Selasa, 30 November 2010

How to Keep Ants Out of the Dog Food Bowl

How to Keep Ants Out of the Dog Food Bowl

Dog food bowls provide easy meals for ants and other pests. Once ants find dog food, they swarm the bowl. Not only is this unsightly, but soldier ants often guard worker ants, and their pincers can sting unwary dogs. Ants communicate with each other using scent pheromones, and lay down pheromone trails between the dog food and the ant nest. Understanding this helps you keep dog bowl ant-free.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the dog food bowl. Mop the dog's feeding area with soapy water. Mopping destroys any existing scent trails the ants have established.

    2

    Place the larger dog bowl in the feeding area, and fill it partially with water. Place the second bowl inside the first. Ideally the second bowl will not float. It should have an inch of water between it's edge and the edge of the first bowl.

    3

    Fill the second bowl with food. The water will drown any ants that try to reach the food, and prevent the ants from laying down a scent trail that leads to the food.

    4

    Remove any food from the surrounding floor as soon as possible. With no way to reach the food in the bowl, and no food scattered around the bowl, the ants will move on to other food sources.

How to Feed a Pug Dog

How to Feed a Pug Dog

Pug puppies need three meals a day, while adult pugs require only one daily meal. The rule of thumb for a puppy is one ounce of food for each pound of its weight at each meal; for an adult the ratio is one-half ounce of food per pound of weight. Some dog breeders and dog owners have turned away from commercial dog foods because they believe too many of the commercial brands contain fillers, ingredients that provide no nutrients. Instead, these breeders and owners recommend that you cook your pugs meals.

Instructions

Scrambled Eggs and Green Beans

    1

    Dice and steam green beans until they are soft but not mushy. Whisk together two eggs with a dash of low-fat milk. The Pugspot website recommends, "If you're using two eggs, remove one yolk." Cut into tiny bite-sized pieces, suitable for a pug. Let cool before serving.

    2

    Pour into a hot skillet and scramble the eggs. When they are cooked, add the cooked green beans.

    3

    Cut the scrambled eggs and green beans into tiny bite-sized pieces, suitable for a pug. Let cool before serving.

Stewed Chicken with Brown Rice

    4

    Stew the dark meat of a chicken (legs and thighs) in water until the meat falls off the bone.

    5

    Line a wire kitchen strainer with cheesecloth and pour the chicken broth through it. Add enough water to the broth to cook brown rice.

    6

    While the rice cooks, mince the chicken. Let the rice cool, then toss it with the chicken and serve to your pug.

Ground Turkey with Vegetables

    7

    Brown ground turkey in a little vegetable oil.

    8

    Before the meat is cooked through, add chopped carrots, green beans or asparagus. Cook the turkey and vegetables until done.

    9

    Cut the turkey and vegetables into pug-size pieces, let cool, then serve.

Minggu, 28 November 2010

How to Make Food for Overweight Dogs

Obesity is now a problem for pets and their owners. Overweight dogs simply need fewer calories. By making your own food for your dog, you can control what is going into their diet. Their food intake will normally be cut in half, but you can ensure that every bite they eat will be filled the absolute best for them.

Instructions

    1

    Start with ingredients that are high in fiber and low in fat. This is the basis of a diet for dogs to lose weight. You can alter any recipe you have for homemade dog food by increasing the amounts of those high fiber ingredients and lessening the amount of fatty foods that you add in.

    2

    Use brown rice rather than white rice. The brown rice has more nutrients and is higher in fiber, which makes it a good choice for an overweight animal.

    3

    Add protein in adequate amounts. Protein is just as important to dogs as fiber, so ensure the recipe has protein as one of the top 2 in terms of amounts.

    4

    Cut out or limit any ingredients that have carbohydrates. Dogs have no need for these calories other than for energy and they can get enough of those from other foods.

    5

    Make sure the food contains vitamins and minerals. It's always best to derive these from actual foods that you include rather than supplements. Remember balance is the key for homemade dog food.

What to Feed a Westie That Is Not Eating

What to Feed a Westie That Is Not Eating

When your West Highland terrier will not eat its food, it can be a scary and stressful situation. There can be many reasons a dog will not eat, such as sickness, teeth problems or possibly it doesn't like the food. Nutrition is important for dogs, so even if your dog won't eat its dog food, you have to make sure it eats something. Several different foods can help your Westie stay healthy.

Wet Food

    A Westie sometimes may not be eating its dry food because it is too hard and rough. Its teeth might be decayed and unable to chew the food, or the dry food might irritate its throat if it has a cold. Whatever the reason your dog is not eating its dry food, a simple solution is to try feeding it wet food. When you don't have any wet food on hand, mix a can of tomato soup or dog food gravy in with the dry kibble to soften it up.

Liquids

    If your dog is refusing to eat both wet and dry foods, but is still drinking, try feeding it some liquid foods. For example, give the dog a bowl of chicken broth, tomato juice or tomato soup, vegetable soup or any other type of soup that you have on hand. If the soup is thick, be sure to thin it with some water so that it becomes more palatable to the dog. Also, make sure that the soup or liquid is not high in sodium, because that can dehydrate the dog.

Home Cooked Food

    When your West Highland terrier does not seem interested in dry kibble, wet dog food or liquids, try enticing it to eat by making some home-cooked food. While feeding a dog the food you eat can cause it to become spoiled, making sure it eats food is more important. Feed the dog cooked boneless, skinless chicken, turkey or beef. Add steamed vegetables to the meat so that the dog gets all of the nutrients it needs. Be sure to limit the salt in the foods. If the Westie eats the home-cooked food, continue feeding that to it and then gradually mix in its regular food until it is again eating the kibble.

Treatment

    A dog that refuses to eat anything at all can have a serious illness. Many dogs will refuse to eat when they have upset stomachs, but that typically will only last a day or so. If your Westie won't eat for more than two days, a trip to the veterinarian might be in order. A veterinarian can diagnose whatever illness might be causing the lack of appetite and can give the dog nutrients intravenously.

Sabtu, 27 November 2010

How to Feed a Picky Standard Poodle

How to Feed a Picky Standard Poodle

Standard poodles are a medium-sized breed of dog. They are at least 15 inches tall at the shoulder, with many being larger. While poodles have a reputation for being persnickety, they are highly motivated by food and not difficult to keep from becoming picky. Don't overfeed your poodle, though. This can lead to an overweight dog and difficulties such as hip problems.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your poodle dog food. If you feed it table scraps or other human foods, you are encouraging picky eating habits. Dog food is especially formulated to provide your poodle with the best nutrients.

    2

    Buy good quality dog food. If you're only going to feed your poodle dog food, make sure it's top quality. Check the list of ingredients and make sure that the first one isn't corn. Your poodle is a carnivore, and corn is not the best food for him.

    3

    Keep worry at bay, unless its warranted. If your poodle has always been picky, has good energy and a shiny coat, the chances are it's doing fine. However, if your pet has always been a good eater and suddenly stops, you may need a trip to the vet.

    4

    Use dog food as a treat during training. Overfeeding with dog treats or human food during training can throw your poodle off its feeding schedule. The food treat only enhances your praise, so using dog food will work just fine.

Jumat, 26 November 2010

What Can I Feed My Dog With Missing Teeth?

Feeding a dog with missing teeth is no small feat, especially if you are also dealing with a picky eater. However, you can make healthy non-solid dog foods or find them at your local pet care store.

Starches

    Should you choose to provide your furry friend with a home-cooked meal, plan in advance so the foods have time to cool in the refrigerator. For example, regular potatoes as well as sweet potatoes provide a good base for nourishing your canine.
    Potatoes should be cooked far in advance to avoid burning your dog's mouth or tongue. Also, it is essential to remove any skin from potatoes prior to serving as it is toxic to dogs.
    Scoop the potato into your dog's bowl and mash until there are no visible lumps. You may need a few tablespoons to1/4 cup of water, depending on your dog's size, to further soften the potato.
    Another good starch to consider is brown rice. Boil the rice until it is limp.

Vegetables

    Add a variety of colorful veggies. Grab a can of cut or diced carrots, green beans or peas. Consider feeding these veggies in moderation if your dog has previously enjoyed a dry food diet to avoid potential stomach upset or diarrhea.
    Stay away from onions and garlic, as these foods cause anemia in dogs. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower should be avoided as they could make your pooch gassy and, even when excessively steamed, may still be difficult to grind without a full mouth of teeth.

Protein and Calcium

    Your homemade food should also contain protein and calcium. Protein should make up at least 60 percent of your canine's diet. For a good source of easy-to-digest protein, boil some chicken, peel the skin, then place in the blender. For calcium, add a tablespoon or two of low-sodium, low-fat cottage cheese.
    Mash and mix each component thoroughly so your dog can enjoy the meal without struggling to chew.

Considerations

    If you don't have the time to make your own dog food, try a natural canned food. Wellness and Blue Buffalo are two popular natural dog food brands. They offer specialty soft food for puppies, adults and seniors, as well as a variety of recipes. Still, you may need to mix soft food with water in order to achieve a puree-like substance easy on the teeth or lack thereof.
    If your dog has a known food allergen or other health problem, consult your vet before embarking on any new diet. Your vet may inform you of food substitutions so your dog remains fully nourished.
    Most importantly, remember that like humans, dogs should have a well-rounded diet, rich in protein and vitamins. It may take time for your companion to accept the texture of his new food, but he may even like it better than dry food.

