Kamis, 30 September 2010

Can Raw Dog Food Be Cooked?

Can Raw Dog Food Be Cooked?

Advocates of raw food diets for dogs believe that uncooked foods, including meats, provide superior nutrition than cooked or commercial dog food. However, sometimes heated meals may be more beneficial to a dog's health.

Function

    A recuperating dog may find cooked food more appetizing.
    A recuperating dog may find cooked food more appetizing.

    Dogs on a raw food diet may find warm, cooked foods to be more appetizing during times of illness, low appetite or distress.

Theories/Speculation

    Many veterinarians believe raw diets put dogs at risk of gastrointestinal illnesses and choking. Holistic veterinarian Marty Goldstein believes "cooked food and enzyme supplements are the only way to go."

Features

    You can find easy recipes to turn raw food into cooked meals. "Spot's Stew," as seen in the book "The Whole Pet Diet," contains poultry, vegetables, kelp powder and herbs.

Considerations

    Cooked raw foods should be supplemented with nutritional elements destroyed by heat. Vitamin C and live enzymes are two examples.

Warning

    Never feed cooked bones. Cooked bones are a choking hazard, while uncooked bones usually are not.

How to Care for Malnourished Dogs

How to Care for Malnourished Dogs

If you've recently rescued a malnourished dog, you may be alarmed by the animal's sickly, bone thin appearance. However, your rescued dog is lucky if malnourishment is its only problem, since the condition is entirely treatable. To make sure that this is the case, before you begin your home recovery regimen, take it to the vet for a thorough examination. A neglected dog may likely have many other problems besides malnourishment or that are contributing to the condition, such as dehydration, parasite infestation or infection.

Instructions

    1

    Weigh the dog so you can get a good indication of how much food to feed the animal as well as for future reference when the dog starts putting on weight. Weigh yourself first, then weight the dog.

    2

    Offer the dog food, but only small amounts at one time. Check the food bag for ideal portion sizes based on the dog's current weight, and divide that amount by five. Feed the dog that amount every half hour. While some websites suggest adding a supplement to a starving dogs' diet, an article published at the Washington State University Veterinary College website states that those are unnecessary and will not speed recovery.

    3

    Write down how much your malnourished dog eats at each sitting, recording that and at what time the dog ate. After two days, the dog should be starting to consume the right amount of food for its size if all incremental feedings are added together. If not, try changing to wet food or to another high-quality brand of kibble. If all else fails, consult your vet about whether the dog must be force fed.

    4

    Continue this feeding schedule for at least three days and up to seven days, when the danger of Refeeding Syndrome passes. According to the Pet Center website, this syndrome occurs when a starved dog is fed too much too fast after an extended period of malnourishment, and can cause muscle weakness and cramping, as well as seizures and heart irregularities.

    5

    Weigh the dog once in the morning and once at night and average the two numbers together to get a daily weight that is less effected by loss bowel movements or vomiting, which the dog may be experiencing.

    6

    Allow the dog to sleep when not feeding. Some exhausted, malnourished dogs may sleep all the time that they aren't eating. Give the dog a warm, comfortable bed in which to recuperate. If your house is cold or has cold floors, you might try adding heated bottles of water to the pet's bed to keep it warm.

    7

    Take the dog on short walks daily after it has regained most of its weight; look for weights of at least 80 percent of the animal's ideal weight. Once the dog seems tired, bring it home immediately.

Senin, 27 September 2010

What to Feed a Wild Dog

Some wild dogs are feral, or not domesticated, and will not make good pets. Other wild dogs are abandoned animals that have been socialized in the past and can be rehabilitated to be adopted. Providing wild dogs with food is one way to gain their respect and get them to trust you enough to capture and domesticate them. Do not feed wild dogs unless you are going to provide for them or find someone who will.

Commercial Dog Food

    Lure wild dogs to trust you by providing them with a selection of commercial dog food. Buy several cans of commercial dog food from a store, and empty an entire can into a dog food dish. Place the dog food dish far away from your home, where the dog is more likely to take it. Go into your home and shut the door. Provide the dog with the same food the next day or twelve hours later. Place this food one foot closer to your home. Continue to provide the dog with commercial dog food twice a day. Each time you provide him with food, move it closer to your home. As soon a the dog has been inticed to come close to your home, begin to stay outside after providing the food. Watch the dog eat, but do not approach him.

    After several days of watching him eat, begin to speak in soothing tones to the dog as the dog eats. If the dog is domesticated and not feral, he will approach you as you gain his trust. You can put a leash and collar on him to take him to your local vet or rescue shelter.

Dry Food

    Provide dry dog food to wild dogs that you care for but do not intend to take to a shelter or vet clinic. Do this only in the countryside, as wild dogs cannot roam in the city and need to be captured. Set out bowls of dry dog food in your barn, your outbuilding, or around the edges of your property to feed wild dogs.

Considerations

    Feed a dog if you intend to take care of him. Gain his trust and take him to a vet or rescue facility, so he can be reunited with his owner or so that he can be adopted. Feed wild dogs you do not intend to care for only in a country setting, and be advised that this will cause them to hang out more on your property and to produce more offspring. Most societies look down on feeding wild dogs without any intent to capture them.

How to Make Healthy Homemade Dog Treats

How to Make Healthy Homemade Dog Treats

Are all the pet food recalls making you wary of what you feed your pets? By making your own homemade dog treats, not only can you avoid all the nasty plastics and other chemicals that are so often finding their way into the food supply, but you can control what exactly goes into them. This way, you can take the medical needs of your pet in mind and make sure that what they get is both healthy and tasty. Making homemade dog treats is not very different from baking for humans. The only real variation is the ingredients, as you can see below.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

    2

    Spray a half sheet pan with nonstick cooking spray or line it with parchment paper to keep your homemade dog treats from sticking to the pan so they can be removed easily.

    3

    Mix egg, vegetable oil, baby food, and water in a bowl until thoroughly combined. Bring the ingredients together, but do not beat the egg into a froth.

    4

    Mix salt, flour, and powdered milk in a separate bowl.

    5

    Pour the wet ingredients on top of the dry and scrape out the bowl.

    6

    Stir all ingredients together until they come together in a smooth, uniform dough, but do not overmix them.

    7

    Pour out dough onto a floured countertop and roll out to about 1/2 inch thickness. It doesn't need to be exact, but you want to be able to cook your homemade dog treats thoroughly without burning the edges.

    8

    Cut into desired shapes using cookie cutters. Depending on the flavor of baby food you used, you could use different shapes, but the classic bone is the traditional shape for homemade dog treats.

    9

    Place your cut shapes onto the pan and bake each batch of homemade dog treats for 20 to 30 minutes, or until lightly browned on the edges.

    10

    Cook your homemade dog treats thoroughly on a wire rack, then store in an airtight container.

Minggu, 26 September 2010

Can I Feed My Adult Dog Puppy Food?

There are many brands of dog food available. Within each brand, you will find a variety of types, including puppy, adult, weight control and senior. If you are wondering whether you should give your adult dog the puppy food he likes, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and other experts say "no."

Dietary Requirements

    According to the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, a dog's dietary requirements change depending on its stage of life and activity level. A puppy requires high levels of protein and other nutrients to develop its muscles and bones.

Warning

    The higher levels of nutrients in puppy food can hurt an older dog. For example, experts say high levels of protein in puppy food can affect organs such as the kidneys and shorten a dog's life. Similarly, adult dog food does not have the proper amounts of nutrients puppies need.

Effects

    If you feed your adult dog puppy food, your dog has an increased risk of becoming obese. Just like in humans, obesity can lead to various health problems in dogs. Among other things, obesity stresses your dog's heart, lungs and joints. It also increases the risk of certain types of cancer.

Time Frame

    Different size dogs are considered to be ready for adult food at different ages. But some nutritionists worry that giant breed puppies might grow too quickly if they are fed only puppy food. Some recommend mixing adult food with puppy food for large breeds.

Changing Foods

    To switch from puppy to adult food, you can mix the types of food over a few days, gradually increasing the proportion of adult food. It is best to consult with your veterinarian before making any changes.

