Senin, 31 Mei 2010

How to Make Puppies Take to a Nipple

How to Make Puppies Take to a Nipple

The first week of a dog's life affects the rest of it in terms of immunity and nutrition. In the first week of life puppies are not crawling yet and they will not have their eyes open. However, they will be growing and developing their immune system and gaining strength. Because of this they have to nurse every two hours. If a puppy is not taking to a nipple, it is not getting the nutrition it needs to survive its first week of life and develop properly, so you must take action.

Instructions

    1

    Squeeze one of the mother's nipples between your thumb and forefinger until you have one or two drops of milk on your fingers.

    2

    Rub the milk over the puppy's nose and mouth.

    3

    Draw the puppy's mouth to the nipple. Squeeze the nipple again so milk enters the puppy's mouth.

    4

    Repeat Step 3 until the puppy takes to the nipple and begins eating on its own.

Minggu, 30 Mei 2010

Feeding Stages of Puppies

Feeding Stages of Puppies

Puppies are fast-growing animals that require the right blend of food and nutrients to ensure they grow up healthy and strong. Different breeds of puppies have different nutritional needs, so always consult your vet and your food manufacturer's recommended feeding guidelines with regard to the appropriate feeding stages of puppies in your care.

The First Eight Weeks

    During the first week of a puppy's life, its weight doubles. During its first eight weeks, a puppy generally is kept its mother, who will nurse the pup as often as it needs. When the puppy is weaned from mother's milk, it should be given a puppy food that is high in protein and enriched with vitamins, minerals and fats. Certain breeds of dog need specialized food blends to support their particular growth and development. For example, large breed dogs that are susceptible to joint problems as adults should be given a puppy food fortified with a special growth formula that regulates how fast bones and joints grow; specially formulated small-breed food provides concentrated nutrition in bite-size kibbles that meet a smaller animal's high metabolic needs.

Age 8 to 12 Weeks

    From 8 weeks to 12 weeks of age, a puppy generally needs to eat two to four times as much as an adult dog to support its growth. As it grows, a puppy can be expected to gain 1 to 2 grams per pound of anticipated adult weight each day. For example, if you have a Labrador puppy expected to reach 75 pounds at full adult size, expect it to gain 3 to 5 oz. per day for the first year of its life.

Age 12 Weeks to 6 Months

    Puppies generally should be fed small, frequent meals as very young puppies, but as they begin to mature at 4 to 6 months, you can reduce the feeding times to just twice day, as long as you still are following the food manufacturer's guidelines for how much food you are giving your puppy. For example, if you feed your puppy a total of 2 cups of food every day, you can break that down into two servings of 1 cup, four serving of cup, or any variation in between.

Age 6 Months to 1 Year

    By the time a puppy is 6 months of age, it should be down to two regularly scheduled feedings per day. You may have to adjust the food manufacturer's feeding guidelines based on the activity level and appetite of your puppy. In general, you should be able to feel but not see a puppy's ribs, and it should have a visible waist when you look down at it. Overweight dogs are susceptible to medical conditions as they age, so overfeeding a puppy is never a good idea.

Sabtu, 29 Mei 2010

Can You Give Vegetables to Puppies?

Puppies have different nutritional needs than adult dogs. Although adult dogs can have a piece of broccoli or meat once a month without doing severe harm, puppies should only receive puppy dog food in dry kibble format and shouldn't be fed vegetables. Also to be avoided are canned dog food, which is higher in fat, and semi-moist puppy food that's high in either salt or sugar.

Welcoming Your New Puppy Home

    Puppies need to transition to a new environment. On the first night, maintain the same feeding times and dry kibble food he received before coming home to you. Gradually mix in your dry kibble food with his old one over a week. Adjust kibble proportions until you are giving him only your food by the end of your puppy's first week. Do not include vegetables in this diet.

Puppies Do Not Receive Necessary Nutrients From Vegetables

    For puppies, vegetables and other table scraps are off the menu. They are not poisonous and the puppy can eat them but they are not good nutritional choices. Some table scraps are higher in calories and can contribute to puppy obesity. Vegetables and other human foods are not fortified with the vitamins and minerals growing puppies need.

Puppies Cannot Properly Digest Vegetables

    Although dogs are omnivores, a puppy's digestive tract is still growing. It cannot process the same food an adult dog could. Table scraps that include can cause digestive problems, leading to diarrhea. They fill the puppy without giving it the nutrients its growing body needs.

Feeding Puppies Vegetables Can Encourage Begging

    Placing a small piece of broccoli or celery in your puppy's dish will give him a taste for human food. Puppies will whine, pout and bark to get the human food they want. A puppy's diet influences the adult dog's health.

Diet for a Diabetic Dog

Have you recently received news that your dog has diabetes? Initially, this type of news can be alarming. Give your canine family member the proper diet and exercise, with medication, to help control the diabetes. The veterinarian will order a special diet for your diabetic dog.

High Fiber Foods

    One of the key nutrients for a diabetic dog is plenty of fiber. Fiber helps absorption of other nutrients. It helps your dog use the bathroom regularly. Fiber digests slowly, reducing the chances of your dog's blood sugar suddenly rising after meals and throughout the day. Talk to the veterinarian about adding unsweetened bran cereal to your dog's diet. Add new foods to your dog's diet slowly. This allows your dog's body to get used to the changes.

Complex Carbohydrates

    There are two primary types of carbohydrates, simplex and complex. Complex carbohydrates take longer to digest. They provide energy for your dog. Cooked brown rice is a nutritional source of complex carbohydrates to feed your dog. You can slowly add cooked, brown rice to your dog's diet. Ideally, mix either the bran for fiber or the cooked brown rice for complex carbohydrates at different meals. Picky eaters might not enjoy the addition of both to their food.

Low-Fat Foods

    Foods rich in fat quickly increase blood sugars during digestion. Your veterinarian will suggest you adopt a diet for your diabetic dog that is low in fat. Avoid feeding your dog milk products, meat scraps, canned food and cheese products. These can be high in fat. Read dry food labels for dog foods with lower fat levels.

Avoid Sugary Food

    Avoid treats, snacks and meals with sugary foods. Sugar is not good for a dog with diabetes. Avoid the temptation to give treats or people food. Get your diabetic dog used to eating only from his bowl, filled with nutritious food specifically for a diabetic dog. You can give a small taste as a treat on a rare occasion. However, make certain your dog has followed his diet for diabetes the rest of that day.

Regular Meal Times

    Regular meal and snack times are vital for a diet for diabetic dogs. Dogs on insulin need their insulin injections and eating times carefully coordinated. Insulin needs time to process in your dog's body to work with the diet. Do not skip meals for your diabetic dog. Keep a rigid feeding schedule; never just free-feed a diabetic dog.

Water

    All dogs need fresh water. Diabetic dogs tend to consume more water than healthier dogs. Keep an eye on your dog. Increased thirst 15 to 30 minutes after meals could mean an increase in blood sugar levels. Carefully monitor your dog and seek emergency veterinarian care if you are unsure of raised blood sugar levels. It's always wise to be safe and cautious.

Jumat, 28 Mei 2010

How to Compare Different Brands of Dry Dog Food

How to Compare Different Brands of Dry Dog Food

When choosing the best dry dog food for your pet, various factors, such as breed, ingredients and price should be considered. Comparing different brands according to your dog's needs will help you choose the most agreeable food.

Characteristics

    Dry dog foods are made specifically for puppies, older dogs, overweight dogs and dogs from smaller breeds. Some brands do not offer all of these choices, so consider your dog's characteristics before deciding on a specific brand of dry dog food.

Ingredients

    Whenever possible, choose a food with real meat, such as beef or chicken, as the first listed ingredient. Also, check for the addition of vitamins, probiotics, antioxidants and bacteria cultures. All of these ingredients support the gastrointestinal tract, helping your dog's body to absorb more nutrients.

Unhealthy Additives

    Food with corn gluten, soy or wheat gluten is not easily digested by dogs. To maintain your dog's health, choose foods that omit all of these ingredients and other unhealthy additives, like preservatives, sugar, high fructose corn syrup and artificial colors or flavors.

