Selasa, 31 Agustus 2010

Chondroitin Sulfate for Dogs

Chondroitin sulfate, a common ingredient in joint supplements, is a type of glycosaminoglycan and is related to glucosamine, though it has not been studied as much as glucosamine has. It is often referred to simply as chondroitin. It is a natural component of a dog's cartilage and bones.

Supplement

    Joint supplements usually use chondroitin sulfate in conjunction with other ingredients believed to help relieve joint pain, such as glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM).

Osteoarthritis

    Chondroitin sulfate can be used to help manage osteoarthritis in dogs, since it is a component of the dog's cartilage and may help the cartilage rebuild or stop eroding.

Other Properties

    Chondroitin sulfate is also an anti-inflammatory and helps to reduce pain, and, with other glycosaminoglycans, helps to regulate oxalates in the body. This may help to reduce kidney stones in dogs.

Ingredients

    Chondroitin sulfate supplements fed to dogs are always made out of animal cartilage.

Bones

    The majority of glycosaminoglycans found in dog's bones are chondroitin sulfate, so supplementing with chondroitin sulfate may help bones heal.

How to Feed Your Dog a Natural Diet

While feeding your dog a natural diet may initially require more time, the investment pays off considerably by giving your dog better health and a longer lifespan. But you should take plenty of time to consider your dog's nutritional needs before attempting to provide a homemade diet.

Instructions

    1

    Understand what your dog needs. Remember that your dog's needs are very different from your own. Dogs require protein, carbohydrates, fat and other ingredients in different proportions than humans do. Unless the dog is pregnant or breast feeding, its diet should consist of 16 percent protein, 10 percent fat, 44 percent carbohydrates, 20 percent calories from protein, and 10 percent vitamins and minerals.

    2

    Talk to your dog's veterinarian. Inform the vet that you will be starting your dog on a natural diet. Take the time to express any questions or concerns you have about your dog's nutrition.

    3

    Determine your dog's caloric needs. If your dog weighs 10 lbs., it should eat 400 calories per day. Dogs weighing 35 lbs. should receive 700 calories; dogs weighing 65 lbs., 1,500 calories; 85 lbs., 1,700 calories; and 130 lbs., 2,200 calories.

    4

    Be aware of foods that are dangerous for your dog. Some of these include chocolate, avocados, mushrooms, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, garlic, onion, tea, coffee, raw eggs, and fish and chicken bones.

    5

    Try an easy recipe like this one:

    Boil 4 cups of uncooked rice, 9 cups of water, 1/4 cup of oats, and a tsp. of salt. Once the mixture has come to a boil, add 1/2 cup milk, 2 tbsp. parsley, 3 oz. chopped liver, 8 oz. ground beef, 3 tbsp. corn oil, 2 beaten eggs and 2 cups chopped vegetables. Reduce temperature and cook until all the water has been absorbed. Serve with cottage cheese.

    6

    Experiment with recipes to see what your dog likes. Websites like TrainPetDog.com provide a wide variety of dog food recipes to suit your pet's taste.

Minggu, 29 Agustus 2010

How Often Should Chihuahuas Eat?

How Often Should Chihuahuas Eat?

Chihuahuas are very small dogs with delicate systems and need to fed accordingly. The amount of feedings your chihuahua gets will depend on the dog's weight and age. Getting your chihuahua on a feeding schedule will help regulate your dog's bathroom schedule, allowing for fewer accidents in the house.

Puppies Under Six Months

    Chihuahua puppies should begin eating solid puppy food around three to four weeks of age to supplement their mother's milk. Puppies under three months of age or that weigh less than 2 pounds can have constant access to puppy food or be fed at least three to four times per day until the dog is six months old. Chihuahua puppies, like all puppies, need plenty of calcium, protein and calories at this stage of development to grow and remain in good health.

Puppies Over Six Months

    After a chihuahua puppy reaches six months of age, you can begin feeding your dog less frequently. A chihuahua puppy, aged six months to one year, only needs to be fed two to three times per day. Feed your chihuahua at the same time everyday and give your dog access to its food for a half hour at a time to help establish a consistent schedule. A schedule will let your dog know what to expect at meal times and will help with the housebreaking training.

Adult Chihuahuas

    Adult chihuahuas can be fed adult dog food twice per day, in the morning and in the evening. As much as possible, maintain the feeding schedule by feeding your adult chihuahua at the same times everyday, giving the dog access to its food for 30 minutes at a time. Take care not feed your chihuahua too much food as even a little weight gain can negatively effect the health of such a small dog.

What To Feed Your Chihuahua

    Feeding a chihuahua is no different that feeding any other dog. Puppies should be fed dog food specially formulated for their growing bodies and then weaned onto adult food. When choosing a dog food, look at the ingredients. The main ingredient should be meat and there should be little, if any, grain. Adult chihuahuas require 1/4 to 3/4 cup of dry dog food at each meal. Canned dog food can be substituted for part of the dry dog food, if desired.

Foods for Arthritic Dogs

Foods for Arthritic Dogs

At first, the signs are subtle. The dog has trouble getting up from a prone position. Long walks take a lot out of him, and he's limping the next day. Climbing stairs or into the car become problematic. Arthritis takes its toll on man and his best friend. While there are many veterinary medications and over the counter supplements to help combat the disease, special dog foods to treat the condition can help put the spring back in Fido's step.

Hill's Science Diet JD Canine

    Hill's Prescription Diet j/d Canine claims that dogs will walk, run and jump within three weeks of continuously eating the dog food. The j/d in the name indicates joint diet. It contains Omega-3 fatty acids to aid cartilage, along with the amino acid L-carnitine to maintain good weight and avoid joint stress. While proper weight management is important for all dogs, it is especially true for dogs with arthritis. Extra pounds means additional stress on joints. If fed in the recommended amounts, this food should keep dogs both spry and sleek, not pudgy.

Purina JM

    According to Purina's website, "Osteoarthritis (OA) has been estimated to affect as much as 20 percent of dogs older than one year." The disease is caused by cartilage breakdown in the joints. In 2004, the company's Purina Veterinary Diets introduced the JM, for joint mobility, brand of dog food. The website states that JM contains high levels of Omega-3 long-chain fatty acids, anti-oxidants such as Vitamins C and E, natural glucosamine, with a high ratio of protein to calories. These ingredients reputedly aid in helping restore joint mobility. The food is only sold by veterinarians, for dogs under veterinary supervision.

Flint River Ranch

    Flint River Ranch Senior Plus Dog Food uses a patented process and is naturally formulated with glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate to aid in joint cartilage maintenance. These ingredients can help lubricate joints, provides an anti-inflammatory effects on joints, regulates cartilage activity, and inhibits the enzymes that break down cartilage. All dog food is human grade with no by-products or chemical preservatives. The company alleges that it not only helps dogs with arthritis, but feeding its products can prevent arthritis from occurring. The food contains no fillers, so less can be fed.

Jumat, 27 Agustus 2010

How to Put a Dog on a Diet

If you have an overweight dog, you should start him on a healthier and lower fat diet immediately. Obese dogs can have numerous health problems including diabetes, bone problems and heart failure. Here are some methods to help put your dog on a more nutritious diet.

Instructions

    1

    Switch his diet gradually. If your dog is used to a certain amount of food, he will not thrive if you suddenly cut his food intake in half. Slowly begin to decrease the food that you give him.

    2

    Cut out fatty table scraps. Many dogs become overweight because of the table food that they are fed on a regular basis. Your dog may beg for awhile, but it is best if you do not give in.

    3

    Buy a healthier brand of dog food for your pet. Avoid discount store brands and choose high-end foods that offer a wide variety of choices that will help you keep your dog on a healthy diet.

    4

    Measure out the amount of food that you give your dog. Many owners will simply pour a large amount of food into the bowl without knowing if it is the recommended amount. Check dog food packages to see how much you should be feeding your pet based on size.

    5

    Incorporate exercise into his daily routine. Take the dog for daily walks and runs. This will help him maintain a healthy weight.

Rabu, 25 Agustus 2010

Purina CV Diet

Purina CV Diet

The Purina Veterinary Diets CV are available in both dog and cat formulas. The food is aimed at providing a complete and balanced diet for dogs and cats with cardiovascular problems.

Benefits

    Purina Veterinary Diets CV are specially formulated for dogs and cats with cardiovascular problems such as congestive heart failure, hypertension and fluid retention (such as ascites and edema).

Features

    Purina CV diet food provides dogs and cats with meals that are low in sodium yet have higher levels of potassium and taurine than what is normally found in dog or cat food. The balance of nutrients is key in providing the dog or cat with a reduced workload on the heart.

Main Ingredients

    The main ingredients for dogs are beef, ground yellow corn, brewers rice, liver, animal fat and wheat flour. Main ingredients for cats are liver, beef, ground yellow corn, fish and beef tallow. All ingredients are highly digestible and easily metabolized in a tasty combination.

How to Make Easy Simple Homemade Dog Treats on the Go

How to Make Easy Simple Homemade Dog Treats on the Go

Perhaps your dog is a picky eater and will only eat certain foods with certain flavors. Perhaps your dog has severe food allergies and you have to carefully monitor the foods she eats in order to keep her safe and healthy. Or perhaps you are simply concerned with the safety and quality of your dog's food and have decided to prepare your own food and treats so you are certain they are the best you can provide. Whatever the reason, you can make up some simple dog treats with basic ingredients and minimal time.

Instructions

    1

    Crack the egg and put the egg's contents into the mixing bowl.

