriers, also known as "yorkies," belong to the terrier breed of dogs. They are small, long-haired dogs that are known for their unique temperament and glossy coat. Although there is only one type of purebred yorkie breed, it is common for Yorkshire terriers to be crossbred with other breeds. There is also two size variations of the yorkie, the regular toy size and the teacup size.

Size

    Standard-sized Yorkshire terriers belong to the toy size classification of dogs, which means they will weigh between 2 and 3 kilograms and grow no taller than 20.5 cm, according to Pet Planet. This puts the yorkie in the very small category of dogs, making it ideal for apartment living and people who do not have access to lots of outdoor space. The smaller version of the yorkie, known as the miniature or teacup Yorkshire terrier, weighs in at about 3 pounds and is half the size of the regular Yorkshire, according to Official Yorkie Guide.

Temperament

    Yorkshire terriers are in no way held back by their small size. They are brave, energetic, loyal and intelligent dogs, says Dog Breed Info. They make excellent watch dogs and are extremely protective of their owners. This can become a problem, however, if the yorkie is not properly socialized with humans and other dogs. Yorkies are prone to being overly protective and can become suspicious of strangers, which can make them yappy and aggressive. Yorkies are affectionate dogs but are naturally more suited to older children or elderly owners because of their sensitive nature and size.

Appearance

    Yorkies have a medium-sized muzzle, black-rimmed eyes, a black nose and teeth that meet in scissors, according to Dog Breed Info. When erect, their eyes are "V"-shaped and their legs are straight at front-view with rounded feet. The coat of a yorkie is traditionally a mixture of steel blue and tan, according to Official Yorkie Guide. The hair grows long, glossy and is fine-textured; it is comparable to human hair, says Pet Planet. The coat needs regular maintenance in the form of daily brushing and combing, and the hair on the top of the head, which grows very long, is often gathered with a clip or elastic band to prevent it from falling in the face and obscuring the dog's eyesight. The coat of a teacup yorkie, however, will not grow as long as that of the standard-sized yorkie, adds Official Yorkie Guide.

Crossbreeds

    Yorkshire terriers are popular for crossbreeding because of their appealing size, appearance and temperament. One of the most common crosses with a yorkie is the maltese-Yorkshire terrier crossbreed, known as the "yorktese" or the "mortkie," says Yorkshire Terrier Puppies. Both dogs share the benefits of a long and glossy coat. Another popular crossbreed is the yorkie apso, a cross between a Yorkshire terrier and an lhasa apso. These dogs share many of the same characteristics such as loyalty and excellent watchdog abilities, making them a suitable match for crossbreeding. The yorkie-poo is also a common crossbreed between a poodle and a yorkie. Poodles are well-matched with yorkies because of their intelligence, receptiveness and attractive appearance.

Kamis, 29 September 2011

Low Protein Dog Food for Kidneys

Canine chronic kidney disease is a condition that involves the loss of functional renal tissue. The disease is progressive, but can be managed with proper diet and veterinary care.

Types

    Low protein diets for dogs can be commercially prepared and purchased from your veterinarian or homemade.

Homemade Diet Recipe

    An example of a homemade low protein dog meal is 1 scrambled egg, 3 cups boiled potato, 1 tbsp. chicken fat, 1/2 teaspoon calcium powder and 1 tbsp. minced parsley combined and served at room temperature.

Effects

    Low protein diets create less nitrogenous waste in the bloodstream which helps to reduce nausea and vomiting in the dog.

Considerations

    Low phosphorus diets are also often recommended for canine chronic kidney disease as they may slow the progression of the disease by creating fewer mineral deposits in the kidneys. Talk to your veterinarian about which diet is best for your pet.

Warning

    If you choose to feed your dog a low protein diet, make sure to carefully manage the diet with the help of your veterinarian. Improperly managed low protein diets can lead to malnutrition.

Kangaroo Dog Information

Australia is well known for boomerangs and kangaroos but not as well known for dog breeds. Australia's first contribution to the dog world, according to the Australian Kangaroo Dog and Staghound website, is the kangaroo dog. Also known as the staghound, Australian greyhound, and kangaroo hound, the kangaroo dog is a type of sighthound used for hunting with a history dating back to the early 19th century.

Physical Appearance

    Kangaroo dogs tend to resemble larger greyhounds. The males weigh more and are taller than the females of the breed. The dogs range in height from 18 to 32 inches at the shoulder, and weigh between 65 and 70 lb. The body of a kangaroo dog is usually muscular and lean. Their heads resemble that of a kangaroo, giving them their name. Coats for kangaroo dogs come in any number of colors, but black is usually not accepted as a breed standard color. Common colors for the coat include gray, fawn and brown brindle. The coat can be smooth or rough, with short, fine hairs. Some kangaroo hounds feature a coat between a smooth and rough coat, known as a broken coat.

History

    During the 1800s, hunters began crossbreeding the Scottish deerhound and English greyhound with other hunting breeds like the Irish wolfhound and Australian cattle dog. If a dog was proven to be a strong hunter, it was very likely used within the breeding of kangaroo hounds. The new hybrid dog was designed to help hunt kangaroos, bears, dingoes and other Australian marsupials. Farmers around Australia used the dogs to keep away any intruders and nuisances on the farm. The kangaroo hounds also allowed farmers and hunters to conserve gunpowder, making them a great asset. While not widely known outside of Australia, the dogs still enjoy popularity as pets and hunting companions.

Temperament

    Kangaroo hounds are built for hunting, which means they may occasionally attempt to hunt unfamiliar animals and must be watched carefully. They tend to get along well with other dogs but should be kept on-leash in public to prevent them from running off to try and hunt. They are gentle dogs and work well in homes with older children. Because they are so active, kangaroo dogs fit best in a family that has enough room for them to run and can handle a more active dog.

Grooming and Diet

    Kangaroo dogs shed very little under normal circumstances. They require the occasional brushing to keep their coats clean, but beyond that, grooming can be kept to a minimum. They are omnivores like most dogs and need to be fed at least twice a day because of the amount of energy they burn.

Health and Life Span

    Sighthounds are occasionally susceptible to problems due to their lack of body fat but generally are a healthy breed. Kangaroo hounds encounter obesity problems if they are fed too often or eat overly rich foods. Because they lack most major health problems, kangaroo hounds are expected to live between 10 and 12 years.

How to Make Slow Cooker Dog Food

Slow cooker dog food is full of meat, vegetables, and other ingredients that your dog will love. More importantly, slow cooker dog food is filling and healthy for your canine companion. When you make it yourself, you know your best friend is getting the best quality ingredients.

Instructions

    1

    Cut the vegetables and potatoes into bite sized pieces.

    2

    Put the chicken necks or beef barrow bones in the slow cooker. Add the vegetables, potatoes, minced garlic, chopped parsley and olive oil.

    3

    Spread the cooked rice over the vegetables and pour the unsalted chicken or beef broth over the top.

    4

    Add enough water to cover all of the ingredients and fill the slow cooker about three quarters full.

    5

    Set the slow cooker on low heat and cook the dog food for 5 to 8 hours.

    6

    Allow the mixture to cool slightly, and remove the bones. Pour the remainder of the mixture into a blender container and blend it until it's thick.

    7

    Put the slow cooker dog food in portion-sized containers or resealable plastic bags. Store them in the refrigerator or freezer.

How to Identify a Maremma Sheepdog

How to Identify a Maremma Sheepdog

The Maremma sheepdog hails from the mountains of Italy. It is descended from the great white Eastern sheepdogs that spread across Europe well over two millennia ago. It is similar to the Turkish Akbash and the Slovakian Kuvac, though evolved to better fit the mountainous surroundings. This breed is a powerful and extremely intelligent flock guard. It takes a firm and steady hand to train, though the benefit for an owner wanting a sheepdog or a companion is great. Unlike many other sheepdogs, the Maremma does not bark, except as a final warning to a stranger approaching the dogs home or charges. This breed is about two-thirds the size and weight of other wolf-slaying sheepdogs, relying on its great agility and intelligence to win the day over brute strength. Despite the danger this breed poses to intruders, it would not under any circumstances harm children or the family of its master. To this end it makes a good pet, though it needs plenty of room and strong training. Here is a guide to recognizing this rare breed.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by judging the size, dimensions and weight of the dog. It should stand a little over 2 feet high at the shoulder and be very wide and square-bodied, roughly as long as it is tall. Depending on height and gender, this breed can weigh between 65 and 100 pounds. The legs should be very thick and have widely splayed paws. The chest should be deep to accommodate a large set of lungs for breathing rarefied air, reaching all the way down to the elbows of the forelegs. The tail should be long enough to touch the ground, thick and heavily feathered with long fur.