Price

    To calculate which brand and size is cheaper, divide the price by weight in pounds. Choosing a larger bag of food may be more economical since smaller bags are usually more expensive in terms of price per pound.

Most Common Food Allergies in Dogs

Food allergies in dogs can be distinguishable by symptoms such as chronic ear infection, hair loss and a lot of scratching. Take your dog to the veterinarian if you observe these conditions. Talk to your dog's vet about what foods she recommends for your pet. Knowing what foods can cause allergies in your dog will help you limit foods that can affect her health.

Beef

    Beef is a common food that can cause allergic reactions in dogs.

Dairy Products

    Dairy products can cause allergic reactions in dogs. Do not give your dog milk without first consulting your veterinarian.

Eggs

    Allergic reactions in dogs can be caused by the consumption of eggs.

Chicken

    Avoid giving your dog chicken unless your veterinarian approves. Dogs can be allergic to chicken.

Soy

    Food allergies can be evident in dogs that have soy products with their meals.

Wheat

    Bread and other products made of wheat can cause allergic reactions in dogs.

Kamis, 27 Mei 2010

How to Feed Turkey to a Dog

How to Feed Turkey to a Dog

Give your dog a special treat this holiday season or after any turkey dinner by making him a few tasty treats that feature this healthy meat. Your dog will appreciate this treat and you will appreciate your now empty refrigerator.

Instructions

Doggie Turkey Omelet

    1

    Pour 2 tbsp. of olive oil into a medium-sized frying pan. Allow the oil to heat on a medium setting for a few minutes.

    2

    Crack two eggs into a medium-sized bowl. Pour 2 tbsp. of mashed potatoes into the bowl. Stir until the two ingredients are incorporated.

    3

    Place 1/2 cup of cooked, diced turkey meat into a small bowl. Add 1/2 cup of cooked mixed vegetables into the bowl. Stir.

    4

    Pour the turkey and vegetable mixture into the bowl with the eggs. Stir all the ingredients.

    5

    Pour the egg and turkey mixture into the hot pan. Stir the eggs periodically until they are completely cooked. This will generally take 4 to 6 minutes.

    6

    Cover the omelet with 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese. Allow the cheese to cook into the omelet for two more minutes. Allow the omelet to cool before serving it to your waiting pooch.

Turkey Dog Treats

    7

    Place 1 lb. ground turkey into a large bowl.

    8

    Add 1 cup of uncooked oatmeal and 1 egg into the bowl. Stir in 1/2 cup of grated Parmesan cheese.

    9

    Crack one egg into the bowl and thoroughly stir the mixture for several minutes until all the ingredients are well incorporated.

    10

    Grease a loaf pan with margarine. Pour the ingredients into the pan. Bake the turkey loaf at 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes.

    11

    Allow the turkey loaf to cool before removing it from a pan. Cut the loaf into 1/4-inch thick strips and feed them to your hungry dog.

How to Bottle Feed an Orphaned Puppy

Most female dogs are nurturing, caring mothers. Unfortunately, at times when the mother dog is very young or one of the temperamental toy breeds, she may neglect her babies. In other cases, older dogs may suffer milk failure, with nothing to give their puppies. Other dogs produce contaminated milk or vaginal exudates that are toxic to her young. Times such as these require that humans take care of the puppies through bottle feeding.

Instructions

    1

    Line the puppy's nesting box with facial tissues, baby diapers or paper towel. This will provide absorption from the puppy's pottying.

    2

    Place a heating pad, on its lowest setting, beneath one end of the box. The ideal temperature for the box should be around 97 degrees F--no higher.

    3

    Be extremely sanitary when handling the puppy. Orphaned pups often to not receive the initial milk, or colostrum, from their mother. Rich in antibodies, this milk protects the pup from many diseases early in life. Without it, it is at much greater risk for getting sick.

    4

    Mix the puppy's powdered milk per directions.

    5

    Use a flame-heated needle to melt 2 small holes in the pet feeding bottle's latex cap. Holes should only be big enough for a few drops of milk drip out when the bottle is shaken.

    6

    Place the puppy in its warm box, lying on its stomach. Puppies should always be fed while lying in this position.

    7

    Insert the nipple into the puppy's mouth using a gentle prying motion. Apply pressure to the sides of the bottle, releasing a drop or two of milk. After these intitial drops, the puppy should suck on its own.

    8

    Feed the puppy 25 to 35 milliliters of formula for every 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of body weight. Depending on age and size, most puppies will eat between 6 and 8 times a day.

Rabu, 26 Mei 2010

Alpo Dog Food Ingredients

Alpo Dog Food Ingredients

Alpo dog food has been produced since 1936 and is available in dry and moist versions. Like most commercially prepared dog foods, it is formulated to meet the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) dog food nutrient profile. AAFCO does not have any regulatory authority, it is a voluntary association which aims to protect consumers and animals through food standards and definitions.

Corn

    The first two ingredients listed in Alpo's Come 'N Get It dry food are ground yellow corn and corn germ meal. In Alpo's somewhat more expensive Prime Cuts dry dog food, the first ingredient is ground yellow corn followed by meat and bone meal. Corn is inexpensive and not inherently harmful to dogs; it is common to find it in bagged dog foods because it makes the food more affordable for consumers and adds dry bulk to the food. The carbohydrates in corn provide energy for dogs.

Animal Digest

    Animal digest is found in the dry and moist versions of Alpo's dog foods. According to AAFCO, animal digest is any kind of meat or animal tissue that is exposed to water, and possibly other chemicals, and allowed to react. It is a processed version of clean animal material and cannot include hair, horns, hooves or animal teeth. This ingredient provides some protein, but it is mostly a flavoring agent.

Meat Byproducts

    Meat byproducts are any part of an animal that do not include the meat cuts typically sold for human consumption. This material must be clean and cannot include hair, teeth, horns, or hooves. AAFCO states that, "It includes, but is not limited to, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, livers, blood, bone, partially defatted low-temperature fatty tissue and stomachs and intestines freed of their contents." These ingredients provide protein, fat, many nutrients and flavoring.

Added Vitamins and Minerals

    A large number of the ingredients listed on Alpo labels are vitamins and minerals that are added to the food to improve its nutritional profile. For instance, the ferrous sulfate added to Alpo's dog foods provides additional iron which is important for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Choline chloride is also a nutrient added to Alpo dog foods and it is important for building and maintaining cell membranes.

Added Fats

    Dogs need fat in their diet, not only for a shiny coat but also for brain health. These ingredients also make food more appetizing to dogs. Alpo's moist dog foods do not have added fats, but the meat and meat byproducts add enough fat to meet the nutritional standards established by AAFCO. The dry dog foods produced by Alpo do have added beef tallow, which brings their fat content to 9 percent.

Selasa, 25 Mei 2010

How to Tell If a Dog Is Getting Food Aggression

Food aggression or possessiveness is a sign of dominance. Your pup or dog is showing that he is the pack leader of your home or environment. It must be stopped as soon as possible or the aggression will build, and you will have a fully grown dog that stands between you and his dish snarling, baring his teeth and potentially poised to bite. The food will not be the only issue. This dog will have won this position in his mind and will be dominant in any area he can.

Instructions

    1

    Watch your puppy or dog to see how it acts when you place food in front of it. Food is important to the dog. A natural instinct is to guard and possess it.

    2

    Keep your body next to the dog. If he is looking at you out of the corner of his eye and starts chugging his food, it is important to test him further.

    3

    Place your hand out, extended toward his dish. Notice if he moves to block you or begins to growl.

    4

    Take a stick or article that will enable you to move the dish slowly away from the dog when he is eating. Check to see if he is growling, baring his teeth or looking at you with a wild look in his eyes.

    5

    Watch to see if the dog is guarding his toys, food or his bed. If he snaps at anyone or another dog when the person or animal gets near any of his things, he is exhibiting aggression.

How to Feed a Bulldog Puppy Baby Mush

How to Feed a Bulldog Puppy Baby Mush

Puppy mush is fed to bulldogs when they are being weaned off of their mothers milk. It is a way in which to prepare their gastrointestinal systems for commercial food. Bulldogs are able to begin digesting puppy mush at about three-and-a-half weeks of age. While your bulldog puppy may protest at not having the comfort of his mother as a food supplier, it is possible to convince him to eat the puppy mush.