Sabtu, 25 September 2010

The Best Way to Feed Dry Dog Food

The Best Way to Feed Dry Dog Food

Dry dog food is more convenient and less expensive than soft foods. It will also benefit your dog by helping control tartar buildup on its teeth. When feeding your dog dry food, you must make sure you are measuring out the food so that your dog does not overeat. You also want to set up a routine so that your dog knows when to expect its kibble.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a dog food based on the age of your dog. If your dog is less than a year old, you want a puppy food. If your dog is past its active years, you want a dry dog food for senior dogs. These dry mixes contain the essential nutrients your dog needs at certain stages of his life.

    2

    Measure out the dog food and set it in your dog bowl. You can follow the guidelines on the dry food package or follow these rules of thumb: under 11 lbs., give 3 to 5 oz.; up to 22 lbs., give 4 to 6 oz.; up to 55 lbs., give 10 to 12 oz.; up to 75 lbs., give 16 to 18 oz.; and dogs over 75 lbs. can have up to 30 oz. of food.

    3

    Set your dog food bowl down on the floor where your dog can reach it. Do this at the same time each morning and evening. This creates a routine for your dog. Your dog will come to anticipate when it is being fed.

    4

    Remove the dog bowl after 10 to 20 minutes have passed. Do this even if the dog has not finished the food. The dog will not starve, and it will learn to eat when the food is served.

Jumat, 24 September 2010

How to Find the Kcals in a Dog's Raw Diet

How to Find the Kcals in a Dog's Raw Diet

Many dog food varieties available at your grocery store, according to a University of Maryland Agricultural Extension lecture called "Basic Canine Care," contain too much corn and other dubious ingredients such as "poultry by-products" (which can mean pulverized beaks and feathers). If you've chosen to feed your dog a raw diet as an alternative make sure there is enough caloric content, measured in Kcals or calories, in your pet's food to sustain your companion's biological processes and daily activities.

Instructions

    1

    Write down a list of everything your dog eats per week on a calendar. Day to day variation is necessary for a balanced raw diet so you'll need to examine more than a single day of meals. Include exact amounts next to each food item.

    2

    Look up the amount of calories in each item you wrote on the calendar. A wide variety of calorie counting resources are available from your local bookstore or library, as well as for free on the internet at websites such as the USDA's nutritional database. You'll find calories listed by weight unit, such as grams or ounces.

    3

    Weigh each of the raw food elements in your dog's diet on a food scale and multiply them by the calorie amounts listed for that item. For example, raw chicken necks are a part of many dogs' raw diets. The average raw chicken neck weighs 35 grams and contains 79 calories, so two necks (or 70 grams) contain 158 calories.

    4

    Write each calorie total down on the calendar next to the food your dog consumes, and then add up the amount for each day. Add all the amounts for the week together and then divide by seven to get a rough estimate of your dog's daily caloric intake on the raw diet.

    5

    Adjust the diet as necessary, adding or subtracting food, to get to your dog's ideal caloric intake.

What Do I Feed Puppies After They Stop Nursing?

What Do I Feed Puppies After They Stop Nursing?

Between 4 and 6 weeks old, your puppy is ready to stop nursing and begin the weaning process. This lasts around 3 to 4 weeks before you can fully introduce puppy food. The weaning process can be a difficult time, as the puppy begins to explore different types of food by using both her nose and mouth, and learns to feed herself and not rely on her mother's milk. You can help her through this process by giving her healthy and nutritional food.

Puppy Food

    Begin feeding your puppy with a good quality solid puppy food mixture. There are a number of alternatives on the market, all of which vary on quality and price. If you are unsure, ask a veterinarian or your local pet store for advice. The actual amount required varies, and you should follow the feeding advice given on the product.

    Although some puppies will have no problems going straight from nursing milk to eating solid food, others will find the transition difficult. If this is the case, you can mix or blend the food with a little warm water or puppy milk replacment. If the puppy continues to refuse the food, use tinned moist puppy food instead.

Food Intolerence

    Puppies stomachs can be sensitive to certain ingredients, and you will need to closely monitor your puppy's health when you start feeding her puppy food. You may need to change her puppy food product if problems continue. Signs to look out for include your puppy being over tired, aggressive or hyperactive, excessive weight gain or loss, and chronic skin and ear problems. As the puppy grows, the intolerance may end, but you will need to keep a close eye on her health if you reintroduce a food.

Further Advice

    If your puppy has ongoing diarrhea, or bloody stools, you may have to change your puppy's diet, and you should consult a veterinarian for further advice.

    It is also possible to prepare your own home made puppy food, but this is only recommended with advice from a veterinarian as you need to be very careful to get the right balance of nutrients. Too much meat in a puppy's diet can also lead to irreversible bone diseases.

    As soon as you start feeding the puppy, you should be with him as he eats. Talk to him, and occasionally stroke him. This is important training for the puppy which stops her being protective and aggressive about food in the future.

Fresh Water

    Puppies drink more water than adult dogs because they experience such rapid growth, and dehydrate easily. Fresh clean water also reduces the risk of diseases like leptospirosis.
    You will need to check their water bowl throughout the day to ensure it is topped up. Always fill the bowl first thing in the morning, and before you go to bed. You can also add a little water to any solid puppy food.

Kamis, 23 September 2010

How to Get a Dog to Eat Dry Food

Dogs can be fussy when it comes to food, especially if it is dry. Like humans, dogs have different tastes and prefer something juicy -- instead of dry. It is possible to encourage your dog to eat the dehydrated food by trying out a few simple techniques. However, you will need to add a couple of extra ingredients to the meal to achieve this. With a bit of trial and error, you will soon find something that works for you and your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the feeding area and bowl to keep the area clean for your dog. This avoids creating unwanted bacteria in your house, which could give your dog an upset stomach.

    2

    Mix together one part water to four parts dry food. Use the same amount of dry food as you would normally feed to your dog. Add the water to the bowl that contains the dry dog food.

    3

    Give the dog the re-hydrated dog food. The water is absorbed by the food, making it easier to eat for the dog. Unlike humans, the dog can also taste the water that has been added, and will hopefully be enticed by it.

    4

    Strain a can of sweetcorn but save the juice. Add the juice and half a can of the sweetcorn to the dry food. Mix it all together. Do not forget to reduce the dry food portion by the same amount of corn you are adding, otherwise the dog will be fed too much.

    5

    Give the dog the food again, and encourage it to eat it. Pat it on the head and give him words of support.

    6

    Try re-hydrating the food with a cup of broth. Boil some vegetables and meat into a broth for yourself, but keep a cup of the liquid aside. When it is your dog's dinner time, add the cup of broth to the dry food. The new flavor will be more appealing.

Rabu, 22 September 2010

Liquid Diets for a Dog

Liquid Diets for a Dog

Dogs, like people, occasionally need to go on a liquid diet. Whether your veterinarian prescribed a liquid diet, or you want to try it on your own, there are a variety of ways to create a liquid diet for your dog. Meal portions will depend on the size of your dog and any possible health issues your dog may have, so always speak with your vet before changing your dog's diet.

Constipation

    If your dog is constipated, combine a few scoops of canned pumpkin and a few ounces of chicken broth. The mixture will soften your dog's stool and allow him an easier bowel movement. Depending on the size of your dog, add a couple of tablespoons of pumpkin, to half a can, mixed with enough chicken broth to liquefy the pumpkin. Canned pumpkin already has a very soft and mushy texture, so you won't need a lot of chicken broth. Most dogs experience this remedy as a tasty treat and eat it with relish. You can also add your dog's normal food, wet or dry, to this mixture and liquefy it in a blender.

Liquefying Normal Food

    If your dog just had a dental cleaning, or is having trouble chewing her meals, consider mixing her normal food with chicken broth and water and liquefying it in a blender. If you use dry kibble, you may need to allow the water and chicken broth to saturate the kibble for a few minutes before blending. You'll need to use enough chicken broth and water to cover the dry food and continue to add additional water while blending until you have the right consistency. Keeping your dog on her normal diet will reduce the chances of vomiting and diarrhea.

Tasty Liquid Treat

    Your dog may enjoy boiled chicken, vegetables, pumpkin, white rice, water and chicken broth, blended as a tasty treat or a normal liquid meal. Vegetables such as green beans and carrots are healthy foods for dogs. Boiled chicken is a good source of protein and adding white rice and pumpkin will help prevent an upset stomach. Add enough water and chicken broth while blending to liquefy the meal.