    2

    Examine the dogs fur. It should be long and slightly wavy, though never curly. This hair is very densely packed and obviously designed for cold weather. It should include significant feathering along the legs and chest, although the fur of the underbelly is often short. The dog should have a particularly thick ruff of fur around the neck, making it seem of much greater mass than it actually is. The fur should be of uniform white, though occasionally the fur around the ears will be marked with light yellow or gold spots resembling stains.

    3

    Conclude by looking at the dogs head. It should seem a bit too small in relation to the dogs size, though this is only because of the fur adding mass to the dogs frame. The skull should be very high-domed and wide, narrowing rapidly to a short and slightly upturned snout. The ears should be small and held low to the sides, flopping over just far enough to hide the ear canal from sight. The nose should be black, but will turn pink-brown as the dog ages. The eyes should be almond shaped and small, and look very intelligent. If the dog matches this description, its a Maremma sheepdog.

What Is Good About Black & Tan Hounds?

Black and tan hounds, or Black and Tan Coonhounds, are often used to hunt game, such as raccoons, deer, mountain lions and opossums. This breed is a good family dog as well as hunting dog. Its distinctive look is also appealing to many people. Black and tan hounds are descended from hounds in England. Know all you can about the black and tan hound before you choose one for yourself.

Appearance

    The black and tan hound has a look that is instantly recognizable. As its name implies, its coat is primarily black with tan, or dark brown, markings. This dog has the typical hound dog drooping ears and keeps its "puppy dog" face into adulthood. Black and tan hounds are larger than some hounds, reaching up to 75 pounds.

Temperament

    The black and tan hound is eager to please its master, making it a good pet to own. These dogs are smart, loyal and generally happy. If you like taking your dog in public, around children and strangers, the black and tan is a good breed to choose, because it is friendly to just about everyone and is rarely aggressive. Because of their breeding as prey hounds, black and tan hounds have a strong instinct for tracking animals. This is a good trait if you enjoy hunting, but you must remember to keep your dog on a leash so it does not take off after something.

Minimal Grooming and Healthcare

    The black and tan hound is an easy dog to own because it does not require much upkeep. Its short coat does not require much brushing and never needs to be trimmed. As for health care, the black and tan hound will likely not have you rushing to the veterinarian's office too frequently. These are healthy dogs, although like most large breeds, they are prone to hip dysplasia. Because they have drooping ears, make sure the ears stay clean and dry so that bacteria does not grow.

Active

    Black and tan hounds are perfect pets for people who have active lifestyles. If you enjoy running, take your black and tan with you, as these dogs not only are able to keep up, they actually need vigorous exercise every day. While they are not the best dogs for small apartment living, they will love living in a house with a big yard, where they can run and play.

Rabu, 28 September 2011

The History of the Redbone Coonhound

The History of the Redbone Coonhound

The Redbone Coonhound is a member of the American Kennel Club Hound Group since 2009. The breed generally ranges in height from 21 to 27 inches and features a short-hair, Beagle-like coat of a solid red color. The fur gets slightly darker around the muzzle, and a little white on the feet is acceptable by AKC standards, but any white that extends beyond the toes is considered a "fault."

Coonhound History

    Many European hunting dogs were imported to the U.S. in the late 1700s for use in foxhunting and other hunting by early American settlers. After the American Revolution, a need for hunting dogs grew as settlers pushed further south and west in the U.S. and hunters found that European hunting breeds were not ideally suited for the various terrain encountered in different parts of the new nation. Southern breeders began combining dog breeds, selecting for stamina, determination and other valuable traits; the result of this selective breeding was the coonhound.

Redbone History

    Scottish immigrants settling in Georgia in the late 1700s brought red-coated Foxhounds, which became the beginning of the Redbone Coonhound breeding. By 1850, Irish Foxhounds and Bloodhounds were being bred with the red Foxhounds. Selective breeding eventually led to a breed that consistently hunted tree-climbing prey, such as raccoons, and that possessed traits such as agility on varied terrain, determination and pack-hunting qualities for different types of hunting. The original Redbone Coonhounds had a black saddle-like patch of fur on their backs, but this was bred out by the 1900s leaving only their distinguishing red coats. One of the earliest breeders of Redbone Coonhounds was a Tennessee breeder by the name of Peter Redbone.

Breed Uses

    The Redbone Coonhound has a natural instinct for prey. It generally seeks tree-climbing animals, such as raccoons, but will also hunt a cougar or mountain lion. The breed is exceptionally agile, making them great hunters in different environments including mountains, swamplands and bayous. Redbone Coonhounds tend to be decent swimmers and may be used as water dogs for duck or other bird hunting. This breed may also be used as watchdogs.

Breed Recognition

    The Redbone Coonhound's claim to fame is attributed to the novel "Where the Red Fern Grows," in which the main character has two Redbone Coonhounds named Old Dan and Little Ann. For professional and breeding recognition, the Redbone Coonhound was the second coonhound breed to receive UKC (United Kennel Club) recognition. It has been AKC recognized, as mentioned above, and is also recognized by the National Kennel Club, Continental Kennel Club, American Pet Registry Inc., American Canine Registry, Dog Registry of America and the North American Purebred Registry.

Five Facts About Shih Tzu Puppies

Five Facts About Shih Tzu Puppies

The Shih Tzu is a popular breed of dog that can make an excellent companion, thanks to its size and temperament. The Shih Tzu is steeped in history and has a colorful background. Study a few facts about the breed before deciding whether is the one for you.

Chinese Origin

    The Shih Tzu breed is thought to have originated in China. The dog also is known as the "chrysanthemum dog," due to its face resembling a flower, or the "snow lion," the literal translation, as it once helped guard the Chinese Imperial palace. It is one of the oldest dog breeds, with evidence suggesting it existed in the Tang Dynasty, from 618 to 907 A.D.

Prone to Health Problems

    Like most dog breeds, certain defects are commonly found in Shih Tzus. They are prone to slipped stifle and spinal disc disease caused by having a long back and short legs. They are also known to put on weight easily and can suffer from common tooth and ear problems.

Long Life Expectancy

    When it comes to pedigree breeds, health problems usually means that many do not live a very long life. However, with a Shih Tzu, you can expect a dog to live about 15 years, which is a long time for a pedigree breed.

Indoor Dogs

    Unlike larger breeds, Shih Tzu's are perfect for indoor living. They can live happily in a small apartment with minimal space, although they should be allowed to roam in an outside yard or taken on a daily walk. Those that are kept cooped up all day without exercise will put on weight quickly, which could lead to serious health issues.

Limited Coat Shedding

    The long coat of the Shih Tzu must be kept healthy with daily brushing. A Shih Tzu will not shed much fur, making them great pets to have if you are house-proud or suffer from common allergies. Trimming the coat is an effective way to make sure that this is the case year-round.

How to Care for Westies

How to Care for Westies

The decision to purchase, raise and care for a West Highland White Terrier, also known as the Westie, should be taken very seriously. Taking care of a Westie is a huge responsibility that is also very rewarding. Many people love West Highland White Terriers for their playful attitude, beautiful coat and charming personality. However, West Highland White Terriers are not all fun and games and require significant amounts of care and attention from their owners.

Instructions

    1

    Accompany your Westie to regular veterinarian check ups, beginning within the first couple weeks after you bring him home. Your veterinarian will recommend specific timelines for when your pet should return for another visit, however you should plan to bring him to the veterinarian at least once a year.

    2

    Brush your West Highland White Terrier daily. The beautiful white coat of this breed often originally attracts pet owners to the Westie. Keep it bright and shiny with daily brushings, as well as regular clipping and stripping of the coat. Bathe your Westie once a week or as suggested by your veterinarian.