How to Find a Dog Food for Dog Allergies

How to Find a Dog Food for Dog Allergies

Dogs will eat anything. However, this doesn't mean that they should, especially since many dogs experience allergies their owners may not even catch on to for quite some time. If you notice your dog is experiencing itchy skin, persistent licking, rubbing his face against surfaces or repeated vomiting and diarrhea, then your dog may be allergic to his food. Following a few simple steps, you can relieve your best four-legged friend of his allergies once and for all.

Instructions

    1

    Take your dog to your regular veterinarian to rule out any underlying health problems. This also includes eliminating the possibility of allergies to carpet shampoo, air freshener, pollen or another plant in your yard that may cause irritation.

    2

    Write down a list of all the ingredients in your dog's food. Include all kinds of meats, dairy, vegetables, and even dyes and preservatives. A lot of dogs are allergic to soy and wheat as well as the aforementioned, so jot down every ingredient and keep the list near the dog food.

    3

    Give your dog a basic, home-cooked meal that contains one ingredient, such as plain white rice. Do this for a few weeks and see if the allergy persists. Document in a calendar or day planner what you fed your dog that day. If the allergy fades, then cross this off your ingredients list and slowly add foods. Repeat with each food on the list -- feed your dog just corn with the rice, then ground beef with the rice and so on until you have found the culprit for the allergy. If you try all foods and the allergy is still absent, then your dog is almost certainly allergic to something harder to pinpoint like a preservative or dye.

    4

    Shop for a dog food that does not contain the food that is causing the allergy. If additives are the suspected problem, then go with an organic dog food or a hypoallergenic food. Some of these are available at your local pet store, and others may have to be ordered through your veterinarian. Try store-bought food first because it is much more affordable, and prescription food is not always necessary to cure an allergy attack.

Kamis, 25 November 2010

Dog Beef Jerky Recipes

Your dog loves you. That's a given. But your dog will love these homemade beef jerky recipes, too, and may even love you more for making them for him. These treats make great rewards, easy to pack camping treats and are ideal to have with you when you go to the park or for a ride in the car. Tuck a few in a plastic bag and never be without a wholesome dog treat again.

Basic Jerky Making Tools

    While it is possible to make jerky in your oven, it is not recommended as it is hard to regulate the temperature, and you have to keep fans going to circulate the air in the oven. If you have a food dehydrator or a smoker, you can make tasty jerky by following the manufacturer's directions.

Basic Recipe

    Freeze a cheap cut of beef until it will slice easily in 1/8-inch strips. Cut across the grain. Marinate the strips of beef in beef broth in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight. Add Italian seasoning if you wish, although your dog will love it plain.

    Do not add garlic, onion or more than a bit of salt. None of these are good for your dog, and the garlic and onion can be toxic. If you want a sweet treat for your dog, put a tablespoon of sugar or some teriyaki sauce in the marinade. You can also add soy sauce, but use a low-sodium one as your dog does not need the salt. However, you don't need to add anything to the meat. Your dog's palate is not as fussy as yours, and he doesn't need all the additives we like in our food.

Making the Jerky

    Lay the jerky on the racks of your food dehydrator or smoker per the manufacturer's instructions. Your jerky is done when it is leathery and fairly dry. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for two to three months. If it lasts that long, once your dog knows it's there.

Selasa, 23 November 2010

Raw Vs. Dehyrated Dog Food

Raw Vs. Dehyrated Dog Food

Raw food and dehydrated food both stand as all-natural, preservative-free choices for your dog. Raw food contains uncooked meat, bones, organ meat, eggs, vegetables and dairy, while dehydrated food often consists of meats, vegetables, fruits and dairy but has no water.

Benefits

    Both raw and dehydrated dog food retain nutrients and enzymes. According to Vetinfo, a raw diet can promote healthy digestion, and healthy skin and coat. Dehydrated dog food has the same benefits, but won't spoil and has a longer storage life.

Risk

    Raw foods often contain whole bones, which can cause choking, and bring a risk of bacteria contamination, Vetinfo states.

Storage

    You must refrigerate or freeze raw food if storing it, but you can store dehydrated dog food on a shelf or in a pantry.

Availability

    Specialty pet stores sell both raw food and dehydrated dog food, but you'll likely find raw food in the freezer.

Preparation

    According to Nature's Variety, you should thaw and serve raw dog food within 24 hours. You can prepare dehydrated food by adding water and letting it sit for five to 10 minutes while it reconstitutes.

Senin, 22 November 2010

What Are Some Wheat Products in Dog Food?

What Are Some Wheat Products in Dog Food?

Growing concerns about the quality of dog food ingredients has led to more transparency in the $15 billion a year industry. Many consumers are unaware that what is used in their dog's food can have a drastic effect on their overall health. Like humans, dogs can develop allergies to foods such as wheat. Wheat is one of the most common ingredients in dog food and used primarily as a filler. Various types of wheat products are used in dog food, though all originate from the same plant source.

Ground Wheat

    When ground, the wheat maintains all of its nutritional values. Used as a foundation for quality dog food, ground wheat is often comprised of whole wheat.

wheat bran

    Bran makes up approximately 14.5 percent of the total weight of a wheat kernel. It is also rich in fiber, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals and vitamins E and B.

wheat germ meal

    Germ accounts for approximately of 2.5 percent of the weight of a whole wheat kernel. It is the part of the seed that sprouts and contains a higher amount of vitamin B and trace minerals than other parts. Since it is relatively high in fat -- about 10 percent -- it can shorten shelf life of flour. Therefore, it is commonly removed from the kernel.

wheat flour

    Wheat flour is made by grinding the kernels into a fine consistency. When flour is milled, kernel parts are separated and mixed together in differing amounts to create flour. The label "wheat flour" can therefore represent flours made with a variety of wheat types.

What Mill Run

    Mill run is a combination of bran, wheat shorts, germ and flour. It is produced by the processing of human food as a by product. It is often called "floor sweepings." Mill run is used as a filler since it is inexpensive, though it has no nutritional value. On a food label, wheat mill run is also called "wheat middlings."

Minggu, 21 November 2010

Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food Ingredients

Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food Ingredients

Retriever brand dog food is sold in stores and online by Tractor Supply Co. as the house brand of dog food. Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food is a dry food for adult dogs with smaller pieces than some other Retriever brand varieties. The food comes in 50-lb. bags and retails for $18.99 at the time of publication. The food includes ingredients to help maintain a dog's appearance, energy and fitness, according to Tractor Supply Co.

Top Ingredients

    Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food is a corn- and meat-based food. The primary ingredient is ground yellow corn, followed by meat and bone meal, soybean meal, wheat middlings and animal fat. The food also contains some vitamin supplements (vitamins E, A B12 and D).

Other Ingredients

    Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food also contains a variety of other ingredients and preservatives. The next 10 ingredients include chicken flavor, poultry-by-product meal, brewers rice, dried plain beet pulp, salt, choline chloride, zinc sulfate, vitamin E supplement, ferrous sulfate and zinc oxide.

Guaranteed Analysis

    The dog food is guaranteed to include at least 21 percent crude protein per serving. It also has a crude fat content of at least 10 percent and contains up to 4 percent crude fiber. The food also contains at least 1 percent calcium and no more than 12 percent of the weight is from moisture.

Feeding

    Retriever Mini Chunk Dog Food can be fed to all adult dogs regardless of size, according to the feeding instructions on the package. The food can be moistened with warm water for puppies who are being switched to an adult dog food formula, or older dogs who have a hard time chewing, or for dogs who prefer a moist food. The food also contains all the nutrition needed for pregnant and nursing dogs, according to the package.

Low Protein Foods for Dogs

Low Protein Foods for Dogs

If your dog has kidney disease, your veterinarian may recommend that you put him on a low protein diet. Such diets can produce less nitrogen wastes and decrease the incidence of vomiting. Aside from kidney problems, low protein diet may be suggested in cases of congestive heart failure and recurring urinary stones. Since it is the digestion of proteins that generate toxins, low protein diets mean less toxins.

Brand Name Foods

    There are several brand name low protein diet dog foods on the market such as Hill's Science Diet, Flint River Ranch Senior, Eukanuba Veterinary Diet, Purina Veterinary Diet, Select-Care, and Waltham's Royal Canine.

Homemade Diets

    You can make your own low protein diet for your dog with rice, egg, low-fat cottage cheese, poultry, and a calcium carbonate, such as Tums. The diet will include some or all of the ingredients depending upon the recommended percentage of protein.

Malnutrition

    If you are placing your dog on a low protein diet, be careful because such diets can cause malnutrition. You should begin such a diet without the advice of your veterinarian.

Vitamins

    You may need to include vitamin supplements to assure that your dog is getting all of the nutrients he needs.

Caution

    Be alert to changes in your dog including increased thirst and urination, loss of weight and weakness, as they are signs of chronic kidney failure. Acute kidney failure will be exhibited by dehydration, walking stiffly with an arched back and low amounts of urine. In either case you should consult your veterinarian.