    2

    Lightly beat the egg with the wire whisk for 1 minute.

    3

    Pour the chicken broth into the mixing bowl and combine with the egg using your whisk.

    4

    Add the whole wheat flour to the mixing bowl. Stir into other ingredients.

    5

    Add the oats to the mixing bowl. Stir to combine ingredients.

    6

    Scoop out tablespoon-sized pieces of the dough. Use your hands or use an actual tablespoon if you cannot estimate the proper size.

    7

    Roll the small pieces of dough into balls using your hands. Place the balls onto a microwave-safe plate. Leave 1/2 inch of space between the dough balls on the plate.

    8

    Microwave the plate of dough balls on high for 10 minutes.

    9

    Allow the treats to cool before serving. Store uneaten treats in an airtight container for up to one week.

Selasa, 24 Agustus 2010

How to Buy Organic Dog Food

Pet lovers want to provide what is best for their beloved pets and organic dog food is one of the items to seek. Many pet owners have been filling up their own grocery carts with organic food for years, so it only makes sense that they start doing the same for their pets.

Instructions

    1

    Don't confuse the terms "organic" and "natural." Just because an item is labeled natural does not mean it is organic. Read labels carefully.

    2

    Purchase small amounts when you buy organic dog food. Buy a few cans of two or three brands to determine what your pet likes.

    3

    Buy organic dog food in bulk once you determine what brand of dog food your pet likes. Buying in bulk can save you a significant amount of money. Transition your dog slowly to his new organic dog food, gradually phasing out the old dog food brand.

    4

    Discount stores typically do not stock organic dog food. Buy organic dog food at specialty pet stores. They usually have the best selection.

    5

    Veterinary offices are a great resource for organic dog food. They usually carry dog food brands that can't be found in other stores. These products usually cost more, but they usually contain very high-quality ingredients.

    6

    Look for coupons or rebates when shopping for organic dog food online. It's often necessary to locate rebates prior to purchasing. The time spent locating a coupon or rebate is usually well worth the savings.

    7

    Check expiration dates on packages just as you do with your own food before purchasing. Occasionally, products remain on shelves even after the expiration date due to oversight. Checking expiration dates when you buy organic dog food eliminates the unnecessary hassle of having to return expired products.

How Much Food Should a Puppy Be Given?

Caring for a puppy is work, but it is more than just providing love, toys and a soft place to sleep. Caring for a puppy is also about feeding the right amount and type of food. Knowing how much to feed your puppy at each age will allow him to grow into a healthy and happy adult dog.

Misconceptions

    Feeding a puppy is not a matter of common sense for most people. Many people believe you can feed a puppy anything at any time, but that's not true. You need to ensure you feed your puppy the right kind of food at the right time and in the right amount.

Time Frame

    Concerns with how much to feed your puppy will start soon after they are born. For the first three to four weeks, the puppy will get all of the nutrition he needs from his mother's milk. At three to four weeks, begin mixing one part water to four parts of puppy food based on weight or veterinarian recommendation. At 6 to 8 weeks old, feed your puppy the required amount of food for his weight as stated by the puppy food manufacturer. This usually starts at about cup a day, and you might continue to mix it with water if the puppy seems to struggle with the hardness of the food. You will need to feed your puppy of this age three to four times a day. At 8 weeks old, defer to the weight guidelines of the puppy food feed him the specified amount twice a day. To ensure your puppy is getting a balanced diet, ensure the food has meat listed as the first ingredient. At 3 to 6 months old, there will be a weight gain and you'll likely need to increase the amount of food twice a day. This can be a trying time as puppies are usually teething. At 6 months to 1 year old, it can be tempting to switch from puppy food to dog food, but he still needs puppy food because he is growing and maturing. Between 6 months and 1 year old, some dogs can be switched to a once a day feeding, although many breeds do better with two smaller meals a day.

Benefits

    The benefits of feeding your puppy the appropriate food are vast. Puppies introduced to small amounts of food at the three- to four-week period usually do much better when separated from their mother and siblings around eight weeks. Puppies continually fed premium puppy foods in the right amount will develop a well-functioning digestive system and be in better health.

Significance

    It's important to feed puppy food because it is the only food that is going to give the dog all of the nutrients he needs. Puppy food is created to give a puppy the specific amount of calories needed to sustain his growth. In the past, it was thought puppies only needed puppy food until they were about 1 year old, but this is no longer the way most veterinarians think. Larger breeds are often fed puppy food for two years, while smaller breeds are full grown at about 1 year old.

Risks

    A puppy not fed premium puppy food might not have the calories and nutrients in his system to grow and develop at a normal pace. This could result in malnutrition resulting in poor bone growth, poor coat quality and other health issues. Feeding a puppy too much food is just as dangerous as not feeding enough. Dogs, like people, have to stick to a balanced and proportionate diet so they do not become obese and suffer an array of health problems related to being overweight.

Senin, 23 Agustus 2010

How to Give Chia to Dogs

How to Give Chia to Dogs

Chia has been used for centuries as an all-natural dietary supplement. Harvested from the Salvia Hispanica plant, chia seeds were used by the Aztecs to treat a variety of ailments. Chia is high in omega 3 fatty acids and has natural antibiotic properties, making it a popular supplement for humans and animals alike. Many dog owners use chia to add weight to thin pets and keep them healthy without the use of artificial medications. Giving chia to dogs is not difficult and can help your dogs thrive with just a little effort.

Instructions

    1

    Schedule your dog for an appointment with your veterinarian before adding any supplements to his diet. Your vet will give your dog a thorough physical to make sure he is not suffering from any medical conditions that might be affecting his health before giving you the green light to introduce the chia seeds to his normal feed.

    2

    Weigh your dog to determine how much chia to feed him. It is a very potent supplement and only a small amount is needed to keep your dog healthy. A half teaspoon for every five pounds of body weight is enough to allow your dog to maximize the chia seed benefits without gaining too much weight.

    3

    Add your dogs normal ration of dry dog food into his bowl and mix it together with a couple of tablespoons of canned dog food. Sprinkle the chia seeds over the dog food and mix gently to combine. The canned food helps the seeds stick to the food and entices him to eat it all without wasting any seeds.

    4

    Fill a bowl with plenty of fresh, clean water to prevent your dog from becoming dehydrated. Chia seeds can absorb many times their own weight in water and can suck vital liquids from his stomach if he does not drink enough.

    5

    Feed your dog extra chia seeds when his digestive system is upset or his appetite is less active than normal. Chia turns into a gel-like substance when combined with water and will coat the lining of the stomach and intestines, easing upset stomach and boosting appetite.

Minggu, 22 Agustus 2010

Homemade Birthday Treats for Pets

Dogs are members of our families. Whether you know your dog's actual date of birth or are celebrating the day it came into your family, birthday treats can make the day seem more special for you and your pup. Bake canine confectioneries to serve to your dog and its puppy pals on its special day, and accompany them with treats for the pups' human companions.

Ingredients

    Choose ingredients that are safe for your dog to eat, but are something it would not get on a regular basis. Ingredients like bananas, apples and honey add an extra taste of sweetness to the birthday treats and are not often found in regular treats. Grapes and raisins should be avoided due to a toxicity leading to kidney failure.

    Pureed meat can also be used in the baking of dog treats. Chicken or beef liver is something many dogs salivate over, but is not OK to feed on a regular basis due to the potential for an overdose of Vitamin A.

    In addition to extra additives, you will also need the base ingredients. Eggs, flour and water are a must for treats. Baking powder is used in "pupcakes" and "cookies," enabling them to fluff up. Yeast can be dangerous when baking for dogs. If it is not cooked thoroughly, the yeast can puff up within the dog's stomach. In the least dangerous situation, this can cause an upset stomach. In the worst, it may mean a trip to the vet.

Types of Treats

    Nearly everyone is familiar with the standard dog biscuit treat. This style of treat is sometimes called a "cookie" and is one of the easiest treats to make. Examine commercially available treats for ideas that deviate from the standard. Cupcakes that are safe for dogs, called "pupcakes" are not dissimilar in preparation from human cupcakes. More elaborate variations on canine confectioneries include full-sized birthday cakes and dog-safe ice cream.

Preparations

    Just like in human-oriented baking, it is advisable to mix wet and dry ingredients first. If your wet ingredients are extremely bulky or oddly shaped, you may wish to run them through a blender or food processor for ease of digestion later.

    For cookies, you'll want to knead your batter into a dough and roll flat. You can then use bone or fire hydrant shaped cookie cutters to create fun shapes for the birthday treats.

    When baking "pupcakes," procure a miniature cupcake baking pan and tiny cupcake wrappers. Bake the "pupcakes" as you would normal cupcakes.

Embellishments

    Low fat cream cheese makes a rich, but doggy safe icing. If your cookies or cupcakes still look plain, crush up a hand full of kibble to use as "sprinkles." Stay away from chocolate or ingredients containing chocolate. While these ingredients are appealing to canines and humans, chocolate is deadly for dogs. Carob is a chocolate alternative that does not contain theobromine, the toxic ingredient in chocolate. Carob has a similar taste to chocolate and makes a wonderful additive to doggy birthday treats.

Information about Feeding Dogs Carrots

Information about Feeding Dogs Carrots

Many vegetables are fine for a dog to eat, and carrots make a low-calorie alternative to fattening, preservative-filled commercial treats. Dogs can eat raw or cooked carrots with no dire consequences except orange poop.

Benefits

    Not only are raw carrots low-calorie treats for the weight-conscious dog, they can also be helpful in helping "scrub" teeth clean as the dog chews.