Commercial Liquid Diets

    If your dog just had surgery, your vet may recommend a liquid diet for her until she's feeling better, or until she's able to process solid foods safely. The vet may provide you with a canned product such as CliniCare, REBOUND or DogSure, which are all liquid diets in a can. Your vet may recommend one of these products to ensure your dog is getting the right nutrients during her recovery. Occasionally, the vet may place your dog on an all-liquid diet if she's lost her teeth, or to help reduce her weight.

The Best Food for Dogs to Prevent Cancer

Dog owners value their four-legged best friends almost as much as a human family member, so when a dog gets cancer, it's like a family member getting the same diagnosis. The best way to prolong the life of your dog as well as prevent your dog from getting cancer is to make sure she is eating proper dog food.

Dark Green Vegetables

    According to See Spot Live Longer in an article by Steve Brown and Beth Taylor, dark green vegetables such as broccoli, asparagus and lettuce leaves contain powerful chlorophyll that helps block the exposure to harmful carcinogens, much the same as they do in humans. See Spot Live Longer also suggests chopping these vegetable up or juicing them and feeding them to your dog a few times a week.

Homemade Meals

    For a while there has been an ongoing debate about homemade meals for your dog versus dry dog food. Homemade meals can go a long way in protecting your dog against cancer. The reasoning is similar to why humans should avoid fast food. Fresh, less processed food provides the most nutrients that help build the immune system and fend off diseases such as cancer. To make sure your dog gets a wealth of the proper nutrition, The Ultimate Dog Guide suggests a stew consisting of meats, vegetables and carbohydrates such as rice. It also suggests serving occasional raw meat such as prepackaged raw frozen hamburger patties.

Store-Bought Food

    Dry dog food is admittedly cheaper and easier to feed your dog on a regular basis. The good news is that there are some good choices out there to help you prevent cancer in your four-legged friend. The most important thing when selecting dry dog food is to read the label. According to The Ultimate Dog Guide, natural dry dog foods and foods that are labeled "AAFCO guarantee" are your best bets. The Ultimate Dog Guide suggests that when you are reading dry dog food labels look for natural preservatives such as Vitamin E and C. Another thing to look for is essential fatty acids, as these are very important to preventing cancer.

    The Ultimate Dog Guide recommends avoiding dry dog foods that lists artificial flavors, artificial colors or anything that contains meal such as chicken meal. Additionally, avoid purchasing food that is expired, or is a generic or store brand.

Selasa, 21 September 2010

Healthy Diet of Miniature Schnauzers

Healthy Diet of Miniature Schnauzers

Miniature Schnauzers need a healthy diet similar to other dogs, although you should bear in mind that this dog is susceptible to diabetes, Willebrand's disease, kidney stones and liver problems. They also tend to gain weight if not on the proper diet. Feeding him fresh food or a commercial brand is up to you, but make sure he has a balanced diet consisting of protein, carbohydrates and fiber, vitamins, minerals and fatty acids. Choose between dry or wet food and read the label to ensure your dog is receiving the correct number of calories and the correct amount of fat in his diet.

What to Feed the Miniature Schnauzer

    Pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and beets are the best thing to feed your dog. Avoid foods with high sugar or fat content to decrease the risk of developing diabetes and weight gain. Feed the dog food low in fat and sugar. Some owners believe in sourcing meat from the butchers only, but this can be expensive. The best thing is to ensure that you choose a high quality dog food brand with quality meat even if it is a bit more expensive than other brands.

How to Feed the Miniature Schnauzer

    A puppy will need to eat more food than a full grown adult will. Feed him two medium sized meals daily once fully grown. There will be instructions on the dog food packet as to how often to feed your pet. Vary this if you feel your Schnauzer could do with more food or at a greater frequency, but be careful not to over feed your pet. Do not feed them scraps from the table of greasy, spicy or salty foods as they can suffer from digestive issues.

Overfeeding your Miniature Schnauzer

    Overfeeding can cause diarrhea in puppies, and your puppy may also get fat. Give your puppy a treat by adding some fruit or vegetables to their meal, like a bit of carrot or apple. The occasional dog treat is fine in moderation. If your miniature Schnauzer develops diarrhea or vomiting, serve him a teaspoon of bismuth liquid or an anti-diarrheal and feed him nothing for 12 hours. Put him on a bland diet, like chicken and rice, for two days. If the symptoms get worse, see your vet.

Feeding your Schnauzer Correctly

    Look at the dog and assess his health. He should have a healthy coat and bright eyes with boundless energy. Older Schnauzers may tire more quickly after exercise, and this is to be expected. He may lose weight, so start to feed him a diet with vitamins and minerals and cut down on the amount of protein and fat in his diet. Feeding smaller portions more regularly may be another option.

How to Bake Treats Putting Your Dog in Nirvana

How to Bake Treats Putting Your Dog in Nirvana

Dogs---being perpetual 3-year-olds---love treats as much as kids. These biscuits are a quick and healthy treat for canines. Store-bought treats are expensive and in most cases unhealthy, contributing to canine diabetes, food allergies and obesity. Most commercial treats list fillers, meals and gluten as prime ingredients. Keep your dog healthy with homemade treats that take 10 minutes to prep and 35 minutes to bake. It's almost a people treat, without the extra salt, sugar and leavening.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray or wipe oil on cookie sheets.

    2

    Put flour in mixer. Mix the cornmeal into the flour on medium speed. Turn mixer off.

    3

    Add egg, water and peanut butter. Mix at a slow kneading speed until all ingredients are blended into a firm, slightly dry, cookie dough. The dough may have a swirling appearance from flour and peanut butter. This is OK. When the dough is solid, spill out on the counter.

    4

    Knead lightly and roll the dough into a "snake" about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in diameter. The dough roll may be almost 3 feet long at this diameter.

    5

    Take the pastry scraper or a table knife and slice the roll into 1/4 inch segments. The dough will collapse into a half circle shape during the cutting, but shaping is a personal option. Place the slices on the cookie sheets. Separation between slices does not matter because without leavening, they will not rise or expand.

    6

    Put the cookie trays in the center of the oven for 35 minutes. If the oven has a cooking time setting, set it to 30 minutes. The treats are ready when they are slightly browned and firm to the touch. This recipe will make more than 100 treats, depending on slice thickness. Let the treats cool before serving to the dog.

How to make Honey Cinnamon Dog Treats

How to make Honey Cinnamon Dog Treats

Honey cinnamon dog treats are easy to make and will keep for several months so your dog can enjoy them anytime. There are many recipes for dog treats that you can use. Whole wheat flour and pumpkin puree hold the dog treats together and have nutritional value for your dog. Honey and cinnamon are also flavors that pair well with the pumpkin. You need to use plain pumpkin though, not pumpkin pie filling. Honey cinnamon dog treats will last for six months if frozen and for one week when refrigerated.

Instructions

    1

    Mix all the ingredients together thoroughly in a bowl. It may take a bit of effort to get the honey to fully mix but it will blend eventually.

    2

    Spray the muffin tin so the dog treats won't stick.

    3

    Add the mixture to the muffin tin so each muffin cup is about two-thirds full.

    4

    Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes.

    5

    Cool the treats completely before serving them to your dog.

Minggu, 19 September 2010

How Much Dog Food Should a Little Puppy Eat?

How Much Dog Food Should a Little Puppy Eat?

    Puppies love to play with toys
    Puppies love to play with toys

Read the Dog Food Bag

    Each bag of dog food has the recommended daily intake on the bag. It is broken out by the size of the puppy in pounds and the age of the puppy. The manufacturer knows the nutrition content of its own food the best and bases the feeding instructions on this.

Consult your Vet

    A veterinarian will be able to give an unbiased recommendation on the amount of dog food needed by a little puppy. Veterinarians are not in the business of selling food and can make their recommendation by taking a look at your puppy's development and weight.

Bottom Line

    Using the feeding instructions from the dog food manufacturer is the ideal way to decide on how much food to give a little puppy. A good rule of thumb to follow is to provide 1.5 cups of dry dog food per every 10 lbs. of weight until the puppy reaches 6 months, then reducing to 1 cup of food per every 10 lbs. Regular visits to a veterinarian will allow the vet to evaluate the dog and suggest increasing or decreasing the amount of food.