    3

    Exercise with your West Highland White Terrier at least once a day. The Westie is a breed that is full of energy and spunk. Take your dog on a long walk or run or play with him in your backyard for a couple of hours. Not only will exercise improve your dog's physical health, it may also reduce the risk for behavior problems.

    4

    Provide your dog with fresh, clean water and a dog food brand specifically designed for small dogs. Work with your veterinarian to choose a specific brand that is best for your Westie. Follow the instructions on your dog's food for how often to feed your Westie.

Selasa, 27 September 2011

Information on the Shorkie Dog Breed

A shorkie is a small dog breed created from crossing Yorkshire terriers and Shih Tzus. Shorkies are not considered purebred dogs according to DogBreedInfo.com, but they are considered a designer mixed breed.

Identification

    Shorkies are a small breed of dog, but size varies from dog to dog because they are not purebred. They often range between 4 to 12 lbs. and 5 to 9 inches in length. Shorkies have long coats that many owners often cut back. They vary in color, ranging from black to a beige color. Some shorkies are even white or reddish, according to the Shorkie Club of America (SCA). Shorkies can get uncomfortable in hot weather under the long coat, prompting many owners to trim the hair.

Temperament

    Shorkies are playful, loving dogs that enjoy sitting on the laps of their owners and cuddling. Like many small dogs, shorkies are not afraid of strangers and enjoy meeting other dogs and people. Most shorkies are loyal and willing to please. However, some shorkies can suffer from "small dog" syndrome, where they feel they must dominate everyone and everything.

Behavior

    Shorkies rarely bark, according to the SCA. While friendly and social, the shorkie can also be independent and spend time entertaining itself. Shorkies are a trainable breed, and do well with children and other animals. Shorkies are also good dogs for people living in cities because they don't require a large yard or lots of space to run.

Benefits

    According to the SCA, shorkies are a good breed for people who are allergic to dogs. They do not shed hair or dander, making them hypoallergenic. Shorkies are also very adaptable to surroundings, fitting easily into most homes and family situations. Shorkies are also easy to train; but, according to the SCA, it is important to stick a routine when potty training.

Care

    Shorkies with long hair constantly deal with tangles. If a shorkies coat is allowed to grow out, it must be groomed daily. According to the SCA, trimming the hair is much easier than daily grooming.

How to Care for a White Boxer Puppy

Approximately one-quarter of all boxer puppies have white coats, according the to American Boxer Club. Both sire and dam must carry the recessive gene that creates white puppies. The puppies of two white Boxers are always white. White is not an American Kennel Club accepted coat color, and there are many misconceptions about the health of white Boxer puppies. Because they cannot be registered for conformation, and because they have been thought for decades to have health problems, many white Boxer puppies are euthanized by breeders. Research by Boxer breeders has done much to dispel the misinformation about White boxer health.

Instructions

    1

    Feed and exercise your white Boxer puppy the same way you would any other puppy. Consult with a dog trainer or your puppy's breeder for general care information. In almost every way, they will need the same type of care as any puppy. Puppy obedience classes give you and your white Boxer puppy an excellent start. Boxers are "keenly intelligent" and even-tempered, according to the American Boxer Club.

    2

    Apply dog sun lotion if your white boxer puppy is spending any length of time in the sun. White Boxer puppies are more susceptible to sunburn than Boxers with solid or brindle coats. Dog sun lotion can be purchased at dog supply stores.

    3

    Be alert to any signs of deafness in your white Boxer puppy. White Boxer puppies have a higher incidence of deafness, in either one or both ears, than other Boxers. According to the American Boxer Club, deafness in white Boxers is caused by the absence of pigment cells in the dog's inner ear. Deafness develops around 6 to 8 weeks of age. Train a deaf puppy with hand signals.

    4

    Watch your white Boxer puppy for vision problems or blindness. Some white Boxers suffer from blindness, says the American Boxer Club. A blind puppy needs specialized training, but can be a happy and loving pet. Veterinary guidance is recommended.

    5

    Spay or neuter your white Boxer puppy. White boxers, thought by many to be genetically mutated, disproportionately end up in shelters and humane societies. White Boxers will produce white puppies, contributing to the ongoing problem of homeless dogs.

How to Get a Puppy Crate Trained & Sleeping Through the Night

How to Get a Puppy Crate Trained & Sleeping Through the Night

There are a number of benefits to crate training your dog, and for this reason, all puppies should go through the crate training process. A crate keeps your dog protected and out of trouble while unsupervised. In addition, most dogs will not eliminate inside their crate, as they don't like to foul the place where they sleep. Dogs like a place to call their own, and a crate serves that purpose --- providing stability, comfort, and reducing destructive behavior and anxiety.

Instructions

    1
    An ideally sized crate is large enough for your puppy to be able to stand.
    An ideally sized crate is large enough for your puppy to be able to stand.

    Find a crate. Crate size needs to be large enough for your dog to be able to stand up and stretch his legs. A mistake that many dog owners make is purchasing an over-sized crate for a puppy --- thinking that their pup will fill the space when it grows. Never give your dog an over-sized crate if it is not fully grown. While dogs don't like to soil the place where they sleep, a large crate will enable them to use one side to "do their business," and the other to sleep and rest.

    If your only option is a larger crate, make sure one end of it is blocked off with blankets.

    2
    Be sure to leave a chew toy inside the crate so that your dog will stay occupied.
    Be sure to leave a chew toy inside the crate so that your dog will stay occupied.

    Make the crate comfortable for your dog by placing a pillow or several blankets at the bottom of it, along with a couple chew toys. Toss a treat inside, carry on with your everyday life and let your dog go into the crate and explore on its own. Leave the door open so that they can roam freely, but praise them once they go inside. This will make it much more appealing for them to use the crate, knowing that they have a comfortable little place of their own that their owner approves of.

    3
    Once crate trained, dogs will sleep soundly through the night.
    Once crate trained, dogs will sleep soundly through the night.

    Increase the amount of time that your puppy is inside his crate. Let your puppy warm up to the idea of staying in their crate for extended periods of time. Once they walk inside on their own, close the crate door and leave the room. Only do so for a short amount of time to begin with, then allow them to exit the crate. Wait a few hours, then try again, gradually increasing the amount of time that your puppy is in the crate. Your dog might whine to get taken out of their crate. Do not reward their cries. Otherwise, you will be teaching them that they can whine anytime they want to be taken out. Wait at least 5 minutes after they stop fussing to remove them.

Characteristics of French Bulldogs

Characteristics of French Bulldogs

French bulldogs, or Frenchies, have genetic roots in the British bulldog. In the 1800s, British dog breeders began breeding bulldogs to create smaller companion dogs with mellow temperaments. The smaller bulldogs, known as miniature or toy bulldogs, became frequent companions of British artisan workers who eventually brought the dogs to France. French breeders took a liking to the toy bulldogs and began refining the dog's look to their own standards. Today, the French bulldog is a companionable pet with an easygoing temperament.

Appearance

    Frenchies generally range in size from 20 to 26 lbs. The American Kennel Club requires dog show Frenchies to not exceed 28 lbs. in weight. The dogs are stocky and heavy-boned and have very short noses and short, flat faces. Their coats are short, fine and smooth and come in a variety of colors and patterns including brindle, fawn and pied. A Frenchie with a brindle coat pattern can have near-black fur with streaks or stripes of light or bright colors in it. Frenchies with fawn coats are tan, mahogany or cream in color and can have a black face. Dogs with pied coats are white in color with brindled or fawn patches of color on them.

Environment

    French bulldogs are highly adaptable; they can live in the countryside, suburbs or in apartments and condos in the city. The dog is not overly hyper or considered high-maintenance. French bulldogs typically have moderate activity levels and are satisfied with short walks every day or two. If you raise a Frenchie and a cat together, there is a greater chance that the two will get along. In a multi-dog home, Frenchies tend to try and be the "top" dog, or the dog who is the boss of other dogs. The dogs can get along with children; however, children under age 2 may be too young to interact with the dog during its play sessions.