Sabtu, 20 November 2010

Foods to Help Prevent Puppy Diarhea

Diarrhea in puppies can pose a serious health risk if left untreated because it can quickly lead to dehydration and malnutrition. The key to eliminating this risk to your puppy's health is to prevent diarrhea before it starts. Several foods can help prevent puppy diarrhea and help keep puppies' digestive systems functioning properly. Many of the foods can be used as an additive.

Cottage Cheese

    Adding a small amount of cottage cheese to your puppy's food can help to prevent puppy diarrhea by helping to balance the flora in your puppy's intestines. Just one or two tsp. can help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut, which helps to improve digestion and reduce the risk of both diarrhea and constipation.

Yoghurt

    Plain, unflavored yogurt that contains live acidophilus cultures that help keep healthy flora in the intestines and assist with digestion. Unbalanced intestinal flora inhibits digestion. In puppies, the most common side effect of this is diarrhea. Adding one to two tsp. of plain yogurt to your puppy's food daily will help to keep beneficial bacteria and promote healthy digestion.

Pumpkin

    Pumpkin is one of the best foods to help prevent puppy diarrhea because it is high in soluble fiber, which helps to reduce liquid in the digestive tract. Soluble fiber is an important additive, and is not sufficient in many commercial pet foods. When you buy pumpkin, use the pure, unsweetened variety. Mix one or two tsp. with the puppy food a few times a week. Do not overfeed pumpkin to your puppy, though, because an excessive amount can contribute to the diarrhea.

Grains

    Grains such as oatmeal, brown rice and bran help reduce liquid in the digestive tract. When adding these ingredients, use only pure sources. Do not use instant-flavored oatmeal or white rice.

Dry Kibble

    Feeding your puppy a high-quality dry kibble can help to prevent diarrhea by limiting water in the digestive tract. Canned puppy food has an extremely high water content that contributes to loose stools and diarrhea. As soon as your puppy's teeth have emerged, begin feeding the dog a dry or semi-moist kibble made from high-quality ingredients that are easily digestible.

How to Use Xantham Gum in Dog Biscuits

How to Use Xantham Gum in Dog Biscuits

Most dog treats are made using wheat flour. For dogs with wheat allergies, that special daily treat is a potentially dangerous allergen. If your dog suffers from wheat allergies, you can purchase special wheat-free treats for snack time. Or, if you prefer, you can make up your own wheat-free dog treats with fresh, safe ingredients. Wheat flour helps thicken and bind most treat recipes, but you can thicken and bind wheat-free treats using xantham gum.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat your oven to 375 F.

    2

    Add the salmon, parsley, dill weed, eggs with shells, sesame seeds, flax seeds, oat flour and xantham gum to your food processor.

    3

    Turn the food processor on and pulse the ingredients until they are thoroughly combined.

    4

    Remove the dough from the food processor and place it on a flat surface. Sprinkle the surface and the dough with extra oat flour.

    5

    Roll out the dough to 1/4-inch thickness using a rolling pin.

    6

    Use a cookie cutter of your desired shape (bone-shaped is cute), and cut out as many biscuits as you can. Place those biscuits on a cookie sheet that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.

    7

    Gather the scraps of dough left from cutting out biscuits, and form it into a new ball. Roll this ball out with your rolling pin and repeat Steps 4 and 5 until you run out of dough.

    8

    Place the greased cookie sheet (or sheets, depending on how many dog biscuits you made) into the oven. Bake for 20 minutes, flipping the dog biscuits over after 10 minutes.

    9

    Cool the dog biscuits to room temperature and store in an airtight, sealed container.

Jumat, 19 November 2010

Homemade Dog Food for Dog With Enlarged Heart

Homemade Dog Food for Dog With Enlarged Heart

Dogs suffering from enlarged hearts must eat a low salt diet in order to live as long as possible with this condition. The diet should include taurine, carnitine, and coenzyme Q supplements to ensure the best prognosis according to The Dog Health Guide website. Making homemade dog food is an excellent way to see that your canine friend has a low salt diet. Dogs need a mixture of carbohydrates and proteins along with any supplements recommended by your veterinarian each day to receive the necessary nutrients in their diet.

Instructions

    1

    Supply four units of protein for your dog each day. A unit of protein equals one egg, 2 oz. of meat, fish, or organ meat, 1/2 cup plain yogurt, 1/3 cup cottage cheese.

    2

    Mix four units of carbohydrates in with four protein units to make enough of a serving for one day. One carbohydrate unit equals 1 cup of vegetables, 1/2 cup of fruit, 1/4 cup cooked beans such as chickpeas or lentils, and 1/3 cup grains such as barley or oatmeal.

    3

    Use a food processor to grind all the ingredients together. Experiment with the different ingredients if your dog is fussy and you will soon find a combination that he loves.

Kamis, 18 November 2010

How to Help My Dog Detox From Changing Food Brands

How to Help My Dog Detox From Changing Food Brands

Changing your dog's diet must be done strategically so the act of "detoxing" from the existing food is handled with care. Although dogs may seem as though they can eat anything, they can't. Quickly or incorrectly switching a dog to a new food is one of the most common causes of vomiting, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal upsets. A gradual change, sometimes called the Pension Method, is your best route to a smooth switch for your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Feed your dog the new food as treats, while still using the old brand for regular feedings. Make the new food a reward for your dog while doing tricks or during other times when it may expect a treat. Do this for one week, or for as little as two days if your dog takes to the new food quickly.

    2

    Give your dog a mixture of the new and old food on Days 1 through 3: 75 percent old food and 25 percent new food. Use measuring cups to make your portions as exact as possible.

    3

    Give your dog 50 percent old food and 50 percent new food for each feeding on Days 4 through 6.

    4

    Give your dog 25 percent old food and 75 percent new food for each feeding on Days 7 through 9.

    5

    Give your dog 100 percent new food starting on Day 10.

Tips on Feeding Newborn Puppies

Tips on Feeding Newborn Puppies

Feeding newborn puppies can be difficult. They need constant care and attention when feeding, and the amounts you give them must be accurate otherwise they could become overfed or malnourished -- both of which can result in serious health problems. Although puppy formula comes with instructions on how to use it, knowing a few tips on feeding newborn puppies will make the process much simpler, safer and less stressful for all involved.

Take Your Time

    When feeding newborn puppies, it is important to take things slowly. Puppies drink at a certain speed and trying to rush the puppy can lead to it breathing in fluid. This will then sit on the puppy's lungs, causing sickness, choking and even death. To further reduce the risk of choking, make sure to only feed puppies when they are horizontal and on their feet -- never on their back or while holding them vertically.

Time Between Feeds

    Newborn puppies need a lot of nutrients to grow and stay healthy so they should be fed about six times a day, spaced out so they get one feeding every two hours or so. Newborn puppies can survive going without food overnight, such as from 11pm to 6am, provided they are fed regularly during the day.

Amounts

    It is important to know exactly how much food a newborn puppy is receiving, so it is a good idea to use a feeding bottle with clear markings on the side. This will greatly assist in measuring the puppy's feeding. Weigh your newborn puppies regularly and consult the information that comes with your particular brand of puppy formula to determine exactly how much to feed the puppy.

Sterilization

    As with bottle feeding human babies, it is important that everything you use to feed your newborn puppies is sterilized after use. You can sterilize puppy feeding equipment with boiling water, which will kill the bacteria that would otherwise infect your puppies. Remember to let the equipment cool for between five and 10 minutes after sterilization so you don't scald yourself or your puppy when using it.

Good Vegetables to Feed Dogs

Dogs are carnivorous, in the sense that they are animals that eat flesh. Dogs, however, produce their own taurine, a nutrient only found in certain muscle meat proteins. In addition, their digestive systems permit them to ingest vegetable matter and grains, as well as meat. For these reasons, dogs can also eat an omnivorous diet as well. However, dogs should not eat a vegetarian diet, as they require a certain amount of meat protein to remain healthy.

Vegetable Nutrition Basics

    Vegetables are good for dogs primarily in two ways. They can be beneficial in a weight loss program, due to their low calorie content, and they can provide essential nutrients without resorting to vitamin and mineral supplements. The vitamins and minerals from vegetable sources can provide a number of nutritional benefits to dogs. Vitamin E supports healthy skin and coat, vitamin K supports blood clotting, niacin assists with digestion and food-to-energy conversion, and folate supports female dog health during pregnancy and embryo formation. Many sources exist that provide information about the precise nutritional benefits of each vitamin and mineral.

Three Good Leafy Green Vegetables

    Celery can provide a reasonable amount of fiber, riboflavin, vitamins A, C, and K, as well as folate and other vitamins and minerals. While this nutritional cornucopia seems ideal for your dog, celery is also high in sodium. Celery can be used instead of salt to season vegetable stock being added to a dog's diet.

    According to NutritionData.com, parsley is an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as potassium, folate, copper, and manganese. People who own Bedlington terriers, and other dogs prone to copper toxicosis, should avoid feeding vegetables that are high in copper.