Instructions

    1

    Select the puppy formulation of the food that the dam is eating. Typically, it is best to stick with a high-quality brand of food. Bulldogs are prone to all sorts of allergies and feeding food that doesnt have quality ingredients can be a factor. All-natural, organic foods that contain fatty acids and that are free of preservatives and artificial colors or flavors, are generally the best foods to feed your bulldog.

    2

    Pour two cups of the puppy food into a blender, along with 12.5 ounces of a liquid puppy milk replacement. Add enough hot water so that the blender is full. Blend the food until it becomes the same consistency as human baby cereal. This amount of mush should be enough to feed six to eight bulldog puppies.

    3

    Place the puppy mush onto a large plate, such as a pizza pan. The puppies can all eat off the same plates and area. The bulldogs will likely walk and play through the mush

    4

    Hand-feed your bulldog puppy if he doesnt seem interested in the puppy mush. You can either place a small amount of food in your hand, or insert a tongue depressor that has the mush on it, into the bulldogs mouth. Because of the "jowls" that bulldogs have, it may be a little difficult to put the food into his mouth without getting it all over the puppy and yourself. Once the bulldog has tasted the mush, he will likely eat it freely by himself.

Senin, 24 Mei 2010

How to Make a Cake Dogs Can Eat

How to Make a Cake Dogs Can Eat

If you want to make a special treat for your canine friend, dog cakes provide versatility and can be customized to the occasion being celebrated. Whether it's your dog's birthday, a new puppy welcome party or an obedience school graduation celebration, dog cakes provide a way to show your love and appreciation for your dog. Several different flavors of dog cake options exist, as do frosting and topping options. Feel free to get creative by adding your dog's favorite treats to the cake.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray the cake pan with cooking spray.

    2

    Place the butter in the bowl, and mix it with the hand mixer on medium speed until smooth.

    3

    Add the vegetable oil, peanut butter and eggs to the butter. Mix these ingredients with the spoon until well combined.

    4

    Stir the flour and baking powder into the batter. Add a few small pieces of the dog treats to the batter and mix well.

    5

    Pour the mixture into the cake pan. Bake the cake for one hour and 15 minutes. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool completely.

    6

    Frost the cake with softened cream cheese, using a knife to spread the cream cheese over the cake's surface. Add additional dog treats to the top of the cake, if desired.

How to Compare Good Dog Foods

How to Compare Good Dog Foods

Good nutrition is an important component of your dog's overall health. Dogs, like people, are individuals, so no one food is the right choice for all dogs. Pet owners must do their own research and read labels to find the best food for their canine companions.

History

    The sales of dry dog food didn't skyrocket until the 1940s when the tin used in the cans was redirected for the war effort. With the availability of canned food significantly diminished, dry food captured 85 percent of the market. Today, dry dog food still outsells canned food.

Considerations

    The ingredients in dog food are listed by weight. Dogs are carnivores, so it is important that meat is a primary ingredient. Meat and eggs contain highly digestible amino acids which are beneficial to your dog. A dog's body is not designed to process food with cheap fillers, such as corn. The meat in a dog food should be identified by specific species, such as chicken, beef or turkey. Avoid dog foods that use generic terms such as "poultry" or "animal" when it comes to their ingredient descriptions.

Warning

    Ingredients that are believed to be carcinogenic to humans are often allowed in pet food. You should avoid dog food with BHT, BHA, Ethoxyquin or Propyl Gallate. It's also important to seek out foods with little or no artificial additives, such as artificial colorings or flavorings.

Benefits

    A dog with a proper diet will often have more energy and a shinier coat. An easily-digestible dog food also means that your pet will produce less waste.

How to Transition a Puppy to Homemade Food

How to Transition a Puppy to Homemade Food

Transitioning puppies from nursing to solids takes time and care. You must take extra precaution when using homemade puppy food. The food must meet the nutritional requirements and needs of a growing dog. Take care to find out exactly what your puppy needs to grow strong and healthy before making any homemade puppy food.

Instructions

    1

    Wean the puppy off of the mother's milk around three to four weeks old. Wean puppies slowly. Nursing puppies get more than just nutrition from the nursing process. They also learn about dominance from their litter mates as well as biting behavior. The slow weaning process helps the mother dog gradually reduce milk flow, as well.

    2

    Add extra calcium and phosphorus to the homemade dog food. Puppies need these minerals to ensure healthy growth. Use bone meal and dog vitamins that contain these minerals in the food. Cooking and freezing destroys nutrients in homemade dog food.

    3

    Space out the homemade food slowly over seven to ten days. This helps the puppy's digestive system adapt to the new food. Be sure the puppy continues to get all the nutrients it needs as you're transitioning to homemade dog food.

    4

    Choose easily digestible foods for the puppy. Commercial puppy foods take into account the maturing digestive system of the puppy. Do not give your puppy food from your table. Puppies find digesting this type of food difficult.

Low Sodium Diet for Dogs

A low-sodium diet for dogs prevents the potential for heart disease and kidney problems. Older dogs are more prone to these problems, more than puppies or young canines. Obese dogs are at risk for heart disease. Dogs on low-sodium diets need regular exercise, such as swimming.

Homemade Dog Food

    Cook and drain 1/4 lb. of lean ground beef or white poultry meat. Cook two cups of brown rice and drain. Do not add any salt. Combine cooked meat and rice with 1 tsp. flax seed oil, 2 tsp. canola cooking oil and 100 mg calcium carbonate. Store the homemade dog food in a plastic container in the refrigerator, up to five days. Serve your dog this food on his regular feeding schedule and portion sizes.

People Food

    Avoid giving a dog on a low-sodium diet any human food scraps, his own plate of human food or people food treats. Many processed foods are very high in sodium. Encourage your canine family member to eat low-sodium food recommended by the veterinarian or you prepare. Regular meal times are important for all dogs. Encouraging your dog to eat people food is not good for dogs, in general.

Review Dog Treat Labels

    Basting and flavoring on dog treats make them tasty and delicious for dogs. The meat flavorings are often very high in sodium, but there are many dog treats on the market low in sodium. Carefully read labels of your dog's favorite treats. Donate any that are high in sodium to an animal shelter to give to homeless puppies. Purchase only dog treats that are specifically low in sodium.

Consider Organic Foods

    Organic foods are grown without the use of pesticides. Processed non-organic dog food is often high in sodium content. Consider feeding your canine family member organic foods, as part of a low-sodium diet for dogs.

Veterinarian Low-Sodium Food

    Many veterinarian offices carry low-sodium dry dog food. Ask your local veterinarian office that provides your dog with his canine care about buying low-sodium dry dog food from them. You can combine the homemade dog food with the dry food.

Fresh Drinking Water

    Make certain to provide your dog with plenty of fresh water. Clean the water bowl daily. Leave fresh water out for your dog on a continuous basis. There is no need to restrict water for a low-sodium diet for dogs. Drinking plenty of water keeps the dog's system healthy and his bowels regular.

How Long Can You Leave Peanut Butter on a Dog Treat?

How Long Can You Leave Peanut Butter on a Dog Treat?


Long Shelf Life

    Food experts at the University of Georgia's College of Family and Consumer Science say, "Peanut butter will not spoil like a perishable food."

    The Peter Pan Company mentions a shelf life of 18 months for unopened jars, but once opened, the company warns, "Exposure to air and excessive heat may accelerate the loss of optimum flavor."

It Attracts Pests

    In fact, peanut butter is widely recommended as a bait in traps for ants, mice and other vermin. See the University of Nebraska link below for one "recipe."

Bottom Line

    Neither you nor Fido are likely to leave a peanut butter-covered treat sitting around long enough for it to go bad. But watch out for those ants and mice---they won't leave it alone for very long, either.

What Is a Yorkshire Terrier's Diet?

What Is a Yorkshire Terrier's Diet?