Health

    In general, if French bulldogs are well bred, they will be healthy dogs and won't have more health problems than other types of dog breeds. Frenchies may, however, face certain health issues such as asthma or back, hip or knee problems. It is important to find a veterinarian that has knowledge of French bulldogs and make sure your dog attends annual vet visits. Frenchies are extremely heat sensitive and their bodies can overheat, so you must not let your dog remain outside too long in hot, humid weather. Keep the dog in an air-conditioned house or around fans on hot days, and make sure it has access to fresh water.

Trainability

    It may be hard to house-train a French bulldog since the dog can be a bit stubborn. Frenchies are not quick-to-train dogs. As soon as you obtain a French bulldog puppy as a pet, you should start house-training the animal. You must decide if you want your puppy to go to the bathroom outside or if you want it to be paper trained in the house. Whichever method you decide, be consistent with your animal so that the dog can more quickly learn the rules of the house. Although French bulldogs can be hard to train, by 4 or 5 months old, they should have improved their house-training skills.

Characteristics of a Boxer

Characteristics of a Boxer

Bred from the English bulldog and a now-extinct breed of European canine, the boxer is a popular family pet today. This large, short haired, stocky dog was actually the seventh most popular dog breed in America in 2010, according to the American Kennel Club website. Although they are a favorite among pet owners, it is a good idea to know about the characteristics of this breed before you rush out and get one of your own. They can be a bit challenging not always be the best fit for everyone.

Playful

    Boxers are full of energy and love to play. They seem to run continuously and are always ready to jump and move about, reserving little time for the lazy behavior of their English bulldog cousins. These dogs love to tease, are very feisty and perfect for those who have lots of time to spend wrestling and being silly with their pets. If you want a lap dog or a breed that piles up in a corner and takes it easy all day, the boxer is probably not a good option.

Slow To Mature

    All dogs go through some sort of "puppy phase.' Generally this lasts a few months and then the dog matures and settles down a bit. Boxers do not mature as quickly as most other breeds and may remain puppy-like and overly energetic for three or four years before mellowing out. Even after mellowing, the boxer is a breed that will retain some of its puppy characteristics throughout its life. Many boxers will remain playful and energetic as long as they are alive.

Need Humans

    Think about the time you will have to spend with your dog before taking on a boxer. The boxer is a breed that enjoys and needs human interaction on a regular basis and does not do well when left alone. Boxers need to be with their human families for a significant amount of time each day to prevent the development of destructive behavioral problems. They also tend to be better behaved as housedogs that have consistent connection with their people, and are not well suited for being yard dogs or doghouse dogs that spend much of their time alone.

Aggressive Toward Same Sex

    For the most part boxers are happy to see you as well as your other pets. Boxers are known to be good around other pets, including cats. Mostly they just want to play with them. Some more aggressive boxers will still usually leave other pets alone unless the boxer is male and there is another male dog in the home. They are rarely aggressive or forceful with humans, but they tend to try and intimidate other male dogs on occasion and occasionally they could chase cats, even if they only see it as a form of playing.

Senin, 26 September 2011

What Breeds of Dogs Made a Yorkie?

What Breeds of Dogs Made a Yorkie?

Yorkshire terriers, also known as Yorkies, are small, long-haired dogs, weighing less than 7 lbs. They first appeared in the northern parts of England in the 1870s and were used primarily to control the severe rat overpopulation. Yorkies possess traits from three main breeds that are now extinct, so their exact bloodline is still debated to this day.

Origins of the Yorkie

    The Yorkshire Terrier was originally known as the broken-haired Scotch terrier. The named changed in 1870, nine years after the first Yorkie was entered in a dog show in England. The name change is due to how well the breed was refined in Yorkshire, Manchester. The sire of all modern day Yorkies is considered to be Huddersfield Ben, a dog owned by M.A. Foster from 1865 to 1871. He was a multiple dog show champion, being exceptionally skillful in the rat-catching contests that were popular at the time and location. In 1878, the breed was officially registered in the American Kennel Club in the United States.

Clydesdale Terrier

    One breed being largely responsible for the Yorkie is the Clydesdale terrier. This dog is a version of the Skye terrier, a dog with a long, straight, silky coat. While the Skye can also be considered a relative of the Yorkie, the Clydesdale is more specific in that it had many of the traits necessary to help create the Yorkshire terrier. They had the same coat texture and colors as the dog we know today. It was a rare breed in its day, and was extinct by the 1920s.

Waterside Terrier

    The waterside terrier, also known as the otter terrier, had the Yorkie's signature black and tan colors, but unlike the Clydesdale, it sported a shorter, rough coat. It is a breed with history dating back to the 1500s. This breed evolved into what we know today as the Airedale terrier, a much bigger dog with a short, wavy coat.

Old English Terrier

    The Old English terrier is another old breed. The variety that contributed to the Yorkie breed is the toy rough and broken-haired. Yorkies were originally shown under the name of this variety until they were given their own name. Today, the only variety that exists under AKC standards is known as an excellent hunting companion.

List of Healthy Dog Foods

List of Healthy Dog Foods

The labeling on most types of dog foods is often difficult to interpret, so many times it's hard to understand what is healthy and what isn't. All pets need a balanced diet consisting of carbohydrates, protein and fat. Several brands of dog food are healthier than others, and are good choices if you're looking for an alternative to the "big name" commercial brands.

Newman's Own

    Newman's Own contains at least 70 percent organic ingredients. The ingredients include natural chicken raised without antibiotics; organic soy meal, brown rice, barley, peas, flax seed, oats and carrots; parsley; and kelp. This dog food does not contain no poultry byproducts, chemical fertilizers, antibiotics, steroids, no chemical additives or artificial flavors, making Newman's a healthy choice.

Innova

    Innova is another healthy dog food choice because it's also all natural. For example, turkey, chicken and chicken meal are the first three ingredients listed in the Innova adult dog food formula. The food does not have any chemical or artificial preservatives. The food focuses on fresh ingredients from all five food groups, making Innova a healthy dog food option.

Flint River Ranch

    Flint River Ranch dog food does not have any meat or grain by-products, color additives or synthetic preservatives such as BHA and BHT. It contains only human-grade, natural ingredients that are slowly oven-baked under carefully controlled conditions. This makes digestion easier for dogs. Flint River's line of dog foods is recommended by veterinarians as well.

Karma Organic

    Karma Organic is 95 percent certified organic, which means it has no artificial preservatives, flavorings or fillers. The ingredients include a combination or organic meats, fruits, vegetables and grains, and the dog food does not contain any pesticides, herbicides or genetically modified ingredients.

Natural Choice

    Natural Choice contains all natural ingredients, including vitamins and minerals that help your dog maintain healthy skin and a lustrous coat. It also helps maintain strong, healthy joints. Natural Choice has a team of experts at the The Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, where they do research to determine the formulas that contribute to optimal pet health.

Do It Yourself

    According to Dr. Martin Goldstein, DVM, "You can boost your pet's health profoundly by making one simple decision. All you have to do is change his diet from commercial-brand fare to something you may never have imagined giving him: real food. The fresh food you buy at the market for yourself is the food you should give your pet, too." If you want to ensure the optimal health of your pet, consider making your own healthy dog food comprised of whole foods.

Skin Irritations in Shar-Peis

The Chinese Shar-Pei is a breed of dog with unusually loose skin. Deep folds and wrinkles can become irritated from bites and allergies. Shar-peis may have a genetic susceptibility to mange and certain allergies, according to VetInfo.

Inhalant Allergies

    Allergies from inhaled substances like mold, dust, and pollen can cause the skin irritation and itching, according to VetInfo. This can lead to the dog licking, scratching, and biting the affected areas.

Infections

    Bacteria and demodex mites can cause skin infections in the Shar-Pei, as noted by the Mar Vista Animal Medical Center. The folds of the dog's skin can interfere with healing. Symptoms include reddened, moist and smelly skin.

Regular Grooming

    Regular inspection and grooming of the coat can help prevent infections. Brushing the skin increases the secretion of natural oils that help protect against infection.

Facts About Jack Russells

Facts About Jack Russells

Jack Russell terriers, which originated from the working fox terriers, was recognized by AKC as part of the terrier group in 1997. The name of the breed was since officially changed to Parson Russell terrier. An extremely active, outgoing and cheerful dog, the Jack Russell requires plenty of attention and exercise. The dog is loyal and loving and can be a great family pet.