Foods That Cause Bladder Stones in Dogs

Foods That Cause Bladder Stones in Dogs

Feeding your dog certain foods can cause the formation of bladder stones, a mineral deposit that can form in the kidneys and urethra. Bladder stones in dogs can lead to severe health problems if left untreated, so providing your dog with a healthy diet is important to prevent the stones from occurring.

Identification

    Bladder stones in dogs can cause symptoms such as frequent urination with minimal fluid output, difficulty and straining with urination and blood in the urine. Recurring bladder infections can often indicate the presence of bladder stones, although in some dogs there may be no outward signs.

Effects

    If left untreated, bladder stones in dogs can cause an obstruction to the urethra that can prevent urination. Untreated bladder stones can also cause the bladder to lose its ability to function properly even if the stones are eventually removed.

Considerations

    Some dog breeds are more prone to bladder stones, such as Yorkshire terriers, chihuahuas, Lhasa Apsos, dachshunds and dalmatians. Genetics can play a part in bladder stone formation, so dogs with parents that suffer from the condition have a higher risk of developing stones.

Types of Foods

    Foods high in protein, particularly red meats and animal fats, increase risk of bladder stones in dogs. Foods high in oxalates, which contribute to stone formation, such as wheat germ, sweet potatoes, beans and soy products, should also be avoided.

Prevention

    A well-balanced diet that contains easily digested proteins and is low in fat will help prevent bladder stone formation. Avoid feeding the dog table scraps and junk food, which can pose a health risk as well. Dogs prone to bladder stones may benefit from a food prescribed by your veterinarian.

Sabtu, 18 September 2010

The Best Vegetarian Dog Food

Dogs are classified as omnivores, meaning they eat both plant and animal matter, unlike cats who are obligate carnivores. Creating a vegetarian diet for your dog is a simple matter of choosing different ingredients and refining the recipe to find the most palatable version that meets his nutritional requirements.

Protein

    One of the biggest limitations on what a dog can eat, in terms of a vegetarian diet, is protein. Protein is made up of amino acids. There are 22 different amino acids, 12 of which the dog can make himself, 10 which he must have in his diet. When deciding on a vegetarian diet, as long as these amino acids are present, the diet can be composed of most any vegetables desired.

    Proteins are given a score for pet foods in terms of how well the food supplies the required amino acids. These essential amino acids that must be represented are arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. Eggs are a balanced source protein that provides all of these amino acids. Milk protein is another high-level protein and contains most of these. Milk protein can be made from dehydrated milk that comes in a powder form.

Foods

    Many vegetarian pet foods are commercially produced and available at most pet stores or online. They will typically be located next to regular varieties made by the same manufacturer. Be sure to read the back of the bag for the list of ingredients to ensure the food is truly vegetarian and that it has an adequate source of protein like eggs or milk powder.

    To make a vegetarian diet at home, begin with the basic requirements of your dog. Your vet can help you determine his calorie and protein needs. Next choose one or more protein sources as the base for the diet. Again egg and milk are both good options. Add starches such as rice, yams or potato as well as other palatable vegetables to bulk out this meal. Some dogs may be picky about eating so much greenery, so keep a close eye on what he eats and what he leaves out. This way you can modify the diet as needed to ensure he eats it all and gets his caloric requirements.

    Some people consider fish as a part of a vegetarian diet. Fish is an excellent source of protein and amino acids as well as fat to give a healthy skin and coat. Fish is also highly palatable to most dogs and can be used alone or in combination with other protein sources. For animals with allergy issues where a limited ingredient diet is recommended, it may be necessary to try several recipe combinations of protein and vegetables to find one that is both vegetarian and non-allergenic.

Jumat, 17 September 2010

What Kind of Food Can You Use to Decorate Dog Cookies?

What Kind of Food Can You Use to Decorate Dog Cookies?

You don't have to feed your dog bland dog cookies. With a little help, you could come up with your own ideas for decorating the cookies. Only the types of foods that dogs can eat limit the possibilities. Before you begin, you must know what a dog can safely eat. You should also consult your veterinarian before feeding the dog any new food and food combinations.

Cheese

    Contrary to belief, dogs can and do enjoy cheese. Melted, the cheese resembles frosting on top of a dog cookie. You can cover the cookie with melted cheese or pipe it onto the dog cookie in decorative designs. You could add additional toppings too. Spread cottage cheese onto the cookie as a base, and then consider placing pieces of cooked pieces of meat or sunflower seeds on top. Add the toppings that your dog enjoys. Cheese is very binding, so try to limit your dog's ingestion of cheese-frosted cookies.

Fruits

    Dogs love fruits. Fruits are versatile, and they can be used to decorate a dog cookie in a method similar to frosting a cookie. Choose the fruits that your dog enjoys, and place them in a blender. Consider blending individual flavors and mixes to give your dog variety. When the fruit has made a paste it can be place into a pastry bag or plastic zippered bag with a small corner cut off. Pipe the fruit onto the cookie as desired. Blueberries, strawberries and kiwis are great for adding coloring. Another method is to place raw fruit on top of a cookie that is iced with cottage cheese or other blended fruits.

Peanut Butter

    Peanut butter can be used as a frosting, topped with berries, melons, bananas, cooked chicken and other safe foods for your dog. You can make a sandwich cookie by placing two cookies together with the peanut butter in the middle.

Yogurt

    Yogurt frosting is good for dogs. Frost the cookie in a thick, Greek-style yogurt and add fruit or seeds to decorate the cookie. Stay away from yogurts with artificial sweeteners. Plain yogurt works fine and creates a nice white background that contrasts with many other foods, making a more decorative frosting.

Kamis, 16 September 2010

Dog Foods Containing Ester C

Dog Foods Containing Ester C

Some evidence indicates that high doses of vitamin C can help dogs with joint disorders like hip dysplasia. In 1994, veterinarian L. Phillips Brown concluded that "Ester-C calcium ascorbate provided symptomatic relief to the study dogs suffering from selected chronic joint and musculoskeletal disorders." Brown also noted that improvement diminished once a dog stopped receiving Ester-C, further evidence of the pills' action.



Ester-C is a brand name for calcium ascorbate, a form of vitamin C.

Dog Foods That Contain Calcium Ascorbate

    Many brands of dog food you can buy in a supermarket or pet shop contain some additional vitamin C, but often this is not calcium ascorbate, the Ester-C formula.

    Natural Life Pet Products adds calcium ascorbate to its dog foods. So does Precept. You can find others by looking on the food labels.

Dog Foods That Contain Ascorbic Acid

    Ascorbic acid is the traditional form of vitamin C. It might be listed as ascorbic acid or as vitamin C in the ingredients. Nearly all dog foods add it, including Advance, Kirkland and Eukanuba.

Do Dogs Need Vitamin C?

    Like most mammals, dogs synthesize vitamin C in their livers but, unlike humans, don't need to eat it. Dogs produce about 18 milligrams per pound of dog, meaning a healthy 50-pound dog produces 900 milligrams of vitamin C per day.

    Brown's research showed that higher daily supplements of calcium ascorbate, up to 2,000 milligrams, worked better.

    The amount of vitamin C in dog foods is minimal. If you want your dog to get extra vitamin C, you should add it yourself. Dogs can eat the same Ester-C or vitamin C pills as you, but you may need to camouflage them in some cheese or peanut butter.

    Don't worry about overdoses in the short term. The worst thing too much vitamin C can do is produce some temporary diarrhea.

Vegetables That Are Good for Diabetic Dogs

Vegetables That Are Good for Diabetic Dogs

Pet owners have a special responsibility to their pets and their pets' health. When a dog is diagnosed with diabetes, a customized diet is often necessary. Rather than the canned diet that is usually all grains and meats, dogs with diabetes must eat grains and meats in moderation, and owners should include more fresh vegetables in their diets.

Winter Squash

    Various winter squashes such as pumpkin, acorn squash or butternut squash, are beneficial for dogs with diabetes because of their high fiber content. According to VetInfo, diabetes-control diets should be high in carbohydrates with plenty of fiber. However, winter squash should be cooked before being served.

Alpha Sprouts

    Veterinarian Jennifer Fry from AllExperts.com says that alpha sprouts are a high-fiber food that are safe for dogs, making raw alpha sprouts (also known as alfalfa sprouts), mixed in with rice or oats and low-fat meat is an excellent diabetic-friendly dinner. Since alpha sprouts tend to pick up bacteria easily, make sure these sprouts are fresh.

