Sabtu, 31 Desember 2011

Difference Between Puggles & Pocket Puggles

Difference Between Puggles & Pocket Puggles

Puggles are a mixed-breed dog created by mating a purebred beagle and a purebred pug. Pocket puggles are a smaller version of the same mixture. Beagle and pug parents produce a dog that is energetic like a hound but thick in build with short hair, a wrinkled forehead and drooping ears like a pug.

Size

    Puggles typically weigh between 15 and 30 pounds and stand about 10 to 15 inches at the shoulder. Puggle puppies grow to be similar in size to their parents, but the size and shape of their heads may vary. Male puggles tend to be larger and more muscular than female puggles. Because puggles are not recognized as a breed, there are no height standards to distinguish a standard puggle from a miniature or pocket puggle. Breeders consider puggles weighing less than 15 pounds and standing shorter than 10 inches at the shoulder pocket puggles.

Health

    Puggles are generally a healthy breed with few of the health problems that purebred pug dogs tend to have. Because of an expanded gene pool, the characteristics of one breed tend to offset the deficiencies in the other breed. Puggles that are extremely small or intentionally bred from smaller parents of each breed to produce pocket puggles, however, are likely to inherit genetic defects existing in each breed. Pocket puggles are often a result of inappropriate breeding, such as breeding small, unhealthy dogs.

First and Second Generation Breeds

    First generation or purebred puggles and pocket puggles come from a purebred beagle and a purebred pug parent. Typically, puppies in each litter will look very similar to each other in color and markings. Second generation puggles are created by breeding two puggles; in second generation puggles, you will see more differences than in purebred first generation puggles. The puppies might look more like beagles, more like pugs or more like the puggles you bred. Breeding two smaller-sized puggles may create a second generation breed of pocket puggles that share the characteristics of second generation standard puggles but do not grow as big.

Buying Puggles or Pocket Puggles

    Pocket puggles are often a sales gimmick breeders use to sell their dogs; there really is no standard or guideline determining what makes a pocket puggle. Often the puppies are the same mixture of beagle and pug, but the breeder will select the smallest beagle and pug parents available. This does not guarantee your pocket puggle puppy will be small when it reaches maturity. Just as two small human parents can produce a large child, so can two small dogs. Your puggle puppy will not have a registration, but the parents should be registered if you are buying from a reputable breeder. Ask to see the parents' registrations before buying your puggle to ensure both parents are purebreds.

The Best Dog Breeds With Cats

The Best Dog Breeds With Cats

Almost any breed of dog can be good with cats, especially if they are raised with them. Terriers (jack russells, airedales, fox terriers) and sighthounds (greyhounds, whippets, salukis) are more likely to chase and even kill cats, since these breeds were bred for hunting. Consider the cat's personality as well. A "dog savvy" cat is less likely to trigger a dog's prey instinct, but an aggressive cat can hurt a small dog.

Golden Retriever

    Golden retrievers, like other retrieving breeds, have a natural tendency to be gentle and have "soft mouths," since they have been bred to retrieve game for hunters carefully without mangling it. Goldens have a well-deserved reputation as good family dogs, because they are rarely aggressive. Although a young golden may be boisterous and want to chase cats, it is less likely to harm them. A cat who calmly stands its ground instead of running away will defuse a dog's playful desire to chase it; a dog can't chase a cat that's sitting still.

Great Pyrenees

    Despite its impressive size (they can weigh over 100 lbs) the Great Pyrenees is calm and watchful over its "flock," including the family cat. Like most livestock guardian dogs, the Pyrenees is a faithful guardian and patient with the smallest animals, although it may try to repel strange cats, perceiving them as a threat. The American Kennel Club standard describes the Pyrenees as a tolerant and quiet dog with its family, but one who won't hesitate to defend its territory from intruders.

Bichon Frise

    The bichon frise is a gentle, playful dog, and according to the American Kennel Club (AKC), "a cheerful attitude is the hallmark of the breed." The intelligent little bichon is bred as a companion dog. Since it's not much bigger than the average house cat, a bichon and a friendly cat can make good playmates, especially when raised together. When introducing a cat and a dog for the first time, give each space to investigate each other without undue stress by using crates or baby gates. A frightened or aggressive cat can lash out and scratch a dog and small dogs are especially vulnerable to cat claws.

Boxer

    Many dogs who are tolerant with children are also tolerant with cats and the boxer is no exception. A medium-sized dog with a long working history, including war time messenger dogs, property guardians and hunting, the modern boxer is primarily purchased as a family pet. They are especially gentle with children, and most are very good with cats.

Mixed Breed

    Mixed breed dogs have temperaments as varied as their looks, and many mixed breed dogs can be very good with cats. Most dogs regardless of breed or breed mix, if well-trained and raised with cats, will be tolerant, if not affectionate, with the family cat. When adopting an adult dog, look for one that was raised with cats, or has been kept in a foster home with a cat. Bringing an already cat-tolerant dog into a cat-owning family is a lot easier than getting a strange dog and hoping that everything will work out OK.

The Best Ways to Raise a Chow

The Best Ways to Raise a Chow

Raising dogs is a rewarding and enjoyable experience for many people. A popular breed of dog is the chow, sometimes referred to as a chow chow. These dogs are characterized by mid-length fluffy fur, short snouts, small ears, stocky bodies and purplish or black tongues. To properly train your chow puppy to be an intelligent, gentle, loving, clean adult, you must implement several training methods.

A Chow's Temperament

    A chow is basically protective of his owners. He may demonstrate this with aggressive behavior toward strangers and new animals. Although many chows show aggressive behavior to others, this is not the case for all chows or chow mixes. Many chows are born with a gentle, easy temperament, but be sure to educate yourself on the possible behaviors shown in chows to prepare for properly raising and training your chow puppy.

Potty Training

    Chows are a naturally clean breed and are generally well-behaved indoors. However, you must still take the time to properly potty-train your chow puppy. Try to refrain from using pee-pee pads or other indoor dog potty equipment. As soon as you get your puppy, immediately begin taking him outdoors every hour to give your puppy the opportunity to use the bathroom outdoors. When your puppy uses the bathroom, reward him with praise and hugs. A chow puppy should generally be taken outside to use the bathroom as soon as he wakes from a nap or within several minutes after drinking water or eating food. Consistently offering your puppy the outdoors for using the bathroom will help him understand that he should not use the bathroom in your house.

Barking

    The chow's protective nature will be evident from the dog's barking at strange noises, smells and sights. It might be tempting to yell at your dog for barking, especially at inconvenient times such as when you are trying to sleep and when you are on the phone. However, try to resist this temptation. Instead, check out the situation and see why your dog is barking. Your chow may be trying to warn you of possible lurking danger, such as a person hanging around your property. His barking may keep an unwanted person away. Or it may be something as simple as him trying to alert you that he needs to go outside to use the bathroom.

Integrating Socially

    To help avoid aggressive behavior and poor social behavior in your adult chow, show your puppy love and affection. Showing your dog proper attention as early as possible will help him to be more easily socially integrated. Bring your chow puppy around family and friends at an early age to get him used to other people. Carefully introduce him to family pets to reduce the possibility of aggressive behavior as he grows into adulthood.

Signs & Symptoms of Allergies in Bulldogs

Signs & Symptoms of Allergies in Bulldogs

Bulldogs develop allergies due to hypersensitivities within the immune system, making their skin swollen and reactive, and causing inflammation in their nasal passages and airways. Bulldogs exhibit an array of visible symptoms and behavioral signs when in contact with a trigger, alerting owners to potential canine allergies.


Significance

    Bulldogs are known to develop allergies that can lead to chronic symptoms causing discomfort, self-mutilating behaviors and infections if left untreated. Infections caused by allergies affect the skin, ears and immune system, resulting in decreased energy levels, loss of appetite and general malaise. Owners can prevent and treat bulldog allergies through precautionary strategies and treatments, increasing the quality of life for pets.

Types

    Bulldogs are prone to developing contact and atopic allergies to food-based, environmental and chemical triggers. Contact allergies occur through direct skin contact, whereas atopic dermatitis allergies result from ingestion or inhalation, without direct skin contact. Immunoglobulin (IgE) antibody responses cause the epidermis to swell in both cases, resulting in eczema; hives; dry, flaky skin; rashes; biting; and paw licking. Topical antihistamines provide short-term relief, whereas oral antihistamines, allergy shots and limited exposure provide extended comfort.

Considerations

    Bulldog food allergies are identified by symptoms of skin irritation, with signs of persistent scratching around the face, neck and ears. Food allergies develop through increased exposure to byproducts, compound proteins and grains, generally taking years of consumption before causing reactions. Simple protein and simple carbohydrate mixtures such as natural fish and sweet potato formulas that do not contain animal byproducts, additives and artificial flavorings provide beneficial dietary changes for allergic and chemical-sensitized bulldogs.