Yorkshire Terriers are small, energetic dogs. Their diets are similar to that of other dogs, but you do need to take into consideration their size when determining how often and how much to feed your dog. When Yorkies are puppies, you might need to feed them as often as four times a day to keep up with the calories they burn, but as they age you can cut back on the number of feedings per day.

Food Quality

    Yorkshire terriers are typically not picky eaters. Feed your terrier a high-quality premium dog food found at specialty pet stores, veterinary offices or online. Check the bag or can to make certain the brand uses USDA-approved ingredients. You can also look for organic brands. As with most dogs, Yorkies might reject a sudden change in their diet. If you are switching brands of dry or wet food, mix the new brand with the old for several days, slowly eliminating the old brand. This gives your Yorkie a chance to get used to the change.

Small and Often

    Yorkshire terriers require dry food to be in small pieces suitable to their physical size. If you feed your Yorkie wet food, make certain you mix it up with a fork so there are no large chunks your dog might choke on. Yorkies are high energy dogs and burn a lot of calories during the day. For this reason, feed your dog at least twice a day. Feed him three times if he seems hungry in the middle of the day. Follow the instructions on your terrier's food bag or container for proper portions based on weight and age.

Treats

    Do not overfeed your Yorkie treats during the day. If you give him a treat, consider cutting back on the portion size of one of his meals. You never want to overfeed a dog as it can be harmful to their health and cause conditions such as obesity and diabetes. In general, avoid giving your Yorkie scraps from the table. Not only does this teach your dog bad manners, but it can interfere with his meal schedule by teaching him to think he can be fed whenever he asks.

Dangerous Foods

    Due to their small size, you must be careful to never feed your Yorkie certain foods that can be dangerous to dogs. While larger dogs might not feel the impact of dangerous food, small dogs such as Yorkies can be susceptible to severe reactions to food. Never feed your Yorkie chocolate, grapes, raisins or macadamia nuts. In general, stick to feeding your Yorkie premium dog food two to three times a day, which you know is safe and specially formulated for the health of your pet.

Water

    Always make sure your Yorkie has access to fresh and clean water. Clean your Yorkie's water bowl at least once and day and fill with fresh water.

Sabtu, 22 Mei 2010

How to Feed a Baby Pomeranian

How to Feed a Baby Pomeranian

The Pomeranian is a diminutive dog breed known for its loving, curious and vibrant temperament, as well as for its straight muzzle, compact physique and high ears. If you are considering making a tiny Pomeranian puppy a part of your household, it can help to first learn the proper feeding habits for the toy dog, as all breeds are different.

Instructions

    1

    Provide your Pomeranian puppy with small meals a minimum of three times daily. Puppies require more frequent feedings than adult dogs. Continue the frequent meals until your puppy is roughly six months old. Because of the breed's tiny size, insufficient food can cause hypoglycemia, which is a blood glucose condition.

    2

    Feed your Pomeranian puppy the same food it ate before you adopted it. Sudden and quick dietary changes can make puppies feel sick with upset stomach, so initially give your puppy the same food it received at the breeder. If you want to make a full change, do it gradually over the course of a month or so. For instance, start out changing 25 percent of the food in the first week. The next week, change 50 percent. In the next three weeks, slowly switch the food over entirely.

    3

    Purchase dry food from a reputable brand of dog food. Seek out puppy food that caters to the needs of small breeds. Make sure the food does not consist of artificial coloring or preservatives. For exact portion sizes, consult the back of the bag.

    4

    Feed your Pomeranian 1 tbsp. of canned food for puppies alongside its standard dry food meals.

    5

    Keep fresh and clean water in your puppy's bowl at all times. Never allow a minute to go by without your Pomeranian having access to water.

Natural Foods for Dog Skin Problems

Natural Foods for Dog Skin Problems

Dogs suffering from itchy, red skin rashes and skin disorders may suffer from nutritional deficiencies, parasitic infestation or environmental allergies. Altering the dog's diet by providing a daily ration of simple recipe foods with few ingredients can help dogs specifically affected by nutritional deficiencies. Some owners may consider adding nutritional supplements and human foods to the dog's diet to soothe and minimize skin problems caused by an imbalanced diet.

Omega Acids Supplements

    Add omega fatty acids to the dog's diet. This will help moisturize his skin from the inside out, reducing occurrences of dandruff, hot spots and allergic reactions. Available as a liquid supplement or in pill form, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids contain anti-inflammatory properties that soothe the dog's skin irritations. Since the acids are derived from fish oils and plant sources, no negative side effects for dogs are known.

Natural Prepackaged Dog Foods

    Choose prepackaged dry dog foods formulated for dry skin, allergies and sensitive skin. Look for dog food formulas that list protein-rich, human-grade meats (such as chicken, beef, lamb, buffalo or fish) as one of the first three ingredients. Meat meals, such as chicken meal, are a good source of natural proteins, vitamins and minerals. A protein source with the word "meal' after it means that the item has been dried. Without water as a filler, meat meals are a more protein-rich source of meat than fresh meats.

    Natural prepackaged dog foods containing rice, oatmeal, barley and potatoes are often soothing for a dog with skin irritations. Look for dog foods containing organically grown ingredients. The lack of pesticides and herbicides indicates the food contains fewer chemicals, which may help dogs with skin conditions.

Natural Human-Grade Foods

    If a dog is still having difficulties with nutritional-based skin conditions, consider feeding him a diet of human-grade foods. By completely controlling each ingredient included the dog's diet, you can learn which foods create a skin sensitivity. Start by creating a protein- and starch-rich meal. Try one part boiled chicken with two parts rice. Do not supplement the dog's diet with dog biscuits, vitamins or any table scraps during the trial. Learn which meats and starches the dog can tolerate by feeding the limited diet for a week. Add one new ingredient to the diet per week, such as carrots or peas.

    This feeding method is a temporary way to learn what foods the dog can tolerate. Long-term use is not advised, because this diet is not nutritionally balanced. Once the pet owner determines safe proteins, vegetables and starches, it is easier to select a high-quality dog food containing these ingredients.

Jumat, 21 Mei 2010

How To Make Frosted Dog Treats

Homemade dog treats are a healthy alternative to store-bought treats, which are often loaded with unhealthy chemicals and additives. Not only do dogs enjoy homemade treats, but their overall health and attitude will benefit from the natural ingredients. Frosted dog treats in particular are a fun and easy way to introduce nutritious ingredients to your dog's diet. You will enjoy pampering your dog with this homemade recipe for Frosted Applesauce Pupcakes--maybe even for his birthday.

Instructions

Applesauce Pupcakes

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

    2

    Grease muffin pans or use muffin papers.

    3

    Combine applesauce, eggs, vanilla, honey and oil in a small bowl. Next, mix the wheat flour, rolled oats, baking powder and baking soda in a large bowl.

    4

    Pour the applesauce mixture in the dry ingredients and mix until just blended.

    5

    Pour into the muffin cups and bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Cream cheese frosting

    6

    Set out the ingredients and let them come to room temperature.

    7

    Combine all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl until mixed.

    8

    Spread the frosting onto cooled pupcakes. The complete recipe makes approximately 14 frosted pupcakes.

Raw Natural Diet for Dogs

Raw Natural Diet for Dogs

Proponents of the raw natural diet claim this regimen mimics a wild dog's diet. For owners concerned about the integrity of the pet food industry, given major recalls such as the March 2007 recall affecting hundreds of brands--or the safety of common ingredients like corn or wheat, animal-protein byproducts or chemical preservatives--a raw diet is a welcome alternative. However, despite its all-natural appeal, this diet is controversial and requires thorough planning to ensure properly balanced nutrition.

Features

    Dr. Billinghurt's Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF) diet guidelines suggest an adult dog's diet include 60 percent raw meaty bones (e.g. poultry wings, beef brisket, pork feet); 15 percent crushed fruit and vegetables; 25 percent meat mince and offal; and vitamins and supplements such as fish oil, kelp and yogurt. Other raw regimens, which consider dogs to be more carnivorous, require little or no fruit or vegetables in the diet. Food can be home-prepared or purchased frozen or freeze-dried, though some raw-diet advocates maintain fresh ingredients are optimal. A dog must be transitioned to the diet gradually to avoid upsetting its digestive system.