    Spinach is high in iron; folate; vitamins A, C, E, and K; thiamine; calcium; and potassium. In addition, it is an adequate supply of niacin and zinc. Like celery, spinach is high in sodium.

Three Good Root Vegetables

    Asparagus is high in vitamins A, B6, C, E, and K, as well as iron, phosphorous, calcium, and copper. As with parsley, people who own dogs with copper toxicosis should avoid feeding their dogs large amounts of asparagus.

    Instead of offering your dog a crunchy commercial dog treat, give him or her a raw baby carrot or two. Baby carrots, because of the high cellulose content, are not easily digested, making them low in calories. In addition, they are high in vitamin A and beta-carotene. Steaming or pureeing carrots makes them higher in sugar and more easily digested, making them less beneficial in a weight loss diet.

    Sweet Potatoes are high in vitamin A and are adequate sources of potassium and vitamin B6. Like carrots, raw or dried/baked sweet potatoes make excellent low calorie treats for dogs.

Three Good Vine Vegetables

    Cooked or pureed squash provides the nutrient potassium, which can be beneficial in supporting a dog's kidneys and may reduce a dog's risk of heart failure. According to NutritionData.com, squash also provides a significant amount of vitamin A and calcium, as well as being a decent supplier of folate.

    Cucumbers must be peeled prior to use, but are very high in potassium. Like green and yellow squash, cucumbers can be beneficial in supporting a dog's kidneys.

    Green Beans have a high cellulose content, making them difficult for dogs to digest in their raw state. This difficulty in digesting the beans is actually a good thing, in that they can be used in helping a hefty dog lose weight.

Puppy Care Information

Puppy Care Information

A puppy requires around-the-clock care and attention. Plan how you are going to schedule and supervise his visits outside, house training, sleeping arrangements and feeding schedule. If you are bringing a puppy into a family, make sure to explain the rules of handling the puppy to any children and decide how they are going to help raise the puppy. Children should be taught to respect the puppy, handle him gently and never pull his tail or ears.

Supplies

    Shop for puppy supplies before your new friend comes home. You can find these things at the pet department of a discount store or at a pet store. You will need food and water bowls, a small collar with tag, leash, crate, bedding and grooming tools, as well as toys safe for puppies.

Puppy Food

    Puppies do not eat the same chow as adult dogs. Buy specially made puppy food, which has a smaller kibble that is easier for small puppy mouths to chew. This also is specially formulated to have the extra nutrients that growing puppies need to fuel their bodies.

Puppy Bedding

    Decide where the puppy will sleep. You can have her sleep in her crate or in a cardboard box with tall sides. Either way, make sure the puppy has a cozy blanket to snuggle on.

Name the Puppy

    Make sure that everyone in the family agrees on what to call the puppy and stick to that one name. Puppies can get confused easily, and having one name to respond to will help during training.

House training

    Puppies don't have a natural instinct to "do their business" outside and must be taught. Take the puppy outside after he wakes in the morning, after each meal and before bed. Do not allow the puppy to roam the house free until he is house trained to avoid accidents.

Veterinarian Visit

    Your new puppy should visit the vet as soon as possible to make sure he is up to date on all puppy shots. The breeder or adoption agency should be able to supply you with a record of what shots, if any, the puppy already received.

Rabu, 17 November 2010

How to Feed a Poodle

How to Feed a Poodle

Poodles are a dog breed with a long and extensive history. For centuries, they were bred as water retrieving dogs, working dogs and companions. Poodles are a very popular breed, requiring very little training and care. Feeding poodles takes just a little time and effort.

Instructions

How to Feed a Poodle

    1

    Determine what type of food you will be feeding your poodle. Many people choose to feed poodles just a dry kibble, while some people prefer canned food. Canned food is easier for dogs to chew and digest, but can lead to extremely dirty teeth.

    2

    Decide how much food your poodle will need. Standard poodles will eat approximately 2 cups of dog food per day while toy poodles might only eat 1/2 cup of food. Take care not to overfeed your poodle.

    3

    Place you dogs food and water bowls in a quiet, secure feeding area. Your poodle will eat best if his bowl is in an undisturbed place.

    4

    Add food to your dogs bowl and allow her time to eat. Leave her alone and give her a chance to eat as much as she likes.

    5

    Check your poodles food dish to see if there is any food left. If there is anything leftover, you can feed a little less next time. If he ate it all quickly, you might need to feed a little more.

How to Feed High Energy Hunting Dogs

How to Feed High Energy Hunting Dogs

The dogfood you feed your high-energy dog makes all the difference between having a healthy, high performing hunting dog or having a dog that is prone to injury and poor performance. Your high energy hunting dog has special nutritional needs for high performance and a long healthy life. Hunting dogs, and other high energy dogs have nutritional needs similar to the needs of an athlete. Therefore, special care must be given to the dogfood you feed your hunting dog. Research indicates that fat, protein and fiber content--in the proper proportions--are essential to the well being of your dog. To help your hunting or other high energy dog have a healthy long life, feed your dog a dogfood that is blended according to the following guidelines:

Instructions

    1

    Provide your dog with a dogfood blend that is nutrient dense, with energy provided by animal protein. For optimum performance and to prevent injury, your high-energy dog should eat 32% to 40% protein that is provided through animal sources, such as chicken. High protein is essential to the maintenance of muscle and keeping body fluids at optimal levels.

    2

    Provide your hard working dog with a dogfood that is 20% fat, which delivers high energy in a small amount of food. A dogfood that is high in fat feeds your dog's muscles, allowing the muscles to utilize oxygen, which translates into higher energy.

    3

    Provide your high energy dog with a dogfood that has 4% to 7% of fiber. Fiber is important to your dog's performance and physical well-being. Just like the other ingredients of your dog's food, the source of fiber is also important. One satisfactory fiber source is beet pulp.

Selasa, 16 November 2010

How to Grade a Dog's Food

How to Grade a Dog's Food

In recent years, dog owners have become more aware of the importance of feeding their dogs a healthy diet. One way to do this is to take a careful look at the food you are feeding your dog. Grading a dog's food means determining how beneficial the food is to your dog's overall health. It means giving a grade to the quality of the ingredients in the food. The process takes some time, but it can tell you a lot about how healthy your dog's food is.

Instructions

    1

    Write down a score of 100 to start. You are going to subtract points for every nonnutritional item or filler you find in the listed ingredients on the dog food container label. Then, you will add points for any extra nutritional values found.

    2

    Subtract 10 points every time you see the words "by-product." In addition, subtract 10 points every time you read an ingredient from a nonspecific animal source, such as "meat" or "fat." Finally, subtract 10 points for each reference to BHT, BHA or ethoxyquin.

    3

    Subtract 5 points for each nonspecific grain item, such as "mill" grain rather than something like oats or barley. Subtract 5 more points if an ingredient is repeated in the first five ingredients. For example, if rice is listed more than once, even under a different name of rice, or if it's called "rice flour."

    4

    Subtract 3 points for each of the following: If there are not at least two meats in the top three ingredients, if there are any artificial colors used, and if the food contains whole or ground corn.

    5

    Subtract 2 points if corn is listed as one of the top five ingredients. Also, subtract 2 points if there is animal fat listed (not fish oil), if lamb is the only protein, and if the ingredients contain soybean or wheat (many dogs are allergic to wheat).

    6

    Subtract 1 point each for salt and beef, unless you are certain your dog does not have a beef allergy.

    7

    Add 5 points for each of the following: if the meat in the ingredients is organic, if the food is endorsed by dog nutritionists or major breed organizations, and if the food is baked.

    8

    Add 3 points if there are probiotics in the ingredients. Add another 3 points if there are any fruits listed, and 3 more points if there are vegetables listed.

    9

    Add two more points for each of the following: if the meat included is from hormone- and antibiotic-free animals, if there is barley listed and if there is flaxseed oil listed.

    10

    Give 1 point for each of the following items: oats; sunflower oil; specific animal proteins, such as chicken or fish; glucosamine; chondroitin; and if the vegetables were grown free of pesticides, if you know.

    11

    Add up the total points to grade your dog's food. The higher the score, the healthier your dog's food is.

Senin, 15 November 2010

English Bulldog Diet

English Bulldog Diet

The proper diet for an English bulldog is one that maintains the dog's health and vitality, allowing it to remain active well into old age. Bulldog's in particular have specific health concerns associated with their breed that require a careful and specific diet that will create better blood flow and ease pressure on joints. This diet will not cost any more than a simple trip to the grocery store, but it's not found down the pet food aisle.

Beginning Diet

    Remember that, regardless of breed, when a dog is brought into the home for the first time it is a learning experience for both the pet and the owner. Follow the breeders routine established for the young English bulldog for the first few weeks to allow the puppy to gradually transition into one that is more convenient. This includes similar feeding times, food, and supplements. By keeping your English Bulldog on a natural based diet with good supplements, you help cut down on the amount of toxins and free radicals...greatly decreasing the chances of your dog developing cancer, according to Champbulldogs.com.