Origins

    The Parson Russell terrier was named after Reverend John Russel, who bred the hunting dogs in the middle of the 19th century in the south of England. The dogs chased foxes underground and made them surface, so that the hunters were able to see them. After the Reverend's death the dog was bred with Welsh corgis, resulting in the Jack Russell terrier breed, today known as the Parson Russell terrier.

Appearance

    The standard size for a Jack Russell terrier is between 13 inches tall when measured at the shoulder for females and 14 inches for males. The breed weighs between 13 and 17 lbs. and has a balanced and muscular build. Jack Russells have a flat skull and a direct and curious expression, with almond-shaped dark eyes. The ears are V-shaped and the tip drops to cover the orifice. The muzzle is rectangular and the nose is black. The body is square and balanced and the tail is typically docked, so that the tip is at the level with the skull. The coat may be either smooth or broken and Jack Russells are double-coated. Parson Russells are predominantly white and have black or tan markings

Exercise Needs and Care

    Jack Russell terriers have been used as working dogs and have a lot of energy and they need regular exercise and playtime. Jack Russells require a lot of human interaction, rewarding attention with great affection for their owners. The short, weatherproof coat doesn't require extensive grooming, so you only need to brush the dog regularly and administer occasional baths. Certain Jack Russells tend to have dry skin, so they need special formula shampoos.

Parson Russell Terrier Health

    Parson Russell terriers are prone to developing a few health issues including eye lens luxation, which is hereditary; cataracts, heart disease, heartworms, liver disease, ear infections or kidney disease. Less severe problems include external parasites such as fleas and ticks, travel sickness, diarrhea or skin flakiness. Regular veterinary checkups can detect and prevent any medical issues. The dog requires vaccinations, including leptospirosis and parainfluenza vaccines at an early age.

How to Feed 5 Week-Old Puppies

You can start weaning a puppy when it is 5 weeks of age. Puppies now can receive all the nutrition they need from commercial puppy food and no longer need to nurse. Knowing how and when to feed a puppy at this stage ensures proper growth and development. The amounts of food will depend on the size of the puppy. Without proper nutrition, puppies at this age can become immunocompromised, making them more susceptible to illnesses and parasites.

Instructions

    1

    Mix two parts wet puppy food with one part warm water until it is semi-thick and smooth. Scoop up a small amount of the mixture with your index finger and gently rub it on the puppy's lips. The taste and smell should peak the puppy's interest.

    2

    Place a small amount of the food into the palm of your hand and offer it to the puppy. Offer the puppy a bowl full of food if it eats readily from your hand. Continue hand-feeding if it does not eat from the bowl.

    3

    Feed the puppy this mixture four times a day. If the puppy displays abdominal issues, such as vomiting, decrease the amount of food per serving and increase the frequency of feeding to five or six times a day.

    4

    On the third day, replace the canned puppy food with dry kibble. Mix one part dry kibble with two parts warm water and let it sit for 5 minutes before offering it to the puppy.

    5

    Reduce the amount of water you use slightly each day after the third day. The puppy should be eating dry kibble without water by the beginning of the sixth week.

    6

    Weigh the puppy daily. Increase the amount of food you are giving the puppy if it loses weight for two days in a row.

What Kind of Human Food Can a Dog Eat?

What Kind of Human Food Can a Dog Eat?

    Finding the
    Finding the "right" food for your dog is more important than finding the "best" food.

Dogs Can Eat Most Kinds of People Food

    Human food adds variety to your pet's diet.
    Human food adds variety to your pet's diet.

    Most healthy human foods are also healthy for dogs. All meats, some grains (such as oats, rice or barley) and most fruits, tubers and vegetables are good for dogs.

Some Human Foods are Harmful to Dogs

    Packaged dog food is nutritionally complete.
    Packaged dog food is nutritionally complete.

    Foods that are toxic to dogs include alcohol, anything caffeinated, onions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, mushrooms, avocados and the artificial sweetener xylitol. Even small amounts of a toxic food can cause health or digestive problems. Nutritionally complete packaged foods avoid these ingredients or use them in safe amounts.

Bottom Line

    Dogs can be fed many human foods either as a supplement that adds variety to a packaged diet or as a complete meal, as long as you are willing to take the time to prepare a safe and nutritionally balanced diet. Fresh food diets are especially useful for dogs with allergies or health problems that rule out most packaged pet foods.

Shorkie Puppy Information

Shorkie Puppy Information

Shorkies are considered a designer breed. They are a mix of a Shih Tzu and Yorkshire terrier. The American Canine Hybrid Club recognizes the shorkie as an official hybrid designer dog.

Appearance

    An adult shorkie weighs an average of seven to 12 pounds. Their height reaches only five to nine inches, thus categorizing them as a toy breed. Coat colors can be tan, reddish-brown and even black with a little white mixed in. The coat tends to lighten as the dog ages.

Grooming

    Shorkie puppies are considered nonshedding, hypoallergenic dogs. Their coats need to be groomed daily if their hair is allowed to grow out. A "puppy cut" trims the hair to a shorter length, giving the dog a cute, youthful look. This cut can be maintained by trims every six to eight weeks.

Temperament

    Mixed-breed dogs usually balance the temperaments of their parents' breeds. The shorkie is a playful, non-aggressive dog. It's not considered a high-strung, barking breed. It prefers to be curled up in someone's lap.

Exercise and Training

    Their small size allows shorkies to get adequate exercise by running around the house. Consistency is the key to training a shorkie puppy. House training, with a schedule of going outside every two or three hours, helps set a routine.

Health

    Shorkies live an average of 14 to 19 years. Some adult onset diseases that affect this breed are kidney and thyroid problems, hip dysplasia and hypoglycemia. Regular vet care and a healthy diet keep shorkies healthy.

Caution

    Shorkie puppies should not have a thin coat. Balding coats can signify either poor breeding or an underlying heath concern. Well-bred shorkies usually have Shih Tzu mothers and Yorkie fathers.

How to Identify a Russian Toy Terrier

How to Identify a Russian Toy Terrier

The Russian toy terrier is the smallest dog in the world and comes in two types: long haired and smooth haired. Prior to the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian toy terrier looked no different than the English toy terrier despite their separate bloodlines. It was one of the most popular decorative dogs in Russia. Between the 1920s and '50s the Russian populace lost interest in the breed thanks to long term pre and post war strife. The breed was reborn in the mid-'50s, having been bred from non pedigree specimens to a distinctly different appearance than its English counterpart. Though their numbers have since risen to prewar levels, this dog is still mostly found in Russia. As such most people would not recognize this breed is they saw it, so heres how to identify a Russian toy terrier.

Instructions

    1

    Begin by assessing the dogs size, weight, and taking note of any bodily characteristics. The Russian toy is typically between 8 and 10 inches high at the shoulder and weighs a feather-light 3 to 6 pounds. Despite this you should not get the impression of frailty from this dog. It is built very lightly but has long sturdy limbs and good muscle tone. The body should resemble that of a Doberman in miniature.

    2

    Look at the tail. The tail is most often docked short to within an inch or two long, which is held energetically upward. When left naturally the tail is roughly four inches in length, slightly curved, and held level with the ground.

    3

    Examine the dogs coat. The only difference between the long-haired and smooth varieties of this breed is the ears. Both breeds will have short, smooth, glossy, skin tight fur across the entire body. But the long-haired variety will have expansive plumes of fur which are said to resemble a butterflys wings extending from the ears. A smooth haired breed lacks this feature. The two most common color combinations are black and tan, and red and sable (a silvery gray). This breed can also have solid black, tan, or blue gray coloring as well. All Russian toy terriers can also have spots of white on the chest and paws in addition to any fur color.

    4

    Finish by looking at the dogs head. Its neck should be long, lean, and slightly curved. The skull is small compared to the body. Though narrow, it should be very tall. It should have a button nose and a very lean and pointed muzzle slightly shorter than the length of the skull. The eyes are round and set widely apart. The ears should be thin, tall, and always standing high on the skull. If the dog matches this description, then its a Russian toy terrier.

