Rabu, 31 Agustus 2011

How to Adopt or Buy Basset Hounds

How to Adopt or Buy Basset Hounds

With their booming voices and long ears, basset hounds have captured the hearts of many pet lovers. For those in the market to adopt or buy a basset hound, it can be difficult to know where and how to obtain one. Fortunately, there are plenty of places where basset hounds are available for purchase or adoption.

Instructions

    1

    Visit an animal shelter to look for basset hounds. Unfortunately, quite a few basset hounds end up in animal shelters. This is likely due to the fact that some who obtain basset hounds do not do the research on this breed beforehand and end up unhappy with the breed's traits. For instance, some cannot tolerate the loud barking that bassets engage in. While bassets can be trained to not bark much, it is in their nature to bark and bark loudly, at that. Therefore, it is best to understand the qualities---both good and bad---of basset hounds before you bring one home to be your pet.

    2

    Locate a basset hound rescue. Your veterinarian's office will likely have a list of basset hound rescues that you can contact. The basset rescue will put you through an interview process, which may include a home visit. The rescue will want to make sure you are aware of the breed's trademark characteristics and potential health problems, including back issues, before it places a basset in your home. A basset rescue's main purpose is to provide its dogs with forever homes. If the rescue feels as though you are not knowledgeable of the breed or can't provide the care the dog requires, it will likely deny your adoption.

    3

    Contact a basset hound breeder. Basset hound breeders can supply basset hound puppies and sometimes adults, as well. Be particular about which basset hound breeder you choose, however, because you don't want to purchase a puppy that comes from basset hounds that have health issues. Basset hounds are prone to developing orthopedic problems and allergies, along with other issues. Theoretically, bassets with these conditions should not breed. However, if you obtain a basset puppy from parents that have these problems, your puppy could develop the same issues. Therefore, ask to view the veterinary records of the puppy's parents and make sure their hips and elbows are certified to be healthy. Also, take a look at the basset parents. Although you can't always tell the health of a basset by looking at it, you can see if it has a skin issue or if it limps. If so, move on to a breeder who doesn't breed bassets with defects it can pass on to its offspring.

The Difference Between a Deer-Head Chihuahua and a Mini-Pinscher

The Difference Between a Deer-Head Chihuahua and a Mini-Pinscher

While both breeds are popular and compact, several differences separate deer-head Chihuahuas from miniature pinschers. In addition to having different ancestors, differences are found in the various coats of the two breeds, as well as in coloring and temperament. In addition, deer-head Chihuahuas may not compete in American Kennel Club competitions, as the shape of the head is considered a flaw. However, "apple-head" Chihuahuas are eligible for competition.

Heads

    While there is only one kind of miniature pinscher head shape, there are two kinds of Chihuahua head shapes. One kind is known as an "apple head," in which the head shape is round and the nose is short, giving the Chihuahua an overall "apple" appearance. The other kind of Chihuahua head shape is known as a "deer head," in which the snout is longer.

Coats

    Another difference between a deer-head Chihuahua and a miniature pinscher is the coat. While the miniature pinscher only has one variety of coat, which is short, the deer-head Chihuahua has two varieties -- short-coated and long-coated.

Coloring

    While many people think of miniature pinschers as being black and tan, there are other color variations in the breed. Some miniature pinschers are red, while others possess a combination of black and red. Some miniature pinschers are chocolate and red. Deer-head Chihuahuas, on the other hand, come in any variation of color, including white, which usually isn't found on miniature pinschers.

Dog Shows

    Another difference between the deer-head Chihuahua and the miniature pinscher is that in any dog show sponsored by the American Kennel Club, such as the Westminster Kennel Club, only the Miniature Pinscher can compete for the top prize. Deer-head Chihuahuas are not eligible. Under the standards imposed by the American Kennel Club, only apple-head Chihuahuas can compete.

Temperament

    Miniature pinschers tend to be high-energy dogs, spirited and active, while the deer-head Chihuahua tends to be more of an alert dog that is not overly active. Deer-head Chihuahuas can sometimes make better "lap" dogs than miniature pinschers.

Origins

    The origin of the miniature pinscher is nearly a world away from the origin of the deer-head Chihuahua. The miniature pinscher traces its roots back to Germany, while the deer-head Chihuahua has ancestors coming from the Chihuahua region of Mexico. While the miniature pinscher is believed to have dachshunds and Italian greyhound bloodlines in its distant past, the deer-head Chihuahua might have come from the Fennec Fox family. In addition, the uses of the two breeds are quite different. While the original Miniature Pinscher was developed as a ratter, the Chihuahua was more of a ceremonial dog, as well as one placed within royal families.

How to Encourage a Senior Dog to Eat

If your senior dog is not eating, you should intervene as soon as possible. When they stop eating, senior dogs can lose weight and health much more quickly than younger dogs. However, unless your dog has a medical condition that has upset his appetite, you should be able to get him back on his food with a little attention.

Instructions

    1

    Look for additional symptoms. If your dog is lethargic, vomits repeatedly, isn't drinking water or displays any other unusual symptoms, take her to the vet immediately. She may be experiencing a medical crisis.

    2

    Reflect on whether you've changed your dog's feeding habits. If you've switched food brands recently or have started feeding at a different time, you may have disrupted your dog's eating cycle. Return to her routine.

    3

    Evaluate his diet. If you give your dog too much variety, or if someone in the house perpetually feeds him "people food," your dog may have come to expect a greater variety of flavors, or may be holding out for something that tastes better than his regular kibble. If this is the problem, choose a high quality dog food as the base and mix in some additional food, such as raw or cooked meat.

    4

    Look for other recent changes. Anything from a new medication to a source of stress may cause her to not eat. If she's on a new medication, consult your veterinarian about side effects. If you think it's stress, engage in activities that relax her. Keep in mind that positive events can also be stressful for an older dog. Even something she loves can cause stress if it's an intense experience, and can cause her not to eat.

    5

    Feed him high-calorie, palatable food instead of his usual diet. A specialized diet, such as Hill's Prescription Diet a/d Canine/Feline canned food, may encourage your older dog to eat. Consult with your veterinarian about the best option for prescription food.

    6

    Schedule a veterinary visit right away if your older dog doesn't eat for more than 2 days.

Positive and Negative Traits in Siberian Huskies

Positive and Negative Traits in Siberian Huskies

Bred by the Chukchi people in Northern Asia, the Siberian husky is famous for its endurance and prowess as a sled dog. According to the Siberian Husky Club of America, in 1925 teams of Siberian huskies helped pull shipments of medication to Nome, Alaska, and saved the lives of diphtheria-stricken residents. Though bred to work, Siberian huskies are adaptable and can make good pets for owners who understand both their positive and negative personality traits.

Affectionate

    One positive quality of the Siberian husky is its loving nature. Huskies are social dogs and require human or animal companionship. Be warned, though, that they can be shy around strange dogs, though they typically get along well with other family dogs. They crave affection and thrive in a family setting where they can be included in family activities. Gentle with kids, they are a good choice for families with young children. If you are looking for a guard dog, then this affection can be a mark against the Siberian husky. They may look intimidating, but they are friendly to everyone and will welcome strangers with a happy tail-wag and open paws.

Intelligent

    Siberian huskies learn quickly. They respond well to positive reinforcement training techniques and can be taught basic obedience commands, tricks and even canine sport competition. Don't try to bully or use heavy-handed training techniques and punishments on a husky. This can cause your husky to resist training, lose respect for you or even trigger fear and aggression. There is a downside to the intelligence of a Siberian husky as well. They are independent and stubborn, and will not respond to a command if they do not respect their owner (no matter how well-trained they are). Siberians will often weigh the consequences of obeying a command. If obedience does not seem to be in their best interests at the moment, they may not obey. Rewarding obedience and appropriate behavior will help you earn the respect and obedience of your Siberian husky.

Energetic

    A Siberian husky's energy is also a double-edged sword. For an active owner, huskies make ideal jogging companions (in cooler weather) and enjoy vigorous walks, hikes or swimming. They are playful and enjoy spending time with their humans in the yard chasing a tennis ball or other toy. It is essential for an owner to get a husky enough exercise every day, however, because Siberian huskies become bored quickly, and when that happens they can become destructive. Some huskies instinctively howl, chew and dig, and these behaviors can become worse if the dog is bored. Huskies also need to have access to different toys, chews and bones to keep their sharp minds occupied.

Roaming

    Bred to travel long distances, Siberian huskies love to roam. They are talented escape artists and must be kept in a well-fenced yard when they are outside. A husky that escapes is not necessarily trying to escape. It simply wants to explore, or it may be lonely if it is left alone for too long. This is unacceptable behavior, however, as leash laws, traffic and even your neighbors can put your husky at risk. This instinctive behavior is difficult to change, so don't get a Siberian husky if you can't provide a fenced-in yard for it to play in.

How to Identify A Belgian Malinois

How to Identify A Belgian Malinois

The Belgian Malinois is the earliest of the four known breeds of Belgian Sheepdogs and is named after the city of Malines. This is a very intelligent and energetic working dog that is best kept for work rather than as a pet. They excel as police dogs, guard dogs, and drug detection dogs. Because of their physical similarity to other species, they can often be mistaken for other types of dog, so here is a guide on how to correctly identify a Belgian Malinois.