Effects

    Bulldogs inhale environmental triggers such as pollen, mold, dust and chemical fumes through the eyes, nose and mouth, causing allergic rhinitis symptoms of sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, congestion, wheezing and constricted breathing. Ear infections may develop due to excess fluid clogging the Eustachian tubes leading to the middle ear, and are signaled by ear scratching and redness inside the ears. Treatments include oral antihistamines for allergies, air purifiers, vaporizers and antibiotics for ear infections.

Prevention/Solution

    Bulldogs with flea allergies bite the underbelly, rear and paws profusely due to intense itching caused by a reaction to flea saliva. Visible signs of flea allergies include: pimple-like bumps, rashes and patches of hair loss. Flea allergies are prevented by monthly applications of Frontline or Advantage, flea collars, regular bathing, grooming and frequent cleaning of dog bedding, carpets and furniture. Flea allergy symptoms may be alleviated with topical and oral antihistamine sprays and ointments.

Uses of Mini Beagles

Uses of Mini Beagles

The compact size and friendly nature of a mini beagle, sometimes called "pocket beagles," lead many to think these dogs are not good for anything other than being a family pet. In fact, there are several uses for mini beagles. Since these dogs usually do not get taller than 12 inches, they are able to do some jobs that standard size beagles could not. Mini beagles love to work hard.

Hunter's Helper

    Standard sized beagles were bred to be hunting companions, but mini beagles are also used in this way. Because of their small size, these dogs are able to go places that a larger dog could not. Also, they have a shrill bark that is easy for hunters to hear outdoors.

Drug Sniffer

    Mini beagles are used as drug sniffing dogs. Because a mini beagle can have more than 200 million smell receptors (compared to humans who have only 5 million), they make a great choice for use by police to detect drugs and explosives. Mini beagles are also used by airport security and customs officials to detect food items being brought in and out of countries illegally. All types of beagles are used in this capacity, including the mini beagle.

Termite Detector

    This is not the most well-known use of a mini beagle, but this dog can in fact be trained to detect termites. This use is most commonly applied in Australia. If the mini beagle detects termite activity, he will pinpoint the location of such activity, making the exterminator's or inspector's job much easier.

Family Pet

    Mini beagles have a gentle nature that make this dog a great choice for a family pet. Thanks to their friendly nature, they do not make the best watch or guard dogs, but they are usually gentle with children and get along well with most other animals. These small dogs do fine in an apartment, but they do require some activity each day. A small yard or daily visit to a local dog park will meet this need.

What Are Labradoodles?

What Are Labradoodles?

A labradoodle is a dog that results from the mating of a Labrador retriever and a standard or miniature poodle. Labradoodles have quite an interesting history and they have many desirable traits that have made this breed quite popular. As a relatively new breed, labradoodles make excellent companions and are highly intelligent canines. Learn what sets this breed apart from other breeds and why they are quite in high demand.

History

    It all started when Wally Conren, a puppy breeding manager at the Royal Guide Dog Association of Australia was asked about an allergy-free guide-dog by a vision-impaired woman residing in Hawaii. Wally decided a poodle would make a good choice because of its low shedding tightly curled coat. However, he was having a hard time finding an appropriate poodle. Finally, in despair, he decided to mate a standard poodle with his best Labrador: the first labradoodle was born.

An Allergen-Free Coat

    Labradoodles are popular dogs among allergy sufferers.
    Labradoodles are popular dogs among allergy sufferers.

    One of the most desired traits in labradoodles are their coats, which come in three distinct varieties: the flat or slick coat, which resembles the smooth coat of a Lab; the fleece coat, which falls out in loose loop spirals resembling the coat of an Angora goat; and the wool curly coats, similar in softness to a woolly sweater. Most importantly, the two latter coats are often non-shedding and are therefore allergy friendly.

Sizes

    Another intriguing quality of labradoodles is the fact that they are available in different sizes to match any household's needs. They come in three different sizes: miniature, medium and standard. Miniatures generally are between 14 to 16 inches tall and weigh no more than 25 pounds. Medium labradoodles are between 17 to 20 inches and can weigh up to 45 pounds. Standards are not over 25 inches and weigh about 50 to 65 pounds.

Temperament

    Labradoodles are very versatile dogs.
    Labradoodles are very versatile dogs.

    Perhaps one of the best qualities of a labradoodle is its temperament. This mixed breed is very sociable and friendly just as the average poodle or Labrador family dog. Labradoodles are also very intuitive and versatile, qualities that make them great candidates for important roles such as guide dogs, therapy dogs and other assistance dog specialties.

Protein Content in Dog Foods

Protein Content in Dog Foods

With all the different types of dog food on the market, understanding what they contain will enable you to be sure you're feeding your dog the very best. Protein is an important part of a dog's diet. A high-quality food can help your dog obtain the protein and nutrition it needs for optimal health.

Significance

    Protein contains 10 essential amino acids that dogs can't produce but that are needed for healthy growth. This important nutrient is used to help convert glucose to energy, which is important in supporting a dog's activity level. Protein also plays a role in building muscle, skin, hair, ligaments and cartilage. In addition, it helps regulate hormone levels.

Benefits

    A dog's digestive system is short and is designed for foods to move through it quickly and efficiently. High-quality proteins are easier for a dog to digest than fillers, which can cause bloating or gas. Protein also helps with weight maintenance, since a diet of lean, healthy protein is lower in calories than one of excess carbohydrates or fats.

Types

    One of the best ways to raise the protein level of dog food is by adding meat. Beef, fish, lamb and poultry are all common sources of protein. Soybeans, corn, wheat and barley are also good sources. There's a wide variety of protein-rich foods available for dogs with food allergies. Reading the labels will help you choose one that doesn't contain the allergen while still providing your dog with the nutrients it needs for healthy growth.

Levels

    A dog's protein needs change throughout its life. Puppies need more muscle-building protein than adult dogs do. Specifically, puppies require a daily diet of 28 percent protein, while adult dogs need 18 percent. Some adult dogs need increased levels of protein, however. These include lactating dogs and working dogs. The higher the activity level of the dog, the more protein it will need. Be sure to read the label to determine the protein levels in the food you buy.

Warnings

    Some dogs may have trouble digesting high amounts of protein. This may lead to gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea. If a dog has severe kidney disease, protein can put an added strain on the kidneys as they work to excrete the additional protein through urine. Be sure you're buying high-quality proteins and not protein byproducts. A single-source protein, such as chicken or fish, should be one of the first ingredients listed on the nutrition label.

How to Switch From Purina Strategy to Nutrena

How to Switch From Purina Strategy to Nutrena

Occasionally, a dog owner may decide to switch a pet from one type of food to another. For dogs with sensitive stomachs, simply replacing a bowl of Purina with one of Nutrena may cause the dog to experience digestive upset. For the best health of the dogs, he or she must be switched over gradually from their current food to a replacement food in order to avoid problems like stomach upset and incontinence. This process can take up to ten days but is well worth the time.

Instructions

    1

    On the first day of the food switch, give your dog three parts Purina and one part Nutrena. Allow the dog frequent access to the outdoors, and observe him for any signs of cramping. Repeat this process for a total of three days.

    2

    On day 4, feed the dog two parts Purina and two parts Nutrena. Monitor him for any signs of cramping or discomfort. If signs of gastric upset are present, move back to step one for a few more days. If all is well, continue with a 2/2 ratio until day 6.

    3

    On day 7, give 1 part Purina and 3 parts Nutrena. Continue with this ratio until day 9 if the dog appears to tolerate the formula well. If stomach upset occurs, revert to step 2 for another few days.

    4

    On day 10, give 4 parts Nutrena. Monitor the dog's stools and allow him frequent visits outdoors. If stools remain firm and no stomach upset occurs, continue to feed the dog only Nutrena.

The Best Dogs to Own With Pit Bulls

The Best Dogs to Own With Pit Bulls

Pit Bulls make great family pets. They are energetic, loyal and love to please their owners. Pit Bulls are good natured and very affectionate. They do have some natural aggressive tendencies toward other animals, but if paired with the right dogs at an early age and properly socialized, they won't be aggressive with them or your family. Pit Bulls should be paired with animals that are playful but not aggressive.

Golden Retriever

    Golden Retrievers are a great choice to pair with Pit Bulls. They are easy to train, not overly aggressive and are devoted to their owners. Golden Retrievers show their love by being eager to please. They are loyal and devoted to their families and other household pets. They are energetic and adapt well to most living situations as long as they get daily exercise.

Labrador Retriever

    Labs are a great choice for active families with Pit Bulls. They are even tempered and easily trained. They are very active and have lots of energy, and will enjoy having another dog to play with. Labs are gentle and smart. They love to play Frisbee and catch. These dogs are good natured, gentle and trustworthy, especially with children.