Benefits

    A report by the Animal Protection Institute claims many commercial pet foods contain "slaughterhouse offal, grains considered 'unfit for human consumption' and similar waste products"--including "intestines, udders, heads, hooves and possibly diseased and cancerous animal parts"--as well as potentially cancer-causing chemical preservatives and depleted nutrients. A raw natural diet offers owners more control over ingredients and provides the dog with enzymes that aid digestion and natural teeth cleaning. Owners who choose a raw diet notice such benefits in their dogs as enhanced skin, breath and teeth; improved digestion and allergy symptoms; smaller, firmer stools; and decreased shedding. Advocates contend that the diet increases a dog's lifespan and reduces her susceptibility to illness, ultimately lowering veterinary care bills.

Disadvantages

    A raw natural diet requires more preparation than scooping commercial kibble into a bowl. Owners need to not only consider the actual meal prep time, but also time to obtain and store ingredients as well as sanitize work areas to prevent bacterial contamination. Cost is another drawback, as a raw diet can be more expensive than a standard commercial one, especially when purchasing commercially available raw food.

Criticism

    The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association published several reports decrying this diet, pointing to nutritional deficiencies and high bacterial contents. Heather Highbrown, doctor of veterinary medicine in Hamilton, New York, cautions, "People are far too likely to add ingredients they think are wholesome for their dog without adequate research or experience to support it." Dr. Highbrown, who's treated many cases of malnourishment due to home-based diets, urges owners who insist on a raw regimen to work with a veterinary nutritionist.

Risks and Warnings

    Raw meat cannot be given to dogs with immune deficiencies. Although healthy dogs' digestive systems can process the bacteria, it is not safe for human consumption. Thorough sanitation of all utensils and preparation areas is imperative, and children or adults with autoimmune conditions should avoid handling raw meat entirely. Some raw foods that are safe for humans, such as grapes or avocados, can be poisonous to dogs.

Supplements for Raw Feeding for Dogs

Supplements for Raw Feeding for Dogs

Whether supplements are necessary when raw feeding dogs is open to debate. Experts, for example, are divided over the necessity of including regular vitamin and mineral supplements. Holistic veterinarian Emma Styles suggests that if an owner is unsure about the completeness or quality of the food he is feeding his pet, then some minor supplementation is not only safe but also gives peace of mind.

Kelp and Alfalfa

    Kelp is a good source of iodine, a natural antibiotic, and a range of trace minerals. It also contains 21 amino acids and both simple and complex carbohydrates. Veterinarian Ian Billinghurst advises that adding kelp can help to promote glandular health.

    Alfalfa contains a good range of vitamins including A, B complex, C, D and E. It can help the body absorb protein, calcium and other nutrients. Styles recommends mixing 1 part kelp with 3 parts alfalfa and incorporating 1 1/2 teaspoons for an 80-pound dog.

Fatty Acids

    The balance of omega-3 and and 6 essential fatty acids (EFAs) in a diet is important, particularly in relation to inflammatory disease, and a supplement might be considered.

    Flaxseed is a prebiotic, a good source of fiber and omega-3. It also contains compounds called lignans, which enthusiasts point out have been shown to have positive health benefits.

    Cod liver oil contains both omega-3 and vitamins A and D. Billinghurst advises daily cod liver oil for dogs, enough to supply 20 to 40 iu of vitamin A per pound of body weight.

    Omega-6 fatty acids in a raw diet normally come from the inclusion of offal and raw meat. If there is a deficiency diagnosed then the diet can be supplemented with evening primrose oil.

Garlic

    Garlic has natural anti-microbial properties.
    Garlic has natural anti-microbial properties.

    Garlic has some anti-microbial properties and is a source of minerals. Billinghurst recommends adding garlic to the diet as a boost for the immune system, particularly against possible infections of the upper respiratory tract. It can also help to stabilize blood pressure.

Whole egg

    Eggs provide quality protein to a raw food diet.
    Eggs provide quality protein to a raw food diet.

    Billinghurst promotes the addition of whole egg (minus shell) to the diet, as an excellent source of high quality protein. Eggs also contain a good range of minerals and vitamins, The yolk contains amino acids, biotin, vitamin A, EFAs and zinc and is recommended for dogs with skin problems.

Leafy Green Vegetables

    Broccoli is an excellent supplement to a raw diet.
    Broccoli is an excellent supplement to a raw diet.

    For those looking to mimic the evolutionary diet of our dogs ancestors, the addition of green leafy vegetables is recommended. They contain a range of nutrients including vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and both soluble and insoluble fiber. Vegetables should be pureed to break down the cell walls.

Senin, 17 Mei 2010

Tips on Syringe-Feeding a Dog

If a dog is injured or ill, it may not be able to obtain a nutritious diet in a normal way. Dogs with conditions such as liver disease often lose their appetites and refuse to eat, while dogs with conditions such as paralysis of the jaw are physically unable to take in food. In cases like this, you must provide the proper nutrition for your dog by syringe-feeding.

Basic Method

    If your dog or puppy refuses food but isn't extremely ill, use a basic syringe-feeding method. With this method, you need a large syringe for adult dogs or a small syringe for puppies. One choice is the 50 ml catheter-tip syringe without a needle. These have a longer end that narrows to a point, which is easier to slip into the animal's mouth. Use liquid formula or pureed wet food only. When the food is ready, place the syringe in the corner of the dog's mouth and depress the plunger. Go slowly so that the dog doesn't choke.

Tube Feeding

    In severe cases, you may need a syringe to tube-feed your dog. Before attempting this, get a veterinarian's opinion and have him demonstrate the correct method. In addition to the syringe, you need a soft catheter, the size of which depends on the dog's size. In general, the tube should equal the length from the dog's nose to its last rib. To determine how fast and hard to press the syringe plunger, draw water into it and the catheter prior to feeding. Practice until you're comfortable. When inserting the tube, do so gently and slowly, without forcing the dog to swallow it. The dog should swallow automatically when the tube reaches its esophagus.

Proper Positions and Techniques

    When using the basic syringe-feeding method, keep the dog steady. An adult dog should sit up. A puppy should be in a position similar to the one it would take while nursing. Tilt the head slightly back and keep the syringe at a 90 degree angle to the dog's jaw. The food should go behind the dog's back teeth and over its tongue. When tube-feeding with a syringe, place the tube in the front of the dog's mouth rather than the side.

Dangers

    Syringe-feeding, if done incorrectly, can lead to a condition called aspiration pneumonia. This occurs when fluid enters the dog's lungs. If the dog coughs, sputters, or has food come out of its nose, stop feeding it immediately and seek veterinary attention. Aspiration pneumonia can be fatal. To prevent fluid from entering the dog's lungs, do not syringe-feed while the dog lies on its back.

Sabtu, 15 Mei 2010

Eating Habits of Saint Bernards

Eating Habits of Saint Bernards

Saint Bernard dogs were originally bred and used for rescue, particularly in the recovery of individuals lost in snowstorms and freezing weather. Today, Saint Bernards utilize their power and senses in competitive events and make for loyal, gentle pets. Ensuring that your Saint Bernard's feeding habits are monitored and maintained will help your pet maintain its strength and happy disposition.

Meal Size

    Monitor your Saint Bernard's food intake to avoid canine bloat or a twisted stomach.
    Monitor your Saint Bernard's food intake to avoid canine bloat or a twisted stomach.

    Saint Bernards will eat nearly anything and will do so in excess. Managing your dog's diet will ensure that it does not eat too much. Feed your Saint Bernard 6 to 12 cups of dog food a day over the course of two or three small meals. This breed is susceptible to canine bloat, so avoid allowing your Saint Bernard to eat whenever it wants to or feeding your dog one large meal a day. Saint Bernards are also prone to twisted stomachs, which can be avoided, in part, by managing these dogs' food intake.

Nutritional Needs

    Saint Bernards were traditionally fed mutton, goat meat, dairy products, wheat products and some vegetables.
    Saint Bernards were traditionally fed mutton, goat meat, dairy products, wheat products and some vegetables.