Carrots

    While they are sugary, Cushing's and Diabetes, a dog diabetes information site and support group, reports that naturally occurring sugars do not affect the insulin levels the same way that sucrose or fructose additives would. Carrots are safe in moderation, either cooked or raw. If serving your dog raw carrots, be sure to pulp the carrots well to be to be safely swallowed and digested sufficiently.

Parsley

    Parsley, like most leafy greens, is high in fiber and low in sugar. It is an ideal vegetable for a diabetic, dog and human alike.

Garlic

    Fresh garlic will help the digestive track in addition to being a nutritional addition to a diabetic dog's diet. However, don't go overboard with this additive, and consult your vet before making this a part of your dog's diet. The vet experts at Pet Education report that garlic in high quantities may cause anemia. Other experts, such as the ones at Natural Dog Health Remedies, say small doses based on the size of the dog (anywhere from half a clove to three cloves daily) is safe.

Broccoli and Cauliflower

    Raw broccoli is very low on the glycemic index, with lots of fiber and few sugars. Broccoli should be well pulped so that the dog can digest it best, and get the most nutritional benefits from it. Cauliflower is similar to broccoli in its nutritional make-up and is an ideal food for diabetic dogs.

Green Beans

    Green beans are very low in carbohydrates, but they pack a lot of fiber, which is exactly what a vegetable should do when it's served to a diabetic dog. They are best served raw and well pulped.

Leafy Salad Greens

    These include greens like collard greens, kale, mustard greens and turnip greens, and your typical salad greens like romaine lettuce. However, do not give a dog Swiss chard or spinach, as these greens will inhibit calcium absorption, according to Cushing's & Diabetes.

Pea pods

    Give the dog the entire pea in the pod. The peas themselves without the pod are high in carbohydrates alone, where as the pod will balance it out with lots of fiber.

Beets

    Throw a little color into your dog's food with fresh beets. They can be served raw or cooked. This vegetable, while a little high in sugars, is fine in moderation. Throw in some beet greens to balance it out.

How to Make Homemade Dog Food for a Labrador's Breakfast

How to Make Homemade Dog Food for a Labrador's Breakfast

It's possible to make nutritious dog food for your Labrador in your kitchen. As long as the recipe uses fresh ingredients that are lean and healthy, it is fine for you dog. Some dog food recipes are designed for small breeds of dogs, so it's important to use a recipe that is intended for large breeds that includes enough calories to support their growth. Labradors require less amino acids in their food than other dog breeds. Homemade dog food can be served once in a while as a special treat or it can served every day for breakfast.

Instructions

    1

    Cut 1 cup cooked turkey into small cubes. Make sure to discard the skin and fat, instead of including it in the meal. Turkey can be substituted with another lean meat.

    2

    Puree 3/4 cup cooked vegetables. Green beans and carrots are two good options for vegetables. Fruits can also be pureed with the vegetables.

    3

    Combine the turkey and vegetables into a bowl.

    4

    Add 3/4 cup cooked brown rice, 3 Tbs. canola oil, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a daily dog multivitamin into the bowl.

    5

    Mix all of the ingredients together, make sure the food is cool and serve 1/4 of it to your dog.

    6

    Mix 4 cups three-grain cereal, 2 cups soy flour, 1/2 cup whole wheat flour, 1 tbs. bone meal, 1 tbs. yeast, and 1 tbs. kelp in a large mixing bowl.

    7

    Mix 1 tsp. cod liver oil, 1/2 cup vegetable oil, 400 IU Vitamin E, and 4 eggs together in another bowl.

    8

    Stir the wet ingredients into the dry food until they are mixed well together. Cover a cookie sheet with foil, and scoop 1/2 tsp. food mixture onto the cookie sheet until you've used up all of the food. Bake the food for 30 minutes 350 degrees Farenheit.

    9

    Serve 1 cup of the food to your dog.

Rabu, 15 September 2010

How do I Rate Dry Dog Foods?

How do I Rate Dry Dog Foods?

Dry dog foods, or kibble, come in a variety of brands, some of which contain better ingredients than others. Look at the ingredient list of the food to determine how it rates in terms of quality and nutritional value.

Ingredients

    Dog food manufacturers list ingredients by weight, with ingredients listed first being most prevalent in the food, according to the Dog Food Analysis website. As carnivores, dogs require a diet made up primarily of meats. High-quality foods specify a type of meat or meat meal first, while other ingredients are listed first in low-quality foods.

Grains

    Dry dog foods need to include grains in their formula to keep the kibble together. Low-quality foods have a higher percentage of grains as a primary ingredient. Higher-quality foods contain whole grains instead of grain fragments. When buying premium foods, look for those that use organic whole grains in small amounts.

Considerations

    Low-quality dry dog food contains byproducts, unidentified meats or fats and controversial chemical preservatives such as BHT, BHA, ethoxyquin and propyl gallate. High-quality dog foods contain natural preservatives like vitamin E or rosemary, but they have a shorter shelf life. Dry dog foods with better-quality ingredients generally cost more than low-quality ones.

Selasa, 14 September 2010

How to Make Peanut Butter Dog Treats

How to Make Peanut Butter Dog Treats

Your dog is more than just a pet; he is a member of your family. Do your best to keep him healthy and make him a special homemade treat with these easy to make treats in a flavor dogs love--peanut butter.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly spray cookie sheet with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.

    2

    Combine flour and baking powder in a medium sized mixing bowl until well mixed. Add in milk and peanut butter and stir until completely mixed.

    3

    Roll dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll to about a half-inch thickness.

    4

    Cut into bone or other shapes using a cookie cutter. Or use a pizza cutter to slice into small wedges.

    5

    Place shapes onto cookie sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Turn off the oven and allow to stand for a few minutes if you want the treats to be good and crunchy. Store in a sealed container for up to three weeks.

Dog Diet With Vegetables

Dog Diet With Vegetables

Although the primary component of most dog diets is protein from meat, vegetables can also play an important role in canine nutrition. Dogs can derive a lot of nutritional benefit from vegetables in their meals, but only when vegetables are combined with other important nutrients from protein and grain sources. Choosing the right vegetables to include in your dog's diet will have a positive impact on his health.

Function

    The healthiest dog diet is one that is comprised of protein, grains and plant sources like fruits and vegetables. Vegetables provide beneficial nutrients including antioxidants, carbohydrates, vitamin A, potassium, calcium, chlorophyll and vitamin K. In order to infuse a dog's diet with these vitamins and nutrients, add pureed vegetables or juiced vegetables to a normal diet, or chopped and mashed vegetables as part of a homemade diet.

Types

    Most vegetables are safe for dogs to consume, especially in pureed or juiced form. Examples of vegetables that are packed with nutrients include peas, carrots, kale, watercress, Swiss chard, parsley, celery, alfalfa sprouts, zucchini and beets. Avoid introducing onions, tomatoes, avocados and mushrooms into your dog's diet, as these foods can be harmful to their health and sometimes deadly.

Consideration

    Most people believe that dogs are obligate carnivores, only requiring a diet of meat and other protein sources. What is not normally considered is that dogs in the wild also consume the stomach contents of their prey, meaning that their diet does also consist of grains and plant matter, so these are typical components of a dog's diet. Most commercial diets do contain vegetables and grains, though not always in the most nutritionally beneficial amounts. Most commercial dog food diets are comprised of primarily filler from grains like rice and wheat.

Homemade Diets

    You can create a homemade diet to give yourself greater control over the nutrients that your dog receives. There are several different methods, including feeding a raw food diet or a cooked food diet. Each type of homemade diet offers its own distinctive set of benefits. The raw food diet is purported to offer the greatest nutritional benefit, since the nutrients in the vegetables and protein are not cooked off during the preparation process. Experiment with different diet choices, types of meat, grain types and vegetables until you find a diet that works best for your dog.

Expert Insight

    "If you have any doubt about feeding your dog vegetables, or whether or not your dog is getting the right nutrients in a commercial or homemade diet, consult your veterinarian," Said Caroline Tanaka, a private-practice veterinarian in Austin, Texas. "Your veterinarian will be able to help you find the right combination of proteins, grains and fruits and vegetables to give your dog an ideal diet for optimum health and well being."