Minggu, 25 September 2011

How to Participate in National Pit Bull Awareness Day

How to Participate in National Pit Bull Awareness Day

Each year at the end of October, a date is designated as "National Pit Bull Awareness Day." In 2009, for instance, it will be celebrated on Saturday, Oct. 24.

It started in 2007 when a woman named Jodi Preis, founder of Bless the Bullys, a pit bull rescue in Cookeville, Tennessee, felt it was "time for responsible pit bull owners to take a stand and band together to show the world how wonderful this breed is." Says Jodi, "Pit bulls are not the problem. Bad owners are the problem. And we are the solution."

Pit Bulls are easily the most misunderstood and mistreated breed of dog in the world. They have a reputation for being vicious, yet are no more prone to viciousness than any other breed. Only difference is: they are stronger than most breeds. They are also one of the more loyal and loving breeds, which unfortunately makes them better candidates for being trained to fight, as they want to please their owners.

According to Wendy Fisher, a pit bull guardian who works at the Canine Adoption and Rescue League in Ventura, California, pit bulls do extremely well on the "Canine Good Citizen" test.

"From my years' experience, pit bulls are the most people-friendly, children-friendly, human-social and passed temperament tests higher than most breeds," she says.

And tragically, because of their undeserved reputation, shelters are filled with pit bulls, most of which will never make it out to loving homes. They are often used to fight or breed, and when their owners are done with them they simply discard them. Often, the types of people who think it's "cool" or "tough" to have a pit bull don't make the most caring, responsible guardians.

Pit bulls are also often victims of breed-specific legislation (banned in certain areas), not permitted in most rental properties and cause their owners to be charged higher insurance rates. All of these factors contribute to the high abandonment rate and destruction of innocent pit bulls.

It doesn't have to be this way, however, when all it takes is some education and awareness about the training, socialization and care of the breed.

Here is how to participate in National Pit Bull Awareness Day.

Instructions

    1

    Attend events related to Pit Bull Awareness Day or host one of your own. Activities are planned throughout the United States and Canada, including bully breed adoptions, free spay/neutering for pit bulls and pit bull mixes, free training sessions for bully breeds, bully breed pet fairs featuring trainers, agility demonstrations and costume contests, peaceful gatherings/sidewalk marches--and if you're in the Seattle/Tacoma area--you are even invited to pamper your pit with a free indoor swim at a doggie spa.

    2

    Educate yourself about pit bulls and learn more about International Pit Bull Awareness Day. Bless the Bullys website is a good place to start (see Resources below). Visit other pit bull rescue sites as well, especially ones in your area.

    3

    If there is legislation in your area that bans pit bulls or a pending ban, educate as many people as you can about why this is unfair and discriminatory. Leasing companies, property managers and realtors are important people to target for discriminatory practices against specific breeds of dogs, including pit bulls. Start petitions and letter-writing campaigns aimed at your local legislators to ban breed-specific legislation.

    4

    Educate your children and other children about pit bulls. Read "Max, the Shelter Dog" by Nicole Rivera to your kids. This is a story for young readers about a pit bull named "Max" who is abandoned at a shelter by his family. The story is told from Max's perspective as he endures his journey through the shelter system in hopes of finding a new family. Through Max's ordeal, children learn about animal shelters, compassion, hope and the urgency of adopting pets. They will be leaders of the generation that will hopefully put an end to animal shelters for good.

    5

    Visit the Kids for Pits website, which is sponsored by "Max, the Shelter Dog" (see Resources). Children that live with pit bulls can share stories of their pit bulls and post photos. You can also purchase copies of the book through the website, and for an indefinite amount of time if you buy one book, you will receive another copy for free to donate to your local library, elementary school or child's class.

    6

    If you have a pit bull as a pet, blog about your pittie, subscribe to other pit bull blogs, post stories and photos of your pitbull on forums and websites dedicated to the breed. Share videos of your pittie on YouTube, Facebook and MySpace.

    7

    If you're looking to add a dog to your family, consider a pit bull. They are a loyal, loving and fun breed. And lord knows, they need rescuing. You might also want to consider fostering a pit bull until he/she is placed in a forever home. There is always a shortage of fosters, especially for pit bulls, since there are so many that need homes.

How to Store Dog Cookies

How to Store Dog Cookies

Many types of store bought dog cookies contain preservatives that allow them to keep for months after opening the packaging. However, when you bake dog treats at home from scratch, or purchase ones that are all natural, you have to store the treats in a special way to make sure they do not spoil and make your dog sick when he eats them. Learning the difference in storage techniques allows you to make sure your dog stays healthy and happy.

Instructions

Cookies With Preservatives

    1

    Open the container or box of dog cookies that you buy from the store. Break the seal that preserves their freshness if in a container, or open the bag inside of a box. Sometimes, boxes of dog cookies do not contain any freshness seal, which is a clue about just how many preservatives are in the cookies.

    2

    Keep the cookies in the container or box. Make sure to always close the packaging up tightly after you open it to fetch a cookie for your dog.

    3

    Dump the cookies from the container or box into your own glass or ceramic cookie jar, or plastic storage ware. Some dog owners choose to throw out the original boxes or containers that the cookies came in and use their own. Plastic storage ware allows you to seal off air from coming into the container, which is effective for making the cookies last longer. Glass or ceramic dog cookie jars also work to store the cookies, but may not have quite as an effective seal.

    4

    Keep the cookies in a cool, dark place in your kitchen, such as the pantry. Direct exposure to sunlight may cause them to spoil faster.

All Natural Cookies

    5

    Store all natural cookies in the refrigerator after opening. Without the preservatives, natural dog cookies can spoil easily if left out in dry conditions. Your refrigerator keeps the cookies fresher for longer, and reduces the growth of mold as quickly.

    6

    Make sure your all natural dog cookies are stored in a plastic container with a lid. All natural dog cookies do not always come in sealable packaging, so it is necessary to find something in your home to use. A storage container with a lid extends the shelf life of the cookies.

    7

    Put dog cookies in the freezer when you do not anticipate using them soon. Some dog owners buy their dog cookies in bulk, but they do not predict using all of the cookies quickly. When you are ready to give your dog the cookies take them out of the freezer a couple of hours ahead of time so that they thaw slightly. Your dog will enjoy the cookie even if it is still frozen.

How Often Should a Yorkie be Fed

As one of the smaller dog breeds, Yorkies have different feeding requirements from their larger relatives. Occasionally a Yorkie puppy will have trouble regulating his blood sugar due to large gaps in time between meals and will need some medical attention to get back on track. Consult your veterinarian to choose the appropriate schedule for your dog's needs.

Weight

    The amount and frequency of feeding a Yorkie depend ultimately on his body weight. Yorkies have been bred into two types, the standard and the toy. Toy Yorkies can weigh as little as half a pound when they are puppies, while the standards can be a couple of pounds. Since these guys don't weigh very much, they don't get fed very much, so the calories they take in are few and can be used up quickly.

Puppies

    Baby Yorkies should be fed four to five times a day. Consult your breeder or veterinarian for the best type of food and the total caloric needs of your puppy. The standard size will require more but should still have meals broken up through out the day. The idea behind so many feedings is to try to ensure a somewhat consistent blood sugar level throughout the day.

    Not only are puppies smaller but they typically are much more active. The combination of a small stomach and high activity with few fat reserves means the risk of hypoglycemia is increased. As they grow and their bodies can maintain blood sugar levels, the number of feedings per day can be reduced.

    Occasionally Yorkie pups will become so hypoglycemic that they appear extremely lethargic and almost unresponsive. If this occurs they may need veterinary care to balance their blood sugar and then a feeding protocol developed by your veterinarian. Occasionally in extreme cases, vet office staff must administer intravenous fluids and glucose and check their blood sugar several times a day for 24-48 hours. This can usually be avoided by sticking to the same feeding schedule every day.

Grown Dogs

    Older dogs do not typically have the same susceptibility to blood sugar highs and lows as the puppies do. Their mature bodies can adjust blood sugar as needed with fewer feedings. Still, at least two feedings a day are recommended by most veterinarians to ensure regular blood sugar levels while avoiding overloading the dog's stomach with one huge meal. Some Yorkie owners feed their dogs so many treats that the dog never wants to eat his actual dog food. This should be avoided, as treats do not always provide the balanced nutrition a Yorkie needs.