Poodle

    Poodles are smart, intelligent and friendly dogs who do well with companionship. According to the American Kennel Club, they don't shed much and their hypoallergenic coat reduces allergic reactions, although they do need frequent grooming. Poodles are very smart and sensitive. The AKC says poodles excel in obedience training. Poodles come in three different sizes (toy, miniature or standard), but the standard size is recommended when paired with Pit Bulls.

Golden Retriever Puppy Problems

Golden Retriever Puppy Problems

The golden retrievers is a happy-go-lucky breed of dog that loves people. They make wonderful companions and are reasonably free of problems, but there are important things to consider when selecting your golden retriever puppy. Understanding what physical and behavioral problems occur with golden retriever puppies and how to avoid them will give you a head start on a long and fulfilling relationship with your new friend.

Behavioral Problems

    Golden retrievers are stable dogs not known for many behavioral problems. There are some issues that can lead to temperament problems that a puppy buyer should avoid. Inbreeding or careless breeding of unrelated dogs without regard to the disposition of the parents adds to the likelihood of future problems. Golden retrievers are socially oriented family dogs, so they are predisposed to separation anxiety.

Physical Problems

    Golden retrievers are large, heavy-boned and sturdy, but the weight they carry combines to create a common problem in large dogs--hip dysplasia. The golden retriever puppy is at risk for problems in all of the "big four" areas--hips, elbows, eyes and heart. Do not buy a puppy from a breeder that does not run the proper tests to ensure good health, and never buy from a puppy mill or pet store. Other golden retriever puppy problems are allergies, hot spots, hypothyroidism, epilepsy and bone cancer.

Correcting Behavioral Problems

    Usually temperamentally based difficulties are due to a lack of attention and exercise. Golden retriever puppies are active dogs that need lots of exercise. They are happy to lay on the couch watching TV with you, but only after you have played, jogged or taken a nice long walk with them. Do not expect your golden to self-exercise. They will likely stand by the door and whine for you to come back out. They do not like being away from you. If you do not train a golden retriever puppy early to accept periods when he will be left alone, in a crate or a kennel for his protection, the dog may become destructive or whine and cry when you're gone.

Curing Physical Problems

    Physical problems range from those that can be controlled or cured with medication to those that are terminal. Rather than a cure, new golden retriever puppy owners should look for breeders who thoroughly test their breeding stock for major problems like hips, elbows, subaortic stenosis and osteochondritis dissecans. The breeder should also have information on the less severe health concerns of all their animals and the immediate relatives and ancestors of their dogs. Ask a breeder for the Canine Health Information Center numbers. CHIC is a database for dog-related health screening tests from the various medical programs such as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals for hips and Canine Eye Registration Foundation for eye testing. It gives breeders, puppy buyers and other interested parties a place to find out about the health of any dog that carries a number in the system.

Maturity

    The golden retriever takes several years to fully mature. The puppy may look like an adult on the outside at 6 to 8 months of age, but he is still growing on the inside. Both physical and mental maturation is not complete until about 2 years of age.

Is It Bad for a Maltese to Have Yellow Spots?

Is It Bad for a Maltese to Have Yellow Spots?

The Maltese, which was once known as "Ye Ancient Dogge of Malta," is known to date back more than 2800 years. Publius, the Roman governor of Malta around the time of the Apostle Paul, owned a Maltese which was immortalized in a poem written by the poet Marcus Valerius Martialis. Publius had a portrait painted of his beloved dog, which was said to be hard to distinguish from the actual dog, it was so lifelike.

The Maltese Coat

    Maltese are small dogs with long, straight, all-white hair which grows continuously like human hair. Sometimes, a Maltese puppy has yellow or tan spots on the coat. The spots vary in size and location, but are most often on the ears. Some puppies have yellow spots on the ears and along their backs. These patches of yellow may be pronounced or almost unnoticeable, depending on the dog. It is common for the spots to fade and the coat to become solid white by the time the puppy is one year old, but this is not always the case.

The Breed Standard

    The confirmation ring is intended to judge those dogs which should be bred.
    The confirmation ring is intended to judge those dogs which should be bred.

    The American Kennel Club lists the official standards for all breeds of dog accepted into their registry. The standard for the Maltese states that the coat be completely straight, with no waviness, and pure white. The light tan or yellow coloring is allowed on the ears, but is not desirable. This means that, although a dog with yellow spots on the ears will not be disqualified, it may be penalized, in the confirmation ring.

Concerns

    People who buy a Maltese puppy and then notice yellow spots on its ears or other parts of its body often worry that they were sold a mixed breed puppy instead of the pure breed they expected. Though unscrupulous breeders exist, the presence of yellow spots doesn't mean the dog is not purebred. No breeder can guarantee that any puppy will lose the yellow spots, so it's not necessarily a sign the breeder did anything wrong. There are no health or temperament problems associated with yellow spots on a Maltese; it is purely a preference in confirmation judging. A Maltese puppy that retains yellow or tan spots all its life can still be a great family pet.

Considerations

    Avoid worries about the quality of the puppy or its true heritage by researching breeders carefully and only doing business with a breeder/exhibitor who has a stellar reputation. A reputable breeder will have all possibilities and remedies set forth clearly before any money exchanges hands, and will keep meticulous records of all breeding and history on all her dogs. Yellow spots on a Maltese are not bad; they do not signify anything is wrong with the dog. However, the spots can cause a show dog to lose points.

    Note that Maltese have a tendency to have brownish stains under the eyes and around the mouth. These are stains from saliva and tears, and are not the same thing as the yellow or tan spots on the hair.

How Much Should You Feed a Lab Puppy?

Labrador retrievers are one of the most popular breeds of dog in the world. Originally bred in England to be gun or hunting dogs, labs are loyal, smart, and eager-to-please their owners. If properly cared for, your new lab puppy can live a long and healthy life, and this proper care begins with good nutrition

Your Brand New Labrador

    When you bring your Labrador puppy home initially, it will likely be overwhelmed and frightened by the whole experience. This is why it is a good idea to introduce your puppy to everyone in the house slowly and gently, and why it is also a good idea to feed your puppy the same food that it is used to eating, at least for the first few days. Over the next seven to ten days, mix the old food and the new food together, gradually decreasing the amount of old food until your puppy is used to the new food.

Making a Feeding Schedule

    Your puppy will need approximately three meals a day until it is about nine months old. Puppies of all breeds are voracious eaters, but it is important not to overfeed them. Go by the recommendation on the dog food bag if you aren't sure of the exact amount, but keep in mind that those recommendations are usually more food than your dog will actually need. Feeding your puppy in the same place, at the same times everyday is the best way to help them regulate their appetites and establish a lifelong feeding routine.

Types of Puppy Food

    There are many different brands of puppy food, but two main types: dry and wet. Most breeders and veterinarians recommend limiting the amount of wet dog food that you give your pet, since it is high in fat, salt, and sugar. When it comes to selecting a dry food, or kibble, keep in mind that you get what you pay for. Inexpensive dry food is made with low-quality ingredients, fillers, and contains artificial coloring and ingredients. Premium dog food, naturally, contains the highest quality ingredients but is also the most expensive. If you aren't sure which brand of dog food to choose for your puppy, ask your veterinarian or your breeder.

Where to Feed Your Puppy

    Your puppy should eat its three meals a day in the same place in order to establish a routine. Many people think that placing a dog's food and water in an area of the house where most family members gather (like the kitchen) is best, but in truth, dogs are pack animals and like to be left alone to eat in peace without worrying about having their food stolen from them. Choose an out of the way spot for your puppy's feeding times.

Health for Years to Come

    Establishing good eating habits at an early age is one of the best things that you as a loving pet owner can do for your puppy. Labradors who are overfed and those who are underfed run the risk of developing many health conditions that can be prevented, simply by feeding them the correct amounts of healthy, nutritious dog food on a regular schedule, and of course, plenty of water at all times.

Jumat, 30 Desember 2011

Westie Terrier & Dog Allergies

Westie Terrier & Dog Allergies

West highland white terriers, or Westies, are prone to many illnesses, including allergies, according to "The Veterinarians' Guide to Your Dog's Symptoms." Westies also have conditions that may be mistaken for allergies.

Symptoms

    Westies with allergies will scratch or chew the skin until the skin is crusty scabby, red or bald and sneezing more often than usual, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs."

Causes

    There are many causes for allergy and atopy symptoms in Westies. These include ragweed, pollen, certain foods, grass, house dust, molds, feathers and wool.

Time Frame

    Allergy symptoms in Westies come at predictable times of the year, beginning in early spring and often disappearing in the winter. Allergies caused by food happen only when eating that particular food, according to "ASPCA Complete Guide to Dogs."