Instructions

Identifying A Belgian Malinois

    1

    Begin by looking at the dogs general shape and build. It should be about 25 inches high at the shoulder and about as long disregarding the tail. A Malinois can weigh anywhere between 55 and 65 pounds. The dog should be large, thick boned, and muscular, though not heavily built. The hind legs should be especially strong and have pronounced muscles in the haunches. It should have a deep chest that reaches all the way to the elbows, rounded hindquarters, and a near perfectly straight back.

    2

    Look at the dogs fur. It should be short, straight, and weather resistant with a dense undercoat for warmth. This fur shortens along the head, ears, and lower legs. The Malinois can be anywhere between light tan to mahogany brown. Each hair should have a black tip giving a mottled or overlay appearance. The tips of the ears, muzzle, and throat should be black. White spots on the lower chest and the tips of the toes may appear as well.

    3

    Examine the dogs head. It should be best described as looking at a German Shepherds head. The skull should be flat and parallel to the plain of the muzzle. The muzzle tapers, but only slightly, and is very long. The ears should be large and form equilateral triangles, standing erect high on the dogs head. The eyes should be small, almond shaped, and very expressive. If the dog matches this description then youre looking at a Belgian Malinois.

How to Identify a Bichon Frise

How to Identify a Bichon Frise

The Bichon Frise is a small, powder pull dog that has a precise and effortless trot. This gentle-mannered breed is playful and affectionate. The temperament should always be cheerful and sensitive. When this breed is moving away from you, you should see the foot pads. The tail is carried over its back in a jaunty manner and gives way to its gentle mannerisms.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the small size of a dog from this breed. Both males and females should be 9 to 11 inches tall. The body is only about inch longer than the dog is tall (measured at the withers). Measurements from the withers to the lowest point of the chest should equal about half the distance from the withers to the ground.

    2

    Notice the inquisitive and alert expression. The eyes are round and may be black or dark brown. They look directly forward. The eyes should be round and should not be overly large or bulging. The skin surrounding the eye should form a black or very dark brown halo, giving this breed its enhanced expression. The ears should drop and are covered with long hair. The muzzle should be 3/5 the length of the skull. The nose is always black.

    3

    Look at the well-developed chest. It should extend at least to the elbow. The well-plumed tail is level with the top line and curves over the back. The hair of the tail rests on the back. The tail should not be low-set, nor should it corkscrew. The elbows should be close to the body. Dewclaws may be removed. The round feet are tight and cat-like in the front, and tight and round in the back. The rear is build with muscular thighs that are spaced moderately wide. Rear dewclaws may also be removed.

    4

    Feel the texture of the coat. The undercoat will be soft and dense and the outer coat is coarse and curly. When patted, the coat should spring back. The coat should not be wiry or limp and silky. This breed should be trimmed to the natural outline of the body. The trim should be rounded offyou do not want a square looking dog. The coat is white, but may have a buff, cream or apricot shading around the ears or on the body. The off-colors should not show on more than 10 percent of the entire coat. Puppies may have more than 10% off-color, but it should change to almost all white.

How to Choose Bowls for an English Bulldog

English bulldogs are wonderful pets that delightfully entertain with their unique features and funny antics. Like many other breeds, English bulldogs love to eat and will try to convince you they are hungry even when they are not, so be on guard. Additionally, their unique facial structure, large-sized heads and sensitive skin folds and wrinkles can make everyday tasks, including eating, a chore. This should cause you to take extra care when choosing the dishes that hold their food and water.

Instructions

    1

    Do not choose a bowl for your English Bulldog based on how cute it looks. Ceramic and plastic bowls tend to have adorable designs painted on them that make them appealing to buy. Unfortunately, these types of bowls can become breeding grounds for all sorts of bacteria that can quickly transfer to your bullys skin folds and wrinkles. Stainless steel food bowls are a far better choice.

    2

    Make sure the bowl you purchase is big enough. Sure your puppy is only six months old, but already his head is the size of many full-grown adult dogs. Bulldogs are known for breathing difficulties, so a bowl that is too small will only make it all the more difficult for them to breath easily while inhaling their food. Ask your vet for a recommendation based on the size of your dog or bring your bully to the store with you and choose a bowl that is large enough for him.

    3

    Raise those bowls. Having a stand to elevate your bullys food and water dishes is a great way to reduce strain on her neck and spinal cord while she eats. This may make breathing while she eats easier as well. You would not like to bend down to eat your food, so chances are your bulldog is not crazy about it either.

    4

    Wash your English bulldogs food and water dishes regularly. The great thing about stainless-steel dishes is that they are dishwasher safe. Start the habit of washing your bullys bowls as soon as he is done eating. This way food will not be stuck to the bowl and it will come clean easily. Make sure to thoroughly rinse the dishes if you decided to hand-wash them so your bulldog does not get an upset stomach from eating soap. Regular washing daily and in between meals will reduce the chances of bacteria and dirt building up in the bowls.

Poodle Classifications

Poodle Classifications

The poodle is a well-known ancient breed of French origin. Poodles are intelligent dogs, water dogs historically bred for bird hunting and retrieving. They are popular show dogs and often recognized for their unique show clips. Poodles are devoted family members and known for their patient, good-tempered nature. This breed is often recommended for people with allergies due to their short, nonshedding coats. There are three classifications of poodle, which are based upon size.

Standard Poodle

    The standard poodle is the largest of the three classifications, standing 15 inches or taller at the highest point of the shoulder. Standard poodles average 45 to 70 pounds. Their average lifespan is about 12 to 15 years.

Miniature Poodle

    Miniature poodles, the medium-sized classification, range from 10 to 15 inches at the highest point of the shoulders. They average between 15 and 17 pounds, with some reaching closer to 20 pounds. Miniature poodles have an average lifespan of about 15 years.

Toy Poodle

    The toy poodle is the smallest of the classifications, standing under 10 inches tall at the shoulders. They weigh between six and nine pounds and can live upwards of 15 years. They get their name from their "toy-like" appearance due to their incredibly tiny stature.

Poodle Appearance

    Elaborate show cuts are often considered synonymous with poodles.
    Elaborate show cuts are often considered synonymous with poodles.

    Other than obvious size differences, all poodles have similar features. Poodles are squarely built, well-proportioned dogs with curly coats, long straight muzzles, pointed noses, flat cheekbones and small faces. They possess an intelligent expression resulting from brown or black oval-shaped eyes. They are most often associated with elaborate show clips originating from the French circus, resembling a lion. However, other clips are more practical for everyday wear including the puppy clip, English saddle clip, sporting clip or continental clip. Each style indicates specifications for fur clipped around the face, throat, feet and base of tail. Poodles come in a wide variety of colors including black, blue, silver, cream, white, apricot, red and brown.

Different Pitbull Bloodlines

Different Pitbull Bloodlines

The pit bull terrier --- or simply, pit bull --- has developed a bad reputation due to highly reported incidents of violence toward people and other dogs. Pit bulls were originally bred as vicious fighters. Still, many people own and love their pit bull and claim that they are friendly and docile. As of 2011, more than 80 varieties of pit bull bloodlines exist.

Bloodline

    A breeder chooses a particular breed of dog for the unique qualities it possesses. She takes into account the history of the breed and the qualities valued in that breed; she then chooses a dog by analyzing its health, balance, proportions and temperament. Bloodlines derive their names from a particular male or female dog that possessed desired qualities and was therefore highly bred, or they are named for a breeder who was able to breed high-quality specimens.

Carver Bloodline

    The Carver bloodline originated in Carver Kennels, run by the famous breeder Maurice Carver. Maurice Carver, a breeder in the mid-20th century, has a reputation in some circles as one of the top breeders of all time. His breeding instinct has produced one of the most popular and enduring pit bull bloodlines. Carver bloodline pit bulls embody top qualities in terms of power, health, strength and definition. Breeders proudly display their Carver bloodline pit bulls, and these dogs often fetch top dollar.

Colby Bloodline

    John P. Colby was a breeder in the early 20th century. His son Louis continued to breed high-quality dogs after his father passed away. The Colby bloodline is one of the oldest pit bull bloodlines. Colby would test dogs before crossbreeding them with his original stock. These tests often involved pitting one dog against up to three other dogs. If the single dog survived, it was clearly a powerful specimen, and he would then breed that dog. The lineage of Colby pit bulls originated in England and Ireland.

Other Bloodlines

    Bourdreaux and Mayfield are two other well known bloodlines named after breeders. Carlos Barksdale and Dave Wilson created the Blue bloodlines --- also known as Razor's Edge. Some consider Blue pit bulls highly desirable, but according to Rio's Pit Bull Kingdom, Blue bloodline pit bulls are prone to various infections as well as dermatitis and allergies. The red nose pit bull is not actually a bloodline; a pit bull's coloring does not indicate its bloodline.

Selasa, 30 Agustus 2011

How to Care for a Samoyed

How to Care for a Samoyed

Originally hailing from Siberia, the fluffy Samoyed (a member of the Spitz family) was first bred to herd reindeer, pull sleds and keep their owners warm at night. And nowadays -- even though they're more likely to be pulling in the newspaper than pulling a sled -- "loyal, intelligent, friendly and great companion" still define this breed. And although they are relatively healthy dogs -- you will still need to know the following things about Samoyed care -- to make sure they keep that big ole "Sammy smile."

Instructions

    1

    Take your Samoyed for regular health checkups, including eye exams. Do a monthly home exam of the skin, eyes, ears, nose, teeth and gums.