Senin, 13 September 2010

Nutrition for Dogs With Dry Hair

Nutrition for Dogs With Dry Hair

It is important to ensure that dogs with dry hair receive the best nutrition possible. Dietary supplements are usually required to help relieve this condition. Dry hair in dogs results in a dull, lackluster coat and sometimes itchy skin.

Causes

    The most common causes of dry hair in dogs are poor nutrition and allergies. Overuse or harsh grooming products can strip the hair of oils.

Food

    Dog food for dogs with dry skin should contain high quality ingredients. Avoid foods with common allergens such as wheat, corn and animal by-products. Opt for organic dog foods that contain heavy bodied fish such as salmon.

Supplements

    Dogs with dry hair should receive dietary supplements such as fish oil or flax seed oil. These oils contain omega 3, 6, and 9 fatty acids that help improve the condition of the hair.

Grooming

    Bath your dog with gentle, organic based shampoos developed for dogs with dry skin and hair. Brushing will help distribute oils throughout the coat.

Professional Help

    Severe dry hair and skin could be symptoms indicating an underlying health issue that cannot be resolved by diet and nutrition. Consult a qualified veterinarian if your dog's condition is unresponsive to dietary change.

Minggu, 12 September 2010

How Much Do You Feed a Bulldog?

How Much Do You Feed a Bulldog?

There is no set amount of food to feed bulldogs; depending on the circumstances, one bulldog can eat twice as much as another. However, understanding the breed's nutritional needs can be useful in determining how much food is required by a specific dog. Taking into consideration activity level and life stage are also necessary to select a quality food that best meets the needs of your dog.

Maintence Conditions

    Adults and senior bulldogs require a maintenance diet that accounts for moderate to low activity levels. Adult maintenance dog foods are designed for moderate activity levels such as afternoon walks and play time in the park. Senior maintenance foods are lower in fat and designed for lower activity levels. Depending on the density of the nutrients, dogs are fed per pound; each dog food has different nutrient density levels.

Growing and Reproducing Stages

    Growing and reproducing stages require more energy and nutrients. Puppies require more energy and nutrient than adult maintenance, but this does not mean they eat more. A high-quality food may only require half the serving size of a lesser-quality food. Breeding and whelping foods are also nutritionally geared toward helping the pregnant female maintain a healthy weight during gestation and lactation stages. While many dog foods advertise for all stages, a veterinarian can suggest brands that are most suitable for these stages.

Quality Counts

    The better quality food, the less is necessary to feed, and the less waste produced. Whole foods, raw foods and organic diets are more nutritious than dry and canned commercial dog foods. Quality pet foods are made with real ingredients such as salmon and brown rice, and list meats as a first ingredient rather than corn or wheat. Quality dog foods can be purchased a pet food supply stores, organic pet food retailers and veterinarians.

Considerations

    The standard breed profile for bulldogs suggests a healthy weight of 28 lbs. or less. A good quality diet, fed twice a day (morning and evening), with one or two treats throughout the day and a clean supply of water, is all that is needed to keep a healthy weight. Treats such as pet-safe, commercially prepared sweet potato treats are lower in fat and higher in vitamins than animal part treats, which makes them ideal for treats between meals.

Sabtu, 11 September 2010

Duck & Potato Dog Diet

Duck and potato dog diets are recommended by vets and animal hospitals as one of the more healthy diets for your dog to be on, especially if they have food allergies or are being nursed back to health. Both duck and potato have nutritional values that are integral for a healthy dog.

Hypoallergenic

    As dogs have reactions to certain types of foods, more pet food companies are making sure the food they produce is hypoallergenic, meaning it won't cause reactions within even the most sensitive dog. If your dog has itchy, dry sensitive skin, it may be due to its reaction to the food it is eating, which means it needs to be put on a duck and potato diet. Check the labels on both canned and dry dog food to ensure the ingredients are mainly duck and potato and the food is considered hypoallergenic.

Contents and Frequency

    Duck and potato should be the only two ingredients in this diet consumed by the dog, as they are both highly palatable, digestible and complete sources of protein and carbohydrates. Daily feedings should entail between two to four meals per day, and this will vary based upon age, sex, breed and size of the dog you have put on this diet. If the dog has had some sort of medical condition or extreme reaction, like vomiting, diarrhea or the aforementioned itchy skin, make sure it is not taking any regular medication while on this diet, like heart worm pills, as this will only complicate its digestion.

Prepare Food Yourself

    While most of the duck and potato diet foods that can be purchased in supermarkets or pet food stores are hypoallergenic and primarily duck and potato, there are still other additives and ingredients that will have been added to the food, which can be unhealthy for a very sensitive dog. The best way to ensure your dog is eating a purely duck and potato diet is to prepare the duck and potatoes yourself and serve them to the dog raw. You'll probably want to boil the potatoes for the dog so it is easier to digest, but that's about all the preparation the food will need. Of course, this is much more expensive but will lead to a longer, happier and healthier life for your animal.

Jumat, 10 September 2010

How Much Water Should a Dog Drink in a Day?

How Much Water Should a Dog Drink in a Day?

Facts on Puppy Food

Like with human babies, the puppy stage of dogs is one of the most important times in their lives. It's the time when they learn the most and grow the most. Making sure your puppy gets the appropriate food will ensure your puppy stays healthy and may even help her be more obedient (with time). Consulting your veterinarian or knowledgeable pet store representative will help make sure your puppy gets the appropriate food to stay healthy and grow like she is supposed to.

Significance

    The type of food you feed your puppy can determine his energy level, behavior, skills and abilities.

Types

    Grocery, retail and pet stores and veterinary offices should offer a variety of foods for your puppy, such as for high performance, various sizes and inside puppies and otherwise. Ask your vet if you are unsure what type of food to feed your puppy.

Time Frame

    Most puppies are fed between two and three times per day, depending on their age and weight; consult the pet food bag or your veterinarian for specifics related to your type of dog.

Size

    Puppies often eat a lot, so if you can, buy a large bag of dog food to save on your budget in the long run; buy a plastic bin for storage too for added freshness.

Benefits

    Feeding your puppy the right food will keep her at appropriate energy levels and healthy.

Considerations

    Especially if you are breeding your dog or using your dog for sporting activities, you want to make sure your puppy gets the right nutrition to perform well and stay healthy.

Warning

    Don't overfeed your puppy and watch out for bugs or other animals invading his food; make sure he gets plenty of water throughout the day and night.

Kamis, 09 September 2010

How Much to Feed a Dog Based on Weight

How much food to feed your dog will vary throughout her life. As a puppy, she needs a lot of food to promote healthy growth. As an adult, she needs to sustain her energy levels. The weight of your dog is a starting point to base how much you should feed her.

Puppies and Growing Dogs

    Puppies need a lot of food to help them grow. In the first eight weeks of life, they should primarily nurse on their mother's milk whenever they want. After four weeks of age, you can start adding in small amounts of dry food mixed with water to help them make a better transition when their mother's milk is no longer available.

    After eight weeks, switch your puppy to eating twice a day. Pick a food that has a good balance of protein and calcium and other added nutrients. You can determine if your food choice is good by checking the label. A good indication is if meat is the first ingredient listed.

    Feed puppy food twice a day for the first year. Once your dog is into his second year, smaller breeds only need to be fed once a day and can be switched to adult food. Larger breeds of dogs can sometimes get puppy food and twice-a-day feedings for up to two years. Ask your veterinarian for advise on this feeding timetable.

Adult Dogs

    Adult dogs don't need as much food as puppies. According to Ask the Veterinarian, when picking out dog food you want to pick a food that contains around 21 percent protein, 5 percent oil, 2.5 percent fiber and 8 percent. Aim to feed smaller-breed dogs (up to 11 pounds) three to five ounces of food per day. For dogs that are 11 to 22 pounds, feed four to six ounces per day. Dogs that are 22 to 55 pounds should eat 10 to 12 ounces of dog food per day. Larger breeds around 55 to 77 pounds need 16 to 18 ounces per day. And finally, for very large dogs that are 77 pounds or bigger, feed 24 to 30 ounces per day of dog food.