Qualifications of English Bulldog Show Dogs

Qualifications of English Bulldog Show Dogs

The English Bulldog represents strength to many as evidenced by its use as a mascot for the United States Marine Corps, 39 U.S. universities, the New York City Fire Department and hundreds of sports teams throughout the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. Yet this fan loyalty does not equate to the standards set for bulldogs headed for the show ring. Rather, breeding clubs in America and England have stringent requirements that at times are hotly debated when up for review.

Head

    The head of an English Bulldog is highly scrutinized in the show arena.
    The head of an English Bulldog is highly scrutinized in the show arena.

    Perhaps one of the English bulldog's most important physical features, the head is evaluated in nine aspects in dog shows. It is worth 39 of 100 points when being judged. The circumference of the skull is to equal how tall the dog is at its shoulders. Eyes are best located as far from the ears as possible. The ears should be small and thin and resemble a rose in that the ear fold is at its back lower edge with the upper front edge covering over. The nose should be large, broad and black. An English Bulldog with a brown nose is not qualified to be exhibited in professional dog shows.

Body

    The body of an English Bulldog should be compact.
    The body of an English Bulldog should be compact.

    The body of a quality English bulldog is broad and stocky, especially across the dog's shoulders. Well-rounded ribs and a deep, full chest are most desirable. The dog's body should be stocky enough to make the animal appear to have short legs. A short yet straight back that is broader at the shoulders and tapering to a more narrow point at the hind legs is preferred. A straight tail that is short with a narrow tip at the end scores well with judges.

Coat Color

    Brindle coloring is favored for English bulldogs.
    Brindle coloring is favored for English bulldogs.

    A smooth coat is required for an English bulldog to be shown. According to the qualifications listed on the American Kennel Club website, "the color of coat should be uniform, pure of its kind and brilliant." Currently the red brindle is the first choice of color, followed by all other brindles. A brindle coloring is where in which one dominant color is the base color and other colors are mixed in to that solid color either in a stripe or swirled pattern. Solid white is the next most desirable coloring for English bulldogs being shown. Other solid colors such as red, fawn or fallow are next in line. The piebald coloring, which is a nonsymmetrical random white with various patches of other colors, is the least desirable. Yet, if its colors are well-defined, a dog of this coloring has an advantage over a dog with muddy brindle coloring.

Temperament

    Loyalty is a desirable trait among English bulldogs.
    Loyalty is a desirable trait among English bulldogs.

    Several centuries ago English bulldogs were bred to defend territory; the were also used for dog fighting and bull baiting. At that time, they displayed a less-than-loving demeanor. Today's English bulldogs are no longer aggressive or vicious but are expected to be alert and loyal, to appear courageous, and to remain dignified and calm. English bulldogs being shown are expected to be obedient; thus it is necessary for owners to begin obedience, gait and agility training when a puppy reaches six months of age.

Sabtu, 24 September 2011

Types of Mixed-Breed Dogs

Types of Mixed-Breed Dogs

Mixed-breed dogs, also called designer dogs, are crosses between two or more purebred breeds. They range in size from toy-dogs to large dogs, and can display traits of both their heritage lines. Research the breed of any dog before you buy or adopt one.

Small Mixed-breed Dogs

    Small mixed breeds include the chorkie, cockapoo, puggle and pekepoo. Chorkies are a cross between Chihuahuas and Yorkshire terriers. Cockapoos are a cross between a cocker spaniel and a poodle. According to the North Country Kennels website, they can be anywhere from 10 to 20 lbs. Puggles are a mix of pugs and beagles. They can be anywhere from 15 to 30 lbs., according to the Puggle.org website. Finally, pekepoos are a cross between a Pekingese and a poodle. According to the North Country Kennels website, they can be anywhere from 5 to 15 lbs.

Medium-sized Mixed Breeds

    While some medium-sized mixed breeds may weight in at similar weights to some small dog breeds, they stand taller than the toy-sized dog. These breeds include the Austrailian cattle dog, bulloxer, pointollie, and weimardoodle. The Augstrailian cattle dog weighs about 35 lbs. at full size and stands about 18 1/2 inches tall, according to the Dogs In Depth website. The bulloxer is a cross between a bulldog and a boxer and can weigh up to 70 lbs. The pointollie is a mix of a pointer and a collie. They can weigh between 30 and 60 lbs., according to the Designer Mixes website. The weimardoodle is a cross between a weimaraner and a poodle. They can weigh between 45 and 70 lbs. and can reach 27 inches tall.

Large Mixed-breeds

    Labordoodle, golden labrador, saint berdoodle, and the labradoodle is a cross between a labrador retriever and a poodle. The breed can reach 24 inches tall, and can weigh between 45 to 77 lbs. The golden labrador is a cross between labrador and golden retrievers. They can be close to 100 lbs. The saint berdoodle can weigh just under a pure-bred saint bernard, according to the Triple M Kennel website. The breed can be anywhere from 24 to 28 inches tall.

Considerations

    Research the breeds from which your potential mixed breed comes. Are their temperaments going to match your lifestyle? Are they good with children? Also, check your breeders records and the health records of your to-be puppy's parents to ensure there are no genetic defects.

DNA Dog Breed Identification

DNA Dog Breed Identification

Mixed-breed dogs may have a varied and surprising pedigree, and now owners can find out just what their dogs' genetic backgrounds look like. Dog DNA tests are available from veterinarians, at pet supply stores and online. If you've ever wondered where your mutt's curly tail or multitude of spots came from, a number of genetic labs can tell you.

Choosing a Test

    Starting at around $60, in-home dog breed DNA tests top out at around $120. Looking closely at the packaging or online information, shoppers can see that different labs have the ability to test for different breeds. If you have a hunch on the outcome, look for that breed on the list. Veterinarians and professional dog breeders can help with the guessing game.

Administering

    Most test kits include cotton swabs, instructions, a pre-paid return envelope and an information card. The dog should not be allowed food for an hour before performing the test, and all shared bones, toys and water dishes should be made unavailable to him. The swabs are used to take saliva samples from the dog's cheek, each one having contact with the inside of his mouth for at least 10 seconds, preferably longer. After air-drying, the swabs go back in their sleeves, the information card is filled out, and the test can be dropped in the mail.

Results

    The dog DNA testing facility will return results with a certificate, which will list the breeds found in your dog's DNA. Dog breed relevance is scored by percentage. The DNA Diagnostics Center (DDC) produces results within three weeks and separates scores into five levels: A Level 1 relevance score means 75 percent of your dog's DNA comes from that particular breed. Level 2 represents 37 to 74 percent; Level 3, 20 to 36 percent; Level 4, 10 to 19 percent; and Level 5, less than 5 percent. The DDC features information on 62 AKC breeds, while other tests can identify as many as 170.

Advantages

    Dog breed testing can give owners the information they seek through a simple and painless method. Not only can it explain physical features, discovering a dog's breed through DNA testing can shed light on behavioral patterns, likes and dislikes or medical concerns. Some labs will provide breed-specific information with their results, but if they don't, researching your dog's breed is a good idea. Finding out if your dog has a predisposition to conditions like separation anxiety or hip dysplasia will affect how you train him and what to watch for where his health is concerned.

Considerations

    Although all of the tests report high accuracy ratings, your dog's results may list questionable dog breeds. The testing companies attribute mixed results to very mixed breeds. But Michigan State University genetics professor John Fyfe has said the tests are unreliable due to the lack of information available on dog DNA. "The DNA determinants of most phenotypic traits are as yet unknown," he said in 2009. Different labs have different genetic databases, and the control groups are made up of dogs whose pedigree is known. Fyfe recommended consulting a veterinarian, who he said would be able to tell a dog's breed as accurately as any mail-in test.

What Are the Differences Between Bullmastiffs & Boerboels?

What Are the Differences Between Bullmastiffs & Boerboels?

Bullmastiffs and African boerboels are both part of the mastiff family. The two breeds of dogs look similar side by side, but they do have distinct differences -- you just have to know what to look for. Both bullmastiffs and boerboels can make great family pets; both breeds are very loving dogs. When deciding which breed you want, consider their differences before making your choice.