Considerations

    Dogs are carnivores and do not have the digestive enzymes to break down raw vegetables. For your dog to get full nutritional benefit from carrots, they have to be cooked or pureed.

Types

    Use either baby carrots or chopped up large ones as treats. Carrots can also be cooked, stored in the refrigerator, and handed out as needed.

Warning

    Don't worry if you see small pieces of undigested carrot or any other vegetables in your dog's poop. This doesn't indicate there is anything wrong; simply that his system can't naturally digest carrots.

Expert Insight

    Use frozen carrots as a teething air for a teething pup. The cold, crunchy texture will both ease her urge to chew and soothe irritated gums.

How to Feed Dogs Raw Chicken Wings

How to Feed Dogs Raw Chicken Wings

"A biologically appropriate diet for a dog is one that consists of raw whole foods similar to those eaten by the dogs' wild ancestors," asserts Australian veterinarian Ian Billinghurst, author of the book, "Give a Dog a Bone." According to Wellpet, an online "forum for natural pet care," Billinghurst suggests that 50 to 60 percent of a dog's diet should be from raw meaty bones, and raw chicken wings be 80 percent of this portion. Raw chicken bones are so soft, your dog can simply chomp them up without danger of choking. Plus, they're loaded with minerals and vitamins such as calcium, phosphorous, copper, iron and vitamins A,D and E.

Instructions

    1

    Rinse the raw chicken wings, bought from your local grocery store, under cold water to rinse off any detergents or disinfectants that might be on it. Most mass producers of chicken spray the raw birds with these substances.

    2

    Give your dog one chicken wing for every 10 pounds it weighs. There's no need to cut them up; your dog will crunch them up easily. If you have an 8-pound chihuahua, give it a small chicken wing every day. If you have a 90-pound Maremma Sheepdog, feed it at least nine to 10 chicken wings, divided into two meals, a day.

    3

    Experiment with how much your dog can eat and needs to eat depending on its size, the amount it exercises and its individual needs. You'll know if you're underfeeding your dog if it gets very aggressive at feeding time, you begin to see its ribs or it starts to shed more than normal. On the other hand, you'll know if you're overfeeding your pet if it gets bloated after eating, has trouble defecating or gains weight.

    4

    Wash your hands and any plates, bowls, utensils, etc., with anti-bacterial soap and hot water after they come in contact with raw chicken.

Sabtu, 21 Agustus 2010

Raw Diet for a Newfoundland Dog

Raw Diet for a Newfoundland Dog

The Newfoundland is a large breed of dog with a massive head and muscular body. Males can weigh as much as 150 pounds, while females can reach 120 pounds. The Newfoundland is an active dog on land and in water, and some breeders believe a diet of raw meats and vegetables is more beneficial to the dog's overall health than a diet of commercial food.

The Raw Diet

    Proponents of the Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF) diet insist that carnivorous animals like dogs and cats are healthier when they eat food that their wild ancestors would have consumed. The Newfoundland thrives on a raw diet, according to breeders such as Marithyme Newfoundlands in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and Springhaven Kennels in Lake Hughes, California. The breed possesses strong teeth and jaw muscles ideally suited to consume and process raw food such as meat and bone.

Benefits

    Advocates of the BARF diet argue that heat-processed foods lack essential vitamins, fats and proteins necessary to keep carnivores at the peak of health. Commercial food may also contain artificial colors, chemicals, pesticides or preservatives that are not healthy for dogs to consume. Pet owners have reported that switching to a raw diet has alleviated their dog's skin conditions, diarrhea or bad breath.

Volume

    Feed your pet approximately the same amount of raw food as you would commercial food, advises holistic vet Christina Chambreau. She recommends starting with half meaty bones and protein and half pureed vegetables, with the addition of leftover table foods like rice or potatoes.

Precautions

    Raw diet advocates stress that pet owners must be knowledgeable before switching their pet's diet to 100 percent raw foods. An unbalanced raw diet--for example, a regimen lacking in calcium--can actually be detrimental. Research and knowledge is key to feeding your dog the right foods in the right amount.

Safe Food Handling

    Raw meats can potentially contain bacteria such as salmonella and E. coli. Though a healthy dog can handle these pathogens, the human caregiver should use caution when handling raw foods. Choking is another concern among pet owners, but raw bones aren't as brittle as cooked bones and present less of a danger of splintering. Grinding bones and meat before serving to your pet also eliminates any choking hazard.

Sample Diet

    A typical diet for a large breed like the Newfoundland includes twice-daily feedings of fruits and vegetables, yogurt, eggs, raw meat and supplements including flax oil, fish oil, wheat germ and Vitamins C and E. For those who lack the time or experience to prepare the food themselves, frozen, prepackaged portions are available for purchase online.

Diet for Colitis in Dogs

Diet for Colitis in Dogs

Colitis is a symptom of another medical problem and not a separate disease. Your dog needs prompt veterinary treatment if it constantly has diarrhea and gas and passes blood or mucus with the feces. Colitis is a colon inflammation that can be aggravated by a poor diet. Be sure to work with your vet to help develop a diet best for your dog.

More Fiber

    Many commercial dog food brands are low in fiber and high in fat and preservatives. Although it may seem contradictory, making sure a dog food is higher in fiber can actually help lessen diarrhea in dogs with colitis.

Low Fat in Commerical Foods

    Check to see the percentage of "crude fat "on the dog food label. It needs to be less than 10 percent, or symptoms may return.

No Treats

    When a dog has colitis, treats can aggravate symptoms. Do not feed human treats or dog treats. Raw carrot is okay.

Homemade Diets

    Choose one part lean meat and two parts rice. Boil them together, adding some carrots, peas or broccoli.

Monitor Mouth Intake

    Dogs will stick anything in their mouths, including feces, stones and bits of plastic. These can block the intestines and cause colitis symptoms.

Kamis, 19 Agustus 2010

Primal Diet for Dogs

Primal Diet for Dogs

Dogs were domesticated fairly recently, and some pet owners believe that the pet-food industry has gone too far in changing most dry dog food to grain-based formulas, which are primarily carbohydrates rather than protein. Wolves eat raw meat and bones, and a primal diet for a domestic dog follows a similar format. It is thought to be a healthier and more natural diet for a dog, and supporters believe it will improve the dog's overall health.

Meat

    Commercial pet food is usually made up mainly of grains, which is less expensive to produce. It has been blamed in part for teeth problems and food allergy problems by some vets and owners. Primal diets for dogs include several different types of meat, since dogs eat a variety of meats in the wild. Dogs prefer cheaper, more nutrient-rich cuts of meat such as the organs and marrow rather than the cuts that humans usually love. When feeding your dog a primal diet, feed it raw meat on the bone. Owners who adhere to the primal diet suggest organic, grass-fed meats, especially since you will be feeding your dog the inexpensive parts of the animal.

Bones

    Bones are a controversial part of this diet, especially after the FDA issued a statement on April 20, 2010, suggesting that feeding any bone to your dog is more dangerous than it is worth. However, the primal diet for dogs says that feeding raw bones with the meat that is given at meals will improve your dog's teeth and overall health. They are promoted as being more malleable than cooked bones, so they are less likely to splinter and harm the dog. This should be discussed with your veterinarian before you decide to pursue it.

Fish Oil

    As a supplement to raw meat and vegetables, oily fish or fish-oil supplements can be given to your dog to improve its coat quality. Popular types of fish to feed a dog on a primal diet include sardines, mackerel and herring, but any raw oily fish will work nicely.

Vegetables

    Though dogs are carnivores, it is still recommended that you include raw vegetables in a primal diet. Carrots are often a favorite treat and can improve teeth quality if your dog chews them often. Other raw vegetables and fruits such as spinach, broccoli, apples and blueberries can be ground up and fed to the dog as well. This adds valuable nutrients to the primal diet that are not acquired easily through meat. It is best to use organic fruits and vegetables.

Transition

    There are two different methods on how to properly transition your dog to a primal diet, and it will probably come down to your particular dog to determine which method is best. The first method is switching fully and directly from processed food to a raw primal diet. This has a small potential to upset your dog's stomach and cause some complications, such as diarrhea and gas, for a few days. This is especially likely if your dog is sensitive to any switches in diet. The other method is a gradual transition, which rarely causes any complications. You can do this by adding some raw food to the dog's regular meal for a few days and then fully switching one meal a day to a raw meal.

Poultry By-Products in Dog Food

Poultry By-Products in Dog Food

The term "by-products" refers to a source of animal protein that can include parts that you wouldn't necessarily think of eating. In poultry by-products, this includes beaks, bones, feet and other parts of poultry that can be cleaned, ground and processed into an edible form. According to A+ Flint River Ranch, by-products are often made of animal proteins that have been deemed unfit for consumption by humans. This type of protein is often found in lower quality, inexpensive animal foods and sometimes higher quality foods.

Identifying Poultry By-Products

    According to the Dog Food Project, animal protein by-products aren't always clearly noted by nutritional labels. Instead, and in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations, poultry by-products may appear as "meat byproducts" or "animal protein." Additionally, by-products may appear on a nutritional label as "rendered meat," according to A+ Flint River Ranch. Given this, it may be difficult to identify the actual source of animal protein and the meat can come from different types of animals, including dogs and cats.