Treatment

    The big problem in treating allergies and atopy in Westies is determining what they are allergic to, which can take days or weeks to figure out. Medications like antihistamines and soothing anti-itch creams can help ease symptoms.

Misconception

    Westies are also prone to getting a non-contagious yeast infection on their skin (malassezia dermatitis) which may give the same symptoms as allergies, according to Westie rescue group WestieMed, Inc.

The Top Ten Working Dog Breeds

The Top Ten Working Dog Breeds

Six of the top 10 hardest-working dogs in the world come from the working dog class, according to Animal Planet. One of these also made the American Kennel Club's 10 most popular breed list in 2009 and 2010. One of the hardest-working dogs and another working class breed made the top 10 list of working and obedience intelligence list that was the product of a study published by Dr. Stanley Coren in his 1999 book, "The Intelligence of Dogs."

Working Breed

    The AKC and the Westminster Kennel Club both list 28 breeds belonging to the working class. These dogs originate from far flung areas of the world, such as the Akita from Japan, the Komondor from Hungary and the Malamute from Alaska. Some working dogs are kept as pets and others for work, such as guarding, pulling sleds or being guard dogs. While they share the instinctive intelligence to work, the breeds belonging to this class are quite diverse in the nature of their work.

Top Breeds

    Breeds of dog differ in factors such as popularity, work ethic, loyalty and intelligence. What makes a breed the best for one person won't be the same for another. Even within their disciplines, people don't agree on which breeds are best. For example, in dogsledding, some mushers believe the Siberian Husky is better than the Alaskan Malamute. The SIberian Husky is smaller and can pull faster, but the Alaskan Malamute can pull more, so it all depends on what you are comparing. Furthermore, many of the racing sled dogs today are Alaskan Huskies (a cross-breed), not Siberians Huskies or Alaskan Malamutes.

Animal Planet

    In their top 10 hardest working dog list, Discovery's Animal Planet chose six working class breeds: Boxer, Rottweiler, Doberman, Akita, Newfoundland and Alaskan Malamute. The other breeds were from the sporting (Labrador and Golden Retrievers), herding (German Shepherd) and hound (Bloodhound) categories.

AKC Most Popular Dogs

    For over 20 years, the AKC has maintained a register of the most popular dog breeds in America. For 2009 and 2010, the only breed from the working dog class in the top 10 was the Boxer, placing 7th in 2010 and 6th in 2009. Other breeds from the class made notable improvements in the AKC popularity contest: the Bernese Mountain Dog moved up 19 places from 58 to 39; the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog moved up 16 places from 101 to 88, the Great Dane moved up 11 places from 28 to 17, the Mastiff moved up 10 places from 39 to 28, the Newfoundland moved up 9 places from 53 to 44, and the Anatolian Shepherd Dog moved up 6 places from 115 to 109. Two of the working class breeds were added to the contest in 2010 and had admirable placements: the Leonberger at 33 and the Cane Corso at 51.

Stanley Coren's Intelligence Test

    For his 1999 book, "The Intelligence of Dogs" Stanley Coren conducted a study with dog obedience judges registered with the AKC and the Canadian Kennel Club. The judges were asked to fill out a questionnaire ranking the various breeds on working and obedience. The product of the study was a ranking of the most intelligent dog breeds. Of the working class breeds, only the Doberman Pinscher (5) and Rottweiler (9) made the top 10 list. The Bernese Mountain Dog (22), Giant Schnauzer (28), Samoyed (33), Newfoundland (34), Kuvasz (42), Siberian Husky (45), Boxer and Great Dane (48) and Alaskan Malamute (50) round out the top 10 working class breeds on Coren's intelligence list.

How to Choose a Shiba Inu Puppy

The Shiba Inu breed is the smallest of the Japanese breeds. Shibas look very much like foxes, complete with reddish fur and ears that stand up straight. Whether you're looking to breed or just for a wonderful pet, Shibas have great personalities and are fun to share your home with.

Instructions

    1

    Decide if you want a male or female. Each gender has its pros and cons, but generally, males have more stable moods but can be aggressive if not socialized; females are moodier but can offer a sweet, soft side as well. If you're buying a puppy to breed, figure out if you'd rather take care of a low-maintenance male stud or a female that will go into heat regularly but bear puppies.

    2

    Refer to the AKC breed standard. If you plan to show or breed the dog, he must conform to the standards. If you're going to have your dog sterilized, only think about what you, personally, will be happy with. AKC standard states that acceptable colors are bright orange-red, black with tan points and sesame; all colors should have "urajiro," a whitish undercoat and markings. Also know that the AKC requires that no dewclaws be on the hind legs, which are removable with surgery, if your dog has them; that the dog have a proper bite, not over- or undershot and that the coat be short, with no long or woolly hair.

    3

    Select a breeder. Ask questions of the breeder over the phone to ensure that these puppies are coming from a good home. Find out what the puppies are fed, how much they've been exposed to children, strangers and other animals, if they're had their first set of shots, etc. Ask about the parents to see if any physical or behavioral problems have arisen in the puppies or lineage. If you're planning on breeding, make sure the owners are offering full AKC registration with breeding rights. Set up a time to go to their house and view the puppies.

    4

    Look at the litter as a whole. Step back and watch them interact. It's hard to predict the temperament of an adult dog when they're only 8 weeks old, but the basic rule is to pick a puppy that's average. You don't want the bravest, largest puppy of the litter, nor do you want the shy runt.

    5

    Pick one puppy to take aside. Evaluate him by himself and see if you form a bond. You want a Shiba Inu who's confident even when not around his brothers and sisters. You may need to play with a few individually to make up your mind.

What Dogs Are the Best for Cold Weather?

What Dogs Are the Best for Cold Weather?

Dogs that thrive in cold weather tend to be large and have thick coats meant for withstanding harsh temperatures and adverse conditions. Many of these breeds can be found in the American Kennel Club's "working dog" group because they have their roots in outdoor work, such as herding, guarding animals and property, pulling sleds or carts, doing farm work and performing rescues.

Arctic Breeds

    Sled dog teams have long been used as one of the main methods of transportation in Arctic regions, pulling mail, cargo and people. To be part of one of these tough canine gangs, a dog must have endurance and strength to battle through winter weather and challenging terrain. But dog sleds haven't always just been used for work. Dog sled races are still popular today. The Iditarod race is a famous test of strength and strategy as dog sled teams race more than 1,000 miles over frozen rivers, barren tundra and through dense snowy forests each year in Alaska. The most common breeds used in dog sleds of all types are Huskies, Samoyeds, Alaskan Malamutes, American Eskimo Dogs and Chinooks. These breeds are strong and tough, with coats built for frigid temperatures. Other breeds are used as well, but these are some of the more familiar ones.

Global Breeds

    Many of the rest of the cold weather breeds make up a United Nations of dogs. They include the Norwegian Elkhound, Irish Wolfhound, Bouvier des Flandres (from Belgium), Old English Sheepdog, Bernese Mountain dog, Newfoundland, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, Great Pyrenees, Black Russian Terrier, Chow Chows (which originated in Mongolia) and the Akita, national dog of Japan. Hallmarks of all of these dogs, in addition to their physical characteristics of a muscular body and woolly coat, is that they tend to be independent, intensely devoted and intelligent. Some are more sociable than others. Some tend to be more task-oriented. All of these dogs are happiest when they get a lot of exercise in cold weather.

Familiar Breeds

    Several breeds that are more commonly known can also withstand cool climates. The St. Bernard, a longtime Alpine rescuer, is a big, loving dog that thrives in the snow. The Bearded Collie, which looks like a classic shaggy Disney dog, is affectionate and smart, but the beautiful long coat of hair requires lots of grooming. And German Shepherds have been used for outdoor work as messenger dogs and guard dogs since World War I. There are a few other breeds of dogs that can withstand cold weather, but don't forget that you might find a mutt that will be happy in the cold, too, depending on your needs, your preferences and your location. Remember that no matter what the breed, no dog should be left outside for long periods of time in freezing weather. All breeds need shelter from extreme elements.

How to Make Parmesan Cheese dog Treats

If you've got some leftover Parmesan cheese in your refrigerator and you're not quite sure how to use it, consider making some Parmesan cheese treats for your dog. She'll love the tangy flavor of the cheese, and the parsley will help to keep her breath fresh.

Instructions

    1

    Oil 2 cookie sheets and preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.

    2

    Heat 1 cup of beef or chicken broth in a saucepan.

    3

    Place the oatmeal and butter in a mixing bowl and pour the hot broth over the top. Stir the mixture and then let it sit undisturbed for 10 minutes.