Transition to a New Diet

    Begin the bulldogs transition to a healthier diet. Feed the English bulldog fresh meats, including chicken, turkey and beef, as part of a diet that includes about 22 to 25 percent processed proteins (store bought dog foods). This reduces stress on the kidneys and helps maintain healthy bone development. If at all possible, cut the store-bought dog foods out of the bulldogs diet all together. The majority of meat in packaged dog food, aside from those that are organically composed and certified, according to Bornfreeusa.org, is categorized as 4D, meaning it is from animals that were either: diseased, dying, dead or already dead when they arrived for slaughter.

Stay Informed

    Listen to the research. An English bulldog is already afflicted with a shorter life span, decreased through breeding, than other breeds of comparable size--why shorten it further? You can boost your pet's health profoundly by making one simple decision, writes veterinary Dr. Martin Goldstein. All you have to do is change his diet from commercial-brand fare to something you may never have imagined giving him: real food. It may seen awkward and perhaps embarrassing at first to shop for a dog in the same way as you shop for a human being, but the rewards are evident in the improved vigor and long life of an animal that in most American homes is not simply a creature, but a member of the family.

Jumat, 12 November 2010

Dog Cake Ideas

Dog Cake Ideas

For your pooch's next birthday, don't throw the dog a bone...throw him a party! Celebrating your best friend's birthday is a blast if you do a little planning in advance. Dog cakes and pooch parties have become very popular, but you can avoid the expense of a dog bakery and whip up a healthy dog cake in your own kitchen. You don't need to make a sweet cake, although most any dog will drool over a carob or peanut butter confection. Creating a cake that looks like something you'd dig into yourself is half the fun. As with any new treat or food, give your dog just a small portion so as not to upset his digestive tract.

Electric Pink "Frosted Cake"

    Make your favorite meatloaf recipe substituted with ground turkey. Bake it in a round cake pan or a non-stick pan. While the "cake" is baking, whip up a few potatoes. Mix a teaspoon of beet juice into the whipped, smooth potatoes. Ice your cooled loaf and voila--you've got electric pink "frosting" that looks so real, you'll fool your human guests. Add a few chew sticks for candles.

Pupcakes

    Not quite cupcakes, pupcakes are a cute alternative to doggie birthday cake. Mix 1 cup of flour, 1 tbsp. of baking soda, 1/4 cup of vegetable oil, 1 cup of shredded carrots, 1 tsp. of vanilla, 1/3 cup of honey and 1 egg. Fill muffin tins with 2 1/2 tbsp. each of the batter and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. When the pupcakes are cooled, frost them with 1/2 cup of peanut butter, 1/3 cup of honey and 1/4 cup of sour cream.

Liver Lovers Loaf

    Dogs love liver, so a cake made from it will make your dog's day. Grind 1 lb. of liver in a blender or food processor with 1 1/2 cups of wheat flour, 1 cup of corn meal, 1 tbsp. of vegetable oil, and 2 tsp. of minced garlic or garlic powder. Spread it into a round pan. Bake the mixture at 50 degrees for about 25 minutes. "Frost" your masterpiece with a blended mixture of egg and yogurt, and sprinkle grated raw carrots or apple pieces on top.

Hello Kitty Karob Kake

    Who says dogs don't like cats? They'll love the Hello Kitty Karob Kake, which is a peanut butter-flavored cake with carob on top. Mix 1 cup of whole wheat flour, 1 tsp. of baking soda, 1/4 cup of peanut butter, 1/4 cup of melted butter, 1/3 cup of honey, 1 egg and 1/2 cup of carob chips. Bake the mixture in a Hello Kitty cake mold at 350 for 40 minutes. Drizzle melted carob over the cooled cake. Create Hello Kitty's eyes and mouth out of small treats, and use stick-shaped treats for whiskers.

    Note: Do not use chocolate chips. Chocolate can be toxic to dogs. Use carob chips instead.

ASPCA List of Toxic Foods for Dogs

ASPCA List of Toxic Foods for Dogs

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has compiled a list of 11 "people" foods that owners should steer their dogs clear of. Most of these foods are toxic to dogs.

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine

    Methylxanthine is a substance found in some foods that contain caffeine. Chocolate is such a food, as are beverages such as coffee and some sodas. If ingested by a dog, methylxanthines can cause problems as minor as vomiting and diarrhea or as serious as death.

Alcohol

    Drinking alcohol can cause your dog to experience many of the same impairments a human would, and has the potential to place your dog in a coma. Death is a possibility.

Avocado

    An avocado can make your dog ill.
    An avocado can make your dog ill.

    Avocados are more dangerous for such animals as rodents and birds. However, the fruit contains persin, which is known to cause vomiting and diarrhea and sometimes death in dogs.

Macadamia Nuts

    Complications from eating macadamia nuts can include depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia.

Grapes

    The toxic ingredient in grapes is a mystery.
    The toxic ingredient in grapes is a mystery.

    Though the toxic substance in grapes is unknown, ingesting the fruit can lead to kidney failure in dogs.

Yeast Dough

    The ASPCA states that it is OK to give your dog small amounts of cooked bread, but uncooked dough is dangerous. Uncooked dough will continue to expand inside your dog's digestive system, sometimes causing internal organs to rupture.

Raw Meat, Eggs, Bones

    Raw meat can contain E. coli and Salmonella and, according to the ASPCA, dogs are just as susceptible to the harmful bacteria as humans.

    Raw eggs contain a enzyme called avidin that can lead to skin and coat problems.

    Contrary to popular belief, feeding bones to your your dog isn't necessarily a good idea. Bones can splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pet's digestive tract.

Xylitol

    Xylitol is a dangerous substance for dogs. It is used in many items made for humans, such as gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. In dogs, xylitol can increase their insulin levels and create a diabetic reaction. Your dog might have a seizure, go into a coma or die.

Onions, Garlic, Chives

    Small amounts of onions are OK for dogs.
    Small amounts of onions are OK for dogs.

    Onions, garlic and chives must be ingested in large amounts to have a negative effect on a dog. In fact, some dog foods and treats contain these ingredients in small quantities. If consumed heavily, however, these foods can damage red blood cells.

Milk

    Milk can cause an upset stomach or diarrhea but nothing more serious.

Salt

    In small amounts it will do no harm, but excessive salt intake by your dog can lead to serious complications, even death.

How to Cook Chicken for Your Dog

How to Cook Chicken for Your Dog

Chicken is a bland, low fat option to commercial dog food, and while your pampered pet shouldn't consume it for every meal, it is a good option for when your dog has an upset stomach or is exhibiting finicky eating habits. On its own, chicken is a healthy, inexpensive addition to a dog's diet. As simple as a meal of chicken sounds, it should be prepared in a certain manner for the safety and health of your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the skin from the chicken thighs with a sharp kitchen knife.

    2

    Place the chicken thighs into a large pot filled with 5 cups of cold water.

    3

    Add a dash of salt to the water.

    4

    Place pot on the stove on low heat and cover, allowing the chicken to simmer for two hours. The chicken should be tender at this point. If not, cook for a longer period of time.

    5

    Remove chicken from the water and pull the meat from the bone by hand.

    6

    Allow the chicken pieces to cool and serve to your dog.

Kamis, 11 November 2010

How to Make Puppy Replacement Milk

How to Make Puppy Replacement Milk

Despite the abundance of homemade recipes for canine replacement milk, it's vital that puppy caretakers use a specially formulated commercial canine milk replacer, available at almost any pet store, when feeding their newborns. Brands like Just Born and Esbilac have the precise amount of nutrients required to sustain a young pup's life. Using any other kind of milk replacement, even milk from the fridge, can cause digestive issues and diarrhea - and could put the animal's life at risk. Proper milk replacement products are easy to prepare, and definitely worth the effort.

Instructions

    1

    Weigh the puppy.

    2

    Examine the chart on the back of the milk replacement can or bottle. Find the weight of your puppy and, using the table, and determine how many ounces or tablespoons of milk replacement you'll need to use over a 24-hour period.

    3

    Examine the directions on the back of the replacement product's can or bottle. Determine how much water (if any) should be added to each tablespoon of liquid or powder. Mix the product and water when appropriate, stirring until smooth.

    4

    Fill a pot or pan one-quarter to halfway with water. Place the pot or pan on the stove burner at low heat.

    5

    Pour one day's worth of mixture into a nursing bottle for newborn puppies. Place the bottle into the heated water.

    6

    Test a small portion of the milk replacement against your wrist. The mixture should feel warm - about room temperature.

    7

    Use the chart on the back of the milk replacement can or bottle to determine how many servings of milk replacement the puppy will need each day. Keep unused milk replacement in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.

Free Homemade Dog Food Recipe

There are many reasons why you may turn to homemade dog food. You may have a picky eater, you may be afraid of using commercial dog food after the the 2007 recalls or you may just want to spoil your dog a bit. In any case, there are certain things that you need to keep in mind if you plan to make dog food. Consider basic nutritional guidelines and use this free homemade dog food recipe to get started.

Meat

    Dogs are carnivores, so they need a good amount of meat in their diet. It's best to choose lean meat because domestic dogs are prone to weight gain. If your dog is not prone to allergy or skin irritation, you can use beef, chicken, liver or fish. If your dog is prone to allergy or skin irritation, try lamb or duck, or to use fish, try salmon or whitefish. Cut about 1 pound of meat into bite-sized chunks and put the meat in a stock pot with one can of sodium-free vegetable broth. Stew over medium heat for about an hour and then reduce heat to simmer for several hours.