    2

    Stay current on vaccinations, flea and heartworm preventative.

    3

    Spay/neuter your Samoyed. Spaying your female before the first heat will prevent breast cancer and uterine infections. Neutering your male at a young age will prevent testicular cancer, help maintain a healthy prostate and curb aggression.

    4

    Have your Sammy's teeth cleaned professionally once or twice a year. Check with a vet or teeth-cleaning professional for a recommended schedule.

    5

    Feed your Samoyed a quality diet with the proper nutritional balance. If feeding a commercial dog food, choose a quality natural brand. If feeding a homemade diet, research what foods and food combinations are best.

    6

    Bathe your Samoyed about every three months. Since their white coat has a tendency to show dirt, you can blow dry and brush the dirt out in between baths. Keep the nails trimmed to a comfortable length; every few months during bath time is a good schedule.

    7

    Brush your Samoyed's thick double coat regularly and more frequently during heavier shedding periods. A metal pin brush works best. Grooming is important for keeping your Sammy comfortable in hot weather; therefore a visit to a professional groomer may be a good idea.

    8

    Provide regular exercise and activity for your Samoyed including a daily walk or jog. They are energetic indoors and will do OK in an apartment or with a small yard, provided they get sufficient exercise.

    9

    Use motivational rather than repetitive training with your Samoyed; due to their intelligence and a "mind of their own" they get bored with the same thing over and over and require motivation.

How to Feed Bichon Puppies

How to Feed Bichon Puppies

Bringing home an adorable Bichon Frise puppy is both exciting and joyful. However, there are many things you need to consider besides giving it your love and attention. Most important is what your puppy will eat. As a toy dog, a Bichon Frise is very selective when it comes to food. So, with a finicky dog, comes a finicky owner who must determine what food is best. Heres some helpful hints to get you on your way.

Instructions

Feeding Your Bichon Frise

    1

    Check with your veterinarian to determine what food your Bichon should eat and how to administer it. Most vets and breeders will agree the food should be a proper balance of protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals to match the breed-specific requirements. It should be a premium dog food, not generic, and some may go so far as saying you should prepare your Bichon's meals yourself. A raw food diet can be beneficial to a Bichon as well as a holistic food diet. Some holistic brands include Eagle Pack, Innova and Taste of the Wild.

    2

    Designate an area in your home where you will feed your puppy its meals. Make sure you choose somewhere away from where your family dines. Provide both a food and water bowl for your Bichon. Keeping your Bichon hydrated is important to is health.

    3

    Crating your Bichon at mealtimes can help its finicky ways. This helps determine how well your puppy is eating, as well as with portion control. It also keeps other house pets separated from your puppy's food and minimizes mealtime distractions like children and other interference.

    4

    Feed your puppy at least four times a day. An average size Bichon will eat one cup of dry dog food a day. You will want to give your puppy some form of a dry dog food since Bichons are susceptible to dental problems, including plaque build-up. Dry foods scrape the teeth and clean them as the puppy eats.

    5

    Space meals four to five hours apart. Give the first 1/2 cup when your puppy first wakes up once he has gone to the bathroom. At midday, give a 1/4 a cup and then in the afternoon 1/3 a cup. A final feeding should be given at night before bed. Remove food after 10 minutes if your puppy shows disinterest in eating.

    6

    Continue this feeding schedule until he is at least three months old. Then feed your puppy three times a day until he is six months old. It is important to go off the puppy formula at six months to avoid kidney disease, resulting from excessive protein in the diet.

    7

    Feed twice a day from six months and up.

How to Take Care of an Adult Rottweiler

How to Take Care of an Adult Rottweiler

If you are looking for a dependable, intelligent and beautiful companion dog, an adult rottweiler is an excellent choice. This ancient dog breed that once accompanied Roman soldiers across Europe has a life expectancy of 10 to 12 years. It is important to properly care for an adult rottweiler to ensure the dog has a long and happy life.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your rottweiler a proper diet. Upon maturity, male rottweilers will weigh up to 110 pounds and females up to 95 pounds. One common problem with rottweilers is overfeeding them. If the dog's ribs cannot be easily felt and its waist is not visible, the dog is overweight. Excessive weight gain can lead to shoulder and hip pain, and torn knee ligaments. Commercially available dog food is fine to feed a rottweiler although some people prefer feeding raw food diets. Regardless of the type of food given to your dog, the key is making sure the proper amount is given depending on the animal's age and activity level. Do not leave food out all day but instead give your dog one larger meal a day or two small ones.

    2
    Brush your rottweiler often to reduce shedding.
    Brush your rottweiler often to reduce shedding.

    Groom the rottweiler regularly. Rottweilers are short-haired but have a thick undercoat. They will shed quite a bit indoors if not brushed daily. At the very least, a once-a-week brushing with a rubber brush will reduce shedding. Clean out the Rottweiler's ears once a week. Use a cotton ball dipped in canine ear cleaner, peroxide or alcohol. Rottweiler ears are prone to fungal infections. Rottweilers only need to be bathed once a month or even less. Trim your dog's nails monthly with a canine nail clipper because long nails can get caught on things and cause toe and joint injuries to the dog. If you need help, dog groomers and veterinary offices often provide nail trimming services for a nominal fee.

    3

    Train the rottweiler to obey basic commands. Rottweilers are large, powerful dogs and it is essential they receive obedience training. Training is usually easiest when the dog is a puppy, however, adult dogs can also benefit from training in basic commands and walking on a leash. Rottweilers are intelligent dogs and since they bond closely with their owners, they are eager to please. If you do not have experience with dog training, many pet stores, dog clubs and private trainers offer classes for a fee. Adult rottweilers should also be socialized. Take your dog with you to meet new people and be exposed to different settings. The dog must learn to act calmly in all situations, and not be aggressive or fearful.

    4

    Vaccinate your rottweiler and get yearly checkups for the dog. Treat the dog for fleas and internal worms if the pests become a problem. It is a good idea to put your dog on a monthly preventative medicine for these parasites. Rabies vaccinations are often required by law, and other shots to prevent the spread of disease will be necessary if you board your dog or expose it regularly to other dogs. Yearly checkups will establish a relationship with your veterinarian and help him monitor the dog's health so physical changes or problems can be recognized early and treated.

    5

    Exercise your dog every day. Rottweilers are active animals. Sometimes they will seem content to be indoor "couch potatoes," but they are truly happy burning off energy outside. Exercise will also mentally stimulate the dog and prevent problem behaviors like chewing and digging that stem from boredom. Exercise prevents weight gain and strengthens bones and muscles. Take your dog to a local dog park or on walks around the neighborhood. Be sure to keep your rottweiler on a leash for its safety. Provide toys for your dog both indoors and outdoors. Rottweilers can be trained to participate in a number of competitive and useful activities including agility, carting, tracking and herding. Rottweilers are also useful as therapy dogs in medical settings.

How to Figure Out How Many Calories a Day a Dog Needs

How to Figure Out How Many Calories a Day a Dog Needs

When you have a pet, his nutrition and health become incredibly important. Many dogs are overweight due to improper feeding and lack of knowledge on the subject. Although most pet food labels have guidelines for how many calories your dog needs, they are only guidelines. Your dog's exact caloric needs are easy to calculate. With a little knowledge, your dog can become much healthier, lose extra weight, and gain back some of her lost energy.

Instructions

Counting Calories

    1

    Use the scale to weigh your dog. If your dog won't stand still long enough to get a weight, you can try weighing yourself, then weighing yourself holding the dog. Subtract your weight from the combined weight to get the dog's weight. If your dog is too big for this, try calling your vet to see if they'll weigh him for free or if they have her most recent numbers.

    2

    Convert your dog's weight to kilograms if taken in pounds. To do this, divide your dog's weight by 2.2 (2.2 lbs. equals 1 kilogram). For example, a dog weighs 52 lbs. Divide 52 by 2.2 and the answer is 23.63.

    3

    Calculate the Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR). If your dog is under 2 kg, use the formula RMR = 70 x (weight in kg x 0.75) to find the RMR. If the dog is over 2 kg, use the formula RMR = 70 + (weight in kg x 30) to find the RMR. Using our example dog, the formula would look like this:

    RMR = 70 + (23.63 x 30)

    RMR = 70 + 708.9

    RMR = 778.9 calories

    You may round up or down depending on the last decimal point.

    4

    Check your dog's food labels to see how much food equals how many calories. For wet food, most cans are 500 to 600 calories per pound while straight dry food is often 1500 calories per pound. The label should have everything measured out in cups, but check the company's website if you cannot locate the right feeding amount on the food label.

    5

    Feed your dog accordingly.

Senin, 29 Agustus 2011

What Colors Are Jack Russells?

What Colors Are Jack Russells?

Controversy surrounds the Jack Russell terrier breed. Dog officials agree that these dogs date back to the mid-1800s when the Reverend John Russell of England set out to breed a better fox hunter. The American Kennel Club (AKC), however, recognizes the descendants of his dogs as Parson Russell terriers and claim that those known as Jack Russells have been diluted by crossbreeding with Welsh corgis and other types of terriers. On the other side, the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America (JRTCA) says the two designations are interchangeable.

Development of the Breed

    Whether called Jack Russell or Parson Russell, the terriers bear the name of Reverend Russell, who was an avid hunter as well as a country parson, the AKC reports. Crossing a fox terrier with an English terrier (now extinct), the parson produced a mostly white hunting dog that was small and tenacious in flushing out the prey in fox hunts. Hunters liked to use white dogs in the hunt, so they would not be mistaken for the reddish fox.