Meat By-Products vs. Poultry Meal

    Dog food that is labeled as containing "poultry meal," "chicken meal" or "turkey meal" contains animal meat and skin and sometimes bones. In contrast to by-products, animal meal doesn't contain questionable parts of the animal, like beaks and feet, according to the Dog Food Project. Animal meal has had much of the original moisture removed; however, in the wet food form, it retains most of this moisture. Because it has this kind of versatility, animal meal like poultry meal can be incorporated into higher quality brands of canned and dry foods.

The Problem With Poultry By-Products

    Unlike sources of animal protein that come from meat, skin and bones, poultry by-products are made from inferior parts of the animal. A+ Flint River Ranch explains that by-product meat is made from animals that are determined by U.S. FDA standards as "unfit for human consumption." This can mean that the animal from which the meat was extracted was sick, injured or harbored disease. This means the meat used in poultry by-products is the same meat that you, as a human being, would not be able to purchase because it is considered unhealthy.

What to Look for When Reading a Nutritional Label

    When shopping for dog food, it's important to read the nutritional label and identify higher quality sources of animal protein. According to the Dog Food Project, meat in dog food should be specifically named for the animal it represents. For example, rather than a generic "animal protein," you should look for "chicken" or "chicken meal." In addition, Canidae recommends you choose a dog food that lists meat as one of the first few ingredients, which means it contains a rich source of animal protein that can include its "meal" form.

Rabu, 18 Agustus 2010

Homemade Dog Food for Struvite & PH Balance

Homemade Dog Food for Struvite & PH Balance

Struvite crystals or stones occur in dogs due to a build up of minerals in the urinary tract. These crystals/stones are most often the result of frequent bladder infections or other infections of the urinary tract. Your dog's diet is a contributor to the formation of struvite stones, as foods that lower the urine's pH create the perfect environment for struvites to form. Dogs with this problem require a diet that creates a higher urinary pH level, and you can make that special dog food right in your own kitchen.

Instructions

    1

    Gather your materials and ingredients and place them in your work area. Pre-measure ingredients so that all you have to do is empty them into the mixing bowl.

    2

    Peel the hard-boiled egg and discard the shell. Place the egg into the mixing bowl and smash it into small bits using a fork.

    3

    Add the remaining pre-measured ingredients to the mixing bowl (cottage cheese, brown rice, chicken fat, brewer's yeast and salt substitute).

    4

    Mix the ingredients with a spoon until thoroughly combined.

    5

    Feed your dog 1/2 to 1 cup of the food at each meal (smaller serving sizes for smaller dogs, larger servings for large dogs).

    6

    Pour remaining dog food into an airtight storage container and keep refrigerated until ready to use. Use remaining food within one week and make a new batch.

How to Keep Ants From the Dog Food & Cage

How to Keep Ants From the Dog Food & Cage

Dog food is a very attractive source of food for ants (perhaps more than it is for dogs!). It sits on the floor for hours at a time, usually in some place that's out of the way of normal household foot traffic. It's dry, nutritious and leaves lots of crumbs, which ants can easily carry back to their nest. It is problematic to control ants in and around dog food bowls because the usual methods of ant control (poisons, sticky traps and other toxic materials) cannot be used. Luckily, there is a simple method to prevent ants from finding their way to a dog's food in the first place.

Instructions

Dog food bowl

    1

    Cut a hole in the lid of the plastic container so that the dog food bowl can be placed inside with 1 inch of clearance all around.

    2

    Pour 1 inch of water into the plastic container before placing the bowl inside. If the water comes all the way up and overflows the sides of the dish, pour some out and replace the bowl. The water in the plastic container should not come up so far that your dog will easily be able to lick it up.

    3

    Pour a few drops of dish detergent into the water in the plastic container. This prevents the ants from swimming across to the dish, and also stops them from leaving a chemical trail which leads other ants to the bowl.

Cage

    4

    Wash all bedding in the cage regularly to remove particles of food that will attract ants.

    5

    Wash out the inside of the cage every other time you wash the bedding, as small amounts of food may drop to the bottom of the cage, also attracting ants.

    6

    Wash the area around your dog's cage with soap and water. This will destroy the chemical trails that ants leave to guide other ants back to sources of food. Simply washing the area within a few feet around your pet's cage every two or three days will keep most ants from returning.

Selasa, 17 Agustus 2010

How to Make Dog Food Crunchies With Oats

How to Make Dog Food Crunchies With Oats

Dog owners love to treat their pets and store-bought goodies are OK, but nothing at the store can compare to what you can whip up in your kitchen. As the chef, you have complete control of what goes in (and what stays out) of your dog's diet, and making your own saves you money. Even without baking experience, you'll find making these crunchies easy and rewarding.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large baking sheet.

    2

    In a large bowl combine flour and oats. Add oil, eggs, honey and water. Mix well.

    3

    If the dough is too sticky to handle, sprinkle with more flour. If it is too crumbly, sprinkle with water. Knead until dough is smooth and easy to work with -- approximately 5 to 10 minutes.

    4

    Transfer dough onto a floured surface and roll out to -inch thickness. Create fun shapes with cookie cutters or cut with a sharp knife into squares.

    5

    Place on baking sheet and bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Cool completely before giving to your dog. Store at room temperature in an airtight container for up to two weeks. Crunchies will keep in the freezer for up to six months.

Homemade Diet for a Sick Dog

Homemade Diet for a Sick Dog

Sick dogs need a nourishing daily diet to help them recover, but many dogs show little appetite or refuse to eat entirely while sick. Offer bland foods and appealing food to encourage your pet's appetite and help it keep its food down. Feeding a basic homemade bland diet can help your dog get better a lot faster, and requires only ingredients most people have at home.

Instructions

    1

    Combine one part low fat meat, such as chicken, turkey or boiled hamburger, with two parts cooked brown or white rice. You may substitute boiled potato or cooked oatmeal for the rice. This forms the base of the bland diet.

    2

    Combine two to four tablespoons boiled sweet potato and one to three tablespoons plain yogurt with live, active cultures. Do this just before each meal.

    3

    Combine the basic diet with the sweet potato mixture at feeding time. Provide the amount of food your dog will eat. Begin with one or two tablespoons, fed every few hours. Increase the amount as your dog improves.

    4

    Mix in small quantities of dry food as your dog's appetite improves. If you see signs of digestive problems, reduce the amount of dry food and return to the bland diet.

Senin, 16 Agustus 2010

How to Make Grain-Free Dog Treats

Many dogs have allergies to grains. Often, these allergies will cause scratching, hair loss and in severe cases, skin infections. Switching to homemade grain-free dog treats may be just what your dog needs.

Instructions

Preparing the Dough

    1

    Mix 1.5 cup tapioca flour or soybean flour with two eggs. This forms the base for the treats.

    2

    Mix in one pound of organic beef or chicken liver to make meat treats.

    3

    Mix in one cup of apples, carrots or carob chips for various flavors. Do not substitute the carob chips with chocolate chips, as chocolate is toxic to dogs.

Preparing to Bake

    4

    Line a jelly pan with aluminum foil and spray with non-stick spray. Pour in the mixture and spread evenly throughout the pan.

    5

    For shaped treats, roll the mixture onto a floured surface and cut shapes with cookie cutters.

    6

    Place the shapes on a cookie sheet sprayed with non-stick spray.

Baking and Storing

    7

    Bake the treats at 350 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes. With meat treats, bake longer for crunchier treats.

    8

    Allow the treats to cool slightly before removing from jelly roll pan or cookie sheet. Place on wire racks to cool completely.

    9

    Store in airtight containers for up to three days for meat treats and up to five days for other treats. Freeze immediately after cooling, for later use.

Minggu, 15 Agustus 2010

Homemade Dog Chews

Homemade Dog Chews

Dogs like chewy treats that are tasty and give their mouths a workout. You could buy a box of treats at the store, but if you really want to reward your dog with something special make your own dog chews. If you make them yourself you know the ingredients are wholesome and good for your dog.

Sweet Potato Dog Chew

    Wash a sweet potato and cut it into slices, around 1/3 inch wide. Bake them in an oven at 250 degrees for three hours. Take them out, allow them to cool and then give them to your dog. They will be chewy and will keep your dog entertained. Plus they are better for your dog than rawhide chews because sweet potato is a lot easier to digest.

Frozen Chicken Cubes

    Make frozen chicken cubes to help your dog cool down in hot weather. All you need to do is make some low-sodium chicken stock, add a sliced-up piece of meat such as liver or chicken and then freeze the mixture overnight in an ice cube tray.

Beef Cookies

    It may not sound good to you, but your dog will go crazy for beef cookies. Take a 6-ounce jar of beef and vegetable baby food, 1 cup of wheat germ and 1 cup of nonfat dry milk. Mix and divide the mixture into biscuit-size portions. Bake in an oven set to 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 12-15 minutes. Wait until the cookies are cool before giving one to your dog.

Potato Balls

    To make homemade potato balls with carrots, preheat an oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Combine 1 cup of mashed potatoes with one shredded carrot. Form the potato mixture into about 12 miniature balls and bake for 10-15 minutes.

Dog Behavior: Pawing at a Full Food Bowl

Dog Behavior: Pawing at a Full Food Bowl

After filling up Sparkys bowl with kibble, he notoriously does one quirky thing every meal: He paws at the bowl. Whether he just gives it a few quick shoves or pushes it around for several minutes, rest assured, his behavior is typically perfectly normal -- even if your other dogs dont have the same habit.

Changing Locations

    Its possible that your pooch is just trying to position his bowl in a better spot. Maybe the tile floor makes the bowl slide around. Then every time it moves, it makes a loud sound that startles him. He knows that if he shoves his bowl over to the corner of the room, it wont move around anymore. Additionally, that drafty window or direct ray of sunlight can make that eating location unappealing, further increasing Sparkys desire to relocate his entre.