Grains

    Grains are a great way to make your homemade dog food stretch. They're also a good part of a balanced diet. That said, it is best to use a quality grain that will not cause digestive problems for your dog. Brown rice is the preferred grain for many who make dog food. However, you can also use oats, barley or whole wheat pasta. For this free dog food recipe, use 1/2 cup of uncooked brown rice. Place the brown rice directly in your stock pot with the meat and broth. Cover the pot with a lid until the rice is cooked. Then remove the stock pot from the heat source and allow the stew to cool.

Vegetables

    Vegetables are an important part of a homemade dog food recipe because they provide your dog with many nutritious elements. If you want to use fresh vegetables, you can put them right in the pot with the meat about two to three hours before you add the rice. That said, many dogs will eat around the vegetables in their food if they are not well blended. So, baby food vegetables are great for mixing in dog food. Stick with peas, carrots, sweet potato and green beans. Stay away from corn and broccoli because some dogs have an intolerance to them. Mix two jars of baby food vegetables in with the meat and rice once it has cooled.

Dairy

    Add some plain unsweetened yogurt for calcium and probiotics. While calcium helps strengthen bones, probiotics are good for digestive health. Two tablespoons can be added to the mix once the stew has cooled. You should also add a vitamin supplement to your homemade dog food. It's best to add this when you prepare each individual bowel so that it is measured accurately per serving for your dog's size. Many companies make dog multivitamins in liquid and powder form that work quite well for this purpose.

The Best Allergy Foods for Dogs

Dogs with food allergies often must eat a special diet in order to prevent itching, hair loss and other allergy symptoms. Options include prescription diets, commercially available allergy foods and home-cooked or raw diets designed to meet the individual dog's needs. Successfully managing a dog's food allergies requires the identification of ingredients that cause an allergic reaction and the removal of those ingredients from the dog's diet.

Elimination Diets

    An elimination diet is a diet designed to determine what a dog is allergic to. It should consist of one protein and one carbohydrate source, both of which have never before been fed to the dog being tested. A dog accustomed to a food containing chicken and corn could be switched to a food with lamb and rice. Some dogs have been exposed to numerous proteins and carbohydrates, making elimination diets difficult.
    After a diet has been identified that has limited ingredients and doesn't cause an allergic reaction, the owner should add one ingredient back into the dog's diet at a time and watch for allergy symptoms. If an ingredient is found to cause a reaction, it should be permanently removed from the dog's diet.

Prescription Diets

    Many veterinarians sell prescription foods for dogs with allergies. These diets tend to be expensive and often use ingredients that are no higher-quality than those used in basic nutrition pet foods. While some owners successfully feed prescription allergy diets, it is usually possible to spend less money and get the same benefits from a non-prescription allergy food or from a homemade diet.

Commercial Foods

    Numerous pet food manufacturers offer allergy formulas with limited ingredients for sensitive dogs. These formulas should avoid common allergens such as corn, wheat, soy and chicken. They should also contain one high-quality protein source and one carbohydrate. These foods are most effective if rotated to avoid the development of new allergies due to long-term exposure.
    Natural Balance makes several dog food formulas appropriate for dogs with food allergies. Canidae, Wellness, California Natural, Innova, Ziwi Peak and The Honest Kitchen are also brands that should be investigated as potential foods for dogs with allergies.

Home-Cooked Diets

    Some owners prefer to cook at home for dogs with allergies. Home-cooked diets require significant research and preparation. The obvious advantage of cooking at home is that you control every ingredient that goes into your dog's food. No formula inconsistencies or food recalls are likely to affect dogs on home-cooked diets. Cooking does destroy beneficial enzymes in meat, so supplements are necessary if cooking for your dog. Wholesome, high quality meats and ancient grains such as quinoa should be included in home-cooked diets.

Raw Diets

    Many owners report excellent results when feeding a raw diet to dogs with allergies. Most dogs raised on kibble or canned food have never been exposed to raw meat proteins. Raw meat differs enough from cooked meat that some dogs can be severely allergic to a particular meat when cooked while no allergic reaction occurs if the same meat is fed raw. For dogs that have eaten so many cooked proteins that using kibble as an elimination diet is impossible, a raw diet may be the only sensible choice.
    As with home-cooked diets, raw diets are difficult to formulate and require advanced knowledge of a dog's nutritional needs. Meat, bones and a variety of organs must be included. Owners wishing to feed a raw diet should research this choice extensively and discuss it with a veterinary nutritionist.

How to Measure for an Elevated Dog Bowl

How to Measure for an Elevated Dog Bowl

Providing your dog with an elevated dog bowl has several benefits. When your dog has to bend down to eat, he is putting stress on its hips, shoulders and back. An elevated bowl can reduce these stresses in addition to improving digestion and posture. If you are considering an elevated dog bowl for your pup, you will need to measure the dog to ensure the bowl is the right height.

Instructions

    1

    Stand your dog next to you in a normal standing posture.

    2

    Hold the end of the tape measure on the ground just behind your dog's front paw.

    3

    Extend the tape to the top of your dog's shoulder. The correct measurement for an elevated dog bowl begins with shoulder height.

    4

    Take your dog's shoulder height and subtract 6 inches for the correct bowl height. For instance, if your dog's shoulders are 20 inches tall, look for an elevated bowl that stands 14 inches high.

High-Protein Dog Foods

High-Protein Dog Foods

Dogs are naturally omnivorous and eat a combination of meat and vegetables and protein is beneficial for a number of medical conditions as well as maintaining general good health. Commercial dog food manufacturers recognize that protein is an essential ingredient of its product and ensures that the label reflects this. However, opinion varies as to the quantity of protein that a dog should have and what type of protein it should be.

Identifying High Protein Foods

    Many commercial foods claim to contain protein and pet owners often buy the brand that shows the highest percentage. However, the protein listed may take the form of by-products made from meat, chicken or fish. This means that the food contains ground bones, feathers, heads and feet, not real meat. These types of protein are difficult for your dog to digest, and they don't contain the nutritional value that is found in meat. Look for food brands that have meat, fish or eggs first on the list, as this means it is the main ingredient in the food. Generally, foods with a higher content of quality protein cost more than those containing by-products.

Feeding High Protein Foods

    A dog's protein requirement depends on its health, age and level of activity. Puppies and lactating bitches need around 28 percent protein content, while an adult dog that has an average level of activity needs only about 18 percent. Dogs that participate in high performance activities such as sled racing could require up to 50 percent protein content and dogs that are weak and need nutritional building up also need extra protein.

Protein and Medical Conditions

    Dogs with heart conditions and cancer may benefit from increased protein in their diets. This diet helps to maintain lean muscle mass which is lost as cancer progresses, while heart disease is aided by the amino acids present in a high protein diet. Dogs that are overweight may benefit from a high protein diet as long as they get enough exercise.

Disadvantages of High Protein

    Foods containing a greater quantity of real meat often have a higher fat content, so watch your dog's weight if you are feeding it this diet. Some foods are also higher in sodium, which may not be suitable for dogs with medical conditions. An excess intake of protein is thought to lead to kidney problems, as protein is processed through the kidneys rather than passing straight through the bowels. However, a feeding plan that includes vegetables, minerals and carbohydrates should provide a balanced diet for the dog.

Cook Your Own Dog Food

    Cook healthy, high protein food for your dog by using approximately 30 percent animal protein, including meat, fish, eggs and dairy products such as yogurt or cottage cheese. Combine this with complex carbohydrates like wild rice, pasta, vegetables and fruits. Don't use more than 5 percent organ meat such as liver, as this is very high in fat and keep corn and other grains to a minimum, especially for older dogs or dogs with medical conditions. Avoid salt or artificial flavoring. Once the food is cooked, freeze it for future use.

Rabu, 10 November 2010

Dangerous Dog Foods

Many people treat their dogs like people but when it comes to foods, people and dogs are very different. There are foods that people can eat that will make a dog very sick and potentially cause its death. Knowing what these foods are and why they should be avoided will help all dog owners be more diligent in the feeding of any and all foods to their dog.

Grapes and Raisins

    As people, we are always told that fruits and vegetables are good for us, but this is not always the case for dogs. Two things that you absolutely need to avoid feeding your dog are grapes and raisins. The reason for this is that grapes and raisins cannot be properly digested by a dog's system and can actually become toxic to the kidneys, causing vomiting, diarrhea and even death in some dogs. Your dog may like grapes and raisins, but they simply are not a healthy choice for him.

Chocolate

    This seems like common sense and many people have heard it, but it is true that chocolate should not be fed to your do--even in small amounts. The reason for this is that chocolate is a stimulant, which will increase the heart rate of your dog. In some dogs, the increased heart rate can lead to an irregular heartbeat, causing seizure or even death. For those that don't suffer from an irregular heartbeat, the chocolate can cause vomiting, frequent urination and diarrhea, which will dehydrate your dog.