White Color Predominant

    Jack Russells may have rough or smooth double coats.
    Jack Russells may have rough or smooth double coats.

    According to the JRTCA breed standard, Jack Russells should be more than 51 percent white. Generally, the dogs have black, tan or brown markings. They may also be tricolor, with a combination of white and two secondary colors.

Coloring Not Acceptable in the Show Ring

    Show dogs may be disqualified for certain traits related to coat and coloring. Brindle markings, a pattern of dark stripes on lighter-colored patches, can remove a Jack Russell from competition. On the other hand, grizzling, a sprinkling of white or gray hairs mixed in with black, is acceptable. Markings should be confined to the head and tail areas. Big patches of color over the body are not allowed. Having silky or kinky hair can also disqualify a potential breed contestant. Dogs with too many spots for the show ring still make loyal, happy and affectionate pets.

Color-Related Congenital Defect

    While the more white in a Jack Russell's coat may be an advantage at a dog show, the minimal pigmentation can have a down side. Predominantly white members of the breed have a greater risk for hereditary pigment-related deafness in one or both ears. The Jack Russell Terrier Research Foundation (JRTRF) reports that approximately 13 percent of the breed have inherited the handicap. The foundation is funding Jack Russell terrier deafness research being conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Veterinary Medicine. Developing a DNA test to identify carriers so better breeding decisions can be made is the ultimate goal of the LSU group.

How to Cook Steak for a Dog

How to Cook Steak for a Dog

Homemade dog food is often a healthier alternative to store-bought dog food and is made from a variety of fresh ingredients, including vegetables, grains, fruits, chicken, liver and beef. With recalls on brands of pet food that can potentially make animals ill, many pet owners are making the switch and cooking for their pets themselves. Dog owners cook and use steak in various dog food recipes to give their dogs a protein that is a tasty treat.

Instructions

Veal Stew

    1

    Mix together 1/2 pound cut-up steak, 1 cup water, 1 cup canned tomatoes, 1 cube of chicken bouillon and 1 teaspoon parsley in a pot.

    2

    Simmer on low heat until meat is tender.

    3

    Remove from heat and allow stew to cool. Serve as is or mix with grains such as cooked barley or rice.

    4

    Cover any leftovers and store in the refrigerator.

Ground Round Dog Food

    5

    Grind up a piece of steak in a meat grinder or cut it into small pieces.

    6

    Cook the steak in a pot with olive oil until browned.

    7

    Mix in 1/2 cup cooked oatmeal, 1/2 cup chopped broccoli, 1/2 cup diced carrots and 2 tablespoons cottage cheese.

    8

    Pour a serving into the dog's dish or onto a plate and serve.

    9

    Refrigerate any leftovers in a covered dish.

The Rotation Diet for Dogs

A rotation diet for dogs can be used with kibble or raw feeding. A rotation diet simply rotates the dogs' foods, either daily, semiweekly or weekly, so that he becomes used to different foods. By doing this, you should have fewer problems if you need to change his diet at some point.

Types

    For a rotating kibble diet, choose three to five different types of kibble. You can use the same brand or different brands, but make sure each type offers something different. The main ingredient should be some type of meat, not corn or wheat. You can rotate a lamb-based, chicken-based and beef-based kibbles.

    For a home-cooked diet, use plenty of different types of meat, such as chicken, turkey, beef, pork and rabbit. You can also add vegetables to your dog's diet, but they are not necessary.

    A raw diet consists of whole or ground raw meat. You can also include vegetables and table scraps, if you like, but they are not necessary. There are different types of raw diets--prey model, biologically appropriate raw food model, among others--but meat is rotated in all of them.

Function

    The rotation diet will help prevent your dog from suffering constipation, diarrhea or vomiting if he is fed something that he is not used to.

Features

    A rotation diet rotates food types, but also provides your dog with a broader variety of vitamins and nutrients. Some kibble foods labeled "balanced" might still not contain some beneficial vitamins and nutrients, so rotating between them helps ensure your dog gets everything he needs. Pork, beef, chicken, lamb, emu and other meats all have different amounts of fat, protein and vitamins.

Liver

    Add liver to your dog's diet to make sure he gets vitamins A and B12. It doesn't matter where the liver comes from, but it is important to have some liver in your dog's diet.

Calcium

    Bones and egg shells provide calcium, an important part of a dog's diet. Too little can cause loose stools and too much can cause constipation. With a rotation diet, you can feed your dog bones with one meal, but not with the next. In this way, he will get the correct amount of calcium.

What Dogs Don't Have That Much Dander?

What Dogs Don't Have That Much Dander?

Even though dogs are found in half of our homes, close to 10 percent of the population is allergic to dogs. People with dog allergies often are told that short-haired breeds are less likely to trigger an allergic reaction. However, hair is not the culprit. Skin cells, called dander, are the primary problem, although dog saliva and urine also contain allergens. Some breeds are thought to produce less dander; however, the amount of dander varies greatly between individual dogs.

Poodles

    Not only do poodles usually produce less dander than most breeds, they come in three sizes -- toy, miniature and standard -- and four colors -- white, black, apricot and gray. The poodle considered one of the smartest breeds and usually is a good family dog. Poodle hair grows continuously and requires professional grooming.

Bichon Frise

    The Bichon Frise is a popular dog for people living in condos or apartments.
    The Bichon Frise is a popular dog for people living in condos or apartments.

    This small dog -- less than 12 inches at the shoulder--is another popular breed for allergy sufferers. Like the poodle, it requires regular grooming since it does not shed its hair.

Portuguese Water Dog

    The Portuguese Water Dog is an active, intelligent breed.
    The Portuguese Water Dog is an active, intelligent breed.

    This breed gained a lot of press when it was selected by President and Mrs. Obama for their daughters, one of whom is allergic to dogs. The Portuguese water dog stands just under 2 feet tall at the shoulder and is considered very intelligent. Bred to help fisherman on their boats, it has a dense and waterproof coat that requires regular grooming.

"Hairless" Dogs

    The Xoloitzcuintli is gaining popularity as a hypoallergenic dog.
    The Xoloitzcuintli is gaining popularity as a hypoallergenic dog.

    If you want a low-allergen dog that doesn't require any professional grooming, the Xoloitzcuintli, or Xolo, and the hairless Chinese crested are your best choices. The Xolo, sometimes called the Mexican hairless, has just a few baby-fine hairs that require no trimming on its body. The Chinese crested comes in two forms. The hairless has hair on its head, tail and feet, while the powderpuff has hair over its entire body. The hairless Chinese crested can be trimmed at home.

Other Breeds to Consider

    In addition to the breeds listed above, the American Kennel Club suggests the following dogs for allergy sufferers:

    Bedlington terrier

    Irish water spaniel

    Kerry blue terrier

    Maltese

    Schnauzer

    Soft coated wheaten terrier

    Recent research suggests dander levels vary widely between each dog, even between individuals of the same breed of dogs. When selecting a dog, have a back-up plan in place in case the dog you adopt or purchase causes your allergies to worsen.

How to Care for an Australian Shepherd

How to Care for an Australian Shepherd

The intelligent and playful Australian shepherd has a strong instinct for herding cattle and sheep, but in the absence of both will have just as much fun playing with your little ones. This rambunctious breed needs a securely fenced-in backyard and a lot of daily activity.

Instructions

    1

    Vaccinate your Australian shepherd when you first get her and then make sure she gets yearly booster vaccinations to maintain her immunity to disease. Also, worm your adult dog every three months and consult with your veterinarian about flea control products.

    2

    Feed your Australian shepherd high-grade dog food. The first ingredient should be meat if you want a quality product. Crude protein should be no less than 30 percent and crude fat no less than 20 percent. The fiber content needs to be 4 percent or less.

    3

    Socialize your puppy when she's young to be with children, strangers and other animals. Australian shepherds have a tendency to be guarded with strangers, as they are very protective of their home.

    4

    Know that an Australian shepherd, because of its herding instinct, tends to nip at the heels of children from time to time. This will occur especially if the child is running. Instruct your children to immediately stop running and stand still.

    5

    Train your puppy in obedience early on. This breed, because of its above-average intelligence, needs a lot of mental stimulation. Consider enrolling in obedience classes and/or reading appropriate materials about obedience training.

    6

    Exercise or run your Australian shepherd at least once a day. The Australian shepherd is a working dog and is abounding in energy. It needs a vigorous workout to prevent the formation of negative habits such as chewing and digging.

    7

    Brush your dog's coat as needed with a firm-bristle brush. Shampoo as needed and trim nails every two to three weeks. The Australian shepherd is a medium shedder.

    8

    Contact a recognized Aussie breeder to ensure that your Australian shepherd has been properly bred and tested for certain health conditions such as hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint), cataracts (cloudy eye lens), progressive retinal atrophy (blindness) and Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder).

    9

    Note that male Australian shepherds will grow to 18 to 23 inches and weigh between 30 and 45 lbs. Females will grow to 17 to 21 inches and weigh between 27 and 40 lbs.

    10

    Realize that an Australian shepherd's life expectancy is 12 years or more.