    4

    Stir in 3/4 cup of cornmeal, 3 Tbsp. of chopped parsley, 1/2 cup of milk, 1 cup of shredded Parmesan cheese and 1 lightly beaten egg.

    5

    Mix in the flour 1 cup at a time, until the mixture forms a thick dough.

    6

    Put the dough on a floured surface and knead in more flour until the dough is smooth, about 4 to 5 minutes. Pat the dough to about 1/2-inch thick and cut them into rectangles.

    7

    Bake the Parmesan cheese dog treats for 40 to 45 minutes and allow them to cool on a wire rack.

Top 10 Smartest Dog Breeds

Top 10 Smartest Dog Breeds

The top 10 smartest dog breeds share a few characteristics. Most are excellent family dogs, and many are working breeds. With great intelligence comes great responsibility. These dogs need to be occupied with an active lifestyle to keep boredom away. A smart, bored dog will find ways to amuse himself at the expense of your home or yard.

Border Collie

    Keep a border collie's work ethic challenged.
    Keep a border collie's work ethic challenged.

    According to the American Kennel Club, the border collie is renown for its strong work ethic and intelligence. They are most commonly seen as champions in agility contests and are hard-working farming and herding dogs. Because of their high intelligence, they do bore easily and must be kept occupied to avoid destructive behaviors.

Poodle

    A poodle is intelligent and protective.
    A poodle is intelligent and protective.

    Poodles come in a few sizes, ranging from teacup all the way to the large standard. They are also excellent for people with allergies to dogs because they do not shed. They require regular trips to the groomer to keep their fur trimmed. Poodles are also good guard dogs and respond well to training.

German Shepherd

    German shepherds excel at rescue work.
    German shepherds excel at rescue work.

    German shepherds belong to the herding breeds and have been used as both police and rescue dogs. They are a large breed and have an average lifespan of about 10 years. Like poodles, they also make excellent guard dogs.

Golden Retriever

    Golden retrievers are good with kids.
    Golden retrievers are good with kids.

    Golden retrievers are also a large breed, weighing between 55 to 75 lbs. They excel as hunting dogs and are also used in search and rescue. They generally get along well with other dogs and their mellow temperament tends to make them good with children.

Doberman Pinscher

    The Doberman pinscher is a loyal protector.
    The Doberman pinscher is a loyal protector.

    Dobermans are well known as a guard dog. They have been used as both police dogs as well as military dogs during wartime.

Shetland Sheepdog

    A relative of both the collie and border collie, the Shetland is also a herding breed. They are a smaller breed, standing a little more than 1 foot tall. They can be somewhat shy with people they do not know and make great guard dogs.

Labrador Retriever

    Labs love hunting and playing with their families.
    Labs love hunting and playing with their families.

    Labs are one of the most popular family dogs. They range in size between 55 and 75 lbs. and are water dogs. Excellent at hunting, they possess an even temperament that makes them a great addition to almost any family.

Papillon

    Papillons are a toy-sized breed. They do well in apartment settings because they do not require a large yard. Interestingly, some owners have had success in litter box training them as well.

Rottweiler

    Rottweilers were bred in Germany as guard dogs and have a long history as service dogs in police work. They can be territorial, but they respond well to training.

Australian Cattle Dog

    The Australian cattle dog is also known as the Queensland heeler. As the name suggests, they originate from Australia and are excellent herding dogs. Similar to a border collie, they require an active lifestyle and can get themselves into trouble if they are allowed to become bored.

Kamis, 29 Desember 2011

How to Make Bacon Flavored Dog Treats

How to Make Bacon Flavored Dog Treats

These days, dogs don't feed on just milk bones and kibble. Our dogs are treated like family. We buy them food that looks like "people food," designer clothing and gourmet treats. And rightfully so! Your dog is faithful, loyal and loves you unconditionally. But if the cost of all those special treats for your pooch is taking a bite out of your budget, you can make many of them in the comfort of your own home for just a smidgen of the cost of store-bought goodies.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray cookie sheet with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.

    2

    Cook bacon until crispy, either on the stove top in a skillet or for about three minutes in the microwave. Reserve grease and drain on paper towels.

    3

    Break the eggs into the small mixing bowl. Beat the eggs well using a wire whisk or fork.

    4

    Measure the milk powder, flour, wheat germ and cornmeal into the large mixing bowl. Mix well to combine all of the ingredients thoroughly. Add the eggs, grease and water and stir well.

    5

    Crumble the bacon and fold pieces into the mixture. Drop by heaping spoonfuls onto the greased baking sheet.

    6

    Bake for fifteen minutes at 350 degrees. Turn off the oven and allow dog treats to sit in the oven overnight. This allows them to dry and harden, so that they are nice and crunchy for your favorite pooch! Store in an airtight container for up to two weeks.

How Can I Prove My American Bulldog Is Not a Pitbull?

How Can I Prove My American Bulldog Is Not a Pitbull?

Both American bulldogs and pitbulls are part of the Staffordshire terrier and mastiff family of dogs. Both breeds became popular in England in the 1800s for the sports of bull-baiting and dog-fighting. American bulldogs are a less common breed in the states and are often mistaken for a pitbull. There are some features that set the two apart, but they are so close in ancestry, it is difficult to determine without an American Kennel Club registration or DNA test.

Instructions

    1

    Explain the features of an American bulldog are somewhat different than a pitbull. American bulldogs are slightly taller and thinner. The most distinctive feature that sets the two apart is the American bulldog's jowls and tendency to drool excessively. The pitbull does not have loose jowls or drool.

    2

    Show your American Kennel Club certificate of registration of the bulldog. The AKC doesn't recognize the American bulldog breed, but will register dogs under the breed of bulldog. American bulldogs are often lumped in with Staffordshire terriers or pitbulls for purposes of certification. This is going to be the most-effective route of proving the breed of your dog.

    3

    Obtain a DNA test from a veterinary clinic that describes your dog as not having the pitbull gene. Because American bulldogs are so closely related to pitbulls, this is not a foolproof method.

How to Identify an Old English Mastiff

How to Identify an Old English Mastiff

The Old English Mastiff comes from England, as you might expect. It was there when the Romans first invaded in the 6th century BC, so it is believed to have been brought to the country by Phoenician traders sometime prior. Since then this massive breed, arguably pound for pound the largest dog in the world, has been used as a ward og, as a pit fighter, a flock protector, home guardian and companion. This breed is happy to live with humans, though is a bit standoffish, preferring to watch its family from a comfortable spot on the couch or rug than follow them everywhere. When given a task, this dog is off like a shot, its untiring herculean strength eagerly put to use as a police dog, military dog, search and rescue dog and even a beast of burden.

Instructions

    1

    Start by assessing the height, weight and dimensions of the dog. If its the size of a small horse, thats a good start. The average Old English Mastiff will stand 2 1/2 feet high at the shoulder with a width of over 2 feet, weighing between 160 and 200 pounds. These are average dimensions. Roughly 10 percent of Old English Mastiffs grow to be much taller and heavier, topping out at 4 feet high and more than 300 pounds. These are truly massive, heavyset, and muscular dogs typically much longer than they are tall. The bone structure should be very sturdy and the skin loose in partial fold along the ribs and upper back. The tail should be less than 1/3 the dogs length, thin and always hang low between the rear legs.

    2

    Examine the dogs fur and coloring. The fur should be short and bristle-like in appearance, though soft as down to the touch. It comes in primarily plain colors: grey-silver, cream, apricot, tan and gold. The one exception to this rule is the dark brown brindle, which is a type of blotchy patchwork that includes streaks of orange or tan.

    3

    Conclude by looking at the dogs head. It should be absolutely massive with a jaw span quite capable of fitting in a human head. It should be very wide, thick and rounded with long triangular ears that flop far to the sides. All Old English Mastiffs have a black mask which covers the nose and muzzle all the way up to the eyes. The eyes should be large, round, and dark brown; set well in to the front of the face rather than the sides. They should be well protected by heavy bone orbits above. The muzzle should be short, wide, boxlike and dominated by heavy drooping jowls and lips with a thick dewlap under the chin. This makes the breed very prone to drooling.

How to Figure Out the Breed of a Dog

One of the most common questions dog owners are asked is, "What kind of dog is that?" Sometimes, it just is not possible to know. Perhaps the dog came from a shelter, or is one of a long line of "dogs of mixed heritage."

Normally, canine DNA tests were only available through veterinarians. Now, new technology is available so you can check your dog's DNA yourself. The sample you gather is compared against a database of breeds to figure out what kind of dog you own. This can help maintain the health and wellness of your dog, as well as custom tailor training and activities to its breed traits.

Instructions

    1

    Swipe the inside of your dog's cheek using the cotton swab provided with the canine DNA home test kit.

    2

    Place the cotton swab in the vial included in the kit.