Onions

    Most dogs will not eat onions but if yours will, this is still not a healthy choice for your dog. When consumed by your dog, the onions will actually cause the break down of red blood cells. The result is that your dog will not have as much oxygen in the blood as he should. This may cause your dog to feel generally ill, exhausted or even cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Bread Dough

    Most dogs love bread or the smell of bread dough. It is important that you do not feed your dog bread dough because they have a tendency to eat it without chewing it. This is potentially dangerous because when the bread dough hits the warm stomach it may continue to rise, which will cause bloating and vomiting as well as severe discomfort in the abdominal area.

Raw Fish

    Just because you enjoy raw fish, such as the fish found in sushi, it doesn't mean your dog should. Raw fish often contains parasites, such as fluke larvae. Eating the fluke larvae will result in the dog having the larvae attached to his intestinal walls. The result will be that your dog may feel lethargic, may lose weight, vomit, have diarrhea, and even stop eating or want to eat too much. If you want to feed your dog fish, be sure to cook it thoroughly to avoid feeding him these potentially damaging parasites.

How to Change Your Dog From Eating Raw Food to Dry Food

Changing your dogs' diet should always be a gradual process. Whether your dog is currently on a raw food diet or canned food diet, changing to any unfamiliar foods can disrupt your dogs system. Without time to adjust to the new foods, your dog can experience diarrhea and other gastrointestinal upset.

Instructions

Food Transition Period

    1

    Make a list of all the current ingredients in your dog's raw food diet, such as all the meats, any vegetables and other foods as prescribed by your veterinarian. You may want to switch to a new dry dog food with similar ingredients to make the transition easier.

    2

    Mix three-fourths of your dog's raw food with one-fourth of the new food for the first three days. For instance, if your dog eats a cup of food per meal, serve a three-fourths cup of the current food with one-fourth cup of the new food at the beginning of the transition period.

    3

    Combine half of the old with half of the new food for days four to six.

    4

    Serve your dog one-fourth of the old food with three-fourths of the new food for the final three days of transition. By this time you will note how well your dog is adjusting to the new food.

    5

    Serve a 100 percent portion of the new food by day 10. Your dog should be comfortable with the new food.

Selasa, 09 November 2010

Top 5 Dog Foods

Top 5 Dog Foods

As man's best friend's best friend, it's important that we give our dogs the nutrients they need. As carnivores, it's important that a dog's diet be high in meat and protein. However, with so many choices on the market, how can you know which brands make the best food for your pooch?

Orijen Dog Food

    Orijen is regarded as one of the highest-quality packaged dog foods available. With absolutely no grain, Orijen instead pulls its carbohydrates from potatoes. A healthy mix of chicken, turkey, lake whitefish, russet potatoes and other meats, vegetables and fruits, this is a well-balanced dog food. According to the bag, the adult dog food contains 70 percent protein and 30 percent fruits and vegetables. Orijen even contains pro-biotic microorganisms and beneficial herbs to add to an already well-rounded list of ingredients.

Wellness Core

    For those of you with active dogs, it's important to make sure they get the protein they need to maintain their health. Wellness Core dog food by Old Mother Hubbard is one of the most trusted high-protein dry varieties available today. Similar to Orijen, Wellness Core contains no grain, instead drawing its carbohydrates from potatoes. Talk to your veterinarian before switching to Wellness Core to determine if your dog is active enough to metabolize that much protein. If not, Wellness, as a brand, offers many other varieties of dog food that are just as well regarded as its Core formula.

Canidae

    Canidae is a high quality wet dog food that comes in a can. According to the manufacturers, it contains no fillers, though it does not contain grain. The meat used in Canidae is of a high enough quality for people to eat, so you know your dog will love it and benefit from the healthy mix of chicken, lamb and fish. Though the canned version of Canidae is great, its dry food underwent some ingredient changes in 2008, which some experts say lowered the quality. However, since the canned food was unchanged, it remains a great recommendation for anybody wanting top-of-the-line premium dog food.

Nature's Variety

    Nature's Variety comes in many different varieties for all types of dogs. From its high-protein dry food, Instinct, to its raw USDA-approved meat, all iterations of Nature's Variety are high quality with very little to no filler. According to customers, dogs enjoy Nature's Variety, and it is known for being easy to digest. All of these positive elements make this one of the best brands you can choose.

Innova Evo

    Evo is touted as a tasty, nutritional dog food that offers the same benefits as a raw diet. Canned and kibble versions are available, and Innova recommends you use both to promote the most balanced diet possible. Taken together, it promotes healthy skin and fur and provides bundles of energy.

Minggu, 07 November 2010

How to Feed Puppies at Four Weeks

How to Feed Puppies at Four Weeks

At four weeks old, puppies are ready to start eating dog kibble. Because their teeth aren't strong enough, the food needs to be softened. Eating the kibble at a young age not only introduces the puppies to that type of food, but also helps the weaning process go faster. The watered-down food should only sit out long enough for the dogs to eat. The water and food can grow mold if left out for too long.

Instructions

    1

    Pour the proper amount of dog food for the puppies into the bowl. The amount you use depends on the breed of dog and how many puppies are eating. Read the weight guide on the food container for exact measurements, or contact a veterinarian.

    2

    Pour one tablespoon of water per quarter-cup of dog food into the bowl.

    3

    Stir the water into the dog food. Set the bowl in front of the puppies to eat.

Sabtu, 06 November 2010

How to Feed a Dog Whole Foods

How to Feed a Dog Whole Foods

If you think about dogs as animals that could live on their own without store-bought foods made of dozens of ingredients, then you would understand their preference for whole food. Be careful not to think emotionally or simply believe TV commercials that make you think your dog needs a balanced diet like you do. Their digestive system is not like a human's, and they do not have the same needs as we do. Dogs will be the healthiest if they can eat as close to a wild diet as we can provide for them.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the dog's teeth. They are designed for ripping and tearing meat as well as crunching hard foods. Most commercial dog food fills the need for crunching, but the ripping and tearing comes from eating large chunks of meat.

    2

    Watch how the dog eats. He bolts his food. He is not a modified human who needs to chew his food carefully to start the digestions process in his mouth. A dog does not have the amylase enzyme to break down starches in his mouth and therefore should not have dental plaque unless someone feeds him simple sugars. Poultry, beef and pork are all favorites of dogs.

    3

    Don't spare the fat, animal fat especially. Dogs need it for energy, while they need protein for muscle and tissue growth. Many times when dogs are forced to live in a human environment, they cannot get the exercise they need and get fat. Do not be fooled into thinking that they now need a low-fat diet. Dogs need the fat to move and run. Keep the chicken skin and the fatty hamburger for your dogs when you are watching your own waistline.

    4

    Lower the carbohydrates. Yes, dogs love the protein and fat as their first choices, but they also need carbohydrates for brain function among other things. Include some carbohydrates in the form of whole grains like wheat or oats, but keep it limited to a small amount.

    5

    Keep it varied. Dogs nutritional needs can be met, just as humans' are met by eating a variety of whole meats and foods. Commercial dog food is so popular for its convenience, but if you get in the habit of thinking of scrap meat and meat drippings are wonderful dog food, you will quickly find it is more convenient to feed it the same meat you would eat. Raw meat is the best, as it has all the living enzymes, but even cooked meat is great for dogs.

    6

    Limit the amount of dog food to about 3% of your dog's weight. For example, a thirty pound dog will need almost one pound of food per day. On their own dogs will gorge themselves, as a survival instinct, but regular small portions will keep them happy.

    7

    Do a little research on your dog breed. Each dog has different needs, and you will be able to make the best choice for your dog, knowing how much activity it gets as well as its history. There is not one diet for dogs, just as there is not one for any other living being. Anything living is designed to eat living food, although we can get nutritional benefit from processed food, but open the door of opportunity for disease and problems if we use it on a consistent basis.

Carob Cake for Dogs

Carob Cake for Dogs

If you're among those pet owners who like to share everything with Fido, you may feel guilty while Fido looks on with those big eyes as you enjoy a chocolate treat. Chocolate is poisonous to dogs and while your pooch can't anything made with chocolate, he can still enjoy the taste of chocolate with a carob cake.

Definition

    Carob is an all-natural chocolate substitute. It comes from the carob tree and is often available in a powder that very closely resembles cocoa powder. Carob is caffeine-free and contains about three times the amount of calcium found in cocoa powder. While unsweetened carob is sweeter than unsweetened cocoa, the taste and texture are a bit different. However, Fido, who has hopefully never tasted chocolate, will never know the difference.

Recipes

    Carob cake recipes abound on the Internet. Many of the same carob cake recipes used to make cakes for human consumption will work just as well to make a cake for Fido's own consumption. A simple Internet search of "carob cake for dogs" will also yield recipes specifically made for dogs. You can also experiment and come up with your own recipe, using carob powder as you would cocoa powder to make a faux chocolate cake.

Basics

    If you have ever baked a cake for human consumption from scratch before, you likely have a good idea of what goes into your carob cake for dogs. All purpose flour, milk, margarine, eggs, baking powder, vanilla extract, and of course, the carob will be needed. Different recipes call for different amounts of these ingredients.