How to Tell You Have a Blue Pit Bull

How to Tell You Have a Blue Pit Bull

The American pit bull terrier comes in several color variations, including the popular blue pit bull. These dogs are actually a diluted black color that only appears blue to the human eye. Some pit bull breeders try to profit from the blue pit's color, calling these dogs rare and charging high prices for them, but they are no different from other pit bulls, aside from color. If you are looking to satisfy your own curiosity, there are certain characteristics you can look for to determine if your dog is a blue pit bull.

Instructions

    1

    Examine the color of your pit bull's nose. A blue pit bull will have a charcoal gray or blue-gray nose, or a combination of those colors and small bits of pink. If your dog has a brown, black or red nose, you probably do not have a blue pit bull.

    2

    Look at the color of your dog's fur. A blue pit bull's coat will primarily be the characteristic blue-gray or charcoal gray color, possibly with white patches. If your dog has dark black, red, brindle, tan or brown fur, it's probably not a blue pit bull.

    3

    Examine the color of your pit bull's eyes. If your dog has blue, gray or light amber colored eyes in combination with the blue coat and nose, it is likely a blue pit bull. Some blue pits have darker eyes, but lighter colors are more common.

Reducing Diets for Dogs

Reducing Diets for Dogs

Obesity can cause diabetes, heart disease and hypertension in dogs. An obese dog, whose ribs you cannot feel when you run your hand along its side, may require a weight reducing diet to get down to a healthy weight. A diet of these lower-calorie foods along with a regimen of exercise can help get your dog into shape so it can live a long, happy and healthy life.

Ingredients

    Weight reducing diets for dogs generally contain less calories from fat than other types of foods. Fats contain twice the amount of calories as either carbohydrates and proteins, according to the Pet Education website. Reducing diets also contain more fiber, an indigestible carbohydrate, than regular diets, to give the dog a feeling of fullness after eating. The fiber also stimulates chewing, slows the digestion of the food and stabilizes the blood glucose levels of the dog. Low-calorie diets also contain protein to maintain muscle mass, and added vitamins and minerals.

Losing Weight

    For a dog to lose weight, it must eat fewer calories each day than it uses, so it will start to burn the fat stored in its body. An overweight dog requires a reduction in its daily food intake by 20 percent to 40 percent, according to the Vetinfo website. When you reduce a dog's diet, you also reduce the amount of nutrients it gets each day and your dog may require a separate vitamin supplement. Weight-control diets contain the correct amount of nutrients for your dog with a reduced amount of calories, so you do not need to supplement the dog's diet with separate vitamins.

Types of Food

    Weight-reducing diets for dogs come in both dry kibble and wet canned formulas. Manufacturers make dog foods in weight loss formulas available in pet supply stores, grocery stores and in specialty prescription formulas. Your veterinarian may recommend putting your dog on a weight-control, prescription diet such as Hill's w/d, Hill's r/d, Waltham Calorie Control, Eukanuba Restricted Calorie, or Eukanuba Weight Loss Formula, according to Dr. Rebecca Remillard of the Pet Place website. When feeding these diets, follow the manufacturer's guidelines based on your dog's weight. Divide the recommended daily amount of food into three or four servings to give your dog throughout the day.

Changing Diets

    When dealing with an overweight dog, you need to incorporate feeding a low-calorie dog food into its diet. Slowly add the new, weight-control food into your dog's existing food to prevent gastrointestinal distress. Reduce the amount of your dog's old food over a period of one week, adding a greater portion of the new food each day. Incorporate exercise into your dog's daily routine. Place reduced-calorie dry food into treat ball toys to make your dog work for its food throughout the day. Avoid giving your dog treats in addition to a weight-control food or give it healthy treats, like green beans, carrots or bananas, according to the Vetinfo website.

Minggu, 28 Agustus 2011

Shih Tzu Puppy Growth Stages

Shih Tzu Puppy Growth Stages

The shih tzu is a breed of dog that the Chinese have bred for many centuries. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1968 and it has been featured in dog shows since 1969. Shih tzu puppies grow quickly during the first year of life and go through several growth stages during that time. The puppy will hit many milestones before becoming an adult dog.

Birth

    A shih tzu puppy is blind and deaf when it is first born. It has a pink area surrounding its nose and mouth with a slick coat and short, closed ears. This will remain the same until the puppy is around 10 days old, when it opens its eyes. The muscles in the eyes will still be weak at that time and the puppy's vision cloudy. It will take 3 weeks for the puppy to gain full sight and its ears to finally open up.

3 to 6 Weeks

    When the shih tzu puppy is 3 weeks old it can see and start to recognize those around it. This is the point where the puppy begins to play with its siblings, but for the most part the puppy will want to rest. This period lasts until the dog is old enough to be weaned from its mother at approximately 6 weeks of age.

6 to 8 Weeks

    By the time the shih tzu puppy reaches 6 weeks old it will begin to get curious about its surroundings. Puppy-proof the home before allowing the puppy to roam about freely. The puppy will start to enjoy interacting with others and starts to have the fluffy appearance that most people associate with the breed.

2 to 6 Months

    The shih tzu puppy grows quickly during this time and will require a regular diet. Training can begin at this time and the puppy will begin teething. Keep shoes and other items out of reach to prevent the puppy from chewing them up. Give the puppy chew toys to help it transition easily through the teething period.

6 Months to 1 Year

    During this time, the female shih tzu puppy will enter into her first heat and should be spayed unless she is to be used for breeding purposes. During this period, growth begins slowing down and the owner can reduce the amount of food the puppy takes in. At 1 year old, a shih tzu puppy is officially an adult.

Sabtu, 27 Agustus 2011

About Labrador Dogs & Their Behavior

About Labrador Dogs & Their Behavior

How to Potty Train a Cocker Spaniel

How to Potty Train a Cocker Spaniel

According to the American Kennel Club, the cocker spaniel is one of the most popular canine breeds in the United States. They are sporting dogs, bred to hunt. Like many hunting dogs, cocker spaniels are fairly easy to train.

Jamie J. Sucher, author of "Cocker Spaniels, A Complete Pet Owner's Manual," explains that cockers have a natural willingness to learn. They are quick learners too, which bodes well for potty training. House-training your cocker spaniel can be accomplished with time, patience and praise. Put the dog on a schedule, and remember young cocker spaniels need to relieve themselves every few hours.

Instructions

Paper Training

    1

    Choose an area that is easy to clean up, like the kitchen or bathroom. Make sure this area is not too close to the puppy's eating or sleeping quarters, as your cocker will instinctively try to keep those areas clean. Therefore, he will not eliminate near them.

    2

    Lay out several layers of newspaper.

    3

    Keep the puppy confined to the chosen area until he relieves himself on the newspapers. If you want to keep your dog in the bathroom, keep the door closed. If you want to keep him in the kitchen, put up a doggy gate that restricts his access to other areas of the house. To keep your puppy more comfortable in the confined space, keep a few toys in there with him. Offer him treats to go into the confined space so he relates the potty space with something positive. Your puppy should relieve himself on the paper every two to three hours, or shortly after eating.

    4

    When he has gone, remove the top soiled paper as soon as possible, but keep the clean sheets underneath in place. According to Sucher, doing this would leave the scent from the bottom paper exposed so the puppy can relocate the area. Replace the paper every time your cocker uses the bathroom, which will be every couple of hours, If he misses the paper, clean the area thoroughly to remove the scent and prevent future accidents.

Crate Training

    5

    Establish a schedule and confine your cocker to her crate. This method takes advantage of a dog's natural instinct to keep its area clean. When you first start potty training, you may want to keep your cocker in her crate all day while you are at work, all night, or whenever you leave the room. A young puppy will need to go outside every two to three hours.

    6

    Take her outdoors to eliminate as soon as you let her out of the crate.

    7

    Praise her generously when she goes outside. Verbal praise like "Good girl," scratching behind the ears or simply petting will make your cocker spaniel happy. She will eventually understand this is desired behavior. You may also reward your puppy with a food treat, though it is not necessary.

    8

    Once the cocker becomes used to her crate schedule, let her out of the confinement for longer periods of time. Eventually, you will be able to leave the crate open without fearing accidents.

Outdoor Training

    9

    Pick a spot outdoors, and take your cocker spaniel there before he even comes inside the house for the first time. According to Sucher, outdoor training begins when you first bring your cocker spaniel home.

    10

    Praise him once he has gone. Verbal and physical praise (petting) will boost the cocker's confidence and will increase chances of potty training success.

    11

    Take him inside. In this training method, you must take your puppy back outside every three to four hours. It is also advised you take your cocker outdoors late in the evening to increase the chances that accidents will not occur overnight.

    12

    Repeat taking your dog outdoors every couple of hours. If you continue to do this, and praise him for the wanted behavior, he will seek out the outdoor area on his own. Remember, every dog is different. It may take you a few weeks to potty train your puppy or a few months. Sucher notes to always be patient.

How to Donate Pet Food

How to Donate Pet Food

Donating pet food to area shelters is a wonderful way to help dogs get the nutrition they need while they are waiting for adoption. Many area shelters, animal hospitals and foster pet homes welcome donations of food for the dogs and cats they care for. In this economy, budgets for animal shelters are at risk, so any donations offered to the animal care facilities are gladly welcomed.

Instructions

    1

    Get in touch with your local animal shelter to find out the business hours and ask if the shelter needs any particular pet food item more than others. If you happen to have extra dog food that you don't need, by all means, bring it to the dog shelter. All donations are usually taken and stored if the shelter doesn't need it right away.