Instinctual Habit

    Your beloved furry pal does things sometimes because of his bloodlines. His DNA is encoded with all kinds of habits that helped his ancestors survive out in the wild. Even though he doesnt hunt for his food, he still needs to feel that he got the kill. So hell push around his entre to make it seem alive to him, rather than just a bowl of boring food that he didnt even have to hunt for.

Marking Territory

    If youve ever seen your beloved pooch lift up his tail and give it a shake, you know hes marked that area as his turf. He can also mark his food dish -- although the process is much more subtle. Dogs have scent and sweat glands on their paw pads. Each time Sparky takes a swipe at his dish, or even the floor around it, hes marking it as his own. This way any other canine lurking around in the area knows that this dish is already spoken for.

Health Issues

    Sometimes pawing at the food bowl is a cause for concern, although its not common. Pushing the dish away can be a sign of a poor appetite. Its almost like how you may move food around on your plate after youre full. But if your dog doesnt seem interested in his food, it could be a sign that hes feeling under the weather and needs to make a trip to the vet -- particularly if the behavior is new. He could also be having vision issues and moving the bowl around helps him figure out where his food is. Always talk with your vet about any peculiar behaviors, no matter how minor they may seem.

Getting What He Wants

    Your barking buddy is cleverer than you may realize. Think about it: Every time he starts pushing that bowl around, you come running over to fill it, realizing that you havent given him dinner yet. You just unknowingly taught him that each time he lays a paw on that bowl, his human will put something in it. Before feeding him next time, wait for him to sit and be patient. Hell start to get the hint that making noise and batting around his bowl wont get your attention.

Sabtu, 14 Agustus 2010

Raw Chicken Diet for a Dog

Raw Chicken Diet for a Dog

As organic foods become more popular for humans, pet owners are also searching for more natural diets for their dogs. In the wild, your dog would eat animal carcasses, obtaining nutrients from a balance of muscle and organ meat. He wouldn't have access to cooked foods with grains. However, many veterinarians still contend that raw diets don't provide the balanced nutrients domestic dogs require.

Raw Chicken Diet

    Natural diets consist of raw meats and bones and, in some cases, fruits and vegetables. The most common base for this diet is chicken because it is easily obtained and relatively cheap. Owners can also choose turkey, fish, beef, lamb or venison. Feed one pound of meat per 50 pounds weight of your dog, decreasing portions for smaller dogs. It's important to feed both muscle and organ meat to provide your dog with all the nutrients it needs. Some raw diets are commercially available, reducing preparation time, but be sure you are getting your meat from an organic source as dogs can't process many of the chemicals used in human-prepared meat.

Balanced Diet

    Since dogs are, in fact, omnivores, they require nutrients from fruits and vegetables as well. Good vegetables are carrots, broccoli, zucchini, peas, cauliflower and green beans. Be sure to cook the vegetables and grind them up with a food processor or blender as dogs often don't chew vegetables and thus can't get the nutrients. Dogs will also eat some fruits such as apples. Raw eggs can also round out a balanced diet. If you are not feeding raw bones, provide a calcium supplement for your dog as well.

Advantages

    Owners and veterinarians who prefer raw diets contend that their dogs have healthier coats, more energy and fewer veterinary bills because they are generally healthier. Allergies are often greatly reduced because many dogs have grain allergies, which are eliminated from the raw chicken diet. There are no preservatives or dyes, which can be harmful for dogs or cause additional allergies. In addition, dogs love the raw meat diet and are always excited for mealtime.

Criticisms

    While raw chicken bones are perfectly palatable for dogs. never feed them cooked chicken bones because they can splinter. Many veterinarians also contend that raw diets are bad because of all the bacteria in raw meat. This may be true, but dogs are used to digesting bacteria and can do so more easily than humans. There are very few cases of dogs getting sick from raw food diets.

Warning

    The most important thing to remember when preparing a raw diet for your dog is to protect your own health. Raw chicken contains salmonella, which can lead to severe food poisoning, so wash your hands with hot water after preparing your dog's meal. Be sure to clean up all preparation areas and wash bowls after meals. Keep raw food away from young children who might accidentally touch it and put their hands in their mouths.

Jumat, 13 Agustus 2010

How to Make Homemade Dog Food With Venison

How to Make Homemade Dog Food With Venison

Venison is very good for dogs, and they love it. Using it in your homemade dog food is a healthy, tasty choice. It's comforting to know exactly what's in your dog's food and that there aren't any dangerous artificial sweeteners or empty fillers in it.
This project is very easy. It will produce 14 to 16 cups of very healthy dog kibble. You can freeze any of the dog food that you won't be using right away. If your pet isn't accustomed to eating venison, begin adding it slowly to the diet in order to avoid gastrointestinal upset.

Instructions

    1

    Mix together in a large bowl the flours and rolled oats. Add dried milk and bone meal, and mix well. Begin adding the cooked rice in small amounts, blending thoroughly after each addition.

    2

    Whisk together eggs and meat juices, drippings, broth, or gravy in a separate bowl. Stir in the lard, blending the mixture thoroughly.

    3

    Stir the egg mixture slowly into the dry ingredients, mixing well. Add the venison and blend. Add the peas and carrots, and mix everything thoroughly.

    4

    Grease large baking pans. Spread the kibble batter into the pans so that it's about 1/2 inch deep.

    5

    Preheat your oven to 175 degrees F and bake the kibble for 40 to 50 minutes. When it pulls away from the sides of the pan and has turned light brown, it's done.

    6

    Cool the pans completely on racks when you've removed them from the oven. Break the kibble with your fingers into chunks the right size for your pet. Store what you plan to eat in the next 4 or 5 days in zippered plastic bags or airtight containers in the refrigerator. Freeze the rest of the batch.

How to Give Your Dog Rice to Eat

How to Give Your Dog Rice to Eat

Like all pets, dogs require a specific diet to maintain their health. If a dog digests anything that is irritating to the stomach, it can be uncomfortable not only for the dog, but also its owner. However, by introducing certain foods, such as rice, to a dog's diet, the stomach issues can be easily resolved. Serving white rice to your pooch should clear up the problem.

Instructions

Rice Recipe for Dogs with Diarrhea

    1

    Use a few sheets of paper towel or a kitchen towel to dry out the cottage cheese. Pour the cottage cheese onto the towels and cover with additional towels. Press down on the cottage cheese to remove any liquid.

    2

    Add the cottage cheese to the bowl. Add rice. Stir the ingredients until well blended.

    3

    Spoon the food into eight or 10 containers. Make sure each container has equal amounts. For smaller dogs, divide into smaller portions. Larger dogs can be served more.

    4

    Cover the plastic containers tightly with the lids. Feed the dog one container's worth of food four or five times each day.

Rice Recipe for Vomiting Dogs

    5

    Add the chicken and rice to a bowl. Mix well.

    6

    Place the food into a plastic container until ready to use.

    7

    Introduce the food to your dog only after 24 hours have passed without any vomiting. Give smaller dogs such as poodles only one-half of the mixture at each feeding. Larger dogs such as German shepherds can have a tablespoon of the mixture at each feeding.

    8

    Monitor the dog. If vomiting begins again, stop feeding the dog. Instead, give him only water and other liquids such as broth. If he keeps the food down, continue feeding only the mixture for 24 hours.

    9

    Mix together the dog's regular food with the rice and chicken. The food should be half regular and have the mixture. The serving should be one-quarter of what your dog would normally eat. Serve this meal to your dog four times a day.

How to Make Gourmet Dog Biscuits

Humans aren't the only creatures that enjoy the better things in life. For all the love they give us, our canine companions deserve an occasional gourmet treat, too. Gourmet dog biscuits take a little time and effort, but the tail-wagging delight will be worth every minute. Read on to learn how to make gourmet dog biscuits.

Instructions

    1

    Lightly oil two large cookie sheets, and preheat the oven to 300 F.

    2

    Mix the flours, corn meal, cracked wheat, garlic powder, brewer's year and dry milk in a large bowl

    3

    Stir in 3 cups of the chicken broth and mix thoroughly either with your hands or with an electric mixture. The dough will be very stiff. Add the remaining broth and mix until it reaches the consistency of bread dough.

    4

    Sprinkle a little flour on your working surface and roll the dough until it is approximately 1/2-inch thick, and cut the dough into any shape you like.

    5

    Put the gourmet dog biscuits on the oiled cookie sheets, and brush a little milk over the top of each one.

    6

    Bake the gourmet dog biscuits for 45 minutes. Then, leave the biscuits in the oven with the temperature off overnight so they can "crisp."

    7

    Store the gourmet dog biscuits in an airtight container.

Kamis, 12 Agustus 2010

How to Choose A High-Quality Dog Food

How to Choose A High-Quality Dog Food

Your dog is part of your family, so feeding it well is as important as feeding yourself well. Most commercial-grade dog foods are corn- or wheat-based and not meat-based. However, in the wild, dogs don't readily eat corn and wheat; they are carnivores that need a diet of quality protein in which to thrive. When selecting a high-quality food for your dog, the ingredients in the food and the percentage of each ingredient are important to consider.

Instructions

    1

    Read the ingredients of any dog food you encounter. Dismiss any food that lists corn, wheat, barley or another carbohydrate as a main ingredient. If the ingredient is listed within the first five or six ingredients, it's a main ingredient.