    Saint Bernards are native to the Swiss Alps, where they were traditionally fed mutton, goat meat, dairy products, wheat products and some vegetables. Because of their size and other physical traits, Saint Bernards still require foods that share similar nutritional value with the food their ancestors ate. Provide your Saint Bernard food that has a good balance of protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. When you buy or make your dog's food, the primary ingredient should be meat, preferably lamb.

Picky Tendencies

    Consult with a veterinarian if you're ever concerned about your Saint Bernard's eating habits.
    Consult with a veterinarian if you're ever concerned about your Saint Bernard's eating habits.

    Saint Bernards have been described by owners and breeders as sometimes being finicky eaters. Some Saint Bernards will simply pick at their food, while others might go one or two days without eating at all. Some reasons your Saint Bernard might not be eating are that it isn't burning many calories and, consequently, isn't as hungry, or your Saint Bernard might just be temporarily tired of the food it's being fed. Call a veterinarian if concerns arise.

Diet Exceptions

    Your Saint Bernard's age, gender, size, health condition and activity level all factor into what kind of eating habits it develops.
    Your Saint Bernard's age, gender, size, health condition and activity level all factor into what kind of eating habits it develops.

    As with any dog, your Saint Bernard's eating habits and diet will ultimately rely on several factors. Your Saint Bernard's age, gender, size, health condition and activity level all factor into what kind of eating habits it develops. Consider these aspects when creating your Saint Bernard's diet. Consult a veterinarian if you have questions about your Saint Bernard's eating habits or if its eating habits change unexpectedly.

What Is the Reason for Feeding Large Breed Puppy Food?

What Is the Reason for Feeding Large Breed Puppy Food?

Large breed puppies grow faster than smaller breeds. Although it is possible to feed them raw foods, adult food with protein supplements or regular puppy food, large breed puppy food is formulated to meet their needs.

Problems

    Improper feeding can cause your puppy to develop joint, bone and other orthopedic problems either from too much or too little nutrition elements such as protein and calcium.

Protein

    According to Vetinfo, large breed puppies require more protein and other nutrients to help with their rapid growth than small breed puppies.

Calcium

    Too much calcium can cause calcium retention and too little can cause poor growth or brittle bones according to Vetinfo. According to Albert S. Townshend, DVM, optimum calcium level for large breed puppies has not been established and needs more research. Large breed puppy foods have a lower percent than regular puppy food and supplementing is not recommended.

Calories

    Large breed puppy foods increase some nutrients without increasing calories. Being overweight puts a strain on the bones and is related to problems including canine hip dysplasia, wobbler syndrome, osteochondritis and other orthopedic disorders, according to Townshend. According to Dogfacts, small breeds need 40 calories per pound of body weight but large breeds need only 20 calories per pound.

Tips

    Weigh your puppy weekly and decrease food if he is gaining weight too fast. Switch to adult food at 6 to 7 months old.

How to Make Dog Biscuits Without Yeast

How to Make Dog Biscuits Without Yeast

Many recipes for common flat dog biscuit are yeast-free. Yeast in cooking is typically used to make something rise and maintain a fluffy texture, such as bread. Dog biscuits typically do not rise and are made with different varieties of flour. Yeast-free cooking is popular among people who maintain a gluten-free diet, which includes no grains. Gluten-free foods are also available for dogs with grain allergies. Yeast- and grain-free dog biscuits can be made at home with ingredients found in health food stores.

Instructions

    1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix hot water and the bouillon cube until the bouillon is dissolved.

    2

    Combine the bouillon with all other ingredients and mix well. Finer flour makes stickier dough. Oat and course rice flour biscuit dough may be somewhat crumbly.

    3

    Knead the dough and form into a ball.

    4

    Roll dough to 1/2-inch thickness and cut into shapes with cookie cutters. The dough will yield about 24 cookie-sized biscuits.

    5

    Place dough on cookie sheet and bake for 30 minutes until biscuits are stiff and browned.

    6

    Cool biscuits. They can be stored at room temperature for about a week.

Jumat, 14 Mei 2010

How to Get Your Puppy to Stop Suckling

How to Get Your Puppy to Stop Suckling

The healthiest adoption age for puppies is 8 weeks or older, making it essential for breeders to wean puppies from their mothers between the ages of 3 1/2 and 6 weeks. Providing puppies with appropriate food in addition to their mothers milk facilitates the weaning process. Once puppies recognize an alternative food option, they will gradually become accustomed to obtaining sustenance without suckling.

Instructions

    1

    Allow puppies to begin nursing within two to three hours after they are born. They will gain crucial antibodies from the mother within their first 16 hours of life. If they don't nurse as newborns, they are at risk of becoming severely ill.

    2

    Remove puppies from their position of suckling at the mothers teats once a day to allow her to recover from stress. She will also take this opportunity to lick the puppies clean and encourage them to urinate and pass feces before resuming nursing.

    3

    Cover the bottom of a pan with water or puppy milk replacement, available at most pet stores or from your veterinarian.

    4

    Place high-quality puppy food in the pan and allow it to soak until mushy. Blend the mixture using a food processor, and place it in a dish near the puppies habitat when they are 3 1/2 to 6 weeks old.

    5

    Spend three to four weeks weaning the puppies, allowing them to consume a combination of their mothers milk and the puppy food mixture before attempting to feed them only puppy food or separating them from their mother.

How to Feed Four-Week-Old Puppies

How to Feed Four-Week-Old Puppies

Puppies make darling pets, but they are also vulnerable and dependent on your care for survival. This is especially true of puppies who have been abandoned by their mother. If you find yourself with an orphaned pup on your hands, you will need to take over the duties traditionally performed by the mother. Although a four-week-old puppy is almost ready to be weaned from the mother, it still requires the nutrients that come from her milk. This means you must bottle-feed the pup, which can be done easily by following a few steps.

Instructions

    1

    Clean out a baby bottle by washing it thoroughly. Sanitize the nipple of the bottle as well. Dry the bottle and nipple.

    2

    Mix puppy milk replacer with water inside the bottle. Follow the directions on the label to determine the correct amount of powder and water to use, based on the puppy's weight. Place the nipple and top on the bottle, and shake vigorously to mix the contents and dissolve the powder.

    3

    Heat the bottle until the replacement formula reaches room temperature.

    4

    Place the nipple in the puppy's mouth. At this point, the pup's natural instincts should take over so that it begins to feed. Keep the puppy on its stomach during this process.

    5

    Transfer the puppy to your shoulder, and lightly pat its back. This encourages the puppy to burp, relieving its stomach of any air bubbles. Repeat the feeding process every eight hours.

    6

    Take the puppy to a vet if it refuses the bottle. The vet should be able to feed your puppy through a tube. Tube feeding should be performed only by professionals.

Rabu, 12 Mei 2010

How to Feed Baby Food to a Sick Dog

How to Feed Baby Food to a Sick Dog

A sick and weak dog may pick at its food or refuse to eat altogether. Hand feeding or force-feeding the dog may be the only way to get nutrition into him. Homemade baby food is a good option because it's packed with nutrition the dog needs and it has a consistency that a sick dog can swallow.

Instructions

    1

    Boil hamburger and blend the boiled hamburger with cooked rice and canned pumpkin using a kitchen mixer or blender. This bland combination is suitable to feed your dog; it is not harsh on the stomach and provides the nutrients your dog needs.

    2

    Put a towel or newspaper on the floor in the area you use to feed the dog. Hand feeding a sick dog can be messy, and this allows for minimal cleanup.

    3

    Get on the floor, level with the dog. If the dog is able to sit, this is the best position for it to be in while you feed.

    4

    Draw up the baby food in a syringe or liquid dropper and place it in the side of the dog's mouth. Do not try and place it directly in the front of the mouth as this may shoot the food right down the back of the dog's throat, causing the dog to choke on or aspirate the food.

    5

    Place your hand under the dog's jaw, keeping his head upward. If he has trouble swallowing, gently stroke his throat encouraging him to swallow.

    6

    Wipe the dog's mouth with a damp cloth to keep her face clean. Often a dog will shake its head if there are drips of food around the mouth, and this head shaking could cause a big mess.