    2

    Check sales flyers and cut out coupons for dog food to get the most for your money. Keep in mind that the dog shelter houses a variety of dog breeds, large and small, young and old. Try to pick up pet foods that are beneficial to senior dogs, active adult dogs, overweight dogs and puppies. All dogs have different needs, so the more types of dog foods available to the shelter, the healthier the dogs will be.

    3

    Check the FDA website for the recalled dog food list. Recently, many dog food brands have been recalled due to contaminated vegetables that were causing sickness and death in dogs and cats. If you have any dog foods in your home that you are planning to donate, make sure to check that they are not recalled brands.

    4

    Find a pet food store in your location. PetSmart and PetCo are very large pet food suppliers that carry quality dog food and a huge variety of treats. If you can't travel to one of these pet food stores, supermarkets and department stores also stock many quality dog foods. Check any Feed and Farm stores in your area also. They often carry pet food in bulk for a more economical price.

    5

    Drop the pet food off at the dog shelter, animal hospital or foster dog care home at a time agreeable to everyone. Be sure not to leave the dog food outside at the shelter's door or at a foster home. Squirrels, raccoons, birds, cats and even coyotes or foxes can get into the bags if unattended.

How to Find a Home for a Good American Bull Dog

American bulldogs make good family pets. They are calm and friendly, so many people like to have them with small children. If you have a good American bulldog that you would like to adopt out, there are several things you can do to find a great home. You don't have to take your bulldog to the pound to get it adopted; bulldogs are in high demand.

Instructions

    1

    Gather your bulldog's vet records. Contact your vet to have the records mailed to you. Potential adopters will want to make sure that the dog is up to date on its shots and medical needs.

    2

    Put an ad on Craigslist to find potential adopters. Many people love the American bulldog breed and would be happy to pay you an adoption fee.

    3

    Arrange a time when you can go to the person's house to make sure he is financially secure and has a loving home for the animal.

    4

    Contact local rescues; many specialize in bulldogs. They are contacted constantly by people interested in adopting a bulldog.

    5

    Arrange a time when the rescue can come to your home to evaluate the dog. Rescues will not take aggressive dogs because they pose a danger to families.

Breeds of Dogs That Are Good With Livestock & Do Well in Cold Weather

Breeds of Dogs That Are Good With Livestock & Do Well in Cold Weather

Historically, shepherds of northern climates bred and kept dogs to tend livestock, and many of those breeds are still with us today. Although there are some dogs continuing the proud tradition of herding reindeer or sheep in the cold Alpine hills or snowy valleys, many are pets with families who might not even be aware of their best friend's special abilities.

Typical Characteristics

    A samoyed's thick double coat and triangular ears are suitable for very cold weather.
    A samoyed's thick double coat and triangular ears are suitable for very cold weather.

    Herding breeds come in many colors, shapes and sizes, but snow dogs have some distinct traits that set them apart from others. These include the heavy double coat, which consists of a water-resistant outer coat and a softer undercoat to help insulate them. Snow dogs also have small, triangular sized ears known as prick ears, which are easy for the dog to move and are protected by fur to prevent heat loss. The thick, curvy tail that drapes over a snow dog's back is not just for show or balance. The dog uses it as a blanket to cover it's feet and nose while resting or sleeping.

Dogs and Vikings

    The Icelandic Sheepdog is the only breed of dog that can claim Iceland as its native home. It is descended from the dogs that traveled to the island with the Vikings more than 1,000 years ago. These hardy, medium-sized dogs were an essential part of human survival on in Iceland. This dog traces its ancestry back to the ancient Nordic Spitz, the same as many other Nordic herd dogs.

Arctic Dogs

    Pulling a sleigh is one of many things Arctic dogs can do.
    Pulling a sleigh is one of many things Arctic dogs can do.

    Certain breeds of dogs have been born and breed near the Arctic Circle. The Swedish Vallhund, the Finnish Lapphund and the Samoyed are all working dogs from Arctic climates that trace their roots back to the ancient wolves and foxes of domestic dog ancestry. The dogs of the Arctic still pull sleighs and carry packs, as well as herd reindeer just as they have for hundreds of years.

Mountain Dogs

    Switzerland and Belgium both have unpredictable climates, and Switzerland can have some particularly inhospitable terrain in the Alps. This environment has produced breeds like the Greater Swiss Mountain dog and several variations of Belgian sheepdogs. The Belgian Sheepdog actually distinguished itself as a draft animal in wartime, taking a break from its usual job herding to help haul cannons. The hardy Swiss dog claims the remote and rugged valleys of that mountainous nation as its homeland where it is still used as a herd animal and working dog.

Raw Meaty Bone Diet for Dogs

Raw Meaty Bone Diet for Dogs

The philosophy behind feeding Raw Meaty Bones to dogs was developed in the 1980s by Australian veterinarian Dr. Ian Billinghurst, based upon the belief that the diet a dog evolved over millions of years is still appropriate today.

Evolutionary Diet

    The concept of an evolutionary diet is one which consists of raw whole foods that are similar to that eaten by dogs' wild ancestors. This includes bones, muscle meat and internal organs, plus vegetables and other food materials that the wild ancestors would have consumed. One reason given by Dr. Billinghurst for this diet is that the basic physiology of the dog has changed very little with domestication, despite changes in appearance and behaviour.

In Practice

    A typical complete food for dogs is a mix of meat meal and cereals with added vitamins, precooked and formed into a kibble. The Raw Meaty Bone diet is different, based as it is upon raw bones, muscle meat, offal (liver, kidneys, heart and green tripe) together with leafy vegetables. Grains are not used, and the preference is for fruit and vegetables to be used as a source of carbohydrate.

    The Raw Meaty Bone diet must contain foods that are easily obtainable -- domesticated dogs do not spend their time hunting. Today there are several suppliers of suitable foods, ready prepared for owners to present to their dogs.

Recipes

    A typical Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF) diet for a normal healthy dog would comprise of 60 percent meaty bones (mainly chicken but also including lamb, rabbit, beef, pork and venison) and 40 percent other ingredients (mainly green leafy vegetables, mixed with offal and the occasional raw egg).

Supplementation

    To ensure optimum nutrition, the diet can be supplemented with naturally based commercial preparations. These tend to be based upon dried and ground grasses, vegetables, fruits and herbs, together with probiotics and natural enzymes.

Considerations

    There is debate in the veterinary profession over the relative merits of feeding a Raw Meaty Bone diet to dogs. The British Veterinary Association (BVA) issued cautionary advice in 2006, stating that the feeding of raw meat and bones can put dogs at some risk because of splintered bones causing intestinal perforation. The BVA also pointed to a risk of bacterial infection with uncooked meats, including Salmonalla and Campylobacter. For these reasons they advise against feeding raw bones or meat to dogs.

Guide to Showing at the Canadian Kennel Club

Guide to Showing at the Canadian Kennel Club

Founded in 1880, the Canadian Kennel Club, known as the CKC, considers itself a leader in advancing the quality of purebred Canadian dogs through shows, competitions and trials for its 25,000 members. The CKC show circuit combines strict purebred regulations with etiquette and showmanship among canines and their handlers. Each dog must meet specific physical standards in the show ring, which vary by breed. For purebred owners interested in showing their dogs, the CKC offers opportunities but demands strict compliance with its regulations.

Show Registration

    The CKC offers two paths for show participation. The first option is for owners who already registered their dog with the Canadian Kennel Club by providing the necessary lineage documentation and breeder certification. In this case, entering your dog simply requires submitting an entry form and the necessary fees through the CKC website. The second way to enter a show is by obtaining a performance event number, also known as a PEN, which lets dogs that are not registered with the CKC compete. Obtaining a PEN requires submitting two standing photos of your dog; a statement from your vet verifying your dogs breed and that the dog is neutered or spayed; a registered microchip number; and a statement explaining why your dog is unable to be registered as a full member of the CKC.

Entering the Ring

    Prior to entering the show ring, an official divides all dogs into groups by breed and sex. Viewing dogs in groups helps judges compare dogs with their breed peers. The judges will signal dog handlers to enter the ring. You must lead your dog out to to the show ring using a traditional, nonextendable leash. You may not carry your dog into or out of the ring, regardless of his size. Seeing your dog in motion allows judges to assess his gait, stride and demeanor.

Show Ring Behavior

    Obedience and well-mannered behavior toward the judges and the other canine contestants is paramount throughout the event. Local breed clubs often offer obedience training and classes tailored specifically to CKC show procedure. Your dog must obey verbal commands without any prompting or assistance. For example, you cant nudge your dog in a certain direction or position his body by lifting his paws. Correcting your dogs behavior in the ring is also prohibited. Judges will deduct points for any of the above behavior violations or if the dog behaves poorly by barking, nipping, jumping or pulling.

Point Systems

    The CKC show point system reflects points earned during a single show and your dogs competition placement over several shows, known as championship points. Judges add or deduct points based on a dogs performance during a single event. Championship points reflect a dog's placement at an event. For example, receiving the Best in Show title gives your dog more championship points than earning Best in Breed. Qualifying for the Grand Champion title requires 100 championship points and earning of the Good Canine Citizen Certification.

Jumat, 26 Agustus 2011

The Best All-Weather Dog Breeds

The Best All-Weather Dog Breeds

Among the variations in dog breeds, which can include size, body shape and temperament, coat type can be an important factor. Dogs can have long, shaggy, thick, curly, short or no coat whatsoever. These factors are often influenced by where in the world the breed originated. An all-weather breed is a dog whose coat is short enough to handle hot temperatures, but thick enough for cold, wet climates.