    2

    Select a dog food that has meat listed as the main ingredient, usually chicken, turkey or lamb. Chicken by-products and lamb by-products are also acceptable for high-quality dog food.

    3

    Look at the nutrition label on the dog food. Dogs don't need more than about 18 to 22 percent protein. If the dog food has more protein than that, dismiss it. Feeding your dog more protein than it needs isn't good for its health.

    4

    Examine the Association of American Feed Control Officials' recommendations for dogs. Choose a dog food that comes closest to the recommendations.

How to Help My New Puppy Eat

How to Help My New Puppy Eat

Getting a new puppy to eat properly isn't always easy, but with a little self-discipline and training, you can get him to stick to an eating schedule, which will ensure your puppy's good health. Remember to adjust the puppy's food to ensure chewing ease, to stick to consistent feeding times, and to monitor your puppy's eating habits.

Instructions

    1

    Ask your breeder or veterinarian what type of food your new puppy has been eating before you take him home. Most puppies are taken home around 10 weeks and have been weaned off of their mothers' milk for a few weeks.

    2

    Add just enough boiling water to dry puppy food to cover it and allow it to sit for about 10 minutes. This will create an easier-to-chew mush for your new puppy. Gradually decrease the amount of water each day until your puppy can eat the hard kibble.

    3

    Create three set times to feed your puppy each day until it is three months old when the midday meal can be eliminated. Once the puppy is about seven months old, you can decrease the feeding to once per day.

    4

    Place the food in the puppy's kennel/cage/eating area at the set meal time and leave the puppy alone with the food for 15 minutes.

    5

    Provide lots of affection and praise to the puppy if he has eaten his food. If the puppy has not eaten the food, take the food away without praise or punishment. Do not provide extra meals or treats until the next scheduled meal time when you feed him the normal amount of food.

    6

    Train your puppy to stick to a feeding schedule by following this pattern until your puppy eats every time. A healthy puppy will not allow himself to starve. If your puppy does not eat for two days straight, however, take him to the veterinarian because this could be a sign of illness.

Rabu, 11 Agustus 2010

Foods for Dogs with Bladder Stones

Foods for Dogs with Bladder Stones

The presence of bladder stones is an unfortunate problem in many dogs. Stones have several causes, including an abnormality in the pH of a dogs urine and metabolic diseases, says the Go Pets America website. Dogs with bladder stones often experience a variety of symptoms, such as blood in their urine, pain upon urination and frequent urination. Surgical removal of the stones is typically the only way to eliminate them. You can prevent them from reoccurring, however, by feeding your dog a special diet.

Royal Canin Urinary SO

    Veterinarians will often prescribe Royal Canin Urinary SO food to dogs with a history of bladder stones. Stones form when crystals in the dogs urine clump together. This prescription food is able to dissolve the crystals in the urine and increase the dogs urine volume. This, in turn, decreases the urine saturation, preventing the formation of crystals and, eventually, stones.

Hill's C/D

    Hills C/D food is another option for dogs with bladder stone problems. This food reduces the levels of phosphorus, protein and magnesium, which form crystals, in the dog's urine. In addition, C/D has low salt levels, contributing to a normal blood-pressure level, and has added antioxidants to boost and maintain a healthy immune system.

Homemade Diet

    Homemade diets are also effective in preventing bladder stone formation. The Go Pets America website states that homemade diets are beneficial for dogs with bladder stone issues, because they are unprocessed and free of artificial ingredients. Consult your veterinarian before you feed your dog a homemade diet to ensure it meets your dogs particular dietary needs. In addition, ask the veterinarian how much to feed your dog, as the amount depends on its size and weight.

    To make food for your dog, combine 2/3 cup of low-fat cottage cheese with one large, chopped, hard-boiled egg. Add 2 cups of cooked long-grain brown rice and 2 teaspoons of chicken fat or canola oil. Add 1/2 ounce of brewers yeast and 1/4 teaspoon of potassium chloride--a salt substitute that is available at most grocery stores--to the mix, and combine well. Refrigerate any leftovers.

DIY Automatic Pet Feeder Plans

Cats and dogs need to be fed every day. It is an important part of pet ownership. However, if you are going to be away and are unable to feed and water them, it is important to have automatic pet food and water dispensers. These can be hard to find in stores and can also be expensive. You can make several varieties of them at home, however.

Dry Food Feeder

    Most pets eat dry food. Even if your pet generally eats canned food, you'll want to have a dry food feeder for when you are gone. You can't leave out wet food because it will go bad in the time that your animal has to eat it. Creating a dry food feeder for your dog or cat will keep the dry food fresher longer and will allow you to automatically feed your pet, even when you aren't home.

    Clean out a gallon-sized milk or juice or water jug. Use the plastic kind. Wash out any residue and rinse out any soap. Leave the lid on the jug. Cut a slit in the bottom of one side of the gallon jug. The slit should be 1/2 inch tall and should be the length of one side of the jug. It should be at the bottom of the jug.

    Use a large tray with raised sides, or a large flat plat with raised edges. It should be big enough to accommodate the slit jug. Set the jug onto the plate. Open the lid at the top of the jug and fill it with dry food. Food will spill from the slit and fill up the flat plate or tray. Then, it will fill up the jug. As your pet eats the food from the tray, gravity will pull more food from the jug to slide through to the tray.

Automatic Waterer

    Leaving fresh water for your pet is also important. An automatic waterer can help your pet always have fresh water, whether you are there to fill it up or not. Use a 2.0-liter bottle. Clean out the 2.0-liter bottle and rinse it completely. Cut a 1-by-1-inch square hole in the bottom of the bottle.

    Find a flat bottomed cat or dog water dish. It should be large enough to accommodate the 2.0-liter bottle. Set the 2.0-liter bottle into the flat-bottomed water dish. Unscrew the cap of the bottle and fill it with water from another source. The water should spill out of the bottle and fill the bowl. Then, the water will continue to fill up the 2.0-liter bottle. Poke a hole in the cap before you replace it to allow air to get through. As your cat or dog drinks the water, it will replace itself with water from the 2.0-liter bottle.

Kibble Feeder

    You might also need to leave kibble out for an animal while you are away. Kibble is fed to animals in cages, like guinea pigs. Fill a 20-oz plastic bottle with the animal's kibble. Tip the bottle upside down and stick the top through the bars of the cage, and into the kibble dish. Hook the bottle with wire so that it suspends from the cage and hangs about 1 inch above the level of food in the dish. Kibble will spill out of the bottle and make a pile underneath the bottle's lip, which will prevent more from spilling. As the animal eats what is in the dish, gravity will pull more food from the bottle to the dish.

How to Make Jerky for Dogs in a Dehydrator

How to Make Jerky for Dogs in a Dehydrator

Making home-made jerky for a pet can be a great way to have an economical, healthy, and easy to create treats. By making treats at home, pet owners will know the exact ingredients in their dog treats, and can have better control over their pets diet. Because jerky is solely comprised of dry meat, this is an excellent treat for dogs that have grain allergies. Home-made jerky is a high protein, lower sodium and low fat snack that provides healthy nutrition to a dog.

Instructions

    1

    Set the dehydrator to approximately 145 to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray all racks that will be used for the meat with non-stick cooking spray.

    2

    Slice the meat into thin slices, no wider than a half inch, ideally closer to a quarter inch. Cut against the grain of the meat. If the meat is frozen beforehand, it will make slicing thinly much easier. After slicing, allow any frozen meat to thaw before cooking in the dehydrator.

    3

    Set the meat in the dehydrator in even layers on the racks. Leave the meat in the dehydrator for about six hours. Check the meat to ensure that it is fully dehydrated. To check done-ness, the jerky should be able to bend without breaking when complete. The meat will take no more than 12 hours to fully cook.

Common Pests in Dog Food

Common Pests in Dog Food

Unbeknownst to most people, dog food can contain a few common pests, some which can harm the health of the dog. These pests do not affect canned dog food because of its hermetically sealed packaging, but dry dog food can easily become the new home for these pesky critters. To avoid feeding your dog infested food, make sure you choose a bag that doesn't have any rips or tears.

Indian Meal Moth

    According to Insects Limited, the Indian meal moth is the most common pest found in dry dog food containing grain. This moth is the pest that gives the most problems when it comes to food infiltration. You can identify the adult moth by its grey, white and bronze color. The larva is identified by its silk web like trail. Larvae often hide in the gaps and fissures of the dry dog food bag and can literally gnaw through the bag of dog food. Adult Indian meal moths reproduce quickly, so an infestation in dog food is easily noted.

Warehouse Beetle

    The warehouse beetle is a tiny, oval beetle and is often a problem at dog food facilities. The larvae are orange-brown and covered with hair, while the adults are black with small white spots. Although their life cycle is approximately 43 days, the warehouse beetle can hibernate for up to two years in dry dog food.

Grain Mites

    Grain mites are another proliferate food infesting pest They live off the fungi in grains, and grow in areas with high moistures. They are often found in areas w.here there is fungal growth and an infestation can be detected by the brownish tinge left from mite dust left by mite legs. These mites feed on wheat germ, yeast, flour and other grains, which are often ingredients in dry dog food. They are known to replicate quickly and if the dog food becomes contaminated with grain mites you need to throw it out right away. Harmful effects caused by this mite are allergic reactions, skin inflammation and severe itching.