    3

    Place the vial in the box, envelope or mailing tube provided with the testing kit. If the test kit did not come with a pre-paid mailing envelope, take the mailer to the post office. Make sure it is identified as "fragile."

    4

    In approximately 4-6 weeks, you should get the results of your canine DNA test. Many kits allow you to choose to receive your results via email or postal mail. The test results will provide a definitive analysis of your dog's breed heritage.

How Big Do Maltese Yorkies Get?

How Big Do Maltese Yorkies Get?

A Maltese/Yorkie mix is a common hybrid breed of dog that is usually referred to as either a Morkie, Yorktese, Malkie, or Malki. Due to its popularity, many Maltese/Yorkie mixes are not half purebred Maltese and half purebred Yorkshire Terrier but are products of multi-generational crosses, meaning each parent is a mix of both Yorkie and Maltese.

Size

    Hybrid dog breeds can become as large or as small as either breed, however both Yorkshire Terriers and Maltese breeds are roughly the same size. Both breeds are classified as Toy Group breeds by the American Kennel Club and each has an average healthy weight of 4 to 7 lbs., although individual dogs can be larger. The average height of Morkies tends to be slightly larger than their stock breeds at 8 to 10 inches. Like their stock breeds, Morkies can be bred to teacup size but this drastically decreases the life expectancy of the dog and introduces a wide range of health problems to it.

Physical Characteristics

    Morkie dogs usually feature the long, silky hair found in both breeds and require regular grooming to keep it from matting and tangling. Individual Morkie puppies may have its tail docked at a young age, as docked tails are common for Yorkies, but are not common for Maltese.

Breed Characteristics

    Like any hybrid breed, Morkies can exhibit any of the traits found in either breed, and like all dogs can exhibit temperaments that its breed is not known for. Morkies are not recommended for families with small children, as the Maltese breed's brittle bone structure and the Yorkie's high activity level can be dangerous around a small child. Morkies tend to bond closely with their family and do not do well if left alone or ignored. Ignored Morkies can become bored and distracted if left alone to its own devices.

Life Expectancy

    The average life expectancy for the Morkie breed is between 10 to 13 years, slightly shorter than the mid-teenage life expectancy of the purebred stock. Life expectancy can be shorter still if the individual dog inherits the problems of either or both breeds, such as the Maltese breed's brittle bones and the Yorkie's genetic dental and thigh bone problems.

Miniature Schnauzer Breed Information

The Miniature Schnauzer is the most popular of the Schnauzer breeds, most likely due to the breed's happy temperament and devotion to its owners. A dog of German origin, the breed has been shown as early as 1899.

Identification

    The Miniature Schnauzer stands 12 to 14 inches high, and should weigh between 10 to 15 lbs. It has a long nose, bright black eyes, and sports a beard, mustache and bushy eyebrows.

Colors

    In showing, the recognized colors are solid black, salt and pepper, and black and silver. You can find white schnauzers, but they are disqualified by most kennel clubs.

Features

    This is an alert, intelligent and spirited dog who can live in the city or on a farm. It is fond of children, obedient and willing to please its family.

Potential

    It makes a good watch dog and will let you know when anyone approaches your property. It can be good with other dogs in the family if it has been socialized properly.

Considerations

    The Miniature Schnauzer is in the terrier group, but is not usually as aggressive as so many other terriers can be.

Benefits

    This is generally a healthy breed, with a life expectancy of about 15 years.

About the Maltese Breed

About the Maltese Breed

The Maltese dog breed, also known as Ye ancient dogge of Malta or a Bichon Maltiase, is a toy dog. They are named after the island of Malta, which was an early trading port, where the core population of Maltese dogs resided. They are among one of the oldest breeds of all dog breeds. They are well known for being a lap dog.

History

    Writings about the Maltese dog can be traced back as far as 300 BC. According to Pet Finder, "Greek art includes dogs of Maltese type from the fifth century on; there is evidence that tombs were even erected to favor Maltese." They have always been a well known and sought after dog. For more than 28 centuries they have been referred to as an aristocrat of the canine population and are known as having owners of royalty. According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), even as far back as the 1500s it cost up to $2,000 to purchase one. These dogs became AKC recognized in 1888.

Appearance

    In general, the Maltese dog has a long, silky white coat from head to toe; however, they can come in other colors. They generally weigh four to six pounds. They have low set, drop ears which are heavily feathered. They also have very dark, round eyes and a black nose.

Personality

    The Maltese dog may have an innocent look; however, they are daring and energetic. This dog is known to be fearless and trusting, and has no problem challenging larger dogs. In addition, some may bark frequently. They stand out from other small breeds as the American Kennel Club notes, "He is among the gentlest mannered of all little dogs, yet he is lively and playful as well as vigorous." Males and females are both very loving and affectionate. While they get along well with children, some may be aloof around strangers.

Care

    The Maltese is not an outside dog and they require little exercise. The exercise needs can be met with a short walk on the leash and play indoors. However, their coat may need a brush every two days. Because they have drop ears they should be cleaned and free of excess hair.

Health

    In general, the Maltese dog won't have any major health problems; however, occasionally one may become deaf. On average they live for 12 to 14 years. You should not purchase a puppy younger than 12 weeks of age. The American Maltese Association notes, "A puppy under this age is subject to stress from conditions such as over handling and not getting enough rest or refusing to eat due to changes in home and/or food. This stress can result in "hypoglycemia" - a condition in which the blood-sugar level drops causing seizures and possible coma and an emergency visit to the veterinarian." In addition, because the Maltese is a small dog, crate training is favorable for them. They seem to take well to crate training.

Rabu, 28 Desember 2011

What Are Labrador Specific Behavior Traits?

What Are Labrador Specific Behavior Traits?

Known for being friendly, gentle, easy to train and good-natured, the Labrador retriever is a popular breed as a family pet, a guide dog or as a working retriever for the police and armed forces. The breed requires a lot of exercise and has a particular affinity for swimming. It loves to chew and hold items in its mouth but needs stimulation; otherwise, it can become destructive in the home if left on its own for too long. The Labrador is originally from Newfoundland, Canada, and was bred to hunt and retrieve birds.

Natural Hunter and Retriever

    The labrador's has been bred and trained to retrieve the hunter's spoils.
    The labrador's has been bred and trained to retrieve the hunter's spoils.

    The Labrador was trained to hunt with gun sportsmen and earned the nickname "gun dog." The first written report of the breed was in a letter by a visitor to Newfoundland in 1822. The traveler wrote about "small water dogs" which were preferred for retrieving because their smooth, short coats did not retain icy water in the the cold weather. Britain's Earl of Malmesbury liked the dogs and had some imported to England. In 1887. The name "Labrador" became attached to these dogs when the Earl mistakenly called them his "Labrador dogs."

Friendly, Mellow Disposition

    The breed's friendly and even-tempered disposition makes it a preferred therapy dog and guide dog for the blind and deaf. It can be trained to provide affection, comfort and companionship to people in hospitals, nursing homes, retirement homes, prison, mental institutions, schools --- especially to special education students --- and stressful situations such as disaster areas. The breed's gentle nature also extends to other animals. In a quirky example, at the Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee, a cross-species friendship developed between an elephant and a Labrador, in which the Lab preferred its friendship with the elephant over the people and the other dogs at the sanctuary.

Keen Sense of Smell

    A Labrador's nose has 25 times more olfactory receptors than humans. That's why they are used for hunting, tracking, law enforcement and as detection dogs. A Labrador can pick up even a faint smell from a long distance. The breed's nose is built for superior performance, with slits beside the nostrils allowing more air to pass through the nose, promoting circulation over the olfactory receptors. Labradors can sniff out criminals, drugs weapons or bombs. Some dogs are used to find people buried in rubble after earthquakes, cyclones or landslides.

Big Eaters

    Labs love to eat. Don't let them snack during the day, as they will soon become overweight.
    Labs love to eat. Don't let them snack during the day, as they will soon become overweight.

    As a working dog with a good appetite, the breed is prone to putting on weight if it doesn't get enough exercise. They are fast growing and genetically prone to hip dysplasia. Labrador puppies should be fed a diet prepared for large breeds, or a regular dog food containing less than 25 percent protein. Adult Labradors are particularly prone to a life-threatening condition called gastric dilatation and torsion. The condition usually presents with a dog in various degrees of distress characterized by panting and a distended abdomen. It happens when dogs eat dry dog food and the food then expands in the stomach when the dog drinks water immediately after it has eaten. After putting the portions of dry dog food in the dog's bowl, add warm water up to the level of the nuggets. Let it sit for five minutes before feeding so that the absorption/expansion process happens in the bowl, not in the dog's stomach.