Redbone Coonhound

    The redbone coonhound is medium to large dog, reaching up to 27 inches (69cm) at the shoulder and weighing between 50 and 70 lbs. (23 to 32kgs). They are a robust breed with thick paw pads ideal for working rough terrain. The breed has an all-weather coat and can deal with cold and wet conditions as well as hot weather as long as they have access to water. A calm, affectionate breed, they are just as suited to being a family dog as being a working animal.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    The greater Swiss mountain dog is a large breed, reaching around 28 inches (71cm) at the shoulder and weighing up to 135 lbs. (61kgs). They have a solid build with a thick double coat suitable for the cold Swiss mountain regions. More suited to a cool climate, the breed's coat is not as thick as some breeds, so they still do well in warmer weather. As with all dogs in hot climates, an easily accessible water source is a must.

Belgian Shepherd

    The Belgian shepherd is a medium to large dog, around 26 inches (66cm) at the shoulder and between 65 and 75 lbs (30 and 34kgs). They have a medium-length, all-weather coat that protects against wet and cold conditions, but is not so thick as to cause major problems in hot climates. The breed is suited to living outdoors, but does prefer to be inside with the family as it is a social dog. If outside on a hot day, water and some shade are needed to avoid over-heating.

Bearded Collie

    The bearded collie is a medium-sized breed, about 22 inches (56cm) at the shoulder and between 40 and 60 lbs. (18 and 27kgs) in weight. The breed has a long, loose-haired, all-weather coat which is waterproof. Bred as a herding dog, it is ideal in cold, wet, windy conditions and its loose fur means it can handle heat better than breeds with thicker, more curly coats. In particularly hot climates, the breed's coat is not hard to trim back and usually takes a few months to regrow fully.

Tracking Games for Beagles

Tracking Games for Beagles

Beagles may look adorable and generally make good pets, thanks to their sunny temperament, but they are also scent hounds that are frequently used to hunt small game such as rabbits and squirrels. Beagles resemble miniature foxhounds and first surfaced in the 1500s as English hunting dogs. Teach your beagle how to track through a variety of tracking games, the majority of which can be played either outdoors or inside the home.

Meal Games

    Teach your beagle how to track through games with her meals. Do this for every meal you feed your pooch or for one meal per day, depending on preference. Hide the meal in an area of your home, such as in your basement, by your front door or under the dining room table. It doesn't matter where you place the meal, as long as it is far away from the area where you usually feed your dog. Use kibble to create a long trail leading to the food. Don't make the trail too easy; space the kibble out.

Treat Games

    Use treats as tracking games. Hide a few treats in your backyard, if applicable, and allow your dog to find them on her own. Use your judgment as to how many treats you would like to use, since treats that are too rich can result in an upset stomach. You can also use this game indoors. Make the game more complicated each day, if you so choose, by finding new and more difficult places to hide the treats.

Walking Games

    Walking games are another way to teach your beagle how to track. Place the beagle on a long leash or rope and instruct her to stay, or have a friend or family member hold her. Show her a toy and walk backward for about 20 yards. Drag your feet as you walk to leave a distinct scent trail and walk back to your beagle using the same path. Tell her to "track" and encourage her to sniff your trail to find the toy. Once she understands how to play this game, change direction as you walk to create more complex trails.

"Find the Person" Games

    Have a friend or family member help with this game. Show the beagle that the person is clearly holding her favorite toy and allow her to watch as the person walks away to another area of the house or yard, out of the beagle's sight. Instruct the beagle to find the person by saying "Find (person's name)." Once she has located the person, give her the toy, as well as a treat. You may have to go with her to find the person until she catches on to what she is supposed to do.

How to Cross Breed a Pitbull

How to Cross Breed a Pitbull

Breeding a dog should be done with caution and planning to ensure you produce healthy puppies with a good disposition that will not have a difficult time finding long-term homes. When you are looking to cross-breed a pitbull, you need to pay special attention to both dogs you are breeding to make sure you produce quality offspring. You should be careful not to breed dogs with undesirable qualities or poor dispositions.

Instructions

    1

    Have your pitbull thoroughly checked out by your veterinarian to determine whether the dog is healthy enough to be bred and does not demonstrate any signs of genetic problems that could be passed onto offspring. Hip dysplasia is a genetic condition similar to arthritis in humans that can negatively affect your dog and its offspring, causing the animals significant pain and often requiring surgery to correct. A high susceptibility to red mange, also known as demodectic mange, is another characteristics of pitbulls and is considered to be the result of inbreeding. You do not want to breed a dog with signs of these health problems or any others.

    2

    Thoroughly assess your pitbull to determine if it has qualities that will be beneficial for breeding. Pitbulls are known to be more aggressive as a whole than many other breeds, you do not want to breed an especially aggressive or poor-tempered dog. This is especially true of the female dog, as you may have a hard time handling or accessing the puppies of an aggressive, dominant female pitbull.

    3

    Select a mate for your pitbull. Cross-breeding means you will be selecting a dog of a different breed than your dog, so you will need to look for a dog whose personality and genetics will bring more good qualities to the offspring and can help balance or counteract any flaws in your dog's personality or genetics. Breeds that are commonly crossed with pitbulls include terriers and labrador retrievers. Make sure your dog's potential mate passes a veterinarian's health examination prior to breeding.

    4

    Arrange a breeding contract with the owner of the other dog. A breeding contract puts fees and agreements between both parties into writing and minimizes the chances of ending up in court over misunderstandings and conflicts between the parties at a later date. Breeding contracts should outline how much you are paying, how the animals should be cared for during breeding if one dog has to go to the other person's residence or facility for breeding, how much of the litter the other party gets (some breeders give a discount if given the pick of the litter) and how the animals will be bred (natural or artificial insemination). If you plan on registering the puppies, you need to check the rules of the registry for any specific regulations about breedings prior to breeding.

    5

    Breed the dogs when the female comes into heat. You can either have your vet artificially inseminate the female or you can put the two dogs in a kennel together and allow them to complete the task naturally.

How to Visually Determine the Breed Mix of a Dog

How to Visually Determine the Breed Mix of a Dog

Foods for My Mini Doberman

Foods for My Mini Doberman

The first thing to know about Miniature Doberman Pinschers is that the term "Mini Doberman" is actually a misnomer. The correct term for what many people call a "Mini Doberman" is a "Miniature Pinscher." Miniature Pinschers, or "Min Pins" as they are affectionately called, look like downsized versions of Doberman Pinschers, which is why they are often miscalled "Mini Dobermans." By learning as much as you can about Miniature Pinschers, you will know how to correctly care for your "Mini Doberman" pet.

Breed History

    Both the Doberman Pinscher and the Miniature Pinscher come from the Old German Standard Pinscher. Historians believe the Miniature Pinscher was bred several hundred years ago in Germany to be a barnyard ratter. Miniature Pinschers are believed to have been bred in excess of 100 years before Louis Dobermann bred the Doberman Pinscher in 1890 from a cross between a Rottweiler, Greyhound and a black and tan Terrier. Some of the confusion with the misnomer of the Miniature Pinscher as a "Mini Doberman" may come from a 1935 statement made by the Pinscher Schnauzer Clubs of Giessen Germany describing the dog as "a miniature of the Doberman Pinscher."

Min Pin Traits

    The Miniature Pinscher Club of America describes the Min Pin as a small dog of regal build with a strong heart and vigorous, playful nature. Miniature Pinschers have been dubbed "King of Toys" for their regal attitude in spite of their small stature. They are sturdy, compact, smooth-coated and naturally well-groomed dogs that are easy to train, alert and fearless watch dogs. Dogs range from 10 to 12 inches with females slightly smaller at 10 to 11 inches in height. Weight ranges from eight to 10 lbs.

Diet

    William D. Cusick, who spent a lifetime researching nutritional needs of canines and published a book about what to feed various dog breeds notes that in their native habitat, Miniature Pinschers would have eaten sugar beets, potatoes, cabbage for vegetable products and pork, venison and rodents as a meat source. Cusick recommends feeding Miniature Pinschers fresh, home-cooked food blended from horse meat, beef, wheat, potatoes, yellow corn and beet pulp. He advises to avoid feeding Min Pins ocean fish, soy and rice.

Vitamins and Minerals

    Cusick also recommends a diet that contains essential vitamins and minerals to promote the overall health and energy of a Miniature Pinscher. These vitamins include A Palmitate, B-1 Thiamine Hcl and Yeast, B-2 Riboflavin and Yeast, B-6 Pyridoxine Hcl and Yeast, B-12 Cyanocobalamin and Yeast, D D-activated Sterol, E dl-alpha tocopherol acetate, Niacinamide, Biotin, Folic Acid, d-Calcium Pantothenate and Para Amino Benzoic Acid. Minerals include calcium bone meal, copper gluconate, iodine sea kelp, iron ferrous fumerate, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus bone meal, zinc and potassium. Talk with your veterinarian about the proper amounts of each vitamin and mineral depending on your dog's age and gender.

Yorkie Hair Growth

Yorkie Hair Growth

Yorkshire terriers should be introduced to grooming at an early age. Yorkie dogs have long hair that requires daily brushing and frequent trimming. If you do not plan on showing your yorkie in dog shows, you can reduce your expenses by paying for a short, puppy-style haircut. However, if you enjoy the long, silky hair or plan on showing the yorkie, let the hair grow, but keep it out of the dog's eyes.