Flour Beetle

    Although a flour beetle commonly contaminates flour it also infests dry dog food. Flour beetles lay their eggs on the small pieces of dry dog food. A female flour beetle can lay approximately 450 eggs so infestation can spread quickly. To identify a flour beetle it's important to remember that they are red-brown. Although, they do not harm your pet, they do infest the pet food and can make it unusable. They can also infest other areas of the kitchen or room where the food is stored, so it is important to throw any infested dog food away.

Selasa, 10 Agustus 2010

Top 10 Human Foods for Dogs

Top 10 Human Foods for Dogs

Feeding the family dog from the dinner table will make her happy but it won't make her healthy. Most foods that humans eat are not good for dogs and may make the dog sick or cause long term-health issues, including obesity. There are several human foods that are not bad for a dog and when fed in moderation, these foods actually add some nutritional value to a dog's daily diet.

Lean Beef

    Mix a few scraps of lean beef into your dog's regular dog food to give him an extra boost of protein and flavor. Do not use meats that are heavily seasoned or that have been prepared with onions or are covered in salty gravy. Veterinarians recommend using cooked meat to avoid exposing dogs to toxic bacterias that are found in raw meat.

Poultry

    Combine chunks of boneless chicken and turkey with your dog's dry food to spice up his daily meals. Remove all skin, as it contains fat and salt which are unhealthy for dogs. Chicken and turkey bones are dangerous to dogs. They splinter easily, and when swallowed they may cause internal injury. Remove all bones before feeding poultry to your dog.

Fish

    Although it's common to think of feeding fish to a cat, dogs like it too. Add pieces of freshwater fish to your dog's food to give him a good dose of omega-3 fatty acids, which support the immune system. Fish also provides protein and vitamins to the dogs food. Remove bone fragments from the fish to avoid injury. Don't feed dogs fish cooked in rich sauces.

Yogurt

    Low-fat, unsweetened yogurt is a good source of calcium and protein for both humans and dogs. Blend a few spoonfuls of yogurt with dry dog food or serve yogurt frozen as a sweet summer treat for the dog. Select yogurts that have live active bacteria for added benefits to the dog's digestive system.

Oatmeal

    Feed your dog a small bowl of oatmeal or mix cooked oats into his dry food every few days. Cooked, unsweetened and unsalted oatmeal provides dogs with important soluble fiber. Oatmeal is good for older dogs who are beginning to suffer from irregularity; the fiber in the oatmeal helps maintain normal bowel movements. For dogs who are allergic to wheat, oatmeal is a good grain substitute.

Flax Seed

    Add a sprinkle of ground flax seed to your dog's dry food or feed her a few whole flax seeds as a treat. Flax seeds are filled with omega-3 fatty acids that help maintain healthy skin and a beautiful fur coat. Flax seed goes rancid quickly, so remove and dispose of any uneaten portions of flax seed-covered dog food after your dog is done eating.

Eggs

    Eggs are highly beneficial to dogs and are a good source of riboflavin, selenium and protein. Mix a scrambled or diced hard boiled egg in with food or serve them on their own. Raw eggs are not good for dogs, so always cook them. Hard boiled eggs make a healthy and nutritious treat and are ideal to use as a training reward.

Apples

    The apple is a sweet, crunchy treat for dogs, and it also provides them with vitamins A and C and a good dose of dietary fiber. The skin of an apple contains chemicals called phytonutrients which may be helpful in protecting humans from cancers; dogs may reap this benefit as well. Don't let your dog eat the core or seeds of the apple. Apple seeds contain cyanide which may build up in his system if he consumes too many seeds.

Sweet Potato

    Dehydrated sweet potatoes make a chewy, delicious treat or snack for any dog. The sweet potato is a good source of fiber, vitamin B6 and vitamin C. It also contains manganese and beta carotene. Dogs will eat them cooked and mixed in with food or in a bowl on their own. You may sometimes find dried sweet potatoes in the dog treat aisle at your local pet store.

Beans

    Green beans are a good dietary aid for dogs who have put on a few pounds as they've gotten older. Substitute a meal of dried dog food with a bowl of green beans to cut a few calories. The beans are a healthy, low-calorie food and are filling to the dog. Green beans are a good source of fiber and contain the mineral manganese as well as vitamins C and K.

How to Make Carrot Dog Biscuits

How to Make Carrot Dog Biscuits

Most humans see their dogs as members of the family. They want their dogs to be happy and healthy. One way to show a dog some extra special love is to make it homemade carrot doggy treats. They are made from scratch so there is no question what ingredients are in them, and they have no artificial preservatives. Homemade doggy treats are also less expensive than store bought dog biscuits. They are the best option for every dog owner.

Instructions

    1

    Boil and puree the carrots. Set aside. Mince the garlic.

    2

    Combine the carrots, eggs, and garlic in a medium-sized bowl.

    3

    Add the flour, oats and wheat germ to the mixture. Fold together with the spatula.

    4

    Dump the dough onto a floured surface. Using the rolling pin, roll the dough until it is 1/2-inch thick.

    5

    Cut out the doggy treat shapes with your selected cookie cutters. Place cut treats on the baking sheet.

    6

    Brush the doggy treats with the egg white. It will give them a shiny finish after baking.

    7

    Place treats in a 300 degree oven and bake for 45 minutes. Let cool.

Minggu, 08 Agustus 2010

What Can I Supplement My Dog's Dry Food With?

What Can I Supplement My Dog's Dry Food With?

A dog eating a good dry dog food or kibble doesn't usually need supplements. However, working dogs, pregnant or lactating dogs, and some other dogs may need supplements. Check with your veterinarian first. Don't become confused and worried by the ads and commercials promoting supplements.

Supplements

    Dog biscuits are a good treat.
    Dog biscuits are a good treat.

    A lot of commercial supplements are available, but good natural supplements include cottage cheese, yogurt, oil -- except soybean oil -- meat broth without salt, and leftover vegetables. Treats should be dog biscuits, but a little meat, veggies or ice cream now and then are fine. Never give your dog chocolate. Do not overdose with any supplement, especially vitamins and calcium.

Dogs That Need Supplements

    Dog pointing
    Dog pointing

    Performance dogs, which include hunting dogs, police dogs and guide dogs, need extra energy. Do not experiment with supplements in the field. Owners have used oil in the past for dogs with dry skin, but many dog foods -- and supplements -- now contain fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6.

Deciding If Your Dog Needs Supplements

    All dogs, working or not, need a balanced diet.
    All dogs, working or not, need a balanced diet.

    Do not use vitamins or supplements to compensate for a low-quality food. Many veterinarians and nutrition experts believe that dogs on a balanced diet don't need supplements, which could unbalance a good diet. However, some owners and breeders disagree.

The Best Vegetables to Feed Dogs

The Best Vegetables to Feed Dogs

Vegetables can be part of a healthy canine diet. Dogs have difficulty digesting raw vegetables, and certain veggies may actually inhibit thyroid function in dogs with thyroid problems, so it's important to prepare them correctly. Cooking, steaming and freezing, then thawing and fully mashing vegetables renders them edible. Avoid feeding dogs starchy vegetables, which can lead to weight gain, gas and stool problems.

Broccoli

    Broccoli is chock-full of phytonutrients, which are not found in meats and animal food products. While it is unclear whether dogs can absorb plant nutrients or use phytonutrients, ongoing research continuously returns new benefits, such as helping protect against carcinogens. Broccoli is a good source of B-vitamins and minerals. Broccoli is high in fiber; be sure to steam or cook it before offering it to a dog.

Cucumber

    Cucumbers consist almost entirely of water, but they are low-glycemic (non-starchy) and contain trace amounts of important vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B6, B12, A, E, K, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc. Feeding pickled cucumbers to dogs is not recommended.

Cabbage

    Another non-starchy vegetable, cabbage brings Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9, C, and calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc to the plate. Cabbage can be served cooked or steamed, though you'll want to limit quantities if you choose to serve it raw.

Celery

    Celery may sound like an unusual choice for pet food, but it's loaded with vitamins A, B6, B12, C, E, K and minerals calcium, copper, iron, magnesium and zinc. (dogillness.org) Another of celery's components, sedanolide, has been found to lower occurrence of tumors in lab animal research and is also known to serve as an acid neutralizer.

Special Notes

    Raw vegetables should comprise no more than 20 percent of your dog's diet; cooked veggies, no more than 40 percent. The bulk of the dog's diet still needs to come from meat and protein.

    Introduce vegetables slowly into your dog's diet, working up to the full percentage as he or she gets used to the new food. Mix vegetables into the dog's regular food and meat, and don't introduce too many new veggies at once; integrate them into the diet one at a time.

    If your dog experiences diarrhea or ample stools, reduce the percentage of veggies comprising the diet.

Sabtu, 07 Agustus 2010

Dogs & Food Poisoning From Eating Raw Pork

Dogs & Food Poisoning From Eating Raw Pork

Dogs are notoriously undiscriminating about what they eat, given the chance. With the growth of raw meat diets for dogs, more people are giving their dogs raw meat daily, often including pork. This can be a controversial topic--anything a dog eats has the potential for harm, and raw pork, especially if it's wild or home-raised, can cause food poisoning.

Considerations

    Raw or "BARF" (Bones and Raw Food) diets for dogs have become increasingly more common, with many regional distributors and some large pet food companies selling raw meat pet food, including pork, in pet supply stores. Smaller distributors purchase meat animals from small farms, or raise their own for processing into pet food. Many people also buy meat from butchers and supermarkets for their dogs.

Trichinellosis

    Your dog is more likely to get infected by trichinellosis from eating raw pork from home-raised sources, or from wild pigs, than from store-bought pork. The Centers for Disease Control cautions that trichinellosis associated with eating raw pork is now somewhat rare, but is still a concern with wild game or from home-raised pigs who are fed a diet consisting of garbage and raw meat.