Independent Streak

    Being smart, the dogs learn fast, but they may have an independent streak. Some dogs --- especially those with strong retriever traits --- will get bored with training. Owners have to patiently convince them in a fun yet firm and calm way that what the human wants to do is just as fun as a flushing game.

How to Make Dachshund Treat

How to Make Dachshund Treat

Baking dog treats for your dachshund instead of purchasing them affords you the opportunity to know precisely what your dog ingests. It also gives you the chance to include things in your pet's diet that are beneficial to its health, not in the rest of its diet. The process of making dog treats is similar to preparing a cookie recipe. You can add additional ingredients, such as small pieces of meat, a meat paste, a supplement, or peanut butter to this dough, as you desire.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

    2

    Spray a baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray, or line it with parchment paper.

    3

    Add all the ingredients, except the meat drippings, to a bowl.

    4

    Mix the ingredients thoroughly by hand or with an electric mixer.

    5

    Dust the counter top lightly with cornmeal or flour. Put the dough on the dusted counter top.

    6

    Dust the surface of a rolling pin. Roll the dough until it is 1/4- to 1/2-inch thick.

    7

    Cut the dough into shapes with a cookie cutter. Cut them small enough for a dachshund.

    8

    Place the cut shapes on a baking sheet. Baste them with the meat drippings, applied with a brush.

    9

    Bake the treats for 35 minutes. Baste them with drippings, as desired.

Eye Diseases in German Shepherds

Eye Diseases in German Shepherds

German Shepherds are among the most popular breeds of dog for both companionship and use as a service dog, according to the American Kennel Club. But owners should be aware of the various health conditions that affect the breed, including a number of eye diseases such as juvenile cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, Pannus and multifocal retinal dysplasia.

Juvenile Cataracts

    A cataract causes an opaque coating to form on the lens, capsule or entire eye structure. Large cataracts can impair vision, eventually leading to blindness, while smaller non-progressive cataracts cause no loss of vision at all. German Shepherds are prone to developing juvenile cataracts, sometimes called developmental cataracts, which generally form during the first four years of life. Juvenile cataracts may be re-absorbed as the dog ages, or they can be surgically removed if your veterinarian determines they will severely impair vision.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy

    Progressive retinal atrophy causes the retinal cells of the eye to deteriorate, eventually leading to blindness. Progressive retinal atrophy is actually an umbrella term for a number of ocular diseases including early onset photoreceptor dysplasias, later onset photoreceptor degeneration, retinal pigmented epithelium dystrophy and progressive rod-cone degeneration. There is no cure for progressive retinal atrophy; afflicted dogs will eventually suffer a complete loss of vision.

Pannus

    Pannus is an auto-immune disease that afflicts the conjunctiva and cornea of both eyes. According to "German Shepherd Dog Help," the breed accounts for roughly 90% of all diagnosed cases. Though not painful, Pannus causes opaque spots to form on the cornea and will lead to blindness if left untreated. Pannus has no cure in German Shepherds, but the condition can be treated with medication or surgery if diagnosed in its early stages.

Multifocal Retinal Dysplasia

    Multifocal retinal dysplasia is one of two forms of retinal dysplasia that occur in canines. Multifocal retinal dysplasia is a mild form of retinal dysplasia, with total retinal dysplasia being more severe and damaging. Multifocal retinal dysplasia is most often an inherited condition, though it can also be caused by viral infections or trauma. Retinal dysplasia is not a progressive condition and German Shepherd puppies born with the malformation will exhibit the most severe form of the disease. Signs of multifocal retinal dysplasia include retinal folds and gray patches of coloration on the retina of the eye.

Selasa, 27 Desember 2011

Allergen Free Dogs

Allergen Free Dogs

If you want to own a dog, but you suffer from allergies, there are allergen-free dog breed choices that are an option for allergy sufferers. Allergen-free dog breeds vary, and all are not compatible with every person that suffers from allergies. Accordingly, you will have to do some research to find an allergen-free dog that is suitable for you as a pet.

Allergens

    Dog allergens are small, lightweight particles that originate in a dog's saliva, skin and urine. When these particles are produced, they easily drift and spread throughout a home, especially when an animal sheds excessively. The allergen particles are what cause allergic reactions in humans.

Description

    An allergen-free dog is also known as a hypoallergenic dog. Contrary to belief, a dog that is considered hypoallergenic will not be completely free of allergy-producing particles. The term "hypoallergenic dog" describes a dog that produces less allergens than others, whereby creating a reduced chance of reaction for allergy sufferers.

Allergy Test

    Some allergen-free dogs will work for you, while others may not, depending on what types of allergies you have and how severe they are. The best way to determine how a particular breed will affect you is to visit a breeder and spend time with the breed of your choice. Evaluate how you feel and note any allergy symptoms you experience while in contact with a breed. If you do not experience any noticeable symptoms during or after your exposure, then that dog breed is a pet option for you.

Breeds

    There are some dog breeds that are more suitable for people with allergies. Some allergen free dog breeds are poodles, Chihuahuas, miniature schnauzers and Portuguese water dogs. Also, there are hybrids--two breeds mixed together to make one unique breed--that are considered hypoallergenic. One of these allergen-free hybrids is the Labradoodle, a mix between a Labrador and a poodle.

Misconceptions

    Hairless dogs, like Chihuahuas, are usually seen as allergen-free due to lack of fur. All hairless or shorter-haired dogs are not allergen free. It is dander, skin cells that shed, which cause the most significant allergic reactions, not the length or absence of hair or fur.

What Do Baby Chihuahuas Eat?

Baby Chihuahuas are much like other small breed puppies and should be fed with gentle care. An important fact about baby Chihuahuas is that they have small mouths, and they cannot chew or swallow large pieces of food. Some baby Chihuahuas may be rejected by their mothers, and they will need to be fed by owner.

Puppy Formula

    Puppy formula such as Esbilac Powder by Pet Ag is available at pet stores, and can be used as milk replacement. Puppy formula should be fed to baby Chihuahuas who have been rejected, or have not yet been weaned from nursing. It is also a good source of nutrients for puppies who need vitamins and minerals.

No Cow's Milk

    Never give your baby Chihuahuas cow's milk to drink, as it can cause diarrhea and upset stomachs. Goat's milk can be fed in bottles with nipples to baby Chihuahuas, and it is okay for sensitive digestive systems.

Canned Puppy Food

    For baby Chihuahuas that are picky and will not eat dried dog food, a good alternative is canned puppy food. Canned food is softer and easier on small teeth, but it can cause a puppy to go to the bathroom more often.

Rice and Chicken

    Boiling chicken in a pot, and mixing it with cooked rice is a good option for baby Chihuahua food. Chicken should be cut in small enough pieces to avoid choking, and both meat and rice should be fully cooked.

Dog Food

    All pets stores now sell small breed dog food, specifically for small breed puppies such as Chihuahuas. Dry dog food is best to start early, so that your Chihuahua can get used to the texture. Small dry dog food for puppies will also prevent choking and help control bowel movements.

Foods to Avoid

    Dogs, even Chihuahuas, should not be fed chocolate, onion or grapes. All of these foods can be harmful to Chihuahuas.

How to Estimate the Adult Size of a Puppy

How to Estimate the Adult Size of a Puppy

Before you adopt or purchase the doggy of your dreams, it's important to estimate the adult size of a puppy. As important as personality is to matching the right dog with the perfect family, size plays a major role in making sure your bundle of joy will fit well into your lifestyle.

These instructions will help you make an informed guess about the size your puppy will grow to, and how well your puppy will fit in your home when he or she is a full grown dog.

Instructions

    1

    KNOW THE BREED(S)

    It is easier to estimate the adult size of a puppy if dog is AKC registered or eligible for registration. This is because the AKC (American Kennel Club) will not permit mixed breeds to register. Working with only one breed, predicting the growth of a dog is fairly simple. See the standard size of the adult of the breed and you can guess your dog will likely fall within those guidelines.

    Mixed breeds are more difficult to estimate because there is a great deal of variation, not only in their lineage, but also with a single litter. The outcome of 'mixed' dogs can be unpredictable because there is no way of predicting which dogs of a breed will inherit dominant genetic traits, and which will inherit recessive traits. While you can guess that a mix may contain more of this breed or that, the reality is that any trait can appear depending on statistical likelihood.

    2

    VIEW THE PARENTS OF SIBLINGS

    Knowing how true to the breed's standard your puppy's parents or siblings are, will give you an indication of how your dog does or does not meet those standard. Are the parents larger or smaller than the breed standard? Their offspring is likely to follow the same growth pattern.

    3

    YOUR FEEDING HABITS

    While length and height may be determined largely by breed, weight can be strongly impacted by your feeding habits. If you habitually over-feed, under-exert, or fail to handle food stealing, it is likely your dog will outweigh the breed standard. Likewise, if your puppy is from a rescue, has been underfed or neglected, it may fail to reach the breed standard weight.