Minggu, 09 Mei 2010

Pet Food Nutrition & Health Tips for Cats & Dogs

Pet Food Nutrition & Health Tips for Cats & Dogs

Diet plays an important role in your cat or dog's health. Feed your pet a well-balanced diet containing the proteins, vitamins and minerals the animal needs to stay active and fit. Depending on your cat or dog's age, weight and medical condition, choose a food that meets all of your pet's nutritional requirements.

Amino Acids

    Both dogs and cats require protein in their diets and the amino acids they contain. These amino acids support the immune system, encourage growth and development, and supply the animals with calories to store as fat. Dogs and cats need the amino acids of arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine in their diets, according to PetEducation.com. While dogs can synthesize taurine, cats cannot and need taurine supplementation in their food. A diet that lacks any of the necessary amino acids for the animals can lead to health problems.

Pet Food Labels

    Choose a well-balanced diet by reading the label on the dog or cat food you purchase. Each year, the Association of American Feed Control Officials publishes definitions of ingredients and regulations for the manufacturing of pet food. Companies that follow these regulations must meet the minimum nutritional requirements that make a dry or canned pet food "complete and balanced," according to PetPlace.com. These foods contain all of the necessary vitamins, minerals, meats and vegetables in quantities that provide a cat or dog enough to meet its nutritional needs. If a pet food has a label that features the AAFCO seal, it will provide adequate nutrition for your dog or cat to keep it healthy.

Digestibility and Ingredients

    Manufacturers list the ingredients on a pet's food by weight. Look for the primary ingredients listed as whole meats, eggs, fish or poultry, which have the highest biological value for your cat or dog. A high biological value means the ingredients contain highly digestible amino acids, according to PetEducation.com. Ingredients with lower biological values include meat or poultry meal, by-products and grains. Cats are obligate carnivores, requiring protein from meat and poultry sources as the main ingredients in their diet. Unlike cats, you can feed a commercial diet containing only vegetarian ingredients to your dog. Young cats or dogs need greater amounts of protein and fats in their diets than older animals, to provide greater calories for growth.

Feeding Considerations

    When feeding your cat or dog, give it only food appropriate for its species. Dog food will not meet the needs of your cat, lacking the taurine, extra protein and fats the cat requires; cat food may make your dog obese with the extra fat and protein contained. Feed your cat or dog based on the manufacturer's feeding recommendations, dividing the daily allowance by the number of meals you feed your pet each day. Pets that suffer from a medical condition may need a special veterinary diet. Ask your veterinarian for recommendations of brands and types of food to feed a dog or cat that suffers from a chronic illness such as kidney disease or diabetes.

Sabtu, 08 Mei 2010

Safe Treats for Dogs

Safe Treats for Dogs

There are many dog treats on the market, which can make it difficult to choose the one that's safe for your dog's health. Many commercial dog treats are full of ingredients that can harm your dog: chemical preservatives, sugar, salt and artificial colors and flavors. To make sure you're getting safe treats, read the package label and check carefully for healthy ingredients, buy raw food for your dog or make your own dog treats.

Reading Dog Food Labels

    It's required that dog treat packages list the ingredients. The Association of American Feed Control Officials has standards that pet foods have to meet. Look for at least one of their standards on the dog treat labels. Dog treats made with fresh, pure ingredients are best for your dog. Don't buy treats that contain a lot of fat and sugar. Beware of dog treats with high amounts of preservatives, artificial flavorings or colors, because they may trigger an allergic reaction such as itching or other skin problems, gastrointestinal upset and joint problems.

Raw Dog Food Treats

    Raw food has important enzymes that dogs need for proper digestion. A diet filled with enzymes will help your dog stay healthy and may prevent cancer, arthritis, parasites, bowel and urinary problems and obesity. Dogs have a difficult time digesting cooked grains, unhealthy fats or meats with antibiotics and growth hormones. Grass-fed chicken and cattle are healthy, so you know raw food dog treats made from their meat will be good for your dog. Dogs have strong stomach acids that stave off salmonella and other bacteria, so you won't need to be concerned they'll get sick by eating something raw. You may even notice that your dog has more energy, better muscle tone and stronger bones when they eat raw food dog treats.

Homemade Dog Treats

    It's best to talk to a vet before you make homemade dog treats. He may suggest appropriate ingredients. You need to be completely sure you don't put anything into homemade dog treats that could harm your dog. You can add wonderful flavors to your dog treats that are so much better than artificial flavorings. Experiment with banana, pumpkin, oatmeal, apple, cheese and peanut butter to see which ones your dog likes. Be sure the treats you make are the right size for your dog. A small dog can choke on large treats.

Jumat, 07 Mei 2010

Is Soft Water Good for Dogs?

Is Soft Water Good for Dogs?

All animals need water to survive. Specifically, in the case of dogs, fresh water is needed on a daily basis. Oftentimes, this water comes from wells and city water, which contain hydrogen, oxygen and other minerals. This type of water is known as "hard water." Conversely, "soft water" is that which has been filtered to eliminate many of the minerals. Soft water is considered safe for dogs to drink as well, but there are things to consider before putting your animal on a soft water diet.

Taste

    Soft water is said to have a salty taste. Although this doesn't impact its quality, one thing that pet owners should watch for if they're feeding such water to their dogs is a decrease in water consumption. Some dogs dislike the taste, and, in turn, tend to drink less of it. This can have a negative effect on a dog's health as the regular consumption of water is part of the foundation to a healthy life.

Health Effects

    Soft water contains a greater concentration of sodium compared to hard water. While a little more sodium isn't typically a big deal in a dog's diet, it can be harmful for dogs whose breeds have a tendency to develop cardiovascular problems, or for dogs that have a history of cardiovascular issues. Generally speaking, the more sodium one consumes, the higher one's blood pressure gets and the more at-risk this person is for heart disease. Dogs are no exception.

Bathing

    Soft water can have an impact on a dog's life beyond consumption. For example, one benefit of soft water is in regard to bathing. Dogs who bathe in soft water tend to have healthier and cleaner looking coats of fur. This is because there are fewer minerals in soft water, compared to hard water, and thereby less mineral build-up on a dog's coat when you're giving him a bath. Even dog grooming services, such as Doggie Day Spaw (doggiedayspaw.net) in Meridian, Indiana offer bathing services with soft water.

Side Effects

    If you're looking to make the switch from hard to soft water in your dog's diet, it's best to do it gradually. This is because a dog's stomach is used to hard water and the excess minerals and such it's made up of. A sudden change could upset the dog's stomach and cause diarrhea until the animal gets used to it. While all dogs are different, it's generally recommended that you begin the transition by mixing soft water in with hard water and gradually phasing the hard water out of the bowl.

The Best Puppy Food for a Chihuahua

Chihuahuas are small dogs. They might seem to be the perfect dogs to spoil, but in truth, they have special dietary needs to keep them healthy. For this reason, it is important to start Chihuahuas on the right path to dietary path as puppies.

What Kind of Kibble

    It is best to feed a Chihuahua puppy premium kibble (dry food), to ensure it is getting all of the protein, vitamins, and minerals that it needs with each meal. A premium dog food contains meat as its first several ingredients, natural ingredients, natural preservatives and whole grains, rice or barley instead of glutens or corn.

Fussy Eaters

    According to the Chihuahua Club of America (CCA), Chihuahua puppies needs kibble available 24 hours a day, along with plenty of fresh water. It is not necessary to coax the puppy to eat with homemade food, treats or table scraps. Feeding these things will only lead to a fussy eater that does not want to eat dog food.

Hypoglycemia

    Due to their high metabolisms and small bodies, Chihuahuas are prone to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Giving the Chihuahua puppy access to premium kibble 24 hours each day will prevent it from experiencing this disorder. If the puppy experiences hypoglycemia, rub its gums with corn syrup to force sugar back into its system and bring it to the vet.

How Much to Feed

    When your puppy no longer requires on-demand feeding, then it should be fed the same kibble that its been getting, three to four times daily. At this point, it becomes important to monitor its weight and adjust its food accordingly. At the age of 6 months, the puppy can start eating two times each day.