Hair Growth

    Many dog breeds have fur, but yorkies have true hair that grows like human hair. The hair won't shed like those of other breeds, but it grows so frequent haircuts are required. Frequent clippings are recommended every four to six weeks, depending upon your yorkie's hair style. Shorter hair styles, such as the puppy cuts, may need trimming more often.

Silky Hair

    Brush your yorkie every night, beginning from the top of the dog and stroke downward. Use a high-quality brush and brush the dead skin and loose hair out of the coat. Brushing regularly when the yorkie is relaxed will result in a shiny coat.

Shampooing

    Bathe the yorkie and shampoo the hair regularly with dog shampoo or a mild soap to keep it clean, but do not over-shampoo the hair. Shampooing the hair too often will strip the natural oils from the coat and leave it less conditioned. Do not use an adult soap or shampoo. If the hair is often tangled after shampooing or if the yorkie scratches a lot, change the soap or shampoo.

Quality Diet

    Feeding your yorkie a quality diet will help promote silky hair. Feed the yorkie a proper amount of premium dry dog food each day, according to the dog's weight and your veterinarian's advice. Vitamin supplements and other food, such as treats, can be given if approved by your veterinarian. A quality diet directly relates to your yorkie's healthy coat.

Kamis, 25 Agustus 2011

List of Small Crossbreed Dogs

List of Small Crossbreed Dogs

Designer or hybrid dog breeds are popping up everywhere. A crossbreed often begins as an accidental mating between purebred dogs, but may produce such positive characteristics that aficionados begin breeding programs to reproduce a new breed of dog. Many breeders believe that crossbreeding results in a healthier dog because of the dilution of breed-specific genetic traits. While most of these crossbreeds are not recognized by the American Kennel Club, there are still fans and clubs dedicated to these breeds.

The Puggle

    Puggles are created from breeding a pug to a beagle, and have become a very popular crossbreed due to their personality and looks. These sturdy little dogs often resemble small boxers with their thick body, short and smooth fawn coat, black mask, wrinkled forehead and droopy ears. The puggle weighs between 15 and 30 pounds, and is approximately 10 to 15 inches tall. The puggle first came on the scene in the 1980s. As of 2010, the puggle is the most popular crossbreed of dog in the designer dog classification.

Cockapoo

    A mating between the cocker spaniel and the poodle has produced the cockapoo, a popular, small crossbred dog that weighs between 20 and 24 pounds and has been around since the 1950s. This crossbreed has been around so long that many Cockapoos now are bred from male and female Cockapoos instead of the crossbreeding of the parent breeds. Cockapoo breeders believe this crossbreed produces a better family pet than either their parent breeds. Cockapoos are considered intelligent and loyal and have a hypoallergenic coat with little dander or shedding.

The Dorkie

    While the name might sound like a dog who looks like a geek, a dorkie is a small crossbreed of dachshund and a Yorkshire terrier. Dorkie lovers like this dog for its playful temperament and affectionate nature. Their very small size makes them easy to carry around. Dorkies have a short, dense and smooth coat. There is also a long-haired version as well as a wire-haired crossbreed. Dorkies are a recognized dog in the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Dog Kennel Club, and are known as dorkie terriers in the International Designer Canine Registry.

The Cavachon

    Cavachons are a hybrid mix between a bichon-frise and a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. This breeding produces a dog in toy size, which weighs between 7 and 10 pounds, and standard size, which weighs from 15 to 25 pounds. A cavachon's coat can be fluffy, curly, white and caramel colored and should be brushed weekly. This breed has minimal shedding and is an ideal choice for those who suffer from allergies.

Types of Dogs With Pointy Ears

Types of Dogs With Pointy Ears

Many dog breeds have pointy, or pricked, ears that stand upright on their own. Most terrier's ears stand up, while only a few hounds' do. Many working and herding breeds, and those from cold climates in the spitz family also have erect ears. Some are pointed, while others are rounded on the top. Upright ears are less prone to infections, but are more apt to attract biting bugs.

Small Breeds

    Some small breeds have ears that stand up and out, and seem oversized for the dog's body, like the chihuahua. The papillon's ears look large because of the long hair that hangs from them like plumes. Other small dogs such as the basenji, schipperke, Chinese crested, pomeranian, Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh corgis, shiba inu, Finnish spitz and French bulldog have upright ears that add to their alert look.

Terriers

    Since most terriers were bred for hunting vermin above or below ground, the pointy ears on the majority of them aid locating prey. Terriers with erect ears include the Australian, Boston, bull, cairn, rat, Norwich, silky, skye, Scottish, West Highland and Yorkshire.

Northern and Spitz Breeds

    Northern and spitz breeds raised for cold weather such as the Akita, Alaskan malamute, chow chow, Norwegian elkhound, American Eskimo, keeshond, Samoyed and Siberian husky have pointed ears. There are many dog breeds in other countries that also fall into this category, including the Karelian bear dog, Norwegian buhund and Icelandic sheepdog.

Working & Herding

    The keen sense of hearing in working and herding dogs such as the Australian cattle dog, Belgian malinois, Belgian sheepdog and German shepherd can be largely attributed to their upright ears.

Hounds

    Nearly all hounds have long, drooping ears, but Pharoah and Ibizan hounds have large, upright ears. The Cirneco dell'Etna, an Italian breed that resembles the Pharoah hound, also has large, pointed ears.

Soft Liver Dog Treats Recipe

Soft Liver Dog Treats Recipe

Liver is a healthy treat your dog will beg for. Full of iron and vitamin A, liver is a perfect ingredient for treats. To make soft liver treats, simply boil, saute or bake liver at 350 degrees F until it is firm enough to cut into bits. You can also bake liver with other ingredients to create a more bread-like treat that can be kept soft in a plastic bag.

Liver Bait

    Puree 1 lb. of beef liver, 4 eggs, 1 cup of cornmeal and up to 1 tbsp. of garlic powder in a food processor until smooth. Pour the batter onto a greased cookie sheet and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F. Let it cool for several minutes and then cut it into squares.

Liver Bread

    Puree 1 lb. of beef or chicken liver in a food processor and then mix it with 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of cornmeal, 2 tbsp. of garlic powder and 1 tbsp. of oil. Spread the batter on a greased cookie sheet and bake it for 25 minutes at 350 degrees F. Once it has cooled, you can tear it into chunks that can be given right to your dog or frozen for later.

Liver and Carrots

    For a super dose of vitamin A, mix liver and carrots in a treat for your dog. In a food processor puree 1 lb. of chopped liver, 1/3 cup of grated carrots and 1 egg. Whisk together 1 1/2 cups of whole wheat flour, 1 cup of corn meal and 1 tsp. of oregano. Add the liquefied liver blend to the dry ingredients and mix. Spoon the batter into a greased eight by eight pan and bake it for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F. Once it has cooled, cut it into squares.

The Advantages of Owning Large Size Dogs

If you are leaning toward getting a Great Dane but your husband is in favor of getting a Miniature Daschund, you may need some reasons for why a larger dog is a better choice. Though many people believe a larger dog correlates with being higher maintenance, this is not true. Both large and small breeds of dogs can require the same amount of attention. Training will usually determine temperament as much as the breed. However, there are clear advantages to owning a large dog.

Safety

    Clearly, police officers do not patrol airports and the streets with a Pomeranian in tow; instead, they use larger dogs in part because they have a great sense of smell, but also because are stronger and more intimidating than smaller dogs. Even though some large-size dogs are incredibly friendly and would do no more than slobber on a burglar, many families feel safer with a large dog in the back yard as a deterrent.

    If safety is a factor, consider getting a Doberman, German Shepherd, Rhodesian Ridgeback or a Staffordshire Terrier. Many of these dogs show fierce loyalty, but can be aggressive toward people they perceive are trying to harm you.

Less Fragile than Small Dogs

    Jumping off the couch can cause a back injury for a miniature Daschund, whereas a Great Dane can sit on the couch with most paws resting on the ground. If your family is highly active and you want a dog to go on camping trips with you, for example, a large dog may be preferable to a toy breed, which may have more difficulty keeping up in the outdoors.

Easier to Potty Train

    Some large dogs, like the Great Dane, might not be as astute as a Yorkie, but detecting a Yorkie's accidents on the carpet is much more difficult than spotting a Dane's mess.

    Many large dogs are very sharp, though, and can be potty trained quickly. In fact, veterinary specialist Justine A. Lee's list of the five brightest dogs in her book, "It's a Dog's Life," lists many large-size dogs. They include the Border collie, Poodle, German Shepherd and the Golden Retriever.

Better with Children

    Dan Rice, author of the book, "Small Dog Breeds" explains that young children should have a larger dog if they are unfamiliar with animals. Young children can play rough with a large-sized dog, whereas pulling or pushing a small dog could result in the creature having a serious injury or a broken bone.

    Additionally, large-size dogs are often more tolerant of children. Rice states that smaller dogs are more defensive because of their small size, and are more prone to being snappy and sensitive to a child's quick motion and noises. Large dogs, on the other hand, are usually not intimidated by children and are not easily provoked.

    According to Dog-obedience-training-review.com, the large-size dogs that interact best with children include Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Whippets and Australian Shepherds.