Other Considerations

    The amount you feed your dog should not be based solely on weight. Take into consideration how active your dog is. If he expels a lot of energy, he should be fed slightly more than the average dog. If your dog regularly gets table scraps and treats, feed him slightly less than the recommended amount.

Is it Bad to Feed Bones to a Dog?

Is it Bad to Feed Bones to a Dog?

    Dog with recreational marrow bone
    Dog with recreational marrow bone

Raw Meaty Bones are Good for Your Dog.

    Raw meaty bones are good for a dog's teeth and jaws.
    Raw meaty bones are good for a dog's teeth and jaws.

    Feeding a dog a "biologically appropriate raw food" (BARF) diet is becoming increasingly popular. According to Australian veterinarian Tom Lonsdale, raw meaty bones should ideally comprise 70 percent of a dog's raw diet. Chewing raw bones can help keep a dog's teeth and gums healthy and strengthen its jaw muscles.

Cooked Bones are Bad for Dogs.

    The Food and Drug Administration warns that cooked bones, large or small, are bad for a dog. Hard cooked bones can break a dog's teeth. A dog may also choke on bits of bone that break off and get stuck in its esophagus. Bone fragments may also cause an intestinal blockage or, if sharp enough, may cause peritonitis--a potentially deadly bacterial infection of the abdomen resulting from feces passing through holes in the dog's intestine.

Bottom Line

    It is up to the dog owner whether he wants to feed a raw diet featuring raw meaty bones, which can be beneficial when fed properly. Dogs should never be fed cooked bones of any type.

FDA Pet Food Regulations

FDA Pet Food Regulations

Rabu, 08 September 2010

How to Compare Brands of Dog Food Online

How to Compare Brands of Dog Food Online

You have many choices when it comes to what you can feed your dog. Dog food ranges from dry kibble to wet blends. There are formulas specially designed for puppies as well as formulas to help senior dogs maintain a healthier lifestyle. There is a lot of information available online to help you make the best dog food purchase for your best friend. Understanding what is the best type of food for your dog will help you find the right brand.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the best type of diet for your dog. Puppies need high-calorie diets. Overweight dogs need lower-calorie diets. Older dogs or arthritic dogs, benefit from lower-calorie diets supplemented with glucosomine. Inactive dogs may also need more fiber in food. Talk to your vet about what types of ingredients are important to your dog if you are unsure.

    2

    Evaluate brands with similar claims. Comparing a puppy kibble to a low-calorie kibble won't be of any help. Find brands that meet the basic health needs of your dog.

    3

    Read the label of the dog food and what type of food is claims to be. If it says "chicken dog food" then chicken must be no less than 95 percent of the total food weight, excluding the water needed for processing. Some labels state "chicken dog food dinner." The word "dinner" gives the manufacturer more leeway with ingredients, requiring that the named ingredient be only 25 percent of the total.

    4

    Look at the ingredient list. Ingredients are listed in descending order by weight. Food fillers in dog food include corn, brewers rice, soy flour, potato or cereal byproducts. If the dog food has these listed as the first or second ingredient, then you are paying for filler, not nutrition. Read the label for other information about the specific type of diet you need for your dog, whether it is higher protein, lower calories or amounts of supplements per serving.

    5

    Calculate the cost of the food per pound. Do this by dividing the price of the food by the number of pounds in the bag. Note that smaller bags of kibble generally have higher prices per pound.

    6

    Look at another food that claims to be a similar type of diet. So for an inactive dog, make sure you are comparing not just the basic brand, but the product in that brand that is for inactive dogs. Review the label and ingredient list, comparing it to the other food you researched.

    7

    Use online resources such as dogfoodanalysis.com or nutrapet.com to compare certain brands with others. These resources help you compare things side by side, but not all dog food brands are available. These are good resources to help you understand how to look at a snapshot of the label and take the important information from it.

Minggu, 05 September 2010

How to Make Chicken & Rice Dog Food

How to Make Chicken & Rice Dog Food

Chicken and rice is a popular combination for dog food because it is high in protein and low in fat. According to the Partnership for Animal Welfare, excessive animal-based fats in a dog's diet can lead to digestive disorders and even pancreatitis. Use boneless, skinless chicken breasts, brown rice and green beans for a healthy alternative to store-bought dog food. Commercial dog foods contain by-products and chemicals that are often devoid of the nutrients dogs need to thrive.

Instructions

    1

    Boil chicken breasts in water until cooked and no longer pink.

    2

    Remove the chicken from the pot and reserve the chicken broth.

    3

    Chop the chicken into small pieces or process in a food processor for a finer texture.

    4

    Boil the green beans in the chicken broth until heated through.

    5

    Combine all ingredients together in a large bowl with the olive oil and stir until blended. Add some of the chicken broth for a softer texture.

    6

    Let cool and serve to your dog.

Jumat, 03 September 2010

How to Build a Dog Feeder

How to Build a Dog Feeder

Dog feeders are convenient to use when you are going out of town or if you have a large dog who eats copious amounts of food. Dog feeders have a large back-up supply of dog food. When the bowl is empty, more food is released into the attached bowl. They are simple to put together, requiring just a few materials and a short amount of time.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a plastic cereal container. These tall food storage containers are made of plastic and/or rubber, and come with a tab opening on the top. They can be found in the housewares section of many stores. The typical size is 13-cups, but you can find larger or smaller ones depending on the size and eating habits of your dog.

    2

    Prepare the feeder foundation, which will be made with bricks. You can paint them any color you like, or use them as is. If you do paint the bricks, be sure to let them dry thoroughly. On one of the large flat sides of a brick, secure the Velcro strips, rough side up, attaching as many as you can.

    3

    Remove the tab opening on the container using scissors, if necessary. Attach Velcro strips, fuzzy side up, along one of the tall narrow sides of the container--this should be the side closest to the tab opening. When you lay this side of the container onto the brick, the Velcro strips should join the pieces firmly and keep the unit upright.

    4

    Place the plastic mat on the floor. This will help keep the floor clean and catch any stray dog food bits that fall out of the bowl or container. Set the dog food bowl down onto the mat. Fill the bowl 3/4-full with dog food.

    5

    Set the brick with the Velcro attached to it behind the dog food bowl. Position it so it is centered against the back of the bowl, with one of the smaller ends of the brick headed back away from the bowl lengthwise.

    6

    Fill the container with dog food, packed to the top, but not too tightly. Block the open hole in the top with your hand, and slowly line up the Velcro on the container side to the Velcro on the brick so they match up. Firmly attach the Velcro pieces. The container's hole should be positioned directly over the lip of the dog food bowl, so the food can pour into the bowl.

    7

    Take your hand off of the opening when it is positioned correctly. A small quantity of food should come out into the bowl. As the bowl is emptied by your dog, more food will come out of the opening to take its place. If desired, take the second brick and carefully insert it under the back end of the first brick. This will help slant the container more so food falls out quicker.

Vegan Diets for Dogs

Vegan Diets for Dogs

Many people live on vegetarian or vegan diets, avoiding meat, and in the case of vegans, avoiding all animal products including dairy. Some even put their dogs on the same or a similar diet. Though a vegan diet may be beneficial for some dogs, it can also lead to malnutrition and other problems if not done properly. People who are considering putting their dog on a vegan diet should do careful research and consult their veterinarian.

Advantages

    A vegan diet for a dog can be helpful to more than just the dog. A diet with low or no animal protein is considered better for the environment because it reduces atmospheric gases associated with animal raising. It is also cruelty free because nothing had to die in order to produce the food. It is also possible for dogs to have an allergy to certain types of meats or meat byproducts, though this is rare. In these cases, a vegan diet can clear up allergic reactions and make for a healthier pet.

Disadvantages

    Historically, dogs have been carnivores, or meat eaters. To stay healthy, they rely on vitamin B-12, which is rarely present in non-meat sources. Dogs also have a high need for calcium and protein in the diet -- in fact, higher than in humans. Though you can get these nutrients from non-animal foods, the quantity needed to provide adequate amounts for your dog is fairly large. It's also possible that a dog used to a meat-based diet won't like the taste of a vegan diet; in this case it may lose weight and take in fewer nutrients because it eats less.