    4

    CHECKING UP ON PROGRESS

    Another way to estimate the adult size of a puppy is specifically useful in working with older puppies. Many believe that a puppy will reach 50% of its expected size at the age of 4 months. To estimate the size in this fashion, multiply the 4 month old's height by 2 and length by 2. This, it is believed, is quite likely to be your dog's growth potential.

Demodectic Mange in English Bulldogs

Demodectic Mange in English Bulldogs

Demodectic mange is a problem common among English bulldogs of all ages. If left untreated, this issue can take a serious toll on your bulldog. A thorough understanding of demodectic mange, also called red mange, can help you keep your English bulldog healthy and happy.

Causes

    Demodectic mange is caused by the demodex parasite. This parasite lives in small populations on healthy animals, and English bulldog pups will often pick up this normally harmless parasite from their mothers when they nurse. When a dog's immune system is lowered, or, in the case of puppies, not yet fully developed, the dog may not be able to resist the effects of this parasite.

Genetics and Stress

    English bulldogs are genetically prone to have a low resistance to demodex parasites. Before you purchase your dog, speak with the breeder about the parents of your dog and whether they have ever suffered from issues with demodectic mange. Dogs that are stressed or who have compromised immune systems due to illness can also be prone to developing demodectic mange.

Symptoms

    Demodectic mange causes hair loss on the face, neck, shoulders and head of the English bulldog. The hair loss might extend to the front of the forelegs and the belly. To make sure that the demodex parasite is to blame for the hair loss, a veterinarian scrapes the affected skin and then views the scraping under a microscope.

Types

    Two types of demodectic mange affect bulldogs. Type I is localized, and it will only attack one area of the dog, whether that is the dog's face, its neck or its stomach. Type II is generalized; the outbreak will take place all over the dog's body.

Treatment

    You can treat demodectic mange on English bulldogs in several ways. Bathing using an antibacterial shampoo can help loosen dried skin and reduce the chances of infection. Combined with prescription medication from the veterinarian, bathing can often reduce or eliminate Type I demodectic mange. Type II demodectic mange needs to be treated through a combination of different medications, routine bathing, hair clipping and antibiotics.

What Dog Food Fills Up a Dog With Less Food?

What Dog Food Fills Up a Dog With Less Food?

If your dog has extra pounds to shed, feeding her pet food that's more filling with fewer calories is an essential step for weight loss. Combined with increased physical activity to burn more calories, less food helps bring your pet to a healthy weight to promote better mobility and reduce her risk of heart disease, diabetes, liver problems, arthritis and other conditions.

Canned Food is More Filling

    Canned dog food typically contains 75 percent moisture. In comparison, dry dog food usually contains 6 to 10 percent moisture. The significantly higher water content in canned food makes it more filling with less volume and fewer calories. Wet food also tends to be higher in protein and fat and lower in carbohydrates than kibble. Protein and fat are the primary energy sources for canines, and these are the more filling nutrients, too. Feed your dog canned food to fill her up with less food that's more nutritionally dense and less calorie-dense.

Other Benefits of Canned Food

    Canned dog food offers other advantages. Most dogs -- even the pickiest -- find canned food more palatable than dry food. Also, because canning is a preservative process, wet food generally contains little or no artificial preservatives. The high protein and fat content and low carbohydrate content is in line with what dogs naturally need, as well; though they can use them, these animals don't rely on carbs for energy. The canine body readily turns unused energy from carbs into fat stores. Canned food is also easier to eat for older dogs and those with dental pain. Dogs with diabetes or kidney problems, elderly dogs, dogs coping with hot weather and others benefit from canned food's high moisture content, too.

Filling Up With Vegetables

    While canned food is a smart choice for the bulk of your dog's diet, she doesn't get all the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients she needs from it alone. Unlike cats, who are carnivores, dogs are omnivores; they thrive with diets based mostly on animal sources of protein, but they need some plant-based foods, as well. Supplementing with vegetables provides filling fiber with few calories and lots of important nutrients. Broccoli, cabbage, carrots, celery, cucumbers, green beans, kale, spinach and other canine-safe veggies help keep your pet satisfied with less food and fewer calories.

Other Weight Loss Tips

    Good dietary decisions are key to achieving and maintaining a healthy weight for your dog. Always consult your veterinarian before making significant dietary changes, though, and ask about your pet's nutritional needs and how to safely exercise her. Increase your dog's physical activity per your vet's recommendations by going for more walks, playing in the yard or at the dog park, using games like fetch and tug-of-war, and swimming if your dog enjoys it. Watch the treats -- they're small but often deceptively high in calories, plus they add up more quickly than you may realize. Treats should be given only on occasion, and only when they're earned.

How to Make a Homemade Food for Dogs With Protein Requirements

How to Make a Homemade Food for Dogs With Protein Requirements

Dogs are great companions. They seem to be one of the few animals who choose to be with man over their own kind. For many, dogs are members of the family, we care for their needs with veterinarian visits, walks, baths and good food. Dogs love the same foods that humans love but despite their pleading eyes we should be careful what we feed them. Dogs have nutritional needs that must be met to avoid illness. If you want to feed your dog homemade dishes, you have to make certain that you include all of the nutrients a dog needs to thrive.

Instructions

    1
    Weigh your dog
    Weigh your dog

    Weigh your dog. The amount of food you feed him is dependent on his weight, not just his appetite. For instance, if your dog weighs 15 lbs, he will need to eat approximately 4.8 ounces of food per day.

    2
    Protein can come from beef, chicken or turkey.
    Protein can come from beef, chicken or turkey.

    Prepare your dog food recipe with protein in mind. Proteins come from muscle and organ meats such as beef, liver or chicken. This will need to account for a minimum of 10% of the preparation. Cook the meat without seasonings and then put into a bowl.

    3
    Whole grains are needed.
    Whole grains are needed.

    Add a grain component. Up to 50% of a dogs meal can come from whole grains such as rice or oatmeal. Cook the ingredients without seasonings and add to the mixing bowl.

    4
    Potatoes help your dog produce energy.
    Potatoes help your dog produce energy.

    Include starch from foods such as potatoes and pasta. These carbohydrates are essential for helping your dog to produce energy and should account for approximately 10% of the recipe.

    5
    Vegetables give your dog needed vitamins to thrive.
    Vegetables give your dog needed vitamins to thrive.

    Add vegetables, fat and liquid to make up the remaining 30% of the recipe in equal parts. Vegetables can includes broccoli, carrots or green peas. For the fat component, try adding vegetable oil or meat fat. Use plain water or a liquid broth to aid in mixing the ingredients together.

Eight Most Popular Dogs

Eight Most Popular Dogs

The American Kennel Club generates a yearly list of the most popular dog breeds. The list is based on registration statistics. The popularity of a certain breed may be due to such things as seeing it in a movie, on a dog show or being owned by someone famous. Whatever the reason, a popular dog does not always mean it will be a good pet for your family. Each dog has a unique set of characteristics that may not be appropriate for your lifestyle.

Labrador Retriever

    The Labrador retriever is a hunting dog that has held the number one spot for the last 20 years. This dog was originally bred in Newfoundland, working alongside fishermen retrieving nets and fish. Labradors are family-friendly dogs.

German Shepherd

    German shepherds are herding dogs that were originally bred in Germany as farm workers. Today, the police and military commonly use German shepherds for protection. This breed is strong, fearless and protective. German shepherds became popular many years ago because of the movie "Rin Tin Tin."

Yorkshire Terrier

    The Yorkie is a toy dog with a large personality. This brave little dog was originally bred in England to catch rats. The Yorkshire terrier has long, silky hair that requires lots of brushing. This dog travels well, making it ideal for a busy family.

Beagle

    The beagle is a hound that was originally bred in England to hunt rabbits. It is one of the oldest hound dog breeds. This breed initially became popular from Snoopy in the comic strip "Peanuts."

Golden Retriever

    Golden retrievers were originally bred in Scotland as hunting dogs. Today, it is commonly used as a guide dog or for search and rescue. This dog is a trusting, friendly and loves children.

Bulldog

    Bulldogs are strong, have a gentle disposition and form strong bonds with children. They were originally bred in Britain as fighting dogs. The short nose of this breed makes it prone to overheating in warm weather.

Boxer

    Boxers are powerful, intelligent and versatile. They were originally bred in Germany as hunters for large game such as wild boar or bison and would hold the animal down until the hunter arrived. Boxers are able to stand on their hind legs to battle an opponent. This dog requires very little grooming.

Dachshund

    Dachshunds were originally bred in Germany as badger hunters. This dog has a keen sense of smell. Dachshunds have three coat varieties: short-haired, long-haired and wire-haired. It is an adaptable dog to most living environments.