Features and Identification

    Dogs have similar food poisoning symptoms to people, and they are rather easy to spot: diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy and dehydration are common signs of food poisoning. Trichinellosis poisoning may also include difficulty breathing, loss of motor control and irregular heartbeat. Food poisoning is usually identified by examining a fecal sample under a microscope; when you bring your dog to the veterinarian, take a fresh stool sample with you, if possible. Trichinellosis is disgnosed through a blood test or muscle biopsy.

Prevention/Solution

    If you are unsure about the source of raw pork, cook it thoroughly, just as you would for human family members. If you do feed raw pork, use fresh, high-quality meat and feed it promptly, rather than letting it sit and gather bacteria. If you're unwilling to let your dog eat any raw meat, dispose of all food waste in a trash can with a tight-fitting lid.

Expert Insight

    All foods and treats your dog eats can be contaminated with bacteria, mold or foreign substances such as melamine. The Food and Drug Administration lists 976 pet food recalls between Jan. 1, 2006, and April 7, 2010, and none of these were raw meat products. Raw pork and other raw meat products can also be contaminated and cause food poisoning, although you can eliminate the risk of your dog getting sick from pork by cooking it first. Those who prefer to feed a fresh homemade diet with little risk often choose to cook all raw meat for their dog's meals.

Jumat, 06 Agustus 2010

Automatic Pet Feeder Instructions

Automatic pet feeders feed pets on time, and you can avoid having to open the containers and measure out the food several times a day, making them convenient for busy pet owners.

Instructions

    Automatic pet feeders dispense a specific amount of food at a specific time of day, determined by you. Small feeders accommodate pets weighing 15 pounds or less, medium feeders are for pets up to 40 pounds, and for pets over 40 pounds, buy a large feeder. Automatic pet feeders are comprised of a storage container and a feeder assembly housing. A timer controls an electric motor, which dispenses the food. Most automatic feeders require that you use dry, pellet-style pet food. Many feature a digital timer that is easily programmed in a few minutes and can be over-ridden if your pet needs more food or will be gone.

Advantages

    Veterinarians recommend automatic pet feeders for diabetic pets, who do best when they eat at the same times each day. For owners with varying schedules, automatic pet feeders are reliable, whether or not you are late getting out of the office, and make for satisfied and happy pets.

How to Use Elevated Feeders for Dogs

How to Use Elevated Feeders for Dogs

For older dogs or dogs suffering from mobility issues, it can be quite painful to stoop low enough to eat from a bowl on the floor. Elevated feeders hold the dog's water and food bowl off the ground, making it easier and more comfortable for your dog to reach the bowls and maintain a comfortable posture while doing so. Elevated feeders also stop bowls from sliding around, a common side-effect of a metal bowl, tiled floor and enthusiastic dog.

Feeder Height

    The feeder height should enable your dog to reach his food and water comfortably, but dogs must stoop slightly to eat and drink otherwise they can't bite into the food or lap at the water. Select a feeder that is approximately the same height as the mid way point between the ground and the top of your dog's front legs. Feeders come in a range of sizes. If you are unsure, measure your dog's standing height from his head to the ground. Tell the sales assistant the height and breed and they can advise.

Bowl Size

    Typically an elevated feeder comes with two bowls, one for food and one for water. The circumference of the bowl must be slightly greater than the circumference of the feeder recess, otherwise the bowl will fall through the recess.

Hygiene

    Clean the feeder every two or three days. Although feeders typically reduce the amount of mess a dog can create when feeding, it is still necessary to take sanitation precautions. Use a damp cotton cloth to wipe away any food residue that collects on the feeder. For tough stains, use dish washing liquid on the cloth. Dry the feeder with a towel.

Stability

    Place the feeder on a mat. If you have a tiled or polished wood floor, even the most robust feeder can move if nudged firmly enough by a hungry dog.

Feeding

    Fill the bowls and place them in the feeder. You can fit a deeper than normal water bowl into an elevated feeder. This is useful if you are going out for the day, as it means you can leave more water for your dog. Don't over-fill the food bowl. If necessary, measure the food out to avoid making your dog obese.

Routine

    Follow your normal feeding time routine. Don't feed your dog until you have eaten, unless he is in a different room. If your dog gets his food before you do, he may mistake this for a sign of pack superiority. If your dog leaves his food and begs for human food, take the bowl out of the feeder and place it outside. If he thinks his food is always going to be available, he'll seek out extra food. If he thinks his food may temporarily disappear if he seeks out other food, he'll be less likely to beg for food.

Veterinary

    Elevated feeders are not suitable for all dogs. Large-chested breeds such as German Shepherds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks and Dobermans are prone to gastric torsion, or "bloat." Feeding from an elevated position encourages some dogs to eat faster, which could increase the chances of bloat. Consult your vet before using an elevated feeder.

Kamis, 05 Agustus 2010

How To Choose All Natural Pet Food for Pomeranians

Pomeranians are small, active toy dogs. All toy dogs need specially designed food in order to stay healthy. You can buy organic and all natural pet foods for your Pomeranian at most retail pet stores, or you can shop at boutique stores if you want to get a custom blend formulated for your little prince or princess.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure any all-natural food contains at least 30 percent protein. This will help your little dog stay active and fit. This is particularly important for Pomeranians, who tend toward laziness and can easily get overweight.

    2

    Check the meat content. Meat is the easiest way to get high protein to your dog. As a general rule, all natural dog foods should contain at least 70 percent meat and no more than 30 percent vegetable products. Dogs' digestive systems are not designed to process vegetable products in bulk, and since poms are extremely small, their digestive systems are especially sensitive. Overloading them with vegetable content can lead to upset stomachs and other digestive problems that a larger dog might overcome simply due to hardiness and size.

    3

    Check that the food is certified organic. Simply containing organic ingredients is not enough. Organic foods are an automatic way to make sure your dog food is all-natural. Organic foods help small dogs fight off illnesses because their nutrients do not tend to be as filtered as more processed foods are. A small dog like a Pomeranian needs every defense at the ready because they are operating at a genetic disadvantage because their immune systems are inherently weaker than those of larger dogs.

How to Put a Dog on a Feeding Schedule

Many dog owners allow their pet to free feed all day long. When the dog gets obese, it isnt surprising to find out he has been overeating for a long time. Creating a feeding routine for your dog will help him maintain his weight by portion control. Feeding schedules can be designed to help your dog lose weight or gain weight as needed. A feeding schedule will also help your dog eliminate regularly. That's great becaise you dont want to deal with a surprise potty run late at night.

Instructions

    1

    Call your veterinarian before changing your pets diet. Explain your ideas. Make sure your plans are a safe option for your individual dog. If the dog is on medication, your veterinarian can make recommendations for a safe diet plan.

    2

    Weigh your dog. Use the bathroom scale if he is a small dog. Medium sized dogs can be weighed by holding them in your arms as you stand on the scale. Note the weight, then weigh yourself alone. Subtract the weight from your shared weight with your dog. This will help you to see how much your dog weighs. Large dogs can be weighed at a veterinarian office.

    3

    Read the label on your dog food. Check the recommendations on portion size for your weight of dog. Use the smaller portion on the range listed if your dog needs to lose weight. If your dog needs to maintain a healthy weight, feed him the full portion allowed. Remember, the portion listed is the dogs daily ration.

    4

    Decide if you want to feed your dog two or three times per day. For owners that work away from home--or are gone several hours per day--a morning and evening feeding will work. If you are home during the day, feeding your pet three times a day is also a healthy option.

    5

    Divide the daily ration of dog food into two or three portions. Offer your dog the first portion in the morning. Use the same style and color of bowl for each meal. You want the dog to associate it with his food. If the dog hasnt eaten the food within 20 minutes, take the food up. Set it aside.

    6

    Offer the dog his next meal. If he doesnt eat within 20 minutes, remove the meal. Wait for the next mealtime. The dog will learn that. if he wants to eat, it has to be at mealtime. Try to keep a consistent pattern to the mealtimes. Dont leave the food down all day long, or the dog wont learn the feeding schedule.

How to Feed Liver to Puppies

How to Feed Liver to Puppies

Puppies are wiggly bundles of joy with huge appetites. They need lots of good nutrition when they are young to get them off to a healthy start, particularly in the case of a puppy that has been ill and is convalescing, Liver is a great food to feed to these pups in moderation, as it is packed with nutrients and protein.

Instructions

Feeding Liver to Puppies

    1

    Buy only fresh liver. Do not get past-dated liver or any other meat that is not fit for human consumption. Smell the liver when you open it. If it smells foul, discard it. Rancid meat can not only make your puppy sick, it can kill him.

    2

    Wash the liver in cold water to remove blood. Do not use hot water as that will make any remaining blood seep into the tissues. Rinse it until the water runs clear.

    3

    Cut the liver into small, puppy-bite-sized pieces. If it looks too big, it probably is, so err on the side of safety. You do not want your puppy to choke. Liver is tender but do not assume your puppy can chew up big pieces.

    4

    Offer the liver pieces to one puppy at a time or you might be mauled by a mass of hungry puppy mouths. Only offer a few pieces during any one feeding, as too much liver can cause bloat, which can be a life-threatening condition.

    5

    Check the stool of your puppy after feeding the liver. If he has loose, runny stools, you may need to cut back on the amount you are giving him. While liver is good for him in moderation, it is very rich and can upset fragile stomachs.