Home Made Vegan Food

    The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has minimum standards for nutrition in dogs. The amount of each of these nutrients depends on whether the dog is a puppy or is full grown. If you are planning to feed your dog a homemade vegan diet, you must ensure all these nutritional requirements are met, or your dog could experience health problems and weight loss. Protein and fat are the hardest nutrients to get into a vegan diet. If you find vegan dog food recipes, make sure nutritional information is included and meets all AAFCO standards.

Commercial Availability

    A number of pre-made vegan pet foods are available on today's market. The availability continues to grow as vegan diets, once thought taboo for pets, become more widespread. Available brands include Evolution Diet, Natural Balance Vegetarian Formula, Benevo Duo Vegan Dog Food (canned), PetGuard Organic Vegetarian Vegan Entree for Dogs, V-dog Crunch and Natural Life Vegetarian Dog Formula. The Vegan Dog Nutrition Association has a complete list of available foods along with nutritional information.

Kamis, 02 September 2010

Foods for a Labrador Puppy

Foods for a Labrador Puppy

Named the most popular dog in America for 20 consecutive years by the American Kennel Club, the Labrador retriever remains the top choice for dog owners. As puppies, Labradors are undeniably cute and playful, but Lab pups have specific nutritional needs that must be met if they are to grow up to be healthy adults.

Labrador Puppies

    Labrador puppies are known for being energetic and playful, and will remain so until they're 2 to 3 years old. Puppies, especially when they're young, are still babies, and require an exceptional amount of care. Choosing the right food for a Lab puppy requires some research, both in terms of determining which are the best foods for that particular breed, and how much and how often a puppy should be fed.

Quantity Control

    While some breeds are picky about which food they eat, Labrador retrievers are the exact opposite and will generally eat whatever is placed in front of them, regardless of quantity. That's why it's important to regulate the amount your puppy eats so it will become used to a specific amount of food at meal times. When fully grown, a healthy Labrador retriever should weigh between 65 and 80 lbs. Labs that exceed 90 lbs. could put strain on its joints over time because of its heavier weight, causing long-term health problems.

Finding the Right Balance

    Labrador puppies need a balanced diet that includes plenty of calcium during the first two to three years. Labs have a large bone structure that needs calcium to fully develop. A good rule of thumb when choosing a healthy puppy food is to buy it at a specialty pet food store as opposed to a general retailer. Bargain-priced puppy food should be used with caution, because a cheaper food may cause digestive distress for your puppy. Some puppy owners make their own dog food. A homemade food should be a mix of about 30 percent meat and 70 percent cereal, with the inclusion of vitamin and calcium supplements.

Food and Training

    In addition to the quantity and quality of your puppy's food, it's also important to establish a feeding schedule, because food is the ideal incentive when training a puppy. One thing a puppy should be taught early on is to not beg for food or table scraps. It's a good idea to train your puppy from the beginning that food that is eaten by humans is off limits. Not only will this decrease begging, it will also help ensure your dog won't eat something inappropriate that could lead to digestive problems or obesity.

How to Switch From Dry to Wet Dog Food?

How to Switch From Dry to Wet Dog Food?

Dry foods are composed of dehydrated nutrients in pelleted, kibble form. While these foods are typically lower in cost than canned food and have a longer shelf life, they are not necessarily better for your dog. Switching from dry food to wet food allows you a greater degree of control over what you feed your dog and when you feed it. Switching from dry food to wet food is an involved process that takes about a week. Speak to your veterinarian before switching foods to determine the right methods and food choices for your dog.

Instructions

    1

    Mix a small portion of wet food into your dog's dry food. Switching all at once can cause stomach upset because wet food has a higher concentration of protein. Start out with one-quarter of a serving of wet food mixed in with the dry and increase the amount each day.

    2

    Transition fully to wet food at the end of one week of mixing up the two different types at each meal.

    3

    Feed your dog several small meals a day instead of one large one. This can reduce the occurrence of stomach upset and helps your dog become accustomed to seeing wet food in its bowl.

    4

    Stick to the same brand of food, if possible. Some dogs are picky about the taste of their food. Feeding a wet food from the same manufacturer as the dry food can keep complaints and refusal to eat to a minimum.

    5

    Monitor your dog for stomach upset, including vomiting and diarrhea. If this occurs, feed your dog plain rice and lean boiled chicken until the upset resides. If vomiting or diarrhea occurs for more than 24 hours, seek veterinary medical assistance.

Rabu, 01 September 2010

Homemade Hypoallergenic Dog Food

Homemade Hypoallergenic Dog Food

Dogs may develop allergies for many reasons. Food allergies can cause allergic symptoms such as dry skin, licking, vomiting or asthma. Some common food allergies include grains, vegetables, beef, pork, chicken, milk, whey, eggs, soy, wheat and preservatives. Many times the dog is not allergic to the meat source itself but the cooked or byproduct (secondary) version. In addition, the additives in commercial dog food can cause allergic reactions. Preparing a hypoallergenic food at home can help eliminate allergens from the diet and is commonly referred to as an elimination diet.

Benefits of Raw

    Starting a dog on a homemade hypoallergenic or elimination diet may seem overwhelming at first. However, switching from commercial dog food to homemade raw food will provide your dog with a multitude of health benefits. Aside from allergy relief, a raw-fed dog should experience cleaner teeth, shinier coat, smaller stools and improved digestion. Although slightly more complicated than pouring processed food into a bowl, raw feeding is really quite simple. A dogs digestive system contains enzymes and a pH level designed to break down and utilize raw meat. However, if the dog has been raised on kibble, a few rules will minimize digestive upset during the transition. A simple rule of thumb is 80 percent meat, 10 percent organ and 10 percent bone. This percentage can be adjusted to the needs of each individual dog.

Making the Transition

    Determine the weight of the dog. Feed 2 to 4 percent of the dogs ideal body weight. A 100-pound dog should consume approximately three pounds. If starting a puppy, offer portions of food three to four times per day. Once the puppy reaches three months, back down to three meals. At six months, many move to two meals and after twelve months, one meal per day. This will vary from puppy to puppy. When transitioning an adult to raw, offer food twice per day, eventually combining both feedings into one. This meal can be offered any time of day.

Elimination

    Start with one protein source for about twelve weeks, such as chicken. Chicken is a very mild protein and one of the best sources used for a dog with food allergies. Smaller dogs may be fed pieces as small as chicken wings. Larger dogs may be fed chicken quarters or even a whole chicken. Most dogs will take to the switch immediately with no further encouragement. If enticement is needed, try slicing into the meat or lightly searing it in the beginning. If allergy testing has revealed chicken as an allergen, start with another protein source, such as pork. In time, chicken may be re-introduced once the reaction to processed chicken has subsided.

Protein Sources

    Introduce a new protein source after about 12 weeks of success with chicken or other initial protein source. Pork is another easily obtainable meat source and a great second step from chicken. After a few weeks on the second type of meat, move onto beef, lamb, duck, turkey, deer, fish or any other meat you can find. Keep in mind, most weight bearing bones of large animals such as the leg bones of deer or cattle are too dense and can break teeth, therefore should not be fed.

Organs

    Ten percent of the diet should consist of organ meat. This includes but is not limited to liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Organ meat does not need to be fed every day or every week, as long as it makes up ten percent of the total diet. Liver can be obtained most anywhere and usually comes frozen. Liver, for some dogs, can cause loose stools and should be added carefully in small amounts. The texture of liver can be offensive to some dogs. Again, if some enticement is necessary, lightly sear the liver to encourage consumption.

Bones

    Feeding bones makes up the last 10 percent of the homemade raw diet. Raw meaty bones are safe and necessary in a raw diet. Uncooked bones will not splinter like cooked bones. Raw meaty bones are essential for removing plaque buildup and keeping teeth clean and healthy. Consumption of bones helps maintain a healthy stool as well. Adjust the amount of bone fed based on the individual dog. If stool is loose, add more bone. If stool seems too hard and chalky, decrease bone.

Omega Fatty Acids

    Fish is not mandatory but is an excellent fatty acid source. Due to high mercury levels in slow growing large fish, it is best to stay with small growing fish like sardines and anchovies. Or stay with Atlantic caught fish like Atlantic Mackerel (high in Omega 3 and B12) or Salmon. Fatty acids, such as Omega 3 can be provided with the addition of fish oil pills. These fatty acids provide natural anti-inflammatory relief from inflammation caused by allergies.