Foods to Avoid

    Chihuahuas should not be fed chocolate, raisins, cooked chicken or pork bones, coffee or alcoholic beverages. The artificial sweetener xylitol is deadly and must be avoided at all costs. In addition, low-quality kibble, such as that found in a grocery store or discount store, is not healthy for your Chihuahua.

Selasa, 04 Mei 2010

What Is Canidae Dog Food For?

Canidae is a U.S. manufacturer of premium canine and feline food products. Promising to use "only the highest quality" and "human grade" ingredients of U.S. origin, Canidae has a reputation for being suitable for dogs with health issues.

Significance

    Poisoned by contaminated ingredients from China, hundreds of American dogs died in 2007 and even more suffered debilitating effects. Massive pet food recalls of a wide variety of brands ensued. None of Canidae's products, which are all U.S. grown, were involved in the recall.

Function

    The "All Life Stages" varieties are suitable for any dog; the "Platinum" formula is especially designed for senior and overweight canines, according to the maker. Both formulas meet the requirements of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), according to the manufacturer.

Benefits

    The Transportation Safety Administration lists Canidae as one of the top six brands fed to its security dogs, according to a July 2009 report by Paul Bedard.

    It can also be beneficial for dogs with allergies--the all-natural, antibiotic- and hormone-free formulations will not trigger most allergies and do not create drug interactions.

Types

    Both dry and canned versions of each of the seven formulations are available. The choices include: All Life Stages; Lamb & Rice; Chicken & Rice; Canidae Platinum; Grain Free ALS; Grain Free Salmon and Beef & Fish.

Sizes

    Dry food comes in 5-, 15-, 35- and 44-pound sizes. Cans are sold in 13- and 5.5-ounce sizes as either individual cans or cases of 12 cans.

Availability

    You can use the store locator function on the canidae.com website (find a link in the References section) to find a nearby supplier.

Senin, 03 Mei 2010

Brain Diet Food for Canines

Like humans, aging dogs sometimes suffer from a decline in brain function. A study done in 2005 by Dr. Carl Cotman linked a diet rich in antioxidants to improved cognitive abilities in dogs. This researched has helped pet owners and veterinarians adjust the diets of elderly dogs to improve their lifestyle.

Antioxidants

    In 2005, Dr. Carl Cotman, director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California Irvine, conducted a study on dogs suffering from cognitive dysfunction (CD). These dogs were given foods high in antioxidants and were able to learn new tricks. Adjusting a dog's diet to include foods rich in antioxidants may improve or even reverse symptoms of CD. Antioxidants give fruits and vegetables their rich colors. Good sources of antioxidants include blueberries, cranberries, apples, and potatoes. Mixing these foods in with your dog's daily diet will help increase the amounts of antioxidants they eat.

    Before beginning a new diet for your pet, it is best to consult with a veterinarian, who can help rule out food allergies that could cause other health problems. Your veterinarian can also help you strategize the best way to introduce new foods to your dog.

Prescription Diet

    Hills Petfood has designed a prescription diet called Hills b/d. Hills b/d has been designed to improve the health of elderly dogs with CD. Hills b/d works by limiting the affects of free radicals found in the environment. The food is also rich in antioxidants. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if Hills b/d is the right choice for your elderly dog.

Homemade Diet

    Feeding your dog a well balanced, homemade diet may be a good way to improve your dog's health. Elderly dogs benefit from eating lean cuts of meat and fiber rich food. There are two main options for feeding your dog a homemade, healthy diet. An entirely homemade diet consists of premium proteins paired with well balanced carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. A supplemental homemade diet consists of mixing homemade foods with commercial foods. Add antioxidant rich foods to ensure your pet achieves optimum brain health.

Minggu, 02 Mei 2010

How to Measure Your Dog for an Elevated Feeder

How to Measure Your Dog for an Elevated Feeder

Supplying your dog with an elevated feeder benefits pet health and provides a sanitary feeding option. The posture of a dog remains upright when eating or drinking from elevated bowls versus lowered when having to bend the neck and back to eat from ground-level bowls. Enhancing a dog's posture while eating relieves joint pain caused by arthritis or old age in dogs. Keeping feeding bowls elevated reduces contaminates and pests from entering your pet's food and water. Provide your dog with a feeder that fits his or her size by taking correct measurements so he or she can enjoy meals in comfort.

Instructions

    1

    Stand your dog up on all fours in a relaxed position.

    2

    Place one end of the tape measure flat on the ground next to one of your dog's paws.

    3

    Measure the distance from the ground to the top of your dog's shoulder, located just beneath and to the side of the neck area. Record this measurement, referred to as the "wither height," in inches.

    4

    Subtract six inches from the wither height measurement for large breeds of adult dogs such as golden retrievers and Labradors to determine the correct feeder height. Subtract four inches to find the correct feeder height for small breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers and chihuahuas.

Miniature Schnauzer Dog Food Diet

Miniature Schnauzers are one of the world's most popular dog breeds due to their mellow temperament and playful nature. Like all purebred dogs, Miniature Schnauzers are more prone to specific health problems than the average mutt. Because Miniature Schnauzers often have issues related to fat levels, a healthy diet is crucial to this breed's health and well-being.

Real Food

    Whenever possible, Miniature Schnauzers should be fed a diet of real, "human" food, rather than dried processed dog food. Canine nutrition expert William D. Cusick recommends foods from the breed's homeland, Germany, such as pork, beef, beet pulp and potatoes. Because Schnauzers are sensitive to grease and fat, Cusick says to avoid fatty foods like avocado. Avoid also ocean fish, soy products and rice. Don't feed your pet anything that's spicy or rich--you definitely don't need to season or spice up your dog's meat. Overfeeding can cause a snowballing of health problems for this breed. Always cook anything you wouldn't eat raw yourself. If your dog sneaks something greasy and vomits or gets diarrhea, Miniature Schnauzer breeder Wyoma Clouss recommends a spoonful of Pepto Bismol and bland foods such as cooked chicken breast and applesauce. Clouss suspects that itchy Schnauzer skin is caused by too much wheat and corn, key ingredients in processed dog food.

Dog Food

    If you can't feed your dog fresh food, purebred nutrition author Michele Welton recommends buying a brand of dog food that lists pure meat (not byproducts) as the first two ingredients and doesn't contain soy, corn or artificial preservatives like BHA, BHT or ethoxyquin. Wyoma Clouss endorses some brands that don't contain wheat, corn and soy: Chicken Soup for the Dog Lover's Soul, Prairie by Nature's Variety and Eagle Pack. You can add nutritional value to dried dog food by adding a "garnish" of fresh food--a sliver of cooked meat, a chunk of unseasoned, cooked potato, a dollop of cottage cheese or scrambled eggs whites. Always give your pet fresh water.

Sabtu, 01 Mei 2010

How to Make Dog Treats From Scratch

How to Make Dog Treats From Scratch

Many people love to make their own dog food or dog treats for their most beloved pets. If you enjoy cooking for your family, you also might want to cook for your dog. You can make dog treats full of meat or rice, or you can bake little biscuits like the recipe featured in this article. Your dog is part of your family, and he deserves healthy treats, just like everyone else. Take a few minutes this weekend and try making your dog treats from scratch. You'll see tails wagging in no time.

Instructions

    1

    Mix all the ingredients together that are listed in the "Things You'll Need Section" of this article. You can add the mint to help with your dog's bad breath. You can add the chicken to give the treats some protein. These two ingredients are optional.

    2

    Put the ingredients in a food processor, and combine them until you have a large ball of dog treat dough. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F.

    3

    Sprinkle flour on a cutting board or use another non-stick surface to roll the dough. You will want to press and roll the dough until it is about 1/4- to 1/2-inch thick.

    4

    Take your cookie-cutter, dog-shaped or otherwise, and cut dog treats out of the dough. Place the treats on a non-stick baking pan. Make sure to space them apart, just like you would if you were baking cookies for your family.

    5

    Bake your dog treats from scratch in the heated oven for 20 minutes or until the tops are golden brown. Remove from the pan and cool on a cooling rack. You must store these treats in an air tight container, or they will get moldy. This recipe should make about 30 treats.