Size

    Bullmastiffs and African boerboels are similar in height: Males range from 25 inches to 28 inches at the shoulder or withers and females from 23 to 26 inches. Bullmastiffs usually weigh less than boerboels, ranging from 100 to 130 lbs., while boerboels range from 140-200 pounds. Both breeds have muscular builds, so they do need regular exercise to prevent obesity. A brisk 20- to 30-minute walk each day, or some playtime outside chasing a ball, will help to keep dogs of these breeds fit and trim.

Life Expectancy and Health Issues

    The life expectancy of both breeds varies, but boerboels tend to live longer lives. Boerboels live an average of 12 to 15 years, while bullmastiffs live about eight to 10 years. Bullmastiffs are prone to suffer from a few health issues. Heath problems to be aware of for the bullmastiff are hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, (which can cause blindness), hypothyroidism, lymphoma cancer and entropion, which causes the eyelid to roll inward. Boerboels are a healthier breed, with only two major health issues: hip dysplasia and vaginal hyperplasia. Neither health issue is fatal, but they are issues that you will need to tend to if they occur.

Temperament

    Both breeds are very loyal to their families and love to play, especially with children. They love their owners and may become very protective of them. The Boerboel will protect not only his family but also his familys property; therefore, if you are looking for a guard dog, the boerboel may be the better choice. The bullmastiff is extremely loyal to his family and will protect you when he feels you are in danger; however, he will most likely not protect your property unless he feels that there is a threat to his family. Both breeds are family dogs that love children. Bullmastiffs tend to do better around strangers if they know the family is okay with them, but boerboels must become comfortable with new people before they will accept them. As far as guarding, a boerboel may bite or attack someone that they see as a threat, whereas a bullmastiff will usually grab hold of the person and "lock" its jaws, which will prevent the person from getting away; but they will not usually bite or attack the person. Both breeds want to be around people, thus they do not like to be away from you, or outside alone, for too long.

Grooming

    Bullmastiffs and boerboels require minimal grooming. A simple bath once or twice a month will help to keep both breeds' skin and coat clean and healthy. Both breeds have thick, durable nails that you should trim regularly to prevent the dogs from slipping or having problems walking. You may find light shedding with both breeds; but with routine brushing, you may not notice shedding at all. As with every breed, always look your dog over for fleas and ticks.

Why Is My Pug Drooling Excessively for No Reason?

Why Is My Pug Drooling Excessively for No Reason?

Despite their wrinkly faces and breathing difficulties, pugs are not known for excessive drooling. If there is no obvious cause, such as tasty food nearby, excessive saliva may be a symptom of a medical condition or irritant. Most explanations for drooling are fairly benign and can be treated easily by a veterinarian, but it is worth investigating some of the more serious causes to ensure the best treatment for your pug.

Gum Problems

    Pugs have voracious appetites and are prone to eating anything and everything in their path. This can lead to various problems, but excessive drooling may be caused by a foreign object becoming embedded in the dog's gums. This activates the saliva glands, which attempt to sterilize the object. If the object is sharp or deeply embedded, the best solution is to seek the advice and treatment of a professional veterinarian.

Motion Sickness

    Drooling, while traveling, may indicate motion sickness. Stress from being in unfamiliar surroundings, anticipating a trip to the vet or simply not being able to see the horizon can cause excessive drooling and even vomiting. If the drooling is not stress-related, try opening a window near the pug to allow fresh air to alleviate the symptoms. Make sure the dog can see the road and is facing forward and don't feed the dog, before traveling, other than maybe a couple of ginger snaps to combat the nausea.

Bleach Poisoning

    Ingesting household bleach is highly toxic to any dog, but pugs enjoy consuming foreign objects and liquids even more so than most breeds. Excessive drooling is a symptom of bleach poisoning and is usually accompanied by retching, vomiting and severe stomach pain. Owners who suspect bleach poisoning should contact a vet immediately.

Rabies

    Rabies is rare in North America, but unlucky pugs could still catch the deadly disease if bitten by a wild animal, such as a raccoon or skunk. One of the first signs of rabies is excessive drooling as the disease makes it difficult for the animal to swallow properly, thus forcing saliva to escape out of the mouth. As well as a foam-like drool, other signs of rabies are unusually irritable behavior, sensitivity to light, seizures and difficulty walking.

What Two Breeds Make an English Bulldog?

What Two Breeds Make an English Bulldog?

The English bulldog is a medium-sized dog with short legs. It is a short-haired breed with a smooth coat. English bulldogs are known for their wide, pug-nosed snouts and their stocky bodies. The name "bulldog" comes from the fact that they were once used for bull baiting, and because they look like miniature bulls.

Origin

    English bulldogs originated from the British Isles.
    English bulldogs originated from the British Isles.

    The English bulldog is known to have come from the British Isles. They are believed to have descended from the Asiatic mastiff and the pug. The original bulldogs were fearless dogs and were insensitive to pain. They would attack the bull from underneath then go for the jugular in the neck, making it nearly impossible for the bull to fight back. When dog fighting became illegal in England, the English bulldogs were bred for domesticity.

Description

    English bulldogs can come in a multitude of colors.
    English bulldogs can come in a multitude of colors.

    English bulldogs are around 45 to 55 pounds and are approximately 12 to 16 inches tall. Their coloring can be brindle, white, red, washed out red, pale yellow or a combination of these. They have muscular bodies and small heads. English bulldogs have short legs and a large jaw. The features that the bulldog inherited from the pug were its short snout and short legs. The bulldog inherited its muscular body, large head and fearless personality from the mastiff.

Temperament

    English bulldogs are great with kids.
    English bulldogs are great with kids.

    English bulldogs are gentle dogs, despite their intimidating appearance. They make good pets and are easy contented. American bulldogs are known to be affectionate and good with children. They have a lot of energy when they are puppies but tend to slow down as they age. English bulldogs snore and tend to drool frequently.

Health Problems

    English bulldogs have breathing problems due to their short snout. They also have bad eyesight, which gets worse as they get older. The bulldogs can get heat stroke easily, so it is best they are kept out of extreme heat. They also have hip and knee problems, as well.

What Colors Do Maltese Come In?

What Colors Do Maltese Come In?

Maltese dogs are named after the Mediterranean island of Malta, their supposed place of origin. However, drawings of Maltese-type dogs have been found in Asia as early as 5,000 B.C., indicating that these popular dogs reached Malta later. Well-known for their unique hair and pure white color, Maltese had long been the breed of high society ladies.

Description

    Maltese are small dogs with hair on their bodies instead of fur. They are typically under 7 pounds and less than a foot tall. Their heads are slightly rounded on top with a small muzzle and black nose. Their hair is long and flowing and always white. Sometimes the ears are a light yellow or tan color, but this is not preferred among breeders so it's not common to see them. It has small, round feet with black pads.

Basic Coloring

    These little dogs are always white and sometimes have a light yellow or tan color to the tips of their ears. They have long, straight, flowing hair, not fur and it covers their entire bodies. They have long hair on their ears and a beard or mustache of hair draping down from their muzzles. The hair is pure titanium white all over their bodies, except for the ears in some dogs.

Mixed Breeds

    Occasionally, you'll see Maltese in different colors. These are usually mixed breed dogs with mostly Maltese and another similar breed ancestry. They can look very similar to the Maltese with the same body type and long, flowing hair. However, the different color gives them away every time. Colors such as grey, black, tan and brown can come from ancestors of a similar breed and size. They are still beautiful dogs with agreeable and active dispositions.

Similar Breeds

    It's also possible to confuse another similar breed with a Maltese. These little dogs are a part of the Bichon family of dog breeds. They all share certain characteristics, such as the short muzzle, small size and round dark eyes. The Havanese is similar enough to be mistaken for a Maltese with its long hair and mustache. However, their coats come in different colors, such as off-white, tan, grey, blue or black. The Bichon Frise can also resemble a Maltese with a puppy hair cut. They have fluffy, curly fur that is generally white. Many of them also feature areas of off-white, tan or apricot coloring on their bodies.