Embellishments

    There are a variety of ways to decorate a carob cake for Fido without using icing, which is jam-packed with sugar and preservatives. Some people make a simple cream-cheese icing by whipping it with heavy cream until it's nice and fluffy, while others make icing out of yogurt or even mashed up bananas with a bit of food coloring.

Considerations

    Carob is a safe chocolate substitute for dogs. However, when making Fido a cake, make sure that chocolate is not the only food that can harm him. If you're unsure whether certain ingredients are harmful to dogs, check with the U.S. Humane Society's website, which has an extensive list of foods that can harm dogs. Raisins are on that list, so keep them off your carob cake.

Jumat, 05 November 2010

What Are Good Treats for Dogs?

What Are Good Treats for Dogs?

Good dog treats have much in common with good human snacks -- they're healthy, nutritious and addictive. They should be as free of preservatives as possible. With this criteria in mind, you can purchase good treats for your dog or make them at home with very few ingredients. Your dog will be healthier for it, and your wallet will breathe a sigh of relief.

Bones

    Fresh cattle bones from the butcher are terrific dog treats. Your pet will love them, they don't splinter and chewing on them help keep your dog's teeth clean and tartar-free. One or two bones per month are adequate for the health benefits. Throw away the bone pieces when they get small enough for your dog to swallow. Avoid pre-packaged smoked dog bones, as the smoke flavoring can upset some dogs' stomachs.

Ice Cubes

    Ice cubes are good treats for dogs, and some dogs come running whenever they hear a plastic ice cube tray crack open. Ice cubes aren't as hard as bones, so don't worry about your dog chipping a tooth. If you really want your dog to enjoy ice cubes, designate a special dog-only ice cube tray and use low-sodium chicken or beef stock instead of water.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    Apple slices (fresh or dried), baby carrots, celery chunks and pumpkin squares make great dog treats, especially if you add a smear of peanut butter before serving. The oil in peanut butter is also excellent for your dog's coat. Avoid giving your dog onions and pieces of citrus fruit (lemon, orange, grapefruit), as these foods are poisonous to dogs.

Rice Balls

    If you have leftover plain rice from dinner, roll into one-inch balls and freeze. These treats are great for rewarding dogs with stomachs too sensitive for fattier goodies, and can be thawed and added to your pet's kibble for a treat-filled meal.

Supplements That Dogs Need When Eating Homemade Foods

Supplements That Dogs Need When Eating Homemade Foods

Proponents of feeding dogs homemade food cite the lack of quality in commercial dog food as the main reason to adopt this method. For pet owners who commit to homemade food, knowledge of vitamin and mineral supplements is essential, as these diets may not provide all of the necessary nutrients. Here are some of the nutrients vital to canine health, and consult your veterinarian with questions about dosages for your dog.

B Vitamins

    The B vitamins--B12, biotin, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamin--support neuromuscular function, help a dogs body use enzymes, aid in the development of healthy coat and skin, and assist bone marrow in making red blood cells. Small dogs can be given a low-dose B complex vitamin twice a day, says the University of Floridas Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH), while medium-sized dogs can consume a 50 mg complex, which contains 50 mg of each B vitamin, and large dogs a 100 mg complex. B vitamins also can be found in brewers yeast and molasses.

Vitamin E

    Vitamin E supports muscle and immune-system health, according to the Dog Owners Guide, and soothes dry skin. Dose recommendations vary; Dog Aware suggests 100 I.U. daily for small dogs and 400 I.U. for large dogs. Meanwhile, the VMTH advises supplementing with 400 I.U. for dogs under the age of 2, and 800 I.U. for older animals. Consult your vet for his recommendation.

Vitamin C

    Vitamin C may play several roles in dog health, according to Pet Education. Working with Vitamin E, Vitamin C in the ascorbic acid form is involved in bone growth, and some have found it useful for relieving the joint pain of canine hip dysplasia. The VMTH recommends 250 mg twice daily for dogs under the age of 2, and 500 mgs for older dogs.

Calcium

    Dogs need a constant supply of calcium to maintain strong bones, nails and teeth. Dog Aware recommends adding 800 to 1,000 mg per pound of cooked food for adult dogs. Some owners use ground eggshells; other forms, including carbonate, citrate and lactate will work, too. Puppies need more calcium per day, so ask your veterinarian how much to administer. The VMTH also notes bone meal as a calcium source. Canine bodies can absorb and use the calcium found in yogurt and cottage cheese, too, according to Vet Info.

Fish and Other Oils

    Omega-3 and -6 from oils and plant sources are essential for dog health, especially in the senior years, according to Vet Info, because they help reduce inflammation and support gastrointestinal function. Walnut oil, ground hempseed and flaxseed, and canola oil can be added to food in addition to sardines or fish oil, says Dog Aware. The VMTH recommends dogs consume 1,000 mg of fish oil, 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or two sardines daily.

Probiotics

    Like people, dogs need good bacteria to maintain healthy intestinal function. Dogs treated with antibiotics, suffering from diarrhea or generally under stress benefit most from probiotic supplementation, according to Dog Aware, and products sold for humans work just as well as those marketed for dogs. Two probiotic strains in particular are helpful to dogs: Lactobacillus sporogenes and Enterococcus faecium.

Multivitamins

    Veterinarians generally believe that if a dog is offered a balanced diet, supplements will not be necessary, according to the Dog Owners Guide. However, if a homemade diet is lacking in several nutrients, your vet can recommend a multivitamin to ensure your dog receives all the vitamins and minerals it needs. Your vets recommendation will be based on the diet you review with him.

Rabu, 03 November 2010

How Often Should I Feed My Dog?

Taking good care of a dog involves providing all of his needs: emotional, physical, environmental and nutritional. With so many options available, choosing the right diet for your dog can be a big decision. However, the diet decisions do not stop there. Next you have to determine how often to feed your dog--a common and often debated question in the dog owner's world. With proper research and information, selecting a diet and feeding schedule for you dog should be no problem.

Feeding Puppies

    Puppies are constantly growing, playing and developing. A puppy needs a diet specially formulated for her energy needs. Puppies under the age of 3 months need to be fed at least four times each day. A puppy aged 3-5 months needs to have three daily meals. Feeding several meals daily will allow a puppy the nutrition required to grow into a healthy, strong adult dog. Puppies older than 5 months can be fed on the same feeding guidelines as adults, but continue to feed a diet formulated for puppies until your veterinarian recommends otherwise.

Feeding Adult Dogs

    Adult dogs have different nutritional and energy requirements than those of a growing puppy. If an adult dog eats as many times a day as a puppy does, he quickly becomes overweight. Feed an adult dog food formulated for his adult nutritional needs. A good feeding schedule for an adult dog is two meals per day, although a veterinarian may occasionally recommend a feeding schedule of three daily meals specifically for your dog. These meals can alternate between dry and wet food--for example, canned food for breakfast and dry food for dinner--or can be comprised of only wet or dry food.

Feeding Routine and Tips

    Young and old dogs alike thrive on a schedule and need it to maintain order in their lives. For this reason, a daily feeding schedule is a must. Set up your dog's feeding schedule based on your own daily schedule, taking into account work, errand running and other activities you may partake in so as not to interrupt your dog's feeding schedule. Keeping your dog on a feeding schedule also keeps him on a bathroom schedule, so that you are able to avoid "accidents" in the home or late night bathroom breaks with your dog.

    Keep all food and water dishes clean and feed the same type of food each day to avoid digestive problems.

Selasa, 02 November 2010

How to Feed a Labrador Retriever

How to Feed a Labrador Retriever

The Labrador retriever is a dog breed that is beloved around the world for its smart, loyal and affectionate nature. The sporting dog breed is native to the province of Newfoundland in Canada. Historically, the dogs assisted fishermen. If you are considering the possibility of bringing a Labrador retriever into your home as a pet, first learn how to properly feed the dog to keep it healthy, happy and energetic.

Instructions

    1

    Designate a specific spot for your Labrador retriever's meals. Select a spot that allows your dog some privacy. Although you may feel that your dog wants to eat near others, the proximity could lead it to feel defensive about guarding its food. Allow your Labrador retriever a quiet and calm place to eat in a slow and relaxed manner.

    2

    Feed your dog twice daily. If you have a Labrador puppy, give it three daily meals during its initial growing spurt. Once your dog has reached roughly three months in age, decrease the feedings to two times every day, no matter how much it may beg for more.

    3

    Maintain consistent meal times, and discard any old food that your dog ignores after the meal is over. Doing this will help your Labrador retriever understand the concept of a feeding schedule.

    4

    Give your dog dry food that contains a lot of protein as well as essential vitamins and minerals. Since Labrador retrievers are on the large side, seek out a food that is intended for bigger breeds. If you are unsure about what food to get, ask your veterinarian for recommendations.

    5

    Provide your dog with fresh, cool water at all times.

    6

    Control your dog's meal portions. For young Labs, a cup-size meal should suffice. As the dogs get older, slowly increase meal sizes. For adult dogs, two cups are generally enough.

    7

    Watch out for weight gain. The breed tends to have a voracious appetite, so weight gain is common. If you feel your Lab is overweight, cut back on how much it is consuming, and make sure it is getting sufficient